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Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

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religious - fictional, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
religious - fictional world 2016 Clarke, Arthur C. The Hammer of God. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 91. Chrislam:
[9] "The second [event that helped Chrislam gain power] was the steady decline in the moral and intellectual status of Christianity, which had started (though few realized it for centuries) on October 31, 1517, when martin Luther nailed his Ninety-five Theses to the door of All Saints Church. The process was continued by Copernicus, Galileo, Darwin, Freud, and culminated in the notorious 'Dead Sea-gate' scandal, when the final release of the long-ridden Scrolls revealed that the Jesus of the Gospels was based on three (perhaps four) separate individuals.

But the coup de grace came from the Vatican itself. "

religious - fictional world 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 13. Servants of Wrath:
"But what, Doctor, Father Handy thought to himself as he shuffled and unfolded the ancient gas-station maps, had been the authentic really dirty weapon of war? The gob of the Deus Irae had killed the most people . . . probably about a billion. NO, the gob of Carleton Lufteufel, now worshiped as the God of Wrath--that had not been it, unless one went by mere numbers. "
religious - fictional world 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 14. Servants of Wrath:
"And so he, Father Handy, did not hate Carlton Lufteufel, because that billion who had died had not gone like those who had been gassed by the U.S. nerve gas; its death had not been monstrous. "
religious - fictional world 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 16. Servants of Wrath:
"The ideology of the Servants of Wrath connected with the Augustinian view of women; there was fear involved, and then of course the dogma got entangled with the old cult of Mani, the Albigensian Heresy of Provincal France, the Catharists... Supreme as is the mekkis of the God of Wrath Himself. But not a mekkis; not Macht, not power or might. It is more a--mystery. Hence, gnostic wisdom is involved, knowledge hidden behind a wall so fragile, so entrancing . . . but undoubtedly a fatal knowledge. Interesting, that truth could be a terminal possession. The woman knew the truth, lived with it, yet it did not kill her. But when she uttered it--he thought of Cassandra and of the female Oracle at Delphi. And felt afraid. " [Many refs. throughout novel to the new religion known as the Servants of Wrath. It is the main fictional group in the novel.]
religious - fictional world 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 17. Servants of Wrath:
"But what, for the Servants of Wrath, did sin consist of? The weapons of war; one naturally thought of the psychotic and psychopathic cretins in high places in dead corporations and government agencies, not dead as individuals; the men at drafting boards, the idea men, the planers, the policy boys and P.R. infants--like grass, their flesh. Certainly that had been sin, what they had done, but that had been without knowledge. Christ, the God of the Old Sect, had said that about His murderers: they did not know what they were up to. Not knowledge but the lack of knowledge had made them into what they had been, frozen into history as they gambled for His garments or stuck His side with the spear. There was knowledge in the Christian Bible, in three places that he personally knew of--despite the rule within the Servants of Wrath hierarchy against reading the Christian sacred texts. "
religious - fictional world 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 17. Servants of Wrath:
"And now, he thought, we know. The Catharists had come bleakly close, had guessed one piece: that the world lay in the control of an evil Adversary and not the good god. What they had not guessed was contained in Job, that the 'good god' was a god of wrath--was in fact evil. "
religious - fictional world 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 18. Servants of Wrath:
"Death was not an antagonist, the last enemy, as Paul had thought; death was the release from bondage to the God of Life, the Deus Irae. In death one was free from Him--and only in death.

It was the God of Life who was the evil god. And in fact the only God. And Earth, this world, was the only kingdom. And they, all of them; constituted his servants, in that they carried out, had always done so, over the thousands of years, his commands. And his reward had been in keeping both with his nature and with his commands: it had been the Ira. The Wrath. "

religious - fictional world 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 20. Servants of Wrath:
[More Servants of Wrath theology.] "'...Now look, dear... They [Christians] believe for two thousand years in a good god. And now we know it's not true. There is a god, but he is--you know as well as I do; you were a kid during the war, but you remember and you can see; you've seen the miles of dust that once were bodies . . . I don't understand how you can in all honesty, intellectually or morally, accept an ideology that teaches that good played a decisive role in what happened. See?'

...'All right; we know that a Carleton Lufteufel, Chairman of the ERDA of the United States Government, existed. But he was a man. Not a god.'

'A man in form,' Father Handy said. 'made by God. In God's image, according to your own sacred writ...' "

religious - fictional world 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 20. Servants of Wrath:
[More Servants of Wrath theology.] "'Dear,' Father Handy said, 'to believe in the Old Church is to flee. To try to escape the present. We, our church; we try to live in this world and face what's happening and how we stand. We're honest. We, as living creatures, are in the hands of a merciless and angry deity and will be until death wipes us from the slate of his records. If perhaps one could believe in a god of death . . . but unfortunately--'

'Maybe there is one,' Lurine said abruptly.

'Pluto?' He laughed. "

religious - fictional world 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 21. Servants of Wrath:
"'Maybe God releases us from our torment,' she answered steadily. 'And I may find him in Abernathy's [Christian] church. Anyhow-- I won't worship a psychotic ex-official of the U.S. ERDA as a deity; that's not being realistic; that's... It's wrong.'

'But,' Father Handy [of the Servants of Wrath] said, 'he lives.'

She stared at him, sadly, and very troubled.

