Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to religious - fictional, USA

religious - fictional, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
religious - fictional USA 2025 Stapledon, Olaf. Last and First Men. Los Angeles: Jeremy P. Tarcher, Inc. (1988; first published 1930); pg. 38. Behaviorism:
[Year is estimated.] "The most dramatic feature of American thought in this period was the merging of Behaviorism and Fundamentalism, a belated and degenerate mode of Christianity. Behaviorism itself, indeed, had been originally a kind of inverted puritan faith, according to which intellectual salvation involved acceptance of a crude materialistic dogma, chiefly because it was repugnant to the self-righteous, and unintelligible to intellectuals of the earlier schools. The older Puritans trampled down all fleshly impulses; these newer Puritans trampled no less self-righteously upon the spiritual cravings. But in the increasingly spiritistic inclination of physics itself, Behaviorism and Fundamentalism had found a meeting place... "
religious - fictional USA 2025 Stephenson, Neal. Snow Crash. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 180. Reverend Wayne's Pearly Gates:
"The Reverend Wayne's Pearly Gates #1106 is a pretty big one. Its low serial number implies great age. It was built long ago, when land was cheap and lots were big. The parking log is half full. Usually, all you see at a Reverend Wayne's are old beaters with wacky Spanish expressions nail-polished on the rear bumpers--the rides of CentroAmerican evangelicals who ahve come up north to get deceen jobs and escape the relentlessly Catholic style of their homelands. This lot laso has a lot of just plain old regular bimbo boxes and with license plates from all the Burbclaves. "
religious - fictional USA 2025 Stephenson, Neal. Snow Crash. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 181. Reverend Wayne's Pearly Gates:
"The front room of the Reverend Wayne's Pearly Gates is, of course, like all the others. A row of padded vinyl chairs where worshippers can wait for their number to be called, with a potted plant at each end and a table strewn with primeval magazines. A toy corner where kids can kill time, reenacting imaginary, cosmic battles in injection-molded plastic. A counter done up in fake wood so it looks like something from an old church. Behind the counter, a pudgy high school babe, dishwater blond hair that has been worked over pretty good with a curling iron, blue metal-flake eyeshadow... a flimsy sort of choir robe thrown oer her T-shirt.

...There's a little rack along the front of the counter bearing religious tracts, free for the taking, donation requested. Several slots on the rack are occupied by the Reverend Wayne's famous bestseller, How America Was Saved from Communism: ELVIS SHOT JFK. " [Other refs. not in DB.]

religious - fictional USA 2025 Stephenson, Neal. Snow Crash. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 187. Reverend Wayne's Pearly Gates:
"'It's chemically processed blood serum taken from people who are infected with the metavirus,' Juanita says. 'That is, it's just another way of spreading the infection.'

'Who's spreading it?'

'L. Bob Rife's private church. All of those people are infected.'

...'Wait a minute, Juanita. Make up your mind. This Snow Crash thing--is it a virus, a drug, or a religion?'

Juanita shrugs. 'What's the difference?'

That Juanita is talking this way does not make it any easier for HIro to get back on his feet in this conversation. 'How can you say that? You're a religious person yourself.'

'Don't lump all religion together.'

'Sorry.' "

