Adherents.com Home Page

Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to religious - fictional, world

religious - fictional, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
religious - fictional world 2094 Sladek, John. Tik-Tok. London: Victor Gollancz Ltd. (1985; 1st printed 1983); pg. 132. Church of the Flat Nazareth:
"On Sunday he attended the Church of the Flat Nazareth, a place for strong beliefs. The paradox of working in aerospace and at the same time accepting the doctrine of a flat earth was made easier for him by his minister's assurances that this apparent conflict was resolved in God. "
religious - fictional world 2094 Sladek, John. Tik-Tok. London: Victor Gollancz Ltd. (1985; 1st printed 1983); pg. 85. Reformed Darwinism:
"Our main enemy was a popular creed called Reformed Darwinism, which came about through an accident of history. At the time the colony was being established, a debate was going on in America over the controversial claims of someone called Charles Darwin, a foreigner. Darwin evidently claimed that animals evolved, one species turning into another. This was supposed to happen by means of 'natural selection', in which the fittest members of a species survive, while the less fit perish. The question was, was this science?

It was found in some states that the real guardians of science and scientific truth were religious leaders an lawyers, unswayed by facts. Scientists were generally so dogmatic an arrogant as to claim that some facts were just facts and not matters of religious preference at all. "

religious - fictional world 2094 Sladek, John. Tik-Tok. London: Victor Gollancz Ltd. (1985; 1st printed 1983); pg. 86. Reformed Darwinism:
"The debate raged on until the turn of the century, when some of the more anti-Darwin sects lost a lot of their steam. Many of them had been counting on the end of the world in 1999. When it didn't end, a great many of their flock stopped putting money in the collection plates and took up hobbies: fishing, car-washing, TV criticism.

But then a counter-sect arose, embracing persons who thought they believed in Darwin's novel theory. What they actually believed in was Reformed Darwinism, a religious and social theory combining 'survival of the fittest,' with 'Devil take the hindmost'. The important thing was to be a survivor. Take care of your tribe and your territory. Be selfish. God helps those who help themselves. "

religious - fictional world 2100 Bear, Greg. Moving Mars. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 117. therapied:
"In the early teens of twenty-one, new techniques of effective psychological therapy began to transform Earth culture and politics. Therapied individuals, as a new mental rather than economic class, behaved differently. Beyond the expected reduction in extreme and destructive behaviors, the therapied proved more facile and adaptable, effectively more intelligent, and therefore more skeptical. They evaluated political, philosophical, and religious claims according to their own standards of evidence. They were not 'true believers.' Nevertheless, they worked with others--even the untherapied--easily and effectively... By the end of twenty-one, the underclass of untherapied made up about half the human race, yet created less than a tenth of the world economic product... "; Pg. 113: "2175-2176, M.Y. 54-55 "
religious - fictional world 2100 Hoffman, Lee. "Soundless Evening " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 389. "It was all so simple, so logical, so reasonable. There was a limit to the population the planet could support in comfort. That limit had been reached a long time ago. For a time, during the age of the Emotionalist Revolution, there had been chaos. But when the furor died down, cooler heads prevailed. With the return to sense and sanity, a logical solution had been sought--and found.

A life permit was issued to every individual. It entitled him to reproduce and rear one offspring--one human to take the place of one human. A pair of children to each couple. Simple. One for one.

Since not every individual did reproduce a replacement for himself, the permits of those who died childless could be redistributed, allowing some couples to rear a third child to its adulthood. The population balance was maintained constant. " [But couples are allowed an unlimited number of babies as long as they are killed by the age of 5.]

religious - fictional world 2100 Sanders, Winston P. "The Word to Space " (first published 1960) in Other Worlds, Other Gods: Adventures in Religious Science Fiction (Mayo Mohs, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1971); pg. 87. Akronites:
"'I should think,' said Moriarty, 'there would be a rich source of income in donations from those weird religions which have grown up in response to the preachments from Akron.'

'Strand's eyes bugged. 'You'd take their money?'

'Why not? Better than having them spend it on proselytization.'

'But as long as the only messages are that garbled gospel--'

'Additional idiocies won't make any difference. The people who've adopted the Akronite faith (or, rather, one of the dozen distorted versions) will simply modify their beliefs as more sermons pour in...' "

religious - fictional world 2100 Sanders, Winston P. "The Word to Space " (first published 1960) in Other Worlds, Other Gods: Adventures in Religious Science Fiction (Mayo Mohs, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1971); pg. 95. Akronites:
"'...Nor are we about to spend the tax money of Protestants, Jews, Buddhists, unbelievers. . . even Akronists. . . on propagating our own Faith.' "
religious - fictional world 2100 Stapledon, Olaf. Last and First Men. Los Angeles: Jeremy P. Tarcher, Inc. (1988; first published 1930); pg. 58. Energists:
[Year is estimated.] "The new sect of Energists claimed that the young Discoverer was himself an incarnation of Buddha, and that, since the world was still unfit for the supreme revelation, he had entrusted his secret to the Scientists. "
religious - fictional world 2103 Silverberg, Robert. Tom O'Bedlam. New York: Donald I. Fine, Inc. (1985); pg. 181. Tumbonde:
"'...And, though evidently you haven't heard yet, the migration has now begun. Anywhere between fifty and a hundred thousand tumbonde followers are traveling slowly northward in a caravan of cars and buses, gathering new supporters as they go. I understand that they're somewhere in the vicinity of Monterey or Santa Cruz by now... "
religious - fictional world 2103 Silverberg, Robert. Tom O'Bedlam. New York: Donald I. Fine, Inc. (1985); pg. 166-167. Tumbonde:
Pg. 166: "Senhor Papamacer was dictating scripture to him and wante to make sure he got it down right. There was no doubt I felt the truth at once.

