Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

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religious - fictional, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
religious - fictional Utah 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 7. Servants of Wrath:
"'You could wish,' Father Handy said, 'that you had already died.'

'Yes.'

'So death, as we teach the Servants of Wrath--we teach that it is a solution. Not an adversary, as the Christians taught, as Paul said. You remember their text. 'Death, where is thy sting? Grave, where is thy victory?' You see my point.'

Tibor said slowly, 'If you can't do your job, better to be dead. What is the job I have to do?'

In your mural, Father handy thought, you must create His face.

'Him,' he said. 'And as He actually is.'

After a puzzled pause Tibor said, 'You mean His exact physical appearance?'

'Not,' Father Handy said, 'a subjective interpretation.'

'You have photos? Vid data?'

'They've released a few to me. To be shown to you.'

Staring at him, Tibor said, 'You mean you have a photo of the Deus Irae?'

'I have a color photo in depth, what before the war they called 3-D. NO animated pics, but this will be enough, I think.' "

religious - fictional Utah 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 7. Servants of Wrath:
"'Let's see it.' Tibor's tone was mixed, a compound of amazement and fear and the hostility of an artist hampered, impeded.

Passing into his inner office, Father Handy got the manila folder, came back with it, opened it, brought out the color 3-D photo of the God of Wrath [the Deus Irae], and held it forth. Tibor's right manual extensor seized it.

'That's the God,' Father Handy said presently.

'Yes, you can see.' Tibor nodded. 'Those black eyebrows. That interwoven black hair; the eyes . . . I see pain, but he's smiling... I can't paint him from that.'

'Why not?' But Father Handy knew why not. The photo did not really capture the god-quality; it was the photo of a man. The god-quality; it could not be recorded by celluloid coated with a silver nitrate. 'He was,' he said, 'at the time this photo was taken, having a luau in Hawaii... He was relaxing on a Sunday afternoon before a speech before the faculty of some university...' "

religious - fictional Utah 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 8. Servants of Wrath:
"'A Pilg. The Eltern of the Church say that if the photograph is inadequate--and it is, and we know it, all of us--then you must go on a Pilg until you find the Deus Irae, and they've sent documents pertaining to that.'

Blinking in surprise, Tibor gasped, then protested, 'But my metabattery! Suppose it gives out!'

Father Handy said, 'so you do blame your tools.' His voice was carefully controlled, quietly resounding.

At the stove, Ely said, 'Fire him.'

To her, Father Handy said, 'I fire no one. A pun. Fire: their hell, the Christians. We don't have that,' he reminded her. "

religious - fictional Utah 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 8. Servants of Wrath:
Pg. 8: "And then to Tibor he said the Great Verse of all the worlds, that which both men understood and yet did not grasp, could not, like Papagano with his net, entangle, He spoke it aloud as a bond holding them together in what they, the Christians, called agape, love. But this was higher than that: this was love and man and beautifulness, the three: a new trinity.

Ich sih die liehte heide
in gruner varwe stan.
Dar suln wir alle gehen
die sumerzit enphahen. ";

Pg. 10: "Neither man knew who had written the old poem, the medieval German words which could not be found in their Cassell's dictionary; they together, the two of them, had imagined out, summoned, found, the meaning of the words; they were certain they were right and understood. But not exactly. "

religious - fictional Utah 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 10. Servants of Wrath:
"Now, Father Handy and Tibor needed a power--mekkis, Father Handy thought to himself--to come from Above and aid them . . . on this, the servants of Wrath agreed with the Christians: the good power lay Above, Ubrem Sternenzelt, as Schiller had once said: above the band of stars. Yes, beyond the stars; this they were clear on; this was modern German. "
religious - fictional Utah 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 11. Servants of Wrath:
"His conference now was with the Dominus McComas, his superior in the hierarchy of the Servants of Wrath; the Dominus sat, large and tepid, with strangely cruel teeth, as if he tore things, not necessarily living, in fact much harder--as if he did a job, a profession, teethwise.

'Carl Lufteufel,' the Dominus McComas said, 'was a son of a bitch. As a man.' He added that because of course one did not speak of the god part of the god-man, the Deus Irae, like that. 'And,' he said, 'I'll give you ten to five that he made martinis with sweet vermouth.'

'Did you ever drink sweet vermouth straight or with ice?' Father Handy asked.

'It's sweet piss,' McComas grated... "

religious - fictional Utah 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 11. Servants of Wrath:
"'So your inc,' McComas grated, 'Is going to roll all the way to Los Angeles. Is it downhill?' And this time he laughed...

'Carleton Lufteufel,' Father Handy said, 'was Chairman of the Energy Research and Development Administration from 1982 to the beginning of the war.' He spoke half to himself. 'To the use of the gob.' The great objectless bomb which detonated not at one particular spot on the Earth's surface but which acted so as to contaminate a layer of the atmosphere itself. " [Carleton Lufteufel would go on to become the Deus Irae, worshipped by the Servants of Wrath.]

religious - fictional Utah 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 13. Servants of Wrath:
"'Well,' the Dominus McComas growled... 'if the inc can do it, fine. If I was an elter I wouldn't give a damn if it looked like Lufeufel or not; I'd just get a good fat wicket bloated pig-face up there; you know, a swilling face.' And his own swilling face beamed, and how strange it was, Father Handy thought, because McComas looked like one would imagine the Deus Irae to look . . . and yet, the color photo had shown a man with pain-smeared eyes, a man who seemed ill in a deep and dreadful way even as he gorged on roast chicken with a lei around his neck and a girl--not pretty--to his right . . . a man with shiny, heavy, tumbled black hair and too much stubble, even though no doubt he carefully shaved; it was subdermal, showing through: not his fault, and yet it was the mark. But of what? Blackness was not evil; blackness was what Martin Luther in his translation of Genesis had meant when he said, 'Und die Erde war ohne Form und leer.' Leer "
religious - fictional Utah 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 18. Servants of Wrath:
"'Is there a Christian Church anymore? In this area?'