religious - fictional USA 2025 Stephenson, Neal. Snow Crash. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 182-183. Reverend Wayne's Pearly Gates:
"The customer stomps toward the double doors, drawn in by hypnotic organ strains. The interior of the chapel is weirdly colored, illuminated partly by fluorescent fixtures wedged into the ceiling and partly by large colored light boxes that simulate stained-glass windows. The largest of these, shaped like a fattened Gothic arch, is bolted to the back wall, above the altar, and features a blazing trinity: Jesus, Elvis, and the Reverend Wayne. Jesus gets top billing. The worshipper is not half a dozen steps into the place before she thuds down on her knees in the middle of the aisle and begins to speak in tongues: 'ar ia ari ar isa ve na a mir ia i sa, ve na a mir ia a sar ia . . .'
religious - fictional USA 2030 Disch, Thomas M. On Wings of Song. New York: St. Martin's Press (1978); pg. 55. Marble Collegiate Church:
"It was clear right from page one that Van Dyke [the author] was no undegoder [Evangelical], though just what he was Daniel couldn't quite tell. An atheist it almost seemed, from someof the things he said. Like this, from the 'Prefatory Postscript,' before he even got warmed up: 'Often it has been objected, by this book's admirers and its detractors alike, that I speak of Almighty God as though He were no more than some exceptionally clever Idea I'd got hold of, like a new theorem in geometry, or a scenario for an original ballet. In large part I must allow that this is so, but it does'nt bother me, and I'm sure it doesn't bother God. However He concerns Himself with human fate, He is surely indifferent to human controversy.' "
religious - fictional USA 2030 Disch, Thomas M. On Wings of Song. New York: St. Martin's Press (1978); pg. 55. Marble Collegiate Church:
"Or this, from the same Postscript: 'The Most High is perfectly willing to be understood as an illusion since our doubts only make our trust in Him that much more savory on His tongue. He is, we must remember, the King of Kings, and shares the general kinky taste of kings for displays of their subjects' abasement. Doubt Him, by all means, say I, when I speak to doubters, but don't on that account neglect to worship Him.'

This was religion? It seemed almost the opposite, a burlesque, but Mrs. Boismortier (a good Episcopalian) had sent the book to him, and someone in the hierarchy of the prison, possibly even Warden Shiel, has passed it on, and millions of people, according to the cover, were able to take Reverend Van Dyke seriously. "

religious - fictional USA 2030 Disch, Thomas M. On Wings of Song. New York: St. Martin's Press (1978); pg. 56. Marble Collegiate Church:
"No one is actually expected to believe the ads, but the chain is an enormous success anyhow. There were graphs and sales figures to illustrate its growth across the whole country and around the world. Of course the actual product the Super-King were selling wasn't hamburgers and such, it was an idea--the idea of Jesus, the Super-King. All products, Van Dyke insisted, were only ideas, and the most mind-boggling idea was the idea of Jesus who was both God and an ordinary man and therefore a complete impossibility. Therefore, since He represented the best possible bargain, everybody should buy that product, which was basically what had happened over the last two thousand years--the rise of Christianity being the same as the success of the Super-King chain. "
religious - fictional USA 2030 Disch, Thomas M. On Wings of Song. New York: St. Martin's Press (1978); pg. 57. Marble Collegiate Church:
"Chapter Three was titled 'Wash Your Own Brain' and was about techniques you could use in order to start beleving [sic] in God. Most of the techniques were based on methods of acting. Van Dyke explained that long ago religious-type people had been against plays and actors because by watching them people learned to think of all their feelings and ideas as arbitrary and interchangeable. An actor's identity was nothing more than a hat he put on or took off at will, and what was true for actors was true for us all. The world was a stage.

'What our Puritan forbears failed to recognize,' Van Dyke wrote, 'is the evangelical application of these insights. For if the way we become the kind of people we are is by pretending, then the way to becom egood, devout, and faithful Christians (which, admit it, is a well-night impossible undertaking) is to pretend to be good, devout, and faithful. "

religious - fictional USA 2030 Disch, Thomas M. On Wings of Song. New York: St. Martin's Press (1978); pg. 57. Marble Collegiate Church:
"You must seem to love your neighbor no matter how much you hate his guts. You must seem to accept sufferings, even if you're drafting your suicide note. You must say that you know your Redeemer liveth, even though you know no such thing. Eventually, saying makes it so.' "
religious - fictional USA 2030 Disch, Thomas M. On Wings of Song. New York: St. Martin's Press (1978); pg. 58. Marble Collegiate Church:
"Before Daniel got to Chapter Four--'A Salute to Hypocrisy'--the book was missing from his mattress. For a moment, finding it gone, he felt beserk with loss. Wave after wave of desolation swept through him and kept him from sleep Why should it mean so much? Why should it mean anything? It was a ridiculous book that he'd never have bothered with if there had been anything else on hand.

But the feeling couldn't be argued away. He wanted it back. He ached to be reading it again, to be outraged by its dumb ideas. It was as though part of his brain had been stolen.