He studied the lean sculptured face, the obsidian eyes. This little man who meant to change the world and maybe would, this prophet, this holy monster, latest and perhaps last in a long line of prophets. Moses, Jesus, Mohammed, Senhor Papamacer. The Senhor liked to bracket himself with them: Moses, Jesus, Mohammed, Senhor Papamacer. Maybe he was right. ";

Pg. 167: "'...Mohammed, he drive camels, Moses he was a shepherd, Jesus a carpenter. And Papamacer a taxi-man.'

There they were again, the big four. Moses, Jesus, Mohammed, Papamacer... "

religious - fictional world 2110 Clarke, Arthur C. The Hammer of God. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 10. Chrislam:
"No wonder that, even now, most of mankind could still not believe that it was the instrument of doom. Or, as the Chrislamic Fundamentalists were calling it, 'The Hammer of God.' "
religious - fictional world 2114 Dick, Philip K. The Man Who Japed. New York: Ace Books (1956) Morec:
[Book jacket] "War and famine had been abolished through Morec, Morel Reclamation; peace and prosperity were the rule--they were, in fact, compulsory. Block committees, robot informers and youthful goon squads made sure everyone 'enjoyed' Morec.

Allen Purcell, the new director of Entertainment and Propaganda, had always been happy in his world. At least he thought he was until he joined the world-wide hunt for the mad japer who was playing insulting pranks on the government.

For in the search for the heretical prankster, Purcell fond evidence pointing to himself as the culprit. If it was true--how did he do it? and how could he face the full force of an outraged society if he was discovered? " [Refs. throughout, not in DB.]

religious - fictional world 2114 Dick, Philip K. The Man Who Japed. New York: Ace Books (1956); pg. 44. Morec:
[The world under Morec.] "In the highly moral society of 2114 A.D., the weekly block meetings operated on the stagger system... Here, official nosing and snooping originated. In this room a man's business was everybody's business. Centuries of Christian confessional culminated when the block assembled to explore its members' souls. "
religious - fictional world 2114 Dick, Philip K. The Man Who Japed. New York: Ace Books (1956); pg. 55. Morec:
"'How much is this going to cost?'

'An examination will be made of your income. You'll be charged according to your ability to pay.' It was characteristic of Morec training, this old Protestant frugality. Nothing must be wasted. A hard bargain must always be driven.

The Dutch Reformed Church, alive even in this troubled heretic . . . the power of that iron revolution that had crumbled the Age of Waste, put an end to 'sin and corruption,' and with it, leisure and peace of mind--the ability simply to sit down and take things easy. How must it have been? he wondered. In the days when idleness was permitted. The golden age, in a sense: but a curious mixture, too, an odd fusion of the liberty of the Renaissance plus the strictures of the Reformation. Both had been there; the two elements struggling in each individual. And, at last, final victory for the Dutch hellfire-preachers . . . "

religious - fictional world 2125 Anderson, Poul. Harvest of Stars. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 44-45. Avantism:
"Not that he claimed personally to have seen or grasped ever facet of the vast achievement. Free intellects reached that high. Even Xuan, throughout the decades of his labors, had drawn heavily on the computer resources of the Academic Internet, as well as acknowledging his debt to earlier thinkers. The likes of Sayre must depend on what they were taught in school, with lectures and semipopular writings to deepen it somewhat afterward. Nevertheless, he could appreciate the fittingness of it all--the same process shown to have been at work in Han Dynasty China and Imperial Rome, in Islam and Cao-Dai, in chronometry and calculus. He could be convinced by its arguments that, given modern information processing, the market economy was obsolete, and its inefficiencies and inequities. He could be inspired by the prospect of establishing and maintaining conditions so well planned that society must evolve toward a sane order of things... "
religious - fictional world 2130 Clarke, Arthur C. Rendezvous with Rama. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich (1973); pg. 76. "Church of Christ, Cosmonaut":
"To all his shipmates, Lieutenant Boris Rodrigo was something of an enigma. The quiet, dignified communications officer was popular with the rest of the crew, but he never entered fully into their activities and always seemed a little apart--marching to the music of a different drummer.

As indeed he was, being a devout member of the Fifth Church of Christ, Cosmonaut. Norton had never been able to discover what had happened to the earlier four, and he was equally in the dark about the church's rituals and ceremonies. But the main tenet of the faith was well known. Its members believed that Jesus Christ was a visitor from space, and an entire theology had been constructed on that assumption. " [Other refs. not in DB.]

religious - fictional world 2130 Clarke, Arthur C. Rendezvous with Rama. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich (1973); pg. 76. "Church of Christ, Cosmonaut":
"It was perhaps not surprising that an unusually high proportion of the church's devotees worked in space in some capacity or other. Invariably, they were efficient, conscientious, and absolutely reliable. They were universally respected, and even liked, especially since they made no attempt to convert others. Yet there was also something slightly spooky about them. Norton could never understand how men with advanced scientific and technial training could possibly believe some of the things he had heard Cosmo Christers state as incontrovertible fact.

...the Commander had a sudden insight into his own hidden motives. He had chosen Rodrigo because he was physically fit, technically qualified, and completely dependable. At the same time, he wondered if some part of his mind had not selected the Lieutenant out of an almost mischievous curiosity. How would a man with such religious beliefs react to the awesome reality of Rama? "

religious - fictional world 2130 Clarke, Arthur C. Rendezvous with Rama. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich (1973); pg. 132. "Church of Christ, Cosmonaut":
"'...Is this a personal emergency?'