Lurine said, 'They're very gentle and kind, there.'

'They have to be,' McComas said. 'They have to plead to get people to come in. We don't need to plead; they come to us for protection. From Him.' He jerked his thumb upward. At the God of Wrath, not in his man-form, not as he had appeared on Earth as Carleton Lufteufel, but as the mekkis-spirit everywhere. Above, here, and ultimately below; in the grave, to which they all were dragged at last.

The final enemy which Paul had recognized--death--had had its victory after all; Paul had died for nothing. "

religious - fictional Venezuela 2960 Stableford, Brian. "Mortimer Gray's History of Death " in Immortals (Jack Dann & Gardner Dozois, eds.) New York: Ace Books (1998; c. 1995); pg. 201. Thanaticism:
"...Venezuela... It was there, for the first time, that I came into close contact with Thanaticisim [sic]. The original Thanatic cults had flourished in the twenty-eighth century. They had appeared among the last generation of children born without Zaman transformations; their members were people who, denied emortality through blastular engineering, had perversely elected to reject the benefits of rejuvenation too, making a fetish out of living only a 'natural' lifespan. At the time, it had seemed likely that they would be the last of the man Millenarian cults which had long afflicted Western culture, and they had quite literally died out some eighty or ninety years before I was born.

Nobody had then thought it possible, let along likely, that genetically endowed emortals would ever embrace Thanaticism, but they were wrong.

There had always been suicides in the emortal population--indeed, suicide was the commonest cause of death among emortals... " [Much more.]

religious - fictional Vusstra 3038 Anderson, Kevin J. & Rebecca Moesta. Titan A.E.: Cale's Story. New York: Ace (2000); pg. 1. Vusstrans:
"The Earth had been destroyed . . . but he had to admit, this place didn't look much better... Generations of heavy-duty industrialism had used up the world of Vusstra, and al that remained was a grayish, tired landscape. The natives here survived only by taking off-world commissions, processing materials brought in by orbital cargo haulers, and then doing the work on the surface. The Vusstrans used creaking, age-old facilities, many of which had already been abandoned like rusty dinosaur skeletons in deserted valleys.

And Tek claims this place used to be green and lush and beautiful, Cale thought... Cale's alien guardian, Tek, claimed that Vusstra had once teemed with life. But then, this place was Tek's home, and he probably let his pride interfere with his eyesight (and his common sense). " [Tek is a major character. Many refs. to him and Vusstrans, most not in DB.]

religious - fictional Vusstra 3038 Anderson, Kevin J. & Rebecca Moesta. Titan A.E.: Cale's Story. New York: Ace (2000); pg. 2. Vusstrans:
Pg. 2: "Tek, the genial Vusstran who'd worked with Cale's father for years on the Titan Project, had taken the young boy under his wing. "; Pg. 3: "...Sam Tucker had separated from his son... he'd dumped the five-year-old boy into the waiting arms of Tek, extracted a promise from the Vusstran scientist, and then raced off into the... "; Pg. 8: "Iji, Tek's young pod-daughter, sat there, her round greenish-brown face crinkled with mirth, her snout's overhanging lip curled in a grin that stretched from ear hole to ear hole. Iji's round eyes blinked like a predatory fish. While fatherly Tek insisted that Iji was insufferably cute for a young girl of her species, Cale just found her to be a pest. "
religious - fictional Vusstra 3038 Anderson, Kevin J. & Rebecca Moesta. Titan A.E.: Cale's Story. New York: Ace (2000); pg. 10. Vusstrans:
"In sharp contrast to the planet's dinginess and pollution, the walls of Vusstran dwellings were made of a creamy translucent ceramic-and-metal alloy that was elegant, energy-efficient, and easy to keep clean. The luminous towers of their house seemed to beckon Cale, promising welcome and warmth. "
religious - fictional Vusstra 3038 Anderson, Kevin J. & Rebecca Moesta. Titan A.E.: Cale's Story. New York: Ace (2000); pg. 13. Vusstrans:
"Iji herself had been a miracle. Iji's parents had been killed in a transport accident at one of Vusstra's major industrial plants where Ryt had been taking some environmental samples for analysis. When the pregnant Vusstran woman died, the pod she'd carried had been expected to die as well. But Ryt had taken over nurturing the pd, and--to everyone's surprise--the child, Iji, had lived. "
religious - fictional Vusstra 3038 Anderson, Kevin J. & Rebecca Moesta. Titan A.E.: Cale's Story. New York: Ace (2000); pg. 30. Vusstrans:
"Had he been Vusstran, Cale would long since have entered a group school, where he would have bonded with classmates who had similar skills, interests, and ideals. Iji herself would soon have access to he support of her peers, the comfort of community, the overarching sense of belonging that Cale had yet to experience. "
religious - fictional Vusstra 3038 Anderson, Kevin J. & Rebecca Moesta. Titan A.E.: Cale's Story. New York: Ace (2000); pg. 41. Vusstrans:
"Vusstran food was always bland and recycled, grown in algae vats or processed from protein masses. Cale couldn't remember the last time he'd had a meal that tasted remotely 'interesting.' "
religious - fictional Vusstra 3038 Anderson, Kevin J. & Rebecca Moesta. Titan A.E.: Cale's Story. New York: Ace (2000); pg. 77. Vusstrans:
Pg. 77: "'Hmm, yes. In a manner of speaking, you've reclaimed more of your planet than my people have.' He sighted and rubbed his hands thoughtfully together. 'But we have no outside enemy to blame. We Vusstrans caused the damage to our own environment.' "; Pg. 116: "Tek had always given his foster son the bland Vusstran nourishment made from yeasts, algaes, and recycled proteins, so Cale had little experience with Earth cuisine. "
religious - fictional Washington, D.C. 1995 Hand, Elizabeth. Waking the Moon. New York: HarperPrism (1995); pg. 78. Benandanti:
"She had never known a group more eager to snipe and speculate than old Catholic priests and the Benandanti. No better place than the Divine (or the Vatican) for that. Though, unlike the Vatican, the Benandanti left no histories for the world to read. Most of their cadastrals and cartularies had perished with the libraries of Alexandria, after which time the Benandanti became a nomadic sect. They maintained their eternal vigilance from behind the marble clerestories of the Eternal City, and the Kaaba in Mecca... " [The Benandanti are the primary fictional religious group of the novel.]
religious - fictional Washington, D.C. 1995 Hand, Elizabeth. Waking the Moon. New York: HarperPrism (1995); pg. 126. Benandanti:
[1] "'No. It's not a religious thing--at least, it's not just a religious thing. It's more like the Church is part of the Benandanti--like all these churches and religions and things are part of it. There are members everywhere, all over the world. The Masons, the Vatican, Bohemian Grove, Skull and Bones . . . It's like the ultimate Old Boys' Network.' "
religious - fictional Washington, D.C. 1995 Hand, Elizabeth. Waking the Moon. New York: HarperPrism (1995); pg. 126. Benandanti:
[2] "'But then why doesn't anyone else know about them? I mean, even if it's such a huge secret, wouldn't this have popped up on 'Sixty Minutes' or something?'