Over and above this simple hurt and hunger was the frustration of having no one to complain to. The theft of a book was a trifling injustice in a world where justice did not obtain and no one expected it to. " [Other refs. throughout book to Van Dyke's book. See also pg. 68, 80, 83-85, 145, 229, 315, 319-321, 346]

religious - fictional USA 2030 Disch, Thomas M. On Wings of Song. New York: St. Martin's Press (1978); pg. 145. Marble Collegiate Church:
"Not that he minded being or feeling hypocritical. Hadn't he read, in Reverend Van Dyke's book, that we're all hypocrites and liars in the eyes of God. To deny that was only to be self-deluded as well. "
religious - fictional USA 2030 Disch, Thomas M. On Wings of Song. New York: St. Martin's Press (1978); pg. 55-56. Marble Collegiate Church:
"Seriousness aside, Daniel was enthralled by the book. After a long dusty day of detasseling corn he would return to its paradoxes and mental loop-the-loops with a feeling of immersing himself in seltzer water. Just a few paragraphs, and his mind was all tingly and able to think again, at which point he would return the book to it shome in his mattress of huskings and straw.

Chapter One was an explanation, more or less, of the book's garish cover, and of its title too. It was about a bunch of people who start a chain of fast-food restaurants, called Super-King. The chain is run not for profit but to give everybody something really good--Super-King Hamburgers and Super-King Cola, which, according to the chain's big ad campaign, are supposed to make you live forever and always be happy, if you eat enough of them. "

religious - fictional USA 2030 Disch, Thomas M. On Wings of Song. New York: St. Martin's Press (1978); pg. 56-57. Marble Collegiate Church:
"Chapter Two was about the difficulty of believing in things--not just in religion, but in advertising, in sex, in your own daily life. Van Dyke argued that even when we know that companies aren't telling the complete truth about their products, we should buy them anyhow (as long as they aren't actually harmful) because the country and the economy would collapse if we didn't. 'By the same token,' Van Dyke wrote, 'lies about God, such as we find in Holy Scripture, help us keep our psychic economy running. If we can believe, for instance, that the world was all knocked together in six days rather than in however many billions of years, we've come a long way toward self-mastery.' The rest of the chapter was a kind of advertisement for God and all the things He would do for you if you 'bought' him, such as keeping you from ever being depressed or bitter or coming down with colds. "
religious - fictional USA 2030 Disch, Thomas M. On Wings of Song. New York: St. Martin's Press (1978); pg. 57-58. Marble Collegiate Church:
"He went on to relate the story of one of his parishioners, the actor Jackson Florentine (the same Jackson Florentine who'd co-stared in Gold-Diggers of 1984!), who had been unable to believe in Jesus with a fervent and heartfelt belief until Reverend Van dyke had made him pretend to believe in the Easter bunny, a major idol in Florentine's childhood pantheon. The doubting actor prayed before holographic picture of the Easter Bunny, wrote long confessional letters to him, and meditated on the various mysteries of his existence or nonexistence, as the case might be, until at last, on Easter morning he found n less than 144 brightly dyed Easter eggs hidden all over the grounds of his East Hampton estate. Having revived this 'splinter of the Godhead,' as Van Dyke termed it, it was a simple matter to take the next step and be washed in the blood of the Lamb and dried with its soft white fleece. "
religious - fictional USA 2032 Butler, Octavia. Parable of the Talents. New York: Seven Stories Press (1998); pg. 24. Christian America:
"I'm sorry to say, Jarret was once a Baptist minister like my father. But he left the Baptists behind years ago to begin his own 'Christian America' denomination. He no longer preaches regular CA sermons at CA churches or on the nets, but he's still recognized as head of the church. "
religious - fictional USA 2032 Butler, Octavia. Parable of the Talents. New York: Seven Stories Press (1998); pg. 84. Christian America:
"Here are some of the things Jarrett said back when he was shouting rom his own Church of Christian America pulpit...

'There was a time, Christian Americans, when our country ruled the world,' he said. 'America was God's country and we were God's people and God took care of his own. Now look at us. Who are we? What are we? What foul, seething, corrupt heathen concoction have we become?

'Are we Christian? Are we? Can our country be just a little bit Christain and a little bit Buddhist, maybe?... Or perhaps we can be a little bit Christian and a little bit pagan cultist?'