'No, Commander. It is much more important than that. I want to send a message to the Mother Church.'

...The calm blue eyes stared into his. He had never known Rodrigo to lose control, to be other than completely self-assured. All the Cosmo Christers were like this; it was one of the benefits of their faith, and it helped to make them good spacemen. Sometimes, however, their unquestioning certainty was just a little annoying to those unfortunates who had not been vouchsafed the revelation.

'It concerns the purpose of Rama, Commander. I believe I have discovered it.' "

religious - fictional world 2130 Clarke, Arthur C. Rendezvous with Rama. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich (1973); pg. 133. "Church of Christ, Cosmonaut":
"'It concerns the purpose of Rama, Commander. I believe I have discovered it.'

'Go on.'

'Look at this situation. Here is a completely empty, lifeless world--yet it is suitable for human beings... Our faith has told us to expect such a visitation, though we do now know exactly what form it will take. The Bible gives hints. If this is not the Second Coming, it may be the Second Judgment; the story of Noah describes the first. I believe that Rama is a cosmic Ark, sent here to save--those who are worthy of salvation.' "

religious - fictional world 2130 Clarke, Arthur C. Rendezvous with Rama. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich (1973); pg. 257. "Church of Christ, Cosmonaut":
"'Well, Boris, how do the Hermians fit into your theology?'

'Only too well, Commander,' replied Lieutenant Rodrigo with a humorless smile. 'It's the age-old conflict between the forces of good and the forces of evil. And there are times when men have to take sides in such a conflict.'

I knew it would be something like that, Norton thought. This situation must have been a shock to Boris, but he would not have resigned himself to passive acquiescence. The Cosmo Christers were energetic, competent people. Indeed, in some ways they were remarkably like the Hermians. "

religious - fictional world 2150 Zelazny, Roger. Lord of Light. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1967); pg. 230, 239. Accelerationism:
"'...and further, that he will not seek to suppress Accelerationism, as the gods have done, should we prove victorious...' " [There are many references to Accelerationism throughout this book, most not in DB. It appears to be the most important fictional religion in the novel, although a larger portion of the novel is about Buddhism and Hinduism.]
religious - fictional world 2175 Anderson, Poul. Fleet of Stars. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 156. Avantism:
"'...Unforseeable new ideas, faiths, desires; and some are sure to prove as troublesome as Catharism, Communism, Avantism, or a hundred others were in their day...' " [These religions don't exist at this future date in which this character is talking, but are being mentioned as part of history.]
religious - fictional world 2175 Bear, Greg. Moving Mars. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 116. therapied:
"'Earth's people are more or less eighty percent therapied or high natural. They've had a majority of designer births for sixty Earth years. There's probably never been a more select, intelligent, physically and mentally healthy population in human history' "; Pg. 113: "2175-2176, M.Y. 54-55 " [date]; Pg. 130: "We [Mars] are only five millions. Earth is thirty thousand millions. "
religious - fictional world 2175 Bear, Greg. Moving Mars. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 117. therapied:
"Nations, cultures, political groups, had to accomodate the therapied to survive. The changes were drastic, even cruel for some, but far less cruel than previous tides of history... the result as not the death of political or religious organization...it was a rebirth of sorts. New, higher standards, philosophies, and religions developed. "; Pg. 113: "2175-2176, M.Y. 54-55 "
religious - fictional world 2182 Cowper, Richard. "Out There Where the Big Ships Go " in The Best from Fantasy & Science Fiction: 24th Series (Edward L. Ferman, ed.) New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1982); pg. 129. Kalire:
"On the wall above their heads a huge scoreboard replicated the moves in this, the third session of the Thirty-Third World Kalire Championship.

Besides the two contestants seven other people shared the dais: the Supreme Arbitrator, The Master's two Seconds, Amato's Seconds, and the two Official Scorekeepers, one of whom was Anne. They all sat cross-legged on cushions at a discreet distance from the two principals. If they were conscious that their every movement, every facial expression, was being relayed by satellite to a million Kalire temples around the world, they evidenced no sign of it. They dwelt apart, isolated, enthralled by the timeless mystery and wonder of The Game of Games, the Gift from Beyond the Stars. " [More.]

religious - fictional world 2182 Cowper, Richard. "Out There Where the Big Ships Go " in The Best from Fantasy & Science Fiction: 24th Series (Edward L. Ferman, ed.) New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1982); pg. 132. Kalire:
"The Japanese, with their long tradition of Zen and go, were the first to become enmeshed in the infinite subtleties of The Game, and within a matter of weeks the great toy factories of Kobe and Nagoya were churning out Kalire sets by the million. The Russians and Chinese were quick to follow. And then--almost overnight it seemed--the whole world had gone Kalire-crazy. It leapt across all barriers of language and politics, demanding nothing, offering everything. Before it armies were powerless, creeds useless. Time-hallowed mercenary values, ancient prejudices, long-entrenched attitudes of mind--all these were suddenly revealed as insubstantial shadows of a childhood nightmare. Kalire was all. But was it a religion, or a philosophy, or just a perpetual diversion? The answer surely is that it was all these things and more besides. "
religious - fictional world 2182 Cowper, Richard. "Out There Where the Big Ships Go " in The Best from Fantasy & Science Fiction: 24th Series (Edward L. Ferman, ed.) New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1982); pg. 133. Kalire:
"He [Henderson] wrote a book which he called The Game of Games and prefaced it with a quotation taken from 'The Paradoxes of the Negative Way' by St. John of the Cross--

In order to become that which thou art not,
Thou must go by a way which thou knowest know . . .