'It's not a secret.'

...' 'Hide in plain sight,' that's one of their maxims. So, we all know about parts of the Benandanti--but nobody knows about all of it, unless you're in the very center; and that's where people like Balthazar Warnick are.'

'So what do they do?'

'Research, mostly. Very obscure, totally useless research... Sacrificial rituals of the ancient Scythians. The secret meaning of the Book of Genesis. Trying to find a pattern in NYSE figures between April and June of 1957.' She laughed. 'I mean, can you imagine wasting your whole life on something like that?' "

religious - fictional Washington, D.C. 1995 Hand, Elizabeth. Waking the Moon. New York: HarperPrism (1995); pg. 146. Benandanti:
"I began to shiver uncontrollably. There was no mistaking who they were. They were the Benandanti: Those Who Do Well, The Good Walkers. The chosen ones who for millennia had watched over mankind, benevolent sentries but also jailers, who meted out punishment and torment and death with as much care as they preserved a way of life. As the Furies were known as the Eumenides, The Kindly Ones, so the Benandanti saw themselves as benevolent; but to me they were dreadful even in their stillness. "
religious - fictional Washington: Seattle 1993 Busby, F. M. The Singularity Project. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 87. Heavenly Sons of Rama:
"Entering the Trosper Building's lobby I found a hassle. The guards, who are mostly for ornamental purposes, were trying to evict about a dozen robed, chanting Heavenly Sons of Rama. They were getting red-faced and loud about it, so I arranged my face in its best 'I'm not really here, fellows' expression and edged around the main commotion, toward the elevators.

Only one stood available; the lights showed the others up at various floors and not moving. The man inside the open one wore cult robes but not the sloppy Heavenly Mohawk... " [A few other refs. to this group, not in DB, e.g., pg. 92-93.]

religious - fictional Washington: Seattle 2033 Butler, Octavia. Parable of the Talents. New York: Seven Stories Press (1998); pg. 201. Christian America:
"These were middle-class Black members of the Church of Christian America in Seattle... Both Kayce and Layla believed it was the duty of good Christian Americans to give homes to the many orphaned children from squatter settlements and heathen cults. "
religious - fictional Women's Country 1988 Tepper, Sheri S. The Gate to Women's Country. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 189. Women's Country:
"'...Isn't there some kind of secret society, some group of initiates? The Brotherhood of the Ram? Haven't I heard about oath taking at the foot of the monument on the parade ground?'

Chernon flushed. 'That's different. That's very much like the women going to temple. More . . . more religious.'

'Well, maybe the Councilwomen are religious, too, but I don't think that's why they have secret meetings. The reason is simple enough, I'd guess. It's the Council that has to allocate the food and scarce supplies...' " [Many refs. throughout this novel to fictional religions, particular the religious and cultural life of 'Women's Country.']

religious - fictional world -5010 B.C.E. Tolkien, J. R. R. The Fellowship of the Ring. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1965); pg. 11. [Year estimated. Part 1 of The Lord of the Rings. This volume: 8th printing, 2nd edition.] "It is plain indeed that in spite of later estrangement Hobbits are relatives of ours; far nearer to us than Elves, or even than Dwarves. Of old they spoke the languages of Men, after their own fashion, and liked and disliked much the same things as Men did. But what exactly our relationship is can no longer be discovered. The beginning of Hobbits lies far back in the Elder Days that are now lost and forgotten. Only the Elves still preserve any records of that vanished time, and their traditions are concerned almost entirely with their own history, in which Men appear seldom and Hobbits are not mentioned at all. Yet it is clear that Hobbits had, in fact, lived quietly in Middle-earth for many years before other folk became even aware of them... " [Many other refs. to these fictional groups, throughout novel.]
religious - fictional world -5000 B.C.E. Tolkien, J. R. R. The Hobbit or There and Back Again. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1997; c. 1937, 1966); pg. 237. "So began a battle that none had expected; and it was called the Battle of Five Armies, and it was very terrible. Upon one side were the Goblins and the wild Wolves, and upon the other were Elves and Men and Dwarves... "
religious - fictional world -5000 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. Dragon Wing. New York: Bantam (1990); pg. 28. Kir:
"The courier led the way to a high place that Hugh soon came to recognize, from early and dark childhood memories, as a Kir monastery.