And then he thundered, 'We are God's people, or we are filth!... These pagans are not only wrong. They're dangerous. They're as destructive as bullets, as contagious as plagues, as poisonous as snakes to the society they infest...' "

religious - fictional USA 2033 Butler, Octavia. Parable of the Talents. New York: Seven Stories Press (1998); pg. 136. Christian America:
"Then, he spoke of peace, rebuilding and healing. 'A strong Christian America,' he said, 'needs strong Christian American soldiers to reunite, rebuild, and defend it.' In almost the same breath, he spoke of both 'the generosity and the love that we must show to one another, to all of our fellow Christian Americans,' and 'the destruction we must visit upon traitors and sinners, those destroyers in our midst.' "
religious - fictional USA 2035 Butler, Octavia. Parable of the Talents. New York: Seven Stories Press (1998); pg. 250. Christian America:
"There was a mindless rigidity about some Christian Americans--about the ones who did the most harm. They were so certain that they were right that, like medieval inquisitors, they would kill you, even torture you to death, to save your soul... Christian America had created whole new categories of sin and expanded old ones. We were not permitted pictures of any kind. Movies and television were forbidden, but somehow Dreamasks were not--although only religious topics were permitted... The purpose of Christian America was to make America the great, Christian country that it was supposed to be... Yet sometimes now when I think about Christian America and all that it did when it held power over so many lives, I don't think about order and stability or greatness or even places like Camp Christian or Pelican Bay. I think about the extremes, the many small, sad, silly extremes that made up so much of Christian American life. "
religious - fictional USA 2040 Bova, Ben. Moonrise. New York: Avon Books (1996); pg. 228. Christian Brethren:
"Eldridge hunched forward a little in his chair. 'As you know, Congressman, I represent a coalition of religious organizations--'

'The Christian Brethren, I know.'

'Not merely the Brethren,' said Eldridge. 'Not anymore. We have several Orthodox Jewish groups with us now. And the Muslims as well.'

Underwood suppressed a gasp of surprise. Instead, he let himself chuckle. 'Well, if you can keep those people together you're a better politician than I am.'

'The Lord moves in mysterious ways, Congressman.' " [he 'Christian Brethren' mentioned here is apparently not a denomination, but a fictional coalition group imagined by the author. This group opposes nanotech.]