The Game of Games became a world best-seller even before it had reached bookshops, and within six months of publication had been translated into every language spoken on Earth. " [Many other refs. to Kalire, not in DB.]

religious - fictional world 2182 Cowper, Richard. "Out There Where the Big Ships Go " in The Best from Fantasy & Science Fiction: 24th Series (Edward L. Ferman, ed.) New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1982); pg. 132-133. Kalire:
"The deeper one studied it [Kalire], the more subtle and complex it became. Layer upon layer upon layer of revelation awaited the devotee, and yet there was always the knowledge that however profoundly he delved he would never uncover the ultimate penetralia of the mystery.

Soon international tourneys were being organized, and the champions started to emerge. They too competed among themselves for the honor of challenging Peter Henderson. The first contender so to arise was the Go Master, Subi Katumo. he played six games with Henderson and lost them all. From that point on Henderson was known simply as 'The Master.' He traveled the world over played exhibition games and giving lectures to rapt audiences. He also founded the Kalirinos Academy at Pasadena, where he instructed his disciples in those fundamental spiritual disciplines so vital to the mastery of the art of Kalire and into which he himself had been initiated by the Eidotheans.'

religious - fictional world 2200 Anderson, Poul. Starfarers. New York: Tor (1998); pg. 47. Samaritan Church:
[Year is estimated.] "She sighed. 'It hurt, forsaking medicine. The need is so great. I felt so selfish. But I--I did not think I could stnd seeing much more utter misery, unless I hardened my heart to it, and I didn't want to do that. My parents are ministers of the Samaritan Church. My work was through it, on its behalf. When I quit, they felt betrayed... Envoy badly needed one like me. I joined on condition that the Exploratory Foundation make a substantial grant to their church, a sum that'll make a real difference. We are reconciled, my parents and I. They say they'll wait for me in the afterlife and welcome me gladly...' "
religious - fictional world 2250 Stapledon, Olaf. Last and First Men. Los Angeles: Jeremy P. Tarcher, Inc. (1988; first published 1930); pg. 59. Energists:
[Year is estimated.] "About two centuries after the formation of the first World State, the President of the World declared that the time was ripe for a formal union of science and religion, and called a onference of the leaders of these two great disciplines.... the heads of Buddhism, Mohamedanism, Hinduism, the Regenerate Christian Brotherhood and the Modern Catholic Church in South America, agreed that their differences were but differences of expression. One and all were worshippers of the Divine Energy, whether expressed in activity, or in tense stillness. One and all recognized the saintly Discoverer as either the last and greatest of the prophets or an actual incarnation of divine Movement. "
religious - fictional world 2250 Zelazny, Roger & Jane Lindskold. Donnerjack. New York: Avon (1998; c.1997); pg. 14. Church of Elish:
[1] "Further ceremonies were conducted there, by a priest garbed similarly to themselves, save for the scapulary tablets and elaborate headgear of gold and semiprecious stones worn below his faint blue halo. He told them how all of the gods, along with everything else, survived in Virtu, and in this time of a turning back to religion it was appropriate that the earliest divine manifestations in Indo-European consciousness should be the focus of worship now, dwelling as they did in the deepest layers of the human psyche where description might still function. Ea, Shamash, Ninurta, Enki, Ninmah, Marduk, Azmuh, Inanna, Utu, Dumuzi, and all of the others--metaphors, yes, as were all who came after, for both the best and worst in humanity, but also the most potent of metaphors because of their primacy. And of course they were cosmomorphic as well, embodiments of the forces of nature, and as capable of evolution as everything else in Virtu and Verite. "
religious - fictional world 2250 Zelazny, Roger & Jane Lindskold. Donnerjack. New York: Avon (1998; c.1997); pg. 14. Church of Elish:
[2] "Their beings extended to the quantum level as well as the relativistic. So sing their praises, he went on, ancient gods of quarks and galaxies, as well as the sky, the sea, and the mountains, the fire, the wind, and the burgeoning earth. Let all thing rejoice and let us turn the stories of their doings to ritual. One of the gods was even now within the temple's sanctum, enjoying this worship and sending blessings. A light meal was shared, and the worshipers embraced one and other briefly. The mundane offering of the Collect was done by means of electronic funds transfers, from the eft tokens all bore with them when visiting Virtu.

It was called the Church of Elish, from the Mesopotamian creation story, Enuma elish--meaning, roughly, 'When above'--and the words 'Elishism' and 'Elishite' were derived therefrom, though members of the more traditional religions of the past few millennia had often referred to them as 'Elshies.' "

religious - fictional world 2250 Zelazny, Roger & Jane Lindskold. Donnerjack. New York: Avon (1998; c.1997); pg. 14. Church of Elish:
[3] [Extensive refs. to the Church of Elish throughout novel. The Church of Elish is a major element of the book.] "At first lumped together with the many short-lived cults of Virtu--Gnostic, Africa, Spiritualist, Caribbean--it had shown greater staying power and, upon closer examination, demonstrated a more sophisticated theology, satisfying ritual, and better structured organization than the others. " Its increasing popularity indicated that it had been victorious in the divine wars. It did not demand mortification of the flesh beyond a few holy day fasts and apparently even involved 'rituals of an orgiastic nature,' as some anthropologists put it. "
religious - fictional world 2250 Zelazny, Roger & Jane Lindskold. Donnerjack. New York: Avon (1998; c.1997); pg. 15. Church of Elish:
[4] "It incorporated traditional heavens and hells as fitting waiting places between incarnations alternating between Virtu and Verite, toward the eventual achievement of a transcendental state which combined the best of both realms. It had its representatives in both. Its followers had a tendency to refer to all other religions as 'latecomers.'