It was ancient and had obviously been long abandoned. The flagstones of the courtyard were cracked and in many cases missing entirely. Coralite had grown over much of the standing outer structures that had been formed of the rare granite the Kir favored over the more common coralite... Having been raised by the grim and dour order of Kir monks, the Hand knew the location of every monastery on the Volkaran Isles. He could not remember hearing of any that had ever been abandoned, and the mystery of where he was and why he had been brought here deepened. " [Other refs., not in DB.]

religious - fictional world -5000 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. Dragon Wing. New York: Bantam (1990); pg. 52. Kir:
"Kir monastery, Volkaran Isles, Mid Realm.

Three people were gathered in a room located in the upper levels of the monastery. The room had been one of the monks' cells and was, consequently, cold, austere, small, and windowless. The three--two men and one woman--stood in the very center of the room... "

religious - fictional world -5000 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. Dragon Wing. New York: Bantam (1990); pg. 162. Kir:
"As bravely as other kids I've seen. Better to die young, after all, as the Kir monks say. Why would a child's life be considered more precious than a man's? Logically, it should be less so, for a man contributes to society and a child is a parasite. It's instinctive, Hugh supposed. Our animallike need to perpetuate our own kind. "
religious - fictional world -5000 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. Dragon Wing. New York: Bantam (1990); pg. 286. Kir:
"It is thought by some that the Order of the Kir Monks may have developed among humans as a corrupt form of the Elven Shadows. The Kir Monks, being a secret and closed organization, refuse to discuss their origins. Legend has it, however, that they were founded by a group of human wizards who were endeavoring to discover the secret of soul-capture. The wizards failed to achieve their goal, but the order they founded remained. Ordinary humans--those not possessing magical talents--were allowed to enter, and over the years, the monks gradually turned from the attempt to cheat death to a worship of it. "
religious - fictional world -5000 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. Dragon Wing. New York: Bantam (1990); pg. 56. Worshipers United for Progress and Prosperity:
"'It is therefore our purpose, as Worshipers United for Progress and Prosperity, to bring to our people a time of good living now, not sometime in a future that may never come1' Limbeck, carried away, banged his fist on the table, sloshing ink out of the inkwell. A small river of blue crept toward the paper... 'For centuries we have been told by our leaders that we were placed in this realm of Storm and Chaos because we were not deemed worthy to take our place with the Welves above. We who are flesh and blood and bone could not hope to live in the land of immortals. When we are worthy, our leaders tell us, then the Welves will come from Above and pass judgment on us and we shall rise up into the heavens. In the meantime, it is our duty to serve the Kicksey-winsey and wait for that great day. I say'--here Limbeck raised a clenched and inky fist above his head--'I say that day will never come...' " [More.]
religious - fictional world -5000 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. Dragons of a Lost Star. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast (2001) One God:
[Inside book jacket] "Crying the praises of the One God, a mystical young woman named Mina has appeared out of a magical storm and overrun the land with her army of dark-armored knights. The elven land of Silvanesti has fallen prey to their might. The young elf king has fallen prey to Mina's amber eyes... It seems that no one can stand against the powerful and relentless entity guiding the devastating events on Krynn. At last one lone dragon seeks ou an old enemy, vowing at any coast to find the answers to the mystery that is the One God. " [Extensive refs. to the One God, throughout novel, not in DB.]
religious - fictional world -5000 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. Dragons of a Lost Star. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast (2001); pg. 6. One God:
"'...Suddenly there appeared among us, as if by magic, one of Mina's Knights. Through the power of the One God, he came to tell us that the shield had indeed fallen, brought down by the elven king himself, Silvanoshei, son of Alhana... As to the army, my lord, they have not attacked us. According to Mina, the king, Silvanoshei, has told them that Mina has come to save the Silvanesti nation in the name of the One God. I must say, my lord, that the elves are in pitiable condition... We thought to slay the wretches, but Mina forbde it. She performed miracles of healing on the dying elves and restored them to life. When we left, the elves were singing her praises and blessing the One God and vowing to worship this god in Mina's name.

...The One God! Ha! Targonne thought to himself, seeing far more in the messenger's mind than he was saying. Sorcery. " [Extensive other refs. to the One God, not in DB.]

religious - fictional world -5000 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. Dragons of a Lost Star. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast (2001); pg. 69. One God:
"Mina halted her horse before the gate. She raised her voice, and it carried as clear and ringing as the notes of a silver bell.

'I am called Mina. I come to Silvanost in the name of the One God. I come to Silvanost to teach my elven brothers and sisters of the One God and to accept them into the service of the One God. I call upon you, the people of Silvanost, to open the gates, that I may enter in peace.'

'Do not trust her,' urged the kirath. 'Do not believe her!'

No one listened, and when one of the kirath, a man named Rolan, lifted his bow and would have fired a shaft at the human girl, those standing around him struck him down so that he fell bloody and dazed to the pavement...

A herald advanced and read aloud a proclamation.

'His Majesty the king orders that the gates of Silvanost be opened to Mina, whom His Majesty named Dragonslayer, Savior of the Silvanesti.' "

religious - fictional world -5000 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. Dragons of a Lost Star. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast (2001); pg. 71. One God:
"'Mina!' the elf woman cried, falling to her knees. 'Bless you, Mina!'

'Not me,' said Mina. 'The One God.'

'The One God,' the mother cried. 'I thank the One God.'

'Lies!' cried the elf man, thrusting his way forward through the crowd. 'Lies and blasphemy. The only true god is Paladine.'