religious - fictional USA 2045 Butler, Octavia. Parable of the Talents. New York: Seven Stories Press (1998); pg. 313. Christian America:
"...Reverend Marcos Duran... the best-known minister of the Church of Christian America... By then, though, the Church was just one more Protestant denomination. Andrew Steele Jarret had been dead for years, and the Church had gone from being an institution that everyone knew about and either loved or feared to being a smaller, somewhat defensive organization with much to answer for and few answers. "
religious - fictional USA 2045 Butler, Octavia. Parable of the Talents. New York: Seven Stories Press (1998); pg. 354. Christian America:
"The [Earthseed] community... had been destroyed by Jarret's Crusaders back in the 30s. Its men and women had been enslaved for over a year... The Church of Christian America had denied this and sued Olamina and Earthseed back in the 2040s when Olamina's charge first came to their attention. The church was still poweful, even though Jarret was dead by then... A coalition of angry business people, protestors against the Al-Can War, and champions of the First Amendment worked hard to defeat him for re-election in 2036. They won by exposing some of the earliest Christian America witch-burnings. It seems that beteen 2015 and 2019, Jarret himself took part in singling people out and burning them alive... Jarret and his friends had also burned accused prostitutes, drug dealers, and junkies. "
religious - fictional USA 2045 Butler, Octavia. Parable of the Talents. New York: Seven Stories Press (1998); pg. 351. Earthseed:
"I've been flying... I've walked over most of the West Coast, and now I've flown over the interior of the country and over much of the East Coast. I've flown to Newark, Delaware; Clarion, Pennsylvania; and up to Syracuse, New York. Next, I go to Toledo, Ohio; Ann Arbor, Michigan; Madison, Wisconsin; and Iowa City, Iowa... So now Len an I are lecturing and conducting Earthseed Workshops. We're being paid in hard currency, fed well, and allowed to live in good, safe hotels. And we're being welcomed, listened to, even taken seriously by people who are hungry for something to believe in, some difficult but worthwhile goal to involve themselves in and work toward. "
religious - fictional USA 2047 Bear, Greg. Queen of Angels. New York: Warner Books (1994; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 68. therapied:
"'Synthesis and pattern imposition. The programmer's patterns will fade and the new personality will take on its own character. they're close to getting what they want but my work is finished for now. I can take a furlough. I'm telling them I have a therapy group in Taos to work with. High level expansion therapy. Better living through better minds.' "
religious - fictional USA 2050 Bova, Ben. Moonwar. New York: Avon Books (1998); pg. 131. New Morality:
Pg. 131: "Yet he made a mental note to work more closely with the New Morality zealots in Washington who wanted to put more limits on the news media. "; Pg. 149: "The Urban Corps was one of the many disparate organizations loosely held together under the banner of the New Morality. They had elected presidents, won control of the House of Representatives, and had enough senators on their side to block legislation that they didn't like. The anti-nanotechnology treaty had originated in the New Morality. Nanoluddite fanatics had gunned down pro-nanotech advocates, even women suspected of having nanotherapy instead of plastic surgery, and then proclaimed at their trials with the fervor of true belief that they were doing God's work. " [More, pg. 149-150, etc.]
religious - fictional USA 2050 Haldeman, Joe. Forever Peace. New York: Ace Books (1998; first ed. 1997); pg. 234. Enders:
"It made Julian wonder about the men, maybe Enders, who had raped Arly and left he for dead. And the Ender with the knife, outside the convenience store. Were they just crazy, or part of an organized effort? Or were they both? " [Many other refs. to this fictional religious group are in book, not all in DB.]
religious - fictional USA 2050 Haldeman, Joe. Forever Peace. New York: Ace Books (1998; first ed. 1997); pg. 32-33. Enders:
"Not all Enders had ponytails and obvious attitudes. There were two in Julian's physics department, a secretary and Mac Roman himself.

People wondered how a mediocre scientist had come out of nowhere and brown-nosed his way into a position of academic power. What they didn't appreciate was the intellectual effort it dook to successfully pretend to believe in the ordered, agnostic view of the universe that physics mandated. It was all part of God's plan, though. Like the carefully falsified documents that hd put him in the position of being minimally qualified for the chairmanship. Two other Enders were on the Board of Regents, able to push his case.

Macro (like one of those Regents) was a member of a militant and supersecret sect within a sect: the Hammer of God. Like all Enders, they believed God was about to bring about the destruction of humankind. "

religious - fictional USA 2050 Haldeman, Joe. Forever Peace. New York: Ace Books (1998; first ed. 1997); pg. 233. Enders - Hammer of God:
"'It's not Army Intelligence, either,' Unity said. 'Ingram is one of a cell of Enders. Thee are thousands of them, scattered all through the government.'

'Jesus,' I said. 'And now they know that we can make their prophecy come true.'

What Ingram revealed was that he personally knew only three other members of the Hammer of God. Two of them were fellow employees of the Office of Technology Assessment--a civilian secretary who worked in Ingram's office in Chicago, and his fellow officer, who had gone to St. Thomas to kill Peter Blankenship. The third was a man he knew only as Ezekiel, who showed up once or twice a year with orders. Ezekiel claimed that the Hammer of God had thousands of people scattered throughout government and commerce, mostly in the military and police forces.

Ingram had assassinated four men and two women, all but one of them military people (one had been the husband of the scientist he was sent to kill). They were always far from Chicago... "

religious - fictional USA 2050 Haldeman, Joe. Forever Peace. New York: Ace Books (1998; first ed. 1997); pg. 32-33. Enders - Hammer of God:
"Not all Enders had ponytails and obvious attitudes. There were two in Julian's physics department, a secretary and Mac Roman himself.

People wondered how a mediocre scientist had come out of nowhere and brown-nosed his way into a position of academic power... It was all part of God's plan, though. Like the carefully falsified documents that hd put him in the position of being minimally qualified for the chairmanship. Two other Enders were on the Board of Regents, able to push his case.