Every now and then, usually on high holy days, some worshipers well advanced along their spiritual paths were permitted to enter the temple itself to undergo a higher grade of initiation, involving experiences perhaps intoxicating, oceanic, sexual, illuminating. These tended to result in some small advantage in life, physical or mental, which functioned best in Virtu but which sometimes carried over to Verite. This phenomenon had also been a subject of anthropological consideration for over a decade, the only general conclusion to date being the catch-phrase 'psychosomatic conversion.' "

religious - fictional world 2250 Zelazny, Roger & Jane Lindskold. Donnerjack. New York: Avon (1998; c.1997); pg. 15. Church of Elish:
[5] "In fact, Arthur Eden--tall, very black, his head shot with gray, heavily muscled in the manner of an athlete somewhat past his prime, which he was--was a professor of anthropology at Columbia's Verite campus. He had joined the Elishites for purposes of preparing a full-length study of their creed and practices, comparative religion being his specialty. He was surprised at how much he was enjoying the preliminary work, for the church had obviously been set up by an expert or experts in this area.

As he walked back, singing, amid the pyramids, along the trail through field and wood, he wondered at the administrative entities behind the landscape. During a night service he had once been puzzled by the skies as he'd sought familiar constellations. On a later occasion, he'd recorded it by means of a... " [Much more. The Elishites are the novel's main fictional religious group.]

religious - fictional world 2250 Zelazny, Roger & Jane Lindskold. Donnerjack. New York: Avon (1998; c.1997); pg. 269. Church of Elish:
"The priest [of the Church of Elish] was actually claiming that the gods came among them, attended services, basked in the proximity of their worshipers.

Jay tried to decide if any other of the religions he had sampled had made such a blatant claim. Voudon's possession by a loa was the closest he could recall; all the other faiths contended themselves with some version of Christianity's 'Where two or three are gathered in my name, there will I surely be' or, at best, a group leader who claimed to be the incarnation of some deity. This was quite different.

He straightened, eager to hear more. The priest went on, explaining that Virtu was not merely an artistic construct, it was effectively the collective unconscious of the human race and that within that unconscious the gods had survived. Now that humans had found their own way across the interface, the gods (courtesy of the Church of Elish) would mingle with them. "

religious - fictional world 2250 Zelazny, Roger & Jane Lindskold. Donnerjack. New York: Avon (1998; c.1997); pg. 479. Church of Elish:
"The Hierophant of the Church of Elish (at last poll now one of the four major religious traditions in the Verite--although only if one counted all of the Christian sects as one group) admired his costume in the full-length mirror.

'It is satin and the polka dots are embroidered. The neck ruffle is real lace (or will be in the Verite). And I love the headpiece--a genuine Bozo designer original.'

...'...If they resurfaced and the Verite learned that as far as I see it, the Church of Elish is one big prank . . .'

'But what you have preached is the truth!'

'Since when has that mattered? Think about it.'

There was a long pause. The thunder rumbles subsided.

'You may have a point. But you will not wear that clown costume.'

'I'll talk with the High Priest about something in the Sumerian styles then--they're almost as funny looking when viewed with an objective eye.' "

religious - fictional world 2300 Jeter, K. W. Farewell Horizontal. New York: St. Martin's Press (1989); pg. 82. Knives of God:
"...that alone had been credited with bringing the pivotal Knives of God tribe into the Mass fold; the Grievous Amalgam had had to order up whole new graffex... " [Other refs., not in DB.]
religious - fictional world 2301 Bester, Alfred. The Demolished Man. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1953); pg. 7. Espers Guild:
"'First the background, Mr. Reich: There are approximately one hundred thousand (100,000) 3rd Class Espers in the Esper Guild. An Esper 3 can peep the conscious level of a mind--can discover what subject is thinking at the moment of thought. A 3rd is the lowest class of telepath. Most of Monarch's security positions are held by 3rds. We employ over five hundred... Next, there are approximately ten thousand 2nd Class Espers in the Guild... They are experts like myself who can penetrate beneath the conscious level of the mind to the preconscious. Most 2nds are in the professional class . . . physicians, lawyers, engineers, educators, economists, architects and so on... Finally there are less than a thousand 1st Class Espers in the Guild. The 1sts are capable of deep peeping... down to the unconscious... lowest levels of the mind... These... hold premium positions. Education, specialized medical service... criminologists... Political Analysts...' "
religious - fictional world 2400 Anderson, Poul. Genesis. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 64. "Seventeen hundred years later, a thing occurred that lived in people's memories for generations, until lifeways changed too much for them to make sense of it.

In those days communities, fellowships, nations, and ethnoi all had their own ways of observing New Century's Eve. In Tahalla it climaxed a month of ceremonies and celebrations. Some of these equaled Creation Day or Remembrance in solemnity, others rivaled Fire Night or the Festival for Children in joyousness. The quinquennial Darvic Games now took on an even greater importance; the glory that winning players brought to their clans would heighten the standing of every member and the influence of every captain for the next decade or more. " [Many other refs., not in DB.]

religious - fictional world 2400 Anderson, Poul. Genesis. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 66. "...wearing their canonicals and bearing the symbols according to their orders: of God the Dreamer of the Universe, God the Mother, God the Summoner (black cassock and impaled skull), God the Lover (rainbow hues and wreathed staff). "
religious - fictional world 2400 Pangborn, Edgar. "The Golden Horn " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1961); pg. 160. Amran Church:
[Year estimated.] "It was a Friday anyhow, so all work was sinful, unless you want to claim that shoveling is a work of necessity or piety, and I disagree. I crept into the main kitchen of the inn, where a yardboy wasn't supposed to appear. Safe enough. Everybody would be fasting before church--the comfortable way, in bed. "
religious - fictional world 2400 Pangborn, Edgar. "The Golden Horn " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1961); pg. 162. Amran Church:
"For the first time that I can remember, I wanted to know, Where does it come from, the sun? What happens over there when it's set afire every morning? Why should God go to all the trouble to keep us warm?