'Paladine forsook you,' Mina said. 'Paladine left you. The One God is with you. The One God cares for you.'

...'To be human, elf, or minotaur makes no difference to the One God. We are all children of the One God, but we must be obedient children. Come to me. Come to the One God.' " [More.]

religious - fictional world -5000 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. Dragons of a Lost Star. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast (2001); pg. 72. One God:
"'The One God hs the power to heal one of you,' said Mina. 'Which will it be? You or your brother.'

'My brother,' the child said immediately.

Mina rested her hand on the boy's head. 'The One God admires sacrifice. The One God is pleased. The One God heals you both.'

Mina rested her hand on the boy's head. 'The One God admires sacrifice. The One God is pleased. The One God heals you both.'

Healthful color flooded the pallid cheeks. The listless eyes blazed with life and vigor. The weak legs no longer trembled, the bent spines straightened. The other boy left his father and ran to join his twin, both flinging their arms around Mina.

'Bless you! Bless, you, Mina!' some of the younger Silvanesti elves began to chant, and they gathered close to Mina, reaching out to seize hold of her, begging her to heal them, their wives, their husbands, their children. "

religious - fictional world -5000 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. Dragons of a Lost Star. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast (2001); pg. 73. One God:
Pg. 71: "'To be human, elf, or minotaur make sno difference to the One God. We are all children of the One God, but we must be obedient children. Come to me. Come to the One God.' ";

Pg. 73: "'Mina,' said Galdar in a harsh growl, 'these are elves!' He made no effort to conceal his disguist. 'What does the One God want with elves?'

'The souls of all mortals are valuable to the One God, Galdar,' Mina responded.

Galdar mulled this over but could not understand. Looking back at her, he saw, in the moonlight, the images of countless elves held prisoner in the warm golden amber of her eyes.

Mina continued through Silvanost as prayers to the One God, spoken in the Elvish language, rustled and whispered through the night. "

religious - fictional world -5000 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. Dragons of a Lost Star. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast (2001); pg. 158. One God:
"Silvanoshei did not even know how to pray to a god. His parents had never spoken of the old religion. The subject was a painful one for them. They were hurt, but they were also angry. The gods, with their departure, had betrayed those who had put their faith in them.

But how did he know for certain that the One God cared forhim? How did he know what he was truly one of the Chosen?

He determined to test the One God, a test to reassure himself, as a child assures himself by small tests that his parents really do love him.

Silvanoshei prayed, humbly, 'If there is something you want me to do, I cannot do it if I am prisoner. Set me free, and I will obey your will.'

'Sir!' shouted one of the soldiers who had been guarding the rear. 'Behind--' Whatever he had been about to say ended in a shriek. The tip of a sword protruded from his gut... He fell forward and was trampled under a rush of elven warriors... "

religious - fictional world -5000 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. Dragons of a Lost Star. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast (2001); pg. 17. Solamnics:
"Finding nothing, he rose to his feet as Lady Camilla, leader of the Solamnic Knights on Sancrist, strode into the room. She was a veteran with a veteran's calmness, thinking clearly and matter-of-factly. Her business was not to fight dragons. She could rely on her soldiers at the fortress to undertake that charge. Her business in the citadel was to safely evacuate as many people as possible. Like most Solamnics, Lady Camilla was highly suspicious of magic-users, and she regarded Palin with a grim look, as if she did not put it past him to be in league with the dragons. " [Many other refs. throughout novel.]
religious - fictional world -1000 B.C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer; Julian May & Andre Norton. Black Trillium. New York: Doubleday (1990); pg. 13. White Lady:
Pg. 11: "'By the White Lady, this time there can be no doubt! The sorcerer Orogastus has indeed called down lightning from a clear sky, and this stroke has breached the wall of the inner ward!' "; Pg. 12: "'My heart is filled with sorrow and fear for all of us, but I know my duty. Kadiya, put not your faith in Oddling prophecies. Our Nyssomu servants have fled the Citadel for the safety of the Mazy Mire, leaving us to face the foe...'

'Then I will be your defender,' cried Princess Kadiya, 'and that of my sisters. For if the Oddling prophecy is known to King Voltrik, then he dare not leave one of us royal women alive!...'

'Oh, Kadi, you can't!' sobbed the Princess Anigel. ' "We must hide and pray for the White Lady to rescue us!'

'The White Lady is a myth!' Kadiya said. 'We can only save ourselves.'

'She is no myth,' Anigel murmured... " [Other refs. not in DB.]

religious - fictional world -1000 B.C.E. Norton, Andre & Mercedes Lackey. Elvenblood. New York: Tor (1996; c. 1995); pg. 212. "The Priests that had 'welcomed' the two of them wanted to take them directly to their Chief Priest--and Lorryn agreed, even though he sensed there was something that they were not telling him about that request. " [Extensive refs. throughout the novel to the Priests, including at least one major character who is a Priest of this fictional religion.]
religious - fictional world -998 B.C.E. Goodkind, Terry. Blood of the Fold. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 45. "Without words, Sisters began drifting away, some in solitude, others placing a comforting arm around the shoulder of a boy or a novice. Like lost souls, they meandered down the hill toward the city, and the Palace of the Prophets, going to a home without a mother. As sister Verna kissed her ring finger, she guessed that with the prophet also dead, they were in a way without a father as well... Though all Sisters served the Creator, and she knew that what the prelate had done must have been for the greater good... " [Many refs. throughout novel, not in DB.]
religious - fictional world -800 B.C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. Lady of the Trillium. New York: Bantam (1995); pg. 141. "Then two people in long black robes with golden masks covering their faces entered and took their places on the dais. One of them said something brief that Mikayla didn't catch, and the people in the room all sat down and grew quickly silent.