Macro (like one of those Regents) was a member of a militant and supersecret sect within a sect: the Hammer of God. Like all Enders, they believed God was about to bring about the destruction of humankind.

Unlike most of them, the Hammer of God felt called upon to help. " [Many other refs. in book, not all in DB.]

religious - fictional USA 2071 Bishop, Michael. Catacomb Years. New York: Berkley (1979); pg. 14. Ortho-Urban Church:
[Timeline] "2067-2071: Pair of alien visitors installed in Hyatt-Regency 'Ecologarium.'

2071: First public appearance of alien. Several Cygnusian conversions to Ortho-Urbanism. Publication in newstapes of 'ethnography' devoted to aliens' penthouse society. Attempted assassination of Cygnostik priest. Urban guerrilla episodes. "

religious - fictional USA 2077 Anthony, Piers. God of Tarot. New York: Berkley (1982; c. 1977); pg. 48. Cimmerian:
"In some areas of the country, actual primitive tribes had taken over, calling themselves Saxons, Huns, Cimmerians, Celts, or Picts, and in many respects they did resemble their historic models... the Cimmerians seemed to be derived from the former fans of fantasy adventure novels. "
religious - fictional USA 2077 Anthony, Piers. God of Tarot. New York: Berkley (1982; c. 1977); pg. 15. Holy Order of Vision:
"His concern was genuine and deeply felt; the Brothers of the Holy Order of Vision believed in conservation, and practiced it rigorously. All had taken vows of poverty, and abhorred the wasting of anything as valuable as water.

'But there has been a drought,' Brother Paul said... 'We might inadvertently have overpumped, considering this special circumstance.'

Brother James was a thin, nervous man who took things seriously. 'His long face worked in the throes of inchoate emotion. 'If it be God's will . . .'

Brother Paul noted his companion's obvious anxiety, and relented. 'Nevertheless, we will check the pump first.' " [Many refs. throughout novel to the Holy Order of Vision. The protagonist/main character is a member, and frequently draws on his philosophy and experience during the course of the novel. The first 2 chapters take place in a Holy Order of Vision Station, and much of the 3rd chapter describes the Order.]

religious - fictional USA 2077 Anthony, Piers. God of Tarot. New York: Berkley (1982; c. 1977); pg. 19. Holy Order of Vision:
"Suddenly he brightened. 'Air, Earth, Water, Fire!' he exclaimed. 'Beautiful. Thank you, God, for sending me this revelation.' To him there was no objection to conversing with God directly; in this case, familiarity bred respect, not contempt. The Holy Order of Vision encouraged contact with God in any fashion that seemed mutually satisfactory. "
religious - fictional USA 2077 Anthony, Piers. God of Tarot. New York: Berkley (1982; c. 1977); pg. 20. Holy Order of Vision:
"'In our studies at the Order we place emphasis on the elements,' Brother Paul continued. 'Not the atomic elements of latter-day science--though we study those, too--but the classical ones. Air, Earth, Water, Fire: we find these manifesting again and again in new ways. They show up in personality types, in astrology, in the Tarot deck--their symbolism is universal...' "
religious - fictional USA 2077 Anthony, Piers. God of Tarot. New York: Berkley (1982; c. 1977); pg. 21. Holy Order of Vision:
"'...This, in a very real sense, is what the Holy Order of Vision is all about. 'Holy' as in 'Whole,' 'Vision' as in the vision of Saint Paul on the Road to Damascus, that converted him to Christianity. He is not to be confused with Saint Paul the Hermit. We are not a church, but rather a brotherhood. We wish to bring together all people, and teach them the Universal Law of Creation, to prepare the Earth for the new age that is dawning. We try to provide for those in need, whatever that need may be, counseling them or offering material aid. We place great emphasis on practical applications--even windmills, in this day of retreating civilizations.'

'Hey, that's great!' the girl said. 'Can anybody join?'

Bless her; she was doing his job for him! 'Anybody who wants to, after a student apprenticeship. We do have levels through which the novice progresses according to his ability and faith, and much of the life is not easy...' "

religious - fictional USA 2077 Anthony, Piers. God of Tarot. New York: Berkley (1982; c. 1977); pg. 23. Holy Order of Vision:
"'Perhaps you are right,' he said, without rancor. 'Skepticism is healthy. Speaking for myself alone, however, I must say that though at times I feel as you do, at other times I am absolutely certain that God is real and relevant. It is a matter for each person to decide for himself--and he is free to do so within the Order. We dictate no religion and we eschew none; we only present the material.'

There was a chuckle. Brother Paul noted it with dismay, for he had not been trying to score debater's points, but only to clarify the position of the Order. Somehow he had erred, for now his audience was more intrigued by his seeming cleverness than by his philosophy. "

religious - fictional USA 2077 Anthony, Piers. God of Tarot. New York: Berkley (1982; c. 1977); pg. 26. Holy Order of Vision:
"They all returned his smile, and he knew it was all right again. God had guided him correctly. 'Of course you do not have to join the Holy Order of Vision to receive such instruction. All of our courses in defense, reading, hygiene, farming, mechanics, figuring, and weaving are available to anyone who has the necessary interest and aptitude.' He smiled again. 'We can even be persuaded to teach a class or two in the appreciation of religion.' "
religious - fictional USA 2077 Anthony, Piers. God of Tarot. New York: Berkley (1982; c. 1977); pg. 30. Holy Order of Vision:
"He looked into the box. It contained a deck of Tarot cards, in its fashion the symbolic wisdom of all the ages.

...'Please shuffle them.'

Brother Paul removed the deck form the box and spread several cards at the top of the deck. They were in order, beginning with the Fool, or Key Zero, and proceeding through the Magician, the High Priestess (also called the Lady Pope), the Empress, the Emperor, and so on through the twenty-two Trumps or Major Arcana and the fifty-six suit cards, or Minor Arcana. The suits were Wands, Cups, Swords, and Disks, corresponding to the conventional Clubs, Hearts, Spades and Diamonds, or to the elements Fire, Water, Air and Earth. Each was a face card, beautifully drawn and colored. He had, like all Brothers and Sisters of the Order, studied the Tarot symbolism, had high respect for it, an [sic] was well-acquainted with the cards. One of the Order's exercises was to take black-and-white originals and color them...' "

religious - fictional USA 2077 Anthony, Piers. God of Tarot. New York: Berkley (1982; c. 1977); pg. 47. Holy Order of Vision:
"Brother Paul was basically a man of peace, but neither a weakling nor a fool. He donned his Order habit when near population centers to make himself more readily identifiable. He would defend himself with words and smiles and humility wherever he could, and with physical measures when all else failed.

Though he was a Brother of an Order with religious connotations, he neither expected nor received free benefits on that account. He rendered service for his night's board and lodging; there was always demand for a man handy with mechanical things. He exchanged news with the lord of each manor... "

religious - fictional USA 2077 Anthony, Piers. God of Tarot. New York: Berkley (1982; c. 1977); pg. 48. Holy Order of Vision:
"The Holy Order of Vision, always hospitable to peaceful travelers, had entertained and assisted Shamans and Druids and other priestly representatives, never challenging their beliefs or religious authority. A Voodoo witch-doctor could not only find hospitality at the station, he could converse with Brothers of the Order who took him completely seriously and knew more than a little about his practice. Now this policy paid off for Brother Paul. The small silver cross he wore became a talisman of amazing potency wherever religion dominated--and this was more extensive every year... The laity gave way increasingly to the clerical authorities, as in medieval times. Thus Brother Paul was harvesting the fruit of the seeds sown by his Order. "
religious - fictional USA 2086 Heinlein, Robert A. Stranger in a Strange Land. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1961); pg. 230. Church of the New Revelation (Fosterite):
"They pushed through the crowd and entered the Tabernacle [pg. 227: Archangel Foster Tabernacle of the Church of the New Revelation], into a long high hall. Boone stopped. 'I want you to noitce. There is salesmanship in everything, even the Lord's work. Any tourist, whether he attends seekers' service or not--and services run 24 hours a day--has to come through here. What does he see? These happy chances.' Boone waved at slot machines lining both walls. 'The bar and quick lunch is at the far end, he can't