Understand, at that time I had no learning at all. I'd scarcely heard of books except to know they were forbidden to all by the priests because they'd had something to do with the Sin of Man. I figured Old Jon was the smartest man in the world because he could keep accounts with the beadboard that hung in the taproom. I believed, as the Amran Church teaches everyone to believe, that the earth is a body of land three thousand miles square, once a garden and perfect, with God and the angels walking freely among men, until the time almost four hundred years ago when men sinned and spoiled everything... "

religious - fictional world 2400 Pangborn, Edgar. "The Golden Horn " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1961); pg. 162. Amran Church:
"...so now we're working out the penance until Abraham, the Spokesman of God, who died on the Wheel at Nuber in the year 37, returns to judge His people, saving the few elect and sending the rest to fry forever in the caverns of Hell. And on all sides of that lump of land spread the everlasting seas all the way to the rim of the world. The Book of Abraham, said the teacher-priests, doesn't tell how far away the rim is, because that's one of the things God does not wish men to know.

Doubts I did have. I thought it remarkable how the lightning never did arrive no matter how I sinned, even on Fridays. The doubts were small; young grass trying to work up through the brown old trash of winter. "

religious - fictional world 2400 Pangborn, Edgar. "The Golden Horn " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1961); pg. 162. Amran Church:
"I understood of course -- all children far younger than fourteen understood it -- that while you might get away with a lot of sinning on the sly, you agreed out loud with whatever the Church taught or else you didn't stay alive. I saw my first heretic-burning when I was nine, after I'd gone to work at the Bull and Iron. In Moha they were always conducted along with the Spring Festival. Children under nine weren't required to attend. " [Many other refs. to the Amran Church and the customs and beliefs of this far-future setting, most not in DB.]
religious - fictional world 2400 Pangborn, Edgar. "The Golden Horn " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1961); pg. 165. Amran Church:
Pg. 165: "A patch of land three thousand miles square, and the everlasting seas. Hudson Sea, Moha Water, the Lorenta Sea, even the great Ontara Sea in the northwest--all of those, said the teacher-priests, are mere branches of the great sea, dividing the known world into islands. "; Pg. 166: "But an ignorant boy can think. And I thought, if nobody dares sail beyond sight of land, and if the Book of Abraham doesn't say, then how can anyone, even the priests, claim to know what's out there? Can't there be other lands before you come to the rim?

I thought, How do they even know there is a rim? If it goes on forever-- "

religious - fictional world 2400 Pangborn, Edgar. "The Golden Horn " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1961); pg. 171. Amran Church:
"I knew that mues weren't in the same class with demons or ghosts or elves, but solid flesh in spite of being the get of devils. They couldn't vanish or float through walls; they didn't have the evil eye. If you got near one you'd see and smell him he couldn't use spells, or witch signs (though his father might) because God wouldn't allow that to a miserable mue, and he would die for good when you put a knife in him. The law said when, not if. It said you must if you could; if you couldn't, you must notify the Church at once, so that he could be hunted down by men properly equipped and with the protection of a priest. "
religious - fictional world 2400 Pangborn, Edgar. "The Golden Horn " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1961); pg. 172. Amran Church:
Pg. 172: "I saw myself back at the Bull and Iron telling my truetale. I wouldn't brag, nay, I'd speak with a noble calm. I could afford it. I'd be the Yardboy Who Killed A Mue. "; Pg. 173: "This was what would happen in sober fact. I'd be questioned and examined afterward by the priests, maybe the Bishop of Skoar, the Mayor, even the Colonel of the army garrison. Why, possibly the Kurin family, absolute tops in the Skoar aristocracy... "
religious - fictional world 2786 Clarke, Arthur C. The Songs of Distant Earth. New York: Ballantine (1986); pg. 184. Cauldwellites/Will of God:
"Jonathan Cauldwell and his dwindling but still vocal band of followers proclaimed ever more desperately that all would be well, that God was merely testing mankind as He had once tested Job. Despite everything that was happening to the Sun, it would soon return to normal, and humanity would be saved--unless those who disbelieved in His mercy provoked His wrath. And then He might change His mind . . .

The Will of God cult believed the exact opposite. Doomsday had come at last, and no attempt should be made to avoid it. Indeed, it should be welcomed, since after Judgment those who were worthy of salvation would live in eternal bliss.

And so, from totally opposite premises, the Cauldwellites and the WOGs arrived at the same conclusion: The human race should not attempt to escape its destiny. All starships should be destroyed. " [More.]

religious - fictional world 2800 Roberts, Keith. Kiteworld. New York: Arbor House (1985); pg. 7. Church Variant:
[Year estimated.] "The young priest turned a page in his book, half glanced toward the gantry. He wore the full purple of a Base Chaplain; but this worried face looked very young. I guessed him to be not long from his novitiate; the presence of a Kitemaster was a heavy weight to bear. His voice reached up to me, a thread of sound mixed with the blustering of the wind outside. 'Therefore we beseech thee, Lord, to add Thy vigilance to ours throughout the coming night; that the Land may be preserved, according to Thy covenant . . .' The final response was muttered; and he stepped back, closing the breviary was evident relief. "
religious - fictional world 2800 Roberts, Keith. Kiteworld. New York: Arbor House (1985); pg. 8. Church Variant:
[Year est.] Pg. 8: "As yet there was no sign of Canwen, the Observer... A Flier of his seniority knows, as the Church herself knows, the value of the proper form of things. He would present himself upon his cue; but not before. I sprinkled oil and earth as the ritual dictates, murmured my blessing, clamped the Great Seal of the Church Variant to the basket rim and stepped away. I said, 'Let the Watching begin.' ";

Pg. 9: "'All things,' I said, 'are within the will of God.'...