Then they started chanting, and everyone else joined in. After a few minutes Mikayla found herself singing along with everyone else--even though she had never heard either the words or the tune before in her life. This was not even a style of worship she had encountered before. It was as if the chant was in the room, and if you were in the room... you were part of the chant. Or maybe it was part of you.

'Meret, Thou Lady of the Southern Peak, have mercy upon us.' " [Many other refs., not in DB.]

religious - fictional world -800 B.C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. Lady of the Trillium. New York: Bantam (1995); pg. 153. Pg. 150: "'You will be housed with the Daughters of the Goddess,' she explained. 'We do not use personal names here. I assume that you do know that true names have power...' ";

Pg. 152: "But the only shoes in the chest were sandals. Mikayla put them on, remembering that both the Husband of the Goddess and the Eldest Daughter had worn sandals. Perhaps everyone here did, especially if they didn't have to leave the Temple... "

Pg. 153: "'Lady of Eternity, Queen of Gods . . .'

'Lady of Eternity, Queen of Gods . . .'

'Many-Named, Holy of Form . . .'

'Many-Named, Holy of Form . . . "

'Lady of Secret Rites in Thy Temple . . .'

'Lady of Secret Rites in Thy Temple . . .' "

[Many other refs. not in DB. Much of the second half of the novel takes place in the Temple and details temple worship.]

religious - fictional world -800 B.C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. Lady of the Trillium. New York: Bantam (1995); pg. 141. "Then two people in long black robes with golden masks covering their faces entered and took their places on the dais. One of them said something brief that Mikayla didn't catch, and the people in the room all sat down and grew quickly silent.

Then they started chanting, and everyone else joined in. After a few minutes Mikayla found herself singing along with everyone else--even though she had never heard either the words or the tune before in her life. This was not even a style of worship she had encountered before. It was as if the chant was in the room, and if you were in the room... you were part of the chant. Or maybe it was part of you.

'Meret, Thou Lady of the Southern Peak, have mercy upon us.' " [Many other refs., not in DB.]

religious - fictional world -800 B.C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. Lady of the Trillium. New York: Bantam (1995); pg. 153. Pg. 150: "'You will be housed with the Daughters of the Goddess,' she explained. 'We do not use personal names here. I assume that you do know that true names have power...' ";

Pg. 152: "But the only shoes in the chest were sandals. Mikayla put them on, remembering that both the Husband of the Goddess and the Eldest Daughter had worn sandals. Perhaps everyone here did, especially if they didn't have to leave the Temple... "

Pg. 153: "'Lady of Eternity, Queen of Gods . . .'

'Lady of Eternity, Queen of Gods . . .'

'Many-Named, Holy of Form . . .'

'Many-Named, Holy of Form . . . "

'Lady of Secret Rites in Thy Temple . . .'

'Lady of Secret Rites in Thy Temple . . .' "

[Many other refs. not in DB. Much of the second half of the novel takes place in the Temple and details temple worship.]

religious - fictional world -500 B.C.E. Hambly, Barbara. Dragonshadow. New York: Ballantine (1999); pg. 133. "Behind her, through the open shutters, Jenny watched the red-hooded priests of Grond Firebeard, the Lord of War, process slowly into the camp temple, three and three, with a crowd of men-at-arms in their train. Their candles showed pale in the gloom beneath the colonndade.. 'All the more reason for us to teach mages to use their powers and use them responsibly, for the betterment of the Realm. Thank the Twelve . . . Yes, what is it?'

The red-robed priest in the doorway discreetly held out to her a beeswax taper, part of the ceremonial crossing the court: Jenny recalled that the Firebeard's altars needed to be kindled by the commander of the company that guarded the temple. Father Hiero had long ago given up trying to get John to perform the chore. Evidently Rockly's Legalism was as entrenched as John's belief in the Old God... " [Other refs., not in DB.]