'We,' he continued, 'as you know, are painting him. And we are sending our inc, our artist, to seek him out; we have Richfield Station and AAA maps . . . call it pragmatism, if you want; Abernathy once said that to me. But what does he worship? Not anything. You show me. Show me.' He slammed his flat hand on the table, savagely.

'Well,' Lurine said, 'maybe this is--'

'The prelude? To the real life to come? Do you genuinely believe that? Listen, dear; St. Paul believed that Christ would return in his lifetime. That the 'New Kingdom' would be in in the first century A.D. Did it?'

'No,' "

religious - fictional world 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 21. Servants of Wrath:
"'And everything that Paul wrote or thought is based on that fallacy. but we base our beliefs on no fallacy; we know that Carleton Lufteufel served as the manifestation on Earth of the Deity, and he showed his true character, and it was wrathful. You can see it in every handful of dirt and rubble. You've seen it for sixteen years. If there were any psychiatrists alive they'd tell you the truth, what you're trying to do. It's called--a fugue.' "
religious - fictional world 2020 Heinlein, Robert A. Friday. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston (1982); pg. 105. Angels of the Lord:
"'Worse are some religious fanatics calling themselves the Angels of the Lord. Their so-called program is a mindless collection of anti-intellectual slogans and vicious prejudices. They cannot succeed but their doctrines of hate can easily set brother against brother, neighbor against neighbor. They must be stopped.

'Emergency Decree Number One: All persons representing themselves as Angels of the Lord are sentenced to death. Authorities everywhere will carry out this sentence at once wherever and whenever one is found. Private citizens, subjects, and residents are directed to turn in these self-described Angels to the nearest authority, using citizen's arrest, and are authorized to use force as needed to accomplish such arrest.

'Aiding, abetting, succoring, or hiding one of this proscribed group is declared itself a capital offense.' " [Other refs. to this fictional group, not all in DB.]

religious - fictional world 2020 Heinlein, Robert A. Friday. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston (1982); pg. 285. First Plasmite Church:
"The First Plasmite Church ('In the Beginning was Plasma, without form and void') off the Mall had a sign advertising times of services. A smaller notice with movable letters included on it caught my eye: 'The Next Virgin Will Be Sacrificed at 0251 Oct 22'

That looked like a permanent position but again not one for which I was qualified. It fascinated me. While I was gawking, a man came out and changed th sign and I realized that I had missed last night's sacrament and the next altar sacrifice was two weeks away, which left me undismayed. But my curiosity got me, as usual. I asked him: 'Do you actually sacrifice virgins?'

He answered, 'Not me. I'm just an acolyte. But--Well, no, they don't actually have to be virgins. But they do have to look like virgins.' He looked me up and down. 'I think you could make it. Want to come in and talk to the priest?' "

religious - fictional world 2020 Heinlein, Robert A. Friday. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston (1982); pg. 285. First Plasmite Church:
"'Uh, no. Do you mean that he actually sacrifices them?'

He looked at me again. 'You're a stranger here, aren't you?'

I admitted it. 'Well, it's like this,' he went on. 'If you were to advertise that you were casting for a snuff film, you could cast eery part by noon and not one of 'em would ask if they were actually going to be snuffed. It's that kind of town.' "

religious - fictional world 2020 Vonnegut Jr., Kurt. Player Piano. New York: Delacorte Press (1952); pg. 16. Kolhouri:
"The Shah of Bratpuhr, spiritual leader of 6,000,000 members of the Kolhouri sect, wizened and wise and dark as cocoa, encrusted with gold brocade and constellations of twinkling gems, sank deep into the royal-blue cushions of the limousine--like a priceless brooch in its gift box...

'Khabu' meant 'where?' 'Siki' meant 'what?' 'Akka sahn' meant 'why?' Brahous brahouna, houna saki' was a combination of blessing and thanks, and Sumklish was the sacred Kolhouri drink which Kashdrahr carried in a hip flask for the Shah.

The shah had left his military and spiritual fastness in the mountains to see what he could learn in the most powerful nation on earth for the good of his people. " [Many more refs. about the fictional Kolhouri sect and culture, not in DB.]

religious - fictional world 2025 Goonan, Kathleen Ann. Crescent City Rhapsody. New York: Tor (2001; c. 2000); pg. 178. Extropian:
[People preparing to go to a new world, off the Earth.] "'Most of these--organizations... want everything you own. I mean, look around. Every one of them is like a religion. Worse than a religion. A cult. You have to pledge all. Your property, your life, all your time. Instead of worshipping Goddess, they worship . . . a way out.'

'Or a change,' said Mabel. 'You know, taking humanity to the next level, all that... To tell the truth, we don't have room for anyone else. And we don't need any more money. But what we do need is people so spread the world about us after we leave. To receive whatever messages we might manage to send. For one thing, we'll be able to get messages from the moon colony, at least for a while, and we can send them back, coded. So that the government won't try and intercept them.' "

religious - fictional world 2025 Stephenson, Neal. Snow Crash. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 104. Reverend Wayne's Pearly Gates:
"'Rife contributed $500 to the Highlands Church of the Baptism by Fire, Reverend Wayne Bedford, head minister; $2,500 to the Pentecostal Youth League of Bayside, Reverend Wayne Bedford, president; $150,000 to the Pentecostal Church of the New Trinity, Reverend Wayne Bedford, founder and patriarch; $2.3 million to Rife Bible College, Reverend Wayne Bedford, President and chairman of the theology department; $20 million to the archaeology department of Rife Bible College, plus $45 million to the astronomy department and $100 million to the computer science department.'