He gave his short, barking laugh... 'Plus a little help from Variant politics... But you always had a smooth tongue when it suited. And knew how to make the proper friends.'

'We are not all Called,' I said sharply. ";

Pg. 16: "'Can't beat a good Church training, that's what I always say...' ";

Pg. 28: "...the arrogant, thrusting spire of the Church Variant, fronting the whitewashed barn of the milder Middle Doctrine. " [Many refs. to this fictional church throughout novel, not in DB.]

religious - fictional world 2800 Roberts, Keith. Kiteworld. New York: Arbor House (1985); pg. 29. Church Variant:
"Its sides were blazoned with the insignia of the Church Variant; so it was bound, perhaps, for the great place they had passed.

...Raoul joined in, pointing to this and that wonder; the Middle Lake, the great central parkland where on the morrow the Air Fair would begin, the pale needle-spires of Godpath, Metropolitan Cathedral of the Variants. The sprawling building beside it, he knew from his books and lectures, was the Corps headquarters; beyond was the Mercy Hospital, the Middle Doctrine's chief establishment. ";

Pg. 31: "The hordes of people, hooting of the flower-decked Transporters; here, he decided, must be all the folk in the world. Everywhere, the dark blue of the Corps; and priest in plenty, grey and sage green of the Middle Doctrine, white, black and purple of the Church Variant. Even here and there, the vivid scarlet of a Master and his aides. "

religious - fictional world 2800 Roberts, Keith. Kiteworld. New York: Arbor House (1985); pg. 102. Middle Doctrine:
"The little Master led the way out of the College, stepping briskly. They emerged into bright winter sunlight. Atwill turned right and left, into Main Drag, crossed the wide road in front of Godpath. Beside it stood a smaller building; squarish, and as plain as Godpath was ornate. The Church of the Moving Clouds.

He hesitated again. He'd known for a long time of course that Atwill was of the Middle Doctrine; but he'd never set foot in one of their places of worship. Though his mother had told him a little, his father had always been strict Variant; and he was nothing if not loyal. But the other urged him, still with a faint smile. 'Come,' he said. 'You are not here to pray.' He led the way. Inside the big street door was another, lined with thick green cloth... " [Many other refs. to Middle Doctrine religion, not in DB. That, and the Church of the Variant, are the two main fictional religions in novel.]

religious - fictional world 2800 Roberts, Keith. Kiteworld. New York: Arbor House (1985); pg. 102. Middle Doctrine:
"The inside of the place was as spartan as the exterior. No statuary, no inscriptions; just limewashed walls, relieved at intervals by the slim grey shafts of pillars... In the pews were scattered groups of people, heads bent in meditation. He saw Brothers of the Order, some of the female priests that only the Middle Doctrine allowed. He frowned, would have spoken; but the dominie touched his arm again. He said, 'Come with me.'

He led the way outside, down a side aisle, toward the rear of the place. He pushed open another door. He said, 'My little hidey-hole. A sanctum the Brothers allow me to maintain...' "; Pg. 103: "'...I knew your father, many years ago; and your mother, when she came to Middlemarch. She was a member of this congregation.' he shook his head. 'We take the Middle Way,' he said. 'Punishment forms no part of our doctrine. Though we can be stern when occasion demands.' He smiled... 'As stern as our brothers of Godpath. Sometimes I think sterner.' "

religious - fictional world 3000 Crowley, John. Engine Summer. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1979) Truthful Speakers' Church:
[Book jacket] "In the world of the far future, this continent's population has been reduced to a handful. The survivors have evolved over centuries into self-absorbed, isolated communities with different cultures. Rush that Speaks is born into the Truthful Speakers community. His mission, his religion, is to learn to become a saint--one who tells his life story in such a way that those who listen see reflected in it their own situation and the humanity that joins them all.

But Rush's search for sainthood becomes as well a search into the far past, into the ages-long series of accidents and catastrophes that have made his world. He falls in love with Once a Day, born into the secretive sect Whisper cord, who indeed preserve ancient secrets. Following her deeper and deeper into old mysteries, Rush journeys far and learns much--and grows closer to sainthood, a sainthood he could never have imagined. . . . " [Many refs. throughout novel, not in DB.]

religious - fictional world 3000 Crowley, John. Engine Summer. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1979); pg. 27. Truthful Speakers' Church:
"'What they learned, she went on, 'was to speak on the phones in such a way that your hearer couldn't help but understand what you meant, in such a way that you, speaking, had no choice but to express what you meant. They learned to make speech--transparent, like glass, so that through the words the face is seen truly.

'They said about themselves that they were truthful speakers. In those days people who thought alike were a church. And so they were the Truthful Speakers' Church.

'The truthful speakers said: We really mean what we say and we say what we really mean. That was a motto. They were also against a lot of things, as churches were; but nobody now can remember what they were.