religious - fictional world -106 B.C.E. Leiber, Fritz. "The Cloud of Hate " in Swords in the Mist in The Three of Swords. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1973; c. 1963); pg. 354. Temple of Hate:
"At the Temple of Hate, five thousand worshipers began to rise up weakly and groaningly, each lighter of weight by some few ounces than when he had first bowed down. The drummers slumped over their drums, the lantern-crankers over their extinguished red candles, and the lank Archpriest wearily and grimly lowered his head and rested the wooden mask in his clawlike hands. " [Many other refs. throughout story, not in DB.]
religious - fictional world 500 C.E. Shea, Michael. Nifft the Lean. New York: DAW Books (1982); pg. 109. Kairns:
"Certainly they too in their day had sacred herds, and their doctrine holds the descendants of these beasts to be sacred still, and still their own religious property. Hence Prior Kairnlaw cult activities are felt by Latter Kairns as an intolerably flagrant profanation of their lactescent icons, a heinous sacrilege daily renewed. " [Much more about this, not in DB.]
religious - fictional world 1000 C.E. Eddings, David & Leigh Eddings. Belgarath the Sorcerer. New York: Ballantine (1995); pg. 237. Nyissan:
[Other-worldly fantasy. Actual year indeterminate and immaterial.] "Normal humans make some effort to keep the snake population under control, but the snake is a part of the Nyissan religion, so they don't. Their jungles are literally alive with slithering reptiles--all venomous. I managed to get bitten three times during my first day in that stinking swamp... The war with the Marags had seriously altered Nyissan society... " [Many other refs. to this and other fictional religious cultures, not in DB.]
religious - fictional world 1000 C.E. Eddings, David. Domes of Fire. New York: Ballantine (1993); pg. 4. Elene Church:
[Otherwordly fantasy. Actual year/place indeterminate or immaterial.] "Sir Sparhawk, they discovered, was a member of one of the quasi-religious orders of the Elene Church. His particular order is referred to as the 'Pandion Knights.'... The Knights of the Elene Church are fearsome warriors, and Sir Sparhawk is the forefront of their ranks of champions. At the time in the history of the Eosian continent when the four orders of the Church Knights were founded, the circumstances were so desperate that the Elenes set aside their customary prejudices and permitted the Militant Orders to receive instruction in the arcane practices of Styricum, and it was the proficiency of the Church Knights in those arts that helped them to prevail during the First Zemoch War some five centuries ago. " [Many refs. throughout novel, not in DB.]
religious - fictional world 1000 C.E. Eddings, David. Domes of Fire. New York: Ballantine (1993); pg. 196. "'There are Trolls, and they do have Gods--five of them--and these Gods aren't very nice. That shadow Patriarch Emban just so casually dismissed was them--or something very much like them--and that's what we're up against. That's what's trying to bring down the empire and the Church--both our Churches, probably. I'm sorry I have to put it to you so abruptly, Archimandrite Monsel, but you have to know what you're dealing with. Otherwise, you'll be totally defenseless. You don't have to believe what I just told you, but you'd better behave as if you did, because if you don't, your Church doesn't have a chance of surviving.' "
religious - fictional world 1000 C.E. Eddings, David. The Diamond Throne. New York: Ballantine (1989); pg. 53. "The Church vigorously denounced such atrocities. The Church Knights, who had come to know and respect their alien tutors, went perhaps a step further than the Church, letting it be generally known that unprovoked attacks on Styric settlements would result in swift and savage retaliation. Despite such organized protection, however, any Styric who entered an Elene village or town could expect taunts and abuse... " [Many other refs. throughout novel, not in DB.]
religious - fictional world 1000 C.E. Eddings, David. The Diamond Throne. New York: Ballantine (1989); pg. 397. Pg. 197: "'...Eshand had died, and his successors were not nearly as zealous as he'd been. The Hierocracy of the Church in Chyrellos kept trying to prod the nobility into pressing the war, but the nobles were far more interested in politics than in theology.' ";

Pg. 397: "'His majesty believes that the time has come for a purification of the Elene Church and he further believes that you are the one who has been chosen by God to purge the Church of her sins.'

'Did you hear my sermon tonight?' the old man asked eagerly. 'I preached to that self-same topic.' "

religious - fictional world 1000 C.E. Feist, Raymond E. Rise of a Merchant Prince. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1995); pg. 177. Pg. 177: "On the other side of the bed stood a priest of Kilian, Goddess of Farmers, Foresters, and Sailors. As a deity of nature, her priests were reputed to be healers, though often as not the patient died. ";

Pg. 178: "'The priest looked at him and his expression became one of suspicion. 'What are you doing?' he asked.

'This is a healing I was taught,' answered Roo.

'Who taught you?' asked the priest.

...'A monk of Dala taught me this.'

The priest nodded. 'I thought I recognized the reiki.' Shrugging it off, he said. 'It can't harm him. It will either help his healing or aid him in leaving this life.

Turning to Karli, the priest directed, 'If he regains consciousness, have him drink the herbs in a warm cup of water...' " [Other refs., not in DB.]

religious - fictional world 1000 C.E. Martin, George R. R. A Game of Thrones. New York: Bantam (1997; c. 1996); pg. 22. "Faith, the":
"This was a place of deep silence and brooding shadows, and the gods who lived here had no names.

But she knew she would find her husband here tonight. Whenever he took a man's life, afterward he would seek the quiet of the godswood.

Catelyn had been anointed with the seven oils and named in the rainbow of light that filled the sept of Riverrun. She was of the Faith, like her father and grandfather and his father before him. Her gods had names, and their faces were as familiar as the faces of her parents. Worship was a septom with a censer, the smell of incense, a seven-sided crystal alive with light, voices raised in song. The Tullys kept a godswood, as all the great houses did, but it was only a place to walk or read or lie in the sun. Worship was for the sept. " [Other refs., not in DB.]

religious - fictional world 1000 C.E. Williams, Tad. To Green Angel Tower: Part 1. New York: DAW Books (1993); pg. 112. Aedonite:
"It was easy to pretend there was nothing beyond this place, that this was how it must have felt when God stood atop Mount Den Haloi and made the world, as told in the Book of Aedon.

Jiriki had told Simon about the coming of the Gardenborn to Osten Ard. In those days, the Sitha had said, most of the world had been covered in ocean, just as the west still was. Jiriki's folk had sailed out of the rising sun, across unimaginable distances, to land on the verdant coastline of a world innocent of humanity, a vast island in a great surrounding sea. Some later cataclysm, Jiriki had implied, had then changed the face of the world: the land had risen and the seas had drained away to east and south, leaving new mountains and meadows behind them. Thus, the Gardenborn could never return to their lost home. " [Some other refs., not in DB, e.g., pg. 424, 436, 462-464.]

religious - fictional world 1000 C.E. Williams, Tad. To Green Angel Tower: Part 1. New York: DAW Books (1993); pg. 285. Aedonite:
Pg. 285: "'...and most of all, too many wagging tongues. I swear, they call Aedon's monument Mother Church, but at the Sancellan she is the most babble-breathed old gossip in the history of the world.' "; Pg. 292: "When I was older, I came to doubt them, and believed instead in the single god of the Aedonites--single, though He is dreadfully mixed up with Usires His son and Elysia the blessed mother. Later, in the first blossoming of my scholarship... "; Pg. 299: "The monk plainly did not want to start... I remember staring, my head ringing like a church bell... "; Pg. 320: "'Certainly he should. Aedon's Blood, yes!--otherwise he'd be no better than...' ";

Pg. 332: "'I fear I am not meant to be a war-priest.'

'Nor should you be,' Josua said harshly. 'Nor should any priest, if God were doing all that he ought to.'

'Prince Josua!' Startled, Father Strangyeard sucked in air and coughed. 'Beware of blasphemy!' "; Pg. 381: "Was that too prideful for a good Aedonite? "

religious - fictional world 1000 C.E. Williams, Tad. To Green Angel Tower: Part 1. New York: DAW Books (1993); pg. 385. Aedonite:
"'But here, Deornoth, do not put on such a serious face. If God means me to overthrow my brother, not all the knights and bowmen of Aedon's earth can slay me. If He does not--well, there is no place to hide from one's fate.' "
religious - fictional world 1000 C.E. Williams, Tad. To Green Angel Tower: Part 2. New York: DAW Books (1993); pg. 41. Aedonite:
Pg. 41: "His head was hammering like a Perdruinese church bell. "; Pg. 84: "Seated across from her was a tall, narrow-featured Sitha-woman, thin as a priest's staff, with pale sky-blue hair drawn up atop her head in a birdlike crest. "; Pg. 127: "...in the mural of The Day of Weighing-Out which stretched across the wall of the Hayholt's chapel. He had spent many a boring hour in church staring in fascination at the scenes of torment, marveling at the invention of the anonymous priest. " [Other refs., not in DB, e.g. pg. 269, 636.]
religious - fictional world 1000 C.E. Williams, Tad. To Green Angel Tower: Part 2. New York: DAW Books (1993); pg. 357. Aedonite:
Pg. 357: "'Who are you? What did you seek in God's house?'

Miriamele was so surprised to hear another human voice that for a moment she did not reply. Binabik took a step forward, but she put her hand on his shoulder. 'We are travelers,' she said. 'We wanted to see Saint Sutrin's. The doors were never closed in the past.'

'Are you Aedonites?'

Miriamele thought there was something familiar about the voice. 'I am. My companion is from a foreign land, but he has been of service to Mother Church.' ";

Pg. 579: "On the ground beside it, as wonderful as any miracle from the Book of Aedon, was what felt like a lump of stale bread. " [Many other refs., not in DB, e.g., pg. 358-359, 486-487, etc.]

religious - fictional world 1000 C.E. Yolen, Jane. White Jenna. New York: Tor (1990; c. 1989); pg. . Altite:
"For years, the birth of a girl child in the Dales had been no cause of great rejoicing. After the first of the Garunian Wars, when the patriarchal tribes from the mainland had sailed across to slaughter the men and conquer the island country, there had been a surplus of women in the Dales. Forced into polygamous marriages or forced to expose excess girl babies on the hillsides, a woman's lot was not enviable. However, early on, a few of them had begun to reap the hillsides of the grim harvest, saving the infants an raising them in small, walled communities called Hames.

The centuries passed and the Hames were left alone. Eventually there were seventeen such separated communities filled with women, worshippers of Great Alta, the Goddess who had once been the ruling deity of all the Dales before being supplanted by the Garunian pantheon of gods. As the population regained its balance, the Hames became sanctuaries for dissident women. " [Extensive refs. throughout novel, not in DB.]

religious - fictional world 1000 C.E. Yolen, Jane. White Jenna. New York: Tor (1990; c. 1989); pg. 2. Altite:
"What went on behind the Hame walls was a mystery to the commonfolk of the Dales as well as to their Garunian overlords. Though the commonfolk still spoke of Alta, worshipping her as the consort of Lord Cres, who was the dark warrior god of the Garunians, and as the goddess of childbirth and the homey virtues, the only pure Alta worship belonged to the Hames. Yet as much as the commonfolk of the Dales mentioned Alta in their prayers, they could not even come close to guessing the secret She had gifted the Altite women. Trained from childhood in special breathing exercises, memorizing the words of their goddess as set down in the Book of Light, the Altites had learned how to call up their dark sisters, their shadow souls, when they reached puberty. Ever after, these dark sisters would appear with the moon or in candlelight or firelight, walking and talking, fighting and making love, side by side with their light counterparts. "
religious - fictional world 1000 C.E. Yolen, Jane. White Jenna. New York: Tor (1990; c. 1989); pg. 3. Altite:
"That child, Jo-an-enna, called Jenna, was mothered by the entire Selden Hame, for the priestess, Mother Alta, suspected the child was the prophecy's fulfillment, and wished to have a hand in any glory.

Young Jenna grew up beloved in her community by all except the suspicious and jealous Mother Alta. Instead of choosing to be a priestess, Jenna chose the warrior/hunter path, going through training with her special best friend Marga, called Pynt. Little, lithe, dark-haired Pynt was called Jenna's shadow, and indeed the two were inseparable.

At thirteen, Jenna did not understand the priestess' enmity nor why she was sent to a different Hame for the beginning of her mission year... "

religious - fictional world 1001 C.E. Eddings, David. The Shining Ones. New York: Ballantine (1993); pg. 4. "Sir Sparhawk had come to Zalasta's attention during the Second Zemoch War between the Knights of the Church of Chyrellos and the minions of Ortha of Zemoch. Not even Zalasta, whose wisdom is legendary, can tell us precisely what took place in the city of Zemoch during Sir Sparhawk's fateful confrontation with Ortha and with the Zemoch God, Azash... who quite correctly pointed out that an alliance between the empire and the Church of Chyrellos might well be fraught with danger... Foreign Minister Oscagne himself headed the mission to the seat of the Elene Church of Chyrellos to petition Archprelate Dolmant for Sir Sparhawk's aid in dealing with the crisis... " [Other refs. throughout novel, not in DB.]


religious - fictional, continued

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