...'That Wayne Bedford guy--is this the same Reverend Wayne who runs the Reverend Wayne's Pearly Gates?'

'The same.'

'Are you telling me that Rife owns the Reverend Wayne?'

'He owns a majority share in Peargate Associates, which is the multinational that runs the Reverend Wayne's Pearly Gates chain.' "

religious - fictional world 2025 Stephenson, Neal. Snow Crash. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 169. Reverend Wayne's Pearly Gates:
"Y.T. is supposed to be on her way to a Reverend Wayne's Pearly Gates franchise. If she screws up this delivery, that means she's double-crossing God, who may or may not exist, and in any case who is capable of forgiveness. The Mafia definitely exists and hews to a higher standard of obedience. "
religious - fictional world 2025 Stephenson, Neal. Snow Crash. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 224. Reverend Wayne's Pearly Gates:
"Nearby is a bar built into a crappy mobile home, marked with a graffiti sign: THE SACRIFICE ZONE. Lines of boxcars are stranded in a yard of rusted-over railway spurs, nopal growing between the ties. One of the boxcars has been turned into a Reverend Wayne's Pearly Gates franchise, and evangelical CentroAmericans are lined up to do their penance and speak in tongues below the neon Elvis. "
religious - fictional world 2025 Stephenson, Neal. Snow Crash. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 277. Reverend Wayne's Pearly Gates:
"'...That's how Russians say 'heretic.' The [Russian Orthodox] who came to TROKK were a new sect--all Pentecostals. They were tied in somehow with the Reverend Wayne's Pearly Gates. We had misionaries rom Texas coming up all the... time to meet with them. They were always speaking in tongues. The mainline Russian Orthodox Church thought it was the work of the devil.'

'So how many of these Pentecostal Russian Orthodox people came over to TROKK?'

'Jeez, a hell of a lot of them. At least fifty thousand.'

'How many Americans were in TROKK?' "

religious - fictional world 2025 Stephenson, Neal. Snow Crash. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 376. Reverend Wayne's Pearly Gates:
"'And then came television, and the Reverend Wayne, backed by the vast media power of L. Bob Rife. The behavior that the Reverend Wayne promulgates through his television shows, pamphlets, and franchises can be traced in an unbroken line back to the Pentecostal cults of early Christianity, and from there back to pagan glossolalia cults. The cult of Asherah lives. the Reverend Wayne's Pearly Gates is the cult of Asherah.' "
religious - fictional world 2025 Stephenson, Neal. Snow Crash. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 377. Reverend Wayne's Pearly Gates:
"'Rife likes to think big. He immediately saw that this idea could be much more powerful. he took Lagos's idea and told Lagos himself to buzz off. Then he started dumping a lot of money into Pentecostal churches. He took a small church in Bayview, Texas, and built it up into a unversity. He took a small-time preacher, the Reverend Wayne Bedford, and made him more important than the Pope. He constructed a string of self-supporting religious franchises all over the world, and used his unversity, and its Metaverse campus, to crank out tens of thousands of missionaries, who fanned out all over the Third World and began converting people by the hundreds of thousands, just like St. Louis Bertrand. L. Bob Rife's glossolalia cult is the most successful religion since the creation of Islam. They do a lot of talking about Jesus, but like many self-described Christian churches, it has nothing to do with Christianity except that they use his name. It's a postrational religion.' "
religious - fictional world 2025 Stephenson, Neal. Snow Crash. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 377. Reverend Wayne's Pearly Gates:
"'He [Rife] also wanted to spread the biological virus as a promoter or enhancer of the cult, but he couldn't really get away with doing that through the use of cult prostitution because it is flagrantly anti-Christian. But one of the major functions of his Third World missionaries is to go out into the hinterlands and vaccinate people--and there was more than just vaccine in those needles.

'Here in the First World, everyone has already been vaccinated, and we don't let religious fanatics come up to us and poke needles into us. But we do take a lot of drugs. So for us, he devised a means for extracting the virus from human blood serum and packaged it as a drug known as Snow Crash.' "

religious - fictional world 2027 Atack, Chris. Project Maldon. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 4. Church of the Redeemer:
Pg. 4: "'...Listen: there's a hit planned for tonight. Eastern Free Zone, the medical clinic at the Church of the Redeemer, around two thirty in the morning...' "
religious - fictional world 2027 Atack, Chris. Project Maldon. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 47. Cleaners:
"With a shock, Wolfe saw the skulking demons of the alley transformed into fresh-faced youngsters--three men and two women, their movements crisp, methodical, efficient. The leader, a blonde young man with a pink face and freshly-ironed black shirt, addressed the operative courteously. 'Good evening, doctor. We're Cleaners, preparing the path for Adonai God. I'm afraid we have an account to settle. You have been aiding the forces of uncleanness. Your sin must be purged with a sacrifice of living flesh. As the Pastor says: 'let us not show false mercy, nor seek ourselves to judge the hearts of the wrongdoers.' ' He smiled pleasantly and held up a black-gloved hand to show a short, wicked knife... Two Cleaners forced... " [Other refs., not in DB. The novel appears to present a large number of fictional post-millennial groups, with varying sensibilities.]
religious - fictional world 2027 Atack, Chris. Project Maldon. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 42. Temple of the Accord:
"Politics and religion have always been entwined. Religious belief is merely worldly belief reflected upward in the cosmic mirror. And truly, our revelation explains how faiths and governments replace one another as we struggle upwards toward the Final Truth. The time has come to implement our belief, our vision given to us in these terminal days: to cleanse the earth in preparation for the Coming of the Light.

The Lats Convert, an authorized biography of Henry Stele, First Pastor, Temple of the Accord " [Other refs. not in DB., e.g., pg. 54, 69, 103. This may be the most important fictional religious group in novel.]

religious - fictional world 2027 Atack, Chris. Project Maldon. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 12. Temple of the Accord:
Pg. 12: "'None of the Pastor's heirs is strong enough to take out all the rest at the moment, so they've carved up the Temple by region. Net result: fourteen sons, daughters, nieces and nephews, each waiting for the chance to slaughter all the others and consolidate power. Messy, but that's how it is with new religions.' " [Many other refs., not in DB.]
religious - fictional world 2028 Gunn, James E. The Listeners. New York: Signet (1974; c. 1972); pg. 130. Solitarian:
Pg. 130: "'Jeremiah, the Solitarian evangelist?' White asked. 'What was he doing there?' "; Pg. 134: "...the clean wide streets of Houston and up to the incredible dome that was called the temple of the Solitarians and down underground passages... " [Other refs. not in DB.]
religious - fictional world 2031 Bear, Greg. Heads (fiction). New York: St. Martin's Press (1990); pg. 48-49. Logology:
"[Thierry] wrote massively, still made movies occasionally. His later books covered all aspects of a Logologist's life, from pre-natal care to funeral rites and design of grave site. He packaged LitVid on such topics as world economics and politics. Slowly, he became a recluse; by 2031, two years before his death, he saw no one but his mistress and three personal secretaries. Thierry claimed that a time of crisis would come after his own 'liberation', and that within a century he would return, 'freed of the chains of flesh', to put the Church of Logology into a position of 'temporal power over the nations of the Earth'. 'Our enemies will be cinderized,' he promised, 'and the faithful will see an aeon of spiritual ecstasy.' "
religious - fictional world 2031 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Chronoliths. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 143. Kuinism:
Pg. 139: "'Did they ever talk about a haj?'

'Pardon me?'

'A haj. Janice used the word.'

'She shouldn't have. We discourage that word, too. A haj is a pilgrimage to Mecca. But that's not how the kids use it. They man a trip to see a Kuin stone, or a place where one is supposed to arrive.' ";

Pg. 143: "I thought of it again when I used the motel terminal to call up a map of the world marked with Chronolith sites. If this was madness, here were its tangible symptoms. Asia was a red zone, dissolving into feverish anarchy, though fragile national governments continued to exist in Japan.. and in Beijing... Europe was free of the physical manifestation of Kuinism, which had so far stalled at the Bosporus, but not its political counterpart; there had been massive street riots in both Paris and Brussels staged by rival 'Kuinist' factions. Northern Africa had endured five disastrous arrivals... "

religious - fictional world 2031 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Chronoliths. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 145. Kuinism:
"Five new members introduced themselves and their problems. Four had lost children to Kuinist or haj cells within the last month. One had been missing her daughter for more than a year and wanted a place where she could share her grief... Then Regina Lee stood up again and read from a printed sheet of news and updates--children recovered, rumors of new Kuinist movements in the West and South, a truckload of underage pilgrims intercepted at the Mexican border. " [Extensive other refs. to Kuinism throughout novel. It is the main fictional religious group in the book. Kuinism grew up as a result of the 'Chronoliths', the large monuments arriving in locations around the world, apparently from the future, marking military victories of a leader named 'Kuin.']
religious - fictional world 2031 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Chronoliths. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 153. Kuinism:
"I had spent much of the last week on the net, researching the phenomenon of 'haj youth' and the Kuinist movement, tunneling into their hidden chatrooms.

There was, of course, no unified Kuinist movement. Lacking a flesh-and-blood Kuin, the 'movement' was a patchwork of utopian ideologies and quasi-religious cults, each competing for the title. What they had in common was simply the act of veneration, the worship of the Chronoliths. For the hajists, any Chronolith was a holy object. Hajists attributed all sorts of powers to the physical proximity of a Kuin stone: enlightenment, healing, psychological transformation, epiphanies great and small. But unlike the pilgrims at Lourdes, for instance, the vast majority of hajists were young. It was, in the twentieth century term, a 'youth movement.' Like most such movements, it was as much style as substance. Very few Americans ever made a physical pilgrimage to a Chronolith site, but... "

religious - fictional world 2032 Barnes, John. Kaleidoscope Century. New York: Tor (1995); pg. 184. Cybertao:
"'...Unless they can enlist the cybertaos to go in with them. And the cybertaos would just love that, because any idea that gets too close to cybertao ends up being cybertao, which is why the Jews and Muslims and Hindus have all gotten so paranoid about cybertao--because they've all lost millions of believers overnight. The poor... Buddhists and Taoists just disappeared entirely, you know?' "
religious - fictional world 2032 Bear, Greg. Heads (fiction). New York: St. Martin's Press (1990); pg. 49-50. Logology:
"A year after [Thierry's] death, one of his secretaries was arrested in Green Idaho... the ensuing scandal nearly wrecked the Church of Logology. The Church recovered with remarkable speed when it sponsored a programme of supporting young LitVid artists. Using the programme as a stepping stone to acceptance among politicians and the general public, Logology's past was soon forgotten, and its current directors--anonymous, efficient and relatively colourless--finished the job that Thierry had begun. They made Logology a legitimate alternative religion... "
religious - fictional world 2032 Clarke, Arthur C. The Hammer of God. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 94. Chrislam:
Excerpt from papal encyclical signed by "John Paul XXV, Easter 2032: Earth-Moon-Mars New Network, " which emphasizes that the Catholic Church now supports artificial birth control (in light of new techniques that extend human life and years of fertility), but still opposes abortion: "'The Church is wise enough not to fight against the inevitable, especially in this radically changed situation. I will shortly be issuing an encyclical that will contain guidance on these matters. It has been drawn up, I might add, after full consultation with my colleagues the Dalai Lama, the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Chief Rabbi, Imam Mahommud, and the Prophet Fatima Magdelene [founder of Chrislam]. They are in complete agreement with me. "
religious - fictional world 2032 Clarke, Arthur C. The Hammer of God. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 101. Chrislam:
"Few religions survive the death of their founder unscathed. So it was with Chrislam, despite Fatima Magdelene's efforts at designating a successor.

The first disagreements occurred when her son, Morris Goldenberg, materialized out of nowhere and attempted to claim his inheritance. He was first denounced as a fraudulent pretender, but when he demanded--and obtained--DNA testing, the Movement had to abandon this line of defense.

He next made the pilgrimage to Mecca, and though he was kept at a safe distance from the Kaaba, he thereafter insisted on calling himself Al Haj. How sincere he was in this--or indeed anything else--was hotly disputed. About his mother's sincerity there was never any serious doubt, but after his death most people decided that Al Haj Morris Goldenberg was nothing more than a charming and plausible adventurer, making the most of the opportunity Fate had given him. Ironically, he was one of the last known victims of the AIDS virus... "

religious - fictional world 2039 Drake, David. The Tank Lords. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 373. Church of the Lord's Universe:
[7] "While the new faith appealed to men and women everywhere, it by no means appealed to every man and woman. By their uncompromising refusal to abandon future dreams to cope with present disasters--the famines, pollution, and pogroms of every day--the Universalists faced frequent hatred. During the Flood Riots of 2039, three hundred Universalists were ceremonially murdered and eaten in a packed amphitheater in Dakkah, and there were other martyrs as well. But the survivors and their faith drove on. Their ranks swelled every time catastrophe proved Man was incapable of solving his problems on Earth alone. "
religious - fictional world 2040 Bova, Ben. Moonrise. New York: Avon Books (1996); pg. 314. New Morality:
Pg. 314: "'Oh yes, there are lots of knives in the dark here. Even the New Morality people have questioned what I'm doing. They say it's against God's will to try to imitate the stars.'

Rashid snorted disdainfully. 'What do they know of the One God?'

'Believe it or not, there are Moslems among them.' ";

Pg. 315: "He smiled again, satisfied that even the New Morality could not stop his inevitable rise to wealth and fame and power.

Doug left the meeting with Greg and his mother in a turmoil of conflicting emotions. They shot Quintana. Some New Morality fanatic gunned him down at the U.N. building. Because he was against the treaty. Or was it because he was living proof that nanotherapy can cure cancer? Maybe both reasons. Probably both.

...But if I do I'll be a target for every brain-dead New Morality zealot who can get his hands on a gun. " [Other refs., not in DB.]

religious - fictional world 2040 Stapledon, Olaf. Last and First Men. Los Angeles: Jeremy P. Tarcher, Inc. (1988; first published 1930); pg. 52-53. Energists:
[Year is estimated.] "'...They will see also the reform of your people's sexual frivolity in which you squander so much of the Divine Energy. Unless you agree to this, I cannot stop the war. The law of God must be kept, and those who know it must enforce it.'

The owman interrupted him. 'Tell me, what is this 'God' of yours? The Europeans worshipped love, not energy. What do you mean by energy? Is it merely to make engines go fast...?'

He answered flatly, as if repeating a lesson, 'God is the all-pervading spirit of movement which seeks to actualize itself wherever it is latent... I have served the great God, Energy, all my life, from garage boy to World President...' "; Pg. 53: "'...You must give me time to form in asia a native and spontaneous party of Energists, who will themselves propagate your gospel...' " [Much other material about Energists, most not in DB.]

religious - fictional world 2045 Butler, Octavia. Parable of the Talents. New York: Seven Stories Press (1998); pg. 353-354. Earthseed:
"My mother... was immensely rich--or, at least, Earthseed was immensely rich. But she had no home of her own--not even a rented apartment. She drifted between the homes of her many friends and supporters, and between the many Earthseed Communities that she established or encouraged in the United States, Canada, Alaska, Mexico, and Brazil. "
religious - fictional world 2045 Clarke, Arthur C. & Mike McQuay. Richter 10. New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 352. Cosmies:
Pg. 352: "The virus had been unleashed by the Brotherhood, the terrorist arm of the Religion of Cosmic Oneness--the Cosmies--who were seeking their own State free of the religious persecution of the world's Moslems. The plague had killed nearly forty million people worldwide before mutating into a common cold germ... "; Pg. 360: "There were the looters, the Rockers, who were now called Seismos, the suicides, and the Cosmies dressed in white robes with the Third Eye emblazoned in red on their chests. "
religious - fictional world 2045 Clarke, Arthur C. The Hammer of God. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 102. Chrislam:
"As far as most outsiders were concerned, most of the matters of doctrinal dispute that Morris promoted appeared trivial: were prayers at dawn an sunset the minimum requirement; were pilgrimages to Bethlehem and Mecca of equal merit; could the Ramadan fast be cut to a week; was it necessary to give tithe to the 'poor,' now that Society as a whole recognized its responsibilities in this matter; how to reconcile Jesus' order to 'drink wine in remembrance of me' with Muslim aversions to alcohol . . . and so on. . . .

However, after Morris' death, the disagreements between the various sects were patched up, and for several decades Chrislam showed a fairly united face to the world. At its peak it claimed over a hundred million adherents, and was the fourth most popular religion on Earth, though it made little headway on the Moon and Mars. "

religious - fictional world 2048 Barnes, John. Kaleidoscope Century. New York: Tor (1995); pg. 214. Cybertao:
"...he'd about conquered the world of cybertao before Ecucatholic memes had turned up to fight back, quickly joined by Sunni and Shi'ite memes and the mad-dog guerrilla memes called Freecybers. "
religious - fictional world 2050 Haldeman, Joe. Forever Peace. New York: Ace Books (1998; first ed. 1997); pg. 32. Enders:
"Things are getting worse. I hate to sound like my old man. But things really were better when I was a boy. There weren't Enders on every corner. People didn't duel. Didn't stand around and watch other people die. "
religious - fictional world 2050 Haldeman, Joe. Forever Peace. New York: Ace Books (1998; first ed. 1997); pg. 254. Enders:
"'They're notoriously antijack anyhow,' Asher said. 'Enders in general, I mean. And arguments about status and power aren't going to move them.'

'Spiritual arguments might,' Ellie Morgan said... 'Those of us who are believers find our belief strengthened, and broadened.'

I wondered about that. I'd felt her belief, jacked, and was attraced by the comfort and peace she derived from it. but she'd instantly accepted my atheism as 'another path,' which didn't sound much like any Ender I'd met. "

religious - fictional world 2050 Haldeman, Joe. Forever Peace. New York: Ace Books (1998; first ed. 1997); pg. 321. Enders:
"While they were talking, the general made two unobtrusive hand gestures, recognition signals for Enders and for Hammer of God. Of course, Thurman didn't respond to either one. 'Sir, there's a huge conspiracy--'

'I know, son. Let's continue this conversation face-to-face...' "

religious - fictional world 2050 Haldeman, Joe. Forever Peace. New York: Ace Books (1998; first ed. 1997); pg. 251. Enders - Hammer of God:
"She'd been keying through the text. 'Look at this.' There was nothing but gibberish until the last word:

'GiOiDiSiWiIiLiL.'

It takes time for information to percolate up through a cell system. By the time Amelia found evidence that the Hammer of God had scrambled her files, there was stillone day left before the very highest echelon knew that God had given them a way to bring on the Last Day: all they had to do was keep anybody from interfering with the Jupiter Project. "

religious - fictional world 2050 Haldeman, Joe. Forever Peace. New York: Ace Books (1998; first ed. 1997); pg. 251. Enders - Hammer of God:
"They [Hammer of God] were not dumb, and they knew a thing or two about spin themselves. they leaked the 'news' that there were lunatic-fringe conservatives who wanted to convince you that the Jupiter Project was a tool of Satan; that continuing it could precipitate the end of the world. The End of the Universe! Could anything be mor ridiculous? A harmless project that, now that it was set in motion, cost nobody anything, and might give us real information as to how the universe began. No wonder those religious kooks wanted it suppressed! It might pove that God didn't exist!

What it proved, of course, was that God did exist, and was calling us home.

The Ender who had decrypted and destroyed Amelia's files was none other than Macro, her... boss, and he was glad beyond words to see that his part in the plan was crystallizing.

Macro's involvement did help the other Plan--Marty's rather than God's--in that he deflected attention from the disappearance of Amelia... "

religious - fictional world 2050 Haldeman, Joe. Forever Peace. New York: Ace Books (1998; first ed. 1997); pg. 254. Enders - Hammer of God:
"'I'm worried about the Hammer of God,' Amelia said. 'We're not likely to convert many of them, and some of them like to serve God by murdering the godless.'

I agreed. 'Even if we convert a few like Ingram, the nature of the cell system would keep it from spreading.'

'They're notoriously antijack anyhow,' Asher said. 'Enders in general, I mean. And arguments about status and power aren't going to move them.' "

religious - fictional world 2050 Haldeman, Joe. Forever Peace. New York: Ace Books (1998; first ed. 1997); pg. 259. Enders - Hammer of God:
"Within a few days, the glorious truth had spred to all of the upper echolons of the Hammer of God: God's plan was going to be fulfilled, appropriately enough, by the godless actions of scientists. Only a few people knew about the glorious End and Beginning of God would give them on September 14...

The most powerful member of the Hammer of God was General Mark Blaisdel, the undersecretary of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency... He tried to keep his religious beliefs to himself, but he knew there were people--like Roser--who knew he was very conservative, and might suspect, given a whisper of fact or rumor, that he was an Ender. The army wouldn't demote him for that, but they could make him the highest-ranking supply clerk in the world.

And if they found out about the Hammer of God, he'd be executed for treason. He would personally prefer that, of course, to demotion. But the secret had been sealed for years... "

religious - fictional world 2050 Haldeman, Joe. Forever Peace. New York: Ace Books (1998; first ed. 1997); pg. 263. Enders - Hammer of God:
"She knew Ingram; he was a third of her cell... She had killed more than twenty sinners I service to the Lord, but always at a distance or protected by extremely close contact. God had gifted her with great sexual attractiveness, and she used it as a weapon, allowing sinners in between her legs while she reached under the pillow for the crystal knife. [etc.] She had never done it to anyone who had taken Jesus as his Savior. Instead of being washed in the Blood of the Lamb, they drowned in their own. Atheists and adulterers, they deserved even worse.

Once a man had almost escaped, a pervert she had allowed to engage her from behind. She'd had to half-turn and stab him in the heart... "

religious - fictional world 2060 Clarke, Arthur C. The Hammer of God. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 102. Chrislam:
"The major schism [with Chrislam] was triggered, very unexpectedly, by the 'Voice of Sirius.' An esoteric subsect, much influenced by Sufi doctrine, claimed to have interpreted the enigmatic signal from space by the use of advanced information processing techniques. "; Pg. 103: "The Chrislamic zealots--the 'Reborn' as they were later to call themselves--had a much more ingenious answer, though not an original one. In the early days of communications theory, it had been pointed out that 'pure noise' could be considered not as meaningless garbage, but as the combined total of all possible messages. The Reborn had a neat analogy: imagine that all the poets, philosophers, and prophets of mankind were talking simultaneously. The result would be a totally indecipherable torrent of sound--yet it would contain the sum total of human wisdom. " [More.]
religious - fictional world 2065 Mangels, Andy & Michael A. Martin. Rogue (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 1. Borg:
"Population approximately nine billion . . . all Borg. "
religious - fictional world 2075 Anderson, Poul. "Scarecrow " in New Legends. Greg Bear (ed.) New York: Tor (1995); pg. 329. Agrarian Revival:
"Okay, his folks were Agrarian Revival, fine people, he loved them, but he'd left their ways far behind. "
religious - fictional world 2075 Herbert, Frank & Brian Herbert. Man of Two Worlds. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1986); pg. 9. Dreen:
Book jacket: "Send up or not, Man of Two Worlds is a story with a compelling premise: Suppose all of Earth--all of the universe--were the creation of the fertile imagination of an alien world; suppose too that we had reached the point of being able to destroy that world, without realizing it was our creator, without knowing that its destruction would virtually erase our existence. And suppose that the future of both races lay in the hands of a confused man who is half greedy, aggressive human and half precocious, naive teenage alien! ";

Pg. 9: "If every Dreen dies, the universe collapses, for all life and all matter are sustained by Dreen idmaging.
--The Touchfinger Tabloids,

Dreenschool curriculum. " [Extensive refs. to Dreen throughout novel: the main fictional group.]

religious - fictional world 2075 Herbert, Frank & Brian Herbert. Man of Two Worlds. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1986); pg. 41. Dreen:
[1] "Why don't you . . . grine the door out of existence? Lutt asked.

It's called grine idmaging and I must be very careful what effects I introduce into Earth culture. There is a specific injunction against what you suggest. It's incorporated in the original story.

All I felt was that funny twisting of my eyes. How do you do these things?

Idmaging occurs in a private portion of my thoughts not available to you.

How about idmaging a beautiful woman for me?

Really, Lutt, we must discuss the lustful nature you inherited from your father. Dreens think fornication is quite revolting. We don't touch each other.

Yeahhh? How do you reproduce?

Habiba gives us a childseed. We place it in a seedhouse. You may think of it as a small greenhouse. Then for three days and nights, the parents sit outside with the seedhouse between them. They use concentrated idmaging to produce precisely the child they have decided to bring into being. "

religious - fictional world 2075 Herbert, Frank & Brian Herbert. Man of Two Worlds. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1986); pg. 42. Dreen:
[2] Pg. 41-42: "So you don't get ugly ones or . . .

Dreen ideals have nothing to do with appearance. Desired traits are honesty, fidelity, a peaceful nature, pleasing personality, loyalty to Habiba, our Supreme Tax Collector . . . and characteristics of that sort.

Man, does that sound dull! And if a Dreen created Earth, he must have thought it dull, too.

It is slow, not dull. Each night, the seedhouse must be kept warm with a blanket cover and idmaged heat produced by the parents. When a Dreen baby evolves from the seed and embryo, it is brought forth--a new life.

The parents don't touch each other?

Nor do they speak during the entire three days. Their energy is conserved for the difficult idmaging process.

...Now that I think of it, Habiba says we depend on the concept of 'ampleness' wherein Dreenor is always large enough to accommodate all Dreens. "

religious - fictional world 2075 Herbert, Frank & Brian Herbert. Man of Two Worlds. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1986); pg. 43. Dreen:
"Unfortunately, Dreens cannot do this anywhere except on Dreenor. Habiba says we have a mental and physical block that is coded into us at birth.

And everything you do is controlled by this tax collector?

We pay in stories. The surface occupants of each home are the taxpayers. They are required to tell one or more stories to a Bluecap who transmits them up the hierarchy to Habiba as her tribute.

Good stories, huh?

Habiba judges that. The best story receives a maximum of ten talents, the annual tax rate on a home tract. If is best to have backup stories available at tax time, however. Habiba rarely awards maximum talents to a story... Old stories are quite important, too. They are the Dreen heritage, because if any story dies out from not being shared, the physical aspects of that story--people, planets and other life forms--all vanish. " [Much more throughout novel, not in DB.]

religious - fictional world 2086 Heinlein, Robert A. Stranger in a Strange Land. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1961); pg. 72. Church of the New Revelation (Fosterite):
"The Reverend Doctor Daniel Digby, Supreme Bishop of the Church of the New Revelation (Fosterite) announced that he had nominated the Angel Azreel to guide Federation Senator Thomas Boone and that he expected Heavenly confirmation later today... "
religious - fictional world 2086 Heinlein, Robert A. Stranger in a Strange Land. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1961); pg. 128. Church of the New Revelation (Fosterite):
"Smith was listening to a Fosterite service: the Shepherd was reading church notices: '--junior Spirit-in-Action team will give a demonstration, so come early and see the fur fly! Our team coach Brother Hornsby, has asked me to tell you boys to fetch only your helmets, gloves, and sticks--we aren't going after sinners this time. However, the little Cherubim will be on hand with their first-aid kits in case of excessive zeal.' The Shepherd paused and smiled broadly, 'And now wonderful news, My Children! A message from Angel Ramzai for Brother Arthur Renwick and his good wife Dorothy. Your prayer has been approved and you will go to heaven at dawn Thursday morning! Stand up, Art! Stand up, Dottie! Take a bow!... The Bon Voyage party starts at midnight and doors will be locked at that time... Funeral services will be held thirty minutes after dawn, with breakfast immediately following for those who have to get to work early.' "
religious - fictional world 2086 Heinlein, Robert A. Stranger in a Strange Land. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1961); pg. 134. Church of the New Revelation (Fosterite):
"A devout agnostic, Jubal rated all religions, from the animism of Kalahari Bushmen to the most intellectualized faith, as equal. But emotionally he dislked some more than others and the Church of the New Revelation set his teeth on edge. The Fosterites' flat-footed claim to gnosis through a direct line to Heaven, their arrogant intolerance, their football-rally and sales-convention services - these depressed him... If God existed... and if He wanted to be worshipped... then it seemed wildly unlikely that a God potent to shape galaxies would be swayed by the whoop-te-do the Fosterites offered as 'worship.' But with bleak honesty Jubal admitted that the Fosterites might own the Truth, the exact Truth, nothing but the Truth. "
religious - fictional world 2086 Heinlein, Robert A. Stranger in a Strange Land. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1961); pg. 136. Church of the New Revelation (Fosterite):
"...the Fosterite 'going to Heaven' at a selected time did sound like the voluntary 'discorporation' which, Jubal did not doubt, was the practice on Mars. Jubal susptected that a better term for the Fosterite practice was 'murder'--but such had never been proved and rarely hinted. Foster had been the first to 'go to Heaven' on schedule, dying at a prophesied instant; since then, it had been a Fosterite mark of special grace... it had been years since any coroner had had the temerity to pry into such deaths. "
religious - fictional world 2086 Heinlein, Robert A. Stranger in a Strange Land. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1961); pg. 257. Church of the New Revelation (Fosterite):
"Patricia Paiwonski [the most tatooed woman in the world] associated with grifters and sinners unharmed; she and her husband had been converted by Foster himself, she attended the nearest Church of the New Revelation wherever she was... she was canvas for religious art greater than any in museum or cathedal. When she and George saw the light, there was about three square feet of Patricia untouched; before he died she carried a pictorial life of Foster, from his crib with angels hovering around to the day of glory when he had taken his appointed place. "
religious - fictional world 2086 Heinlein, Robert A. Stranger in a Strange Land. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1961); pg. 245-246. Church of the New Revelation (Fosterite):
"'...My point is that Foster's New Revelation is sweetness-and-light as scripture goes. Bishop Digby's Patron is a good Joe; He wants people to be happy--hapy on Earth plus eternal bliss in Heaven. He doesn't expect you to chastise the flesh. Oh no! this is the giant-economy package. If you like to drink and gamble and dance and wench--come to church and do it under holy auspices. Do it wih your conscience free. have fun at it! Get happy!'... As morals, Fosterism is the Freudian ethic sugar-coated for people who can't take psychology straight...' "
religious - fictional world 2088 Heinlein, Robert A. Stranger in a Strange Land. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1961); pg. 316. Church of the New Revelation (Fosterite):
"'... we work together to show other Fosterites that the Church of All Worlds doesn't conflict with the Faith, any more than being a Baptist keeps a man from joining the Masons.' "


religious - fictional, continued

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