'The Co-op Great Belaire survived for a long time, raised its children and learned speaking. But of course the day came when first the lights and finally, at last, the phones went off...' " [More.]

religious - fictional world 3000 Knight, Damon. "The Dying Man " in Immortals (Jack Dann & Gardner Dozois, eds.) New York: Ace Books (1998; c. 1957); pg. 38. [Year estimated. This story was originally titled 'Dio'] "' 'Again, the Alfurs of Poso, in Central Celebes,' ' she reads aloud, ' 'tell how the first men were supplied with their requirements direct from heaven, the Creator passing down his gifts to them by means of rope. He first tied a stone to the rope and let it down from the sky. But the men would have none of it, and asked somewhat peevishly of what use to them was a stone. The Good God then let down a banana, which was their undoing. 'Because you have chosen the banana,' said the deity, 'you shall propagate and perish like the banana, and your offspring shall step into your place. . . .' ' ' "
religious - fictional world 3131 Simmons, Dan. The Rise of Endymion. New York: Bantam (1998 mass market edition; first ed. 1997); pg. 94. Zen Christian:
"'Jesus,' I whispered.

'An ancient messiah figure,' said the comlog. 'Religions based on his purported teachings included Christianity, Zen-Christianity, ancient and modern Catholicism, and such Protestant sects as . . .' "

religious - fictional world 3332 Attanasio, A. A. Radix. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1981); pg. 461. [Appendix.] "Lami: originally, the yawp designation for the divine embodiment of the kiutl plant; later, incorporated into the Mutric mythos as the Sister of Night. "
religious - fictional world 3332 Attanasio, A. A. Radix. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1981); pg. 462. [Appendix.] Pg. 462: "Masseboth (literally, the Pillars): a human society aided by the eo and disdainful of distorts; it was founded by the eo seven hundred years after the collapse of CIRCLE; the eo's intent was to create a stable, self-sustaining gene pool; Rubeus also helped to sustain this society, and over the five hundred years of its history he insinuated his influence into the government and was instrumental in shaping its politics. ";

Pg. 463: "Mutra: chief deity worshipped in the Masoboth Protectorate, Mother of Fragments; a revival of the Mother-cults from pre-kro times. ";

Pg. 464: "Paseq (the Divider): a tribal deity incorporated into the Mutric mythos as the ultimate arbitrator and spirit of harmony. ";

Pg. 465: "Savant: a Masseboth priest of the Mutric cult. "

religious - fictional world 3332 Attanasio, A. A. Radix. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1981); pg. 464. [Appendix.] "Radix: a mantic term for the root of existence, the void, or, if you prefer, the isostasis in which the infinite-dimensional space of the multiverse is imbedded; within this void, everything exists; the kro called it wu, ain soth, and sunyata. "
religious - fictional world 3332 Attanasio, A. A. Radix. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1981); pg. 465. [Appendix.] "Realityshaping: the conscious ability of godminds to reshape physical reality in the subquantal Field; because the godmind alters subquantum fluctuations, which are time-free, the resulting quantum mechanical changes (the realityshaping) contain timeloose elements; in other words, a godmind does not always consciously know what it does or why; realityshaping is always a process greater than the individual that appears to initiate it. "
religious - fictional world 3332 Attanasio, A. A. Radix. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1981); pg. 467. [Appendix.] "Wangol: kha-strength: the spirit-power of a being. "
religious - fictional Xenex 2353 David, Peter. House of Cards in Star Trek: New Frontier (omnibus). New York: Pocket Books (1998; c. 1997); pg. 9. Xenexian:
"...it was the most unpredictable piece of real estate on Xenex.

But although modern Xenexians gave the Pit a wide berth, centuries previously it had been part of a fundamental rite of passage among Xenexian youth. When a Xenexian reached a certain age, he or she would trudge into the midst of the Pit to embark on what was called the 'Search for Allways.' It was believed that, if one wandered the Pit for a sufficiently long enough time, visions of one's future would reveal themselves and one would come to understand one's true purpose in life.

However, the Search for Allways began to take a significant death toll as young Xenexians would fall prey to the dangers that the Pit presented. As a consequence, the Search disappeared from the practiced traditions of the Xenexians. This did not mean, however, that it vanished from practice altogether. Instead, it went underground. A sort of dare, to test one's bravery... " [Refs. throughout. Main character is Xenexian.]

religious - fictional Zebulon 2275 Panshin, Alexei. "The Sons of Prometheus " in Farewell To Yesterday's Tomorrow. New York: Berkley Publishing Corp. (1975; c. 1966 in different form); pg. 7. Colligations of the Confraternity:
Pg. 7: "You don't suddenly appear out of nowhere. The Colonists find that disconcerting. You arrive in a place from somewhere definite. Particularly on Zebulon... The rough ride over rougher roads had given him a stiff neck and a headache. He had tried to study the local scripture, The Colligations of the Confraternity, but finally gave up, put the book in his bag, and thereafter looked out the window or at his feet. "; Pg. "It gave him a chance to study the Colligations, since that was what Zebulon killed and died for. If the subject came up, he wanted to be ready. " [Many other refs. throughout this story, which is primarily about religion. Only a few examples in DB. The people from the Ship work hard to keep the Colonists from learning about them and advancing technologically, but certain Colonists, including religious leaders, appear to be learning about the reality of the Ship, and might disseminate this knowledge to the planet.]


religious - fictional, continued

Search Adherents.com

Custom Search
comments powered by Disqus
Collection and organization of data © 23 April 2007 by Adherents.com.   Site created by custom apps written in C++.  
Research supported by East Haven University.
Books * Videos * Music * Posters

We are always striving to increase the accuracy and usefulness of our website. We are happy to hear from you. Please submit questions, suggestions, comments, corrections, etc. to: webmaster@adherents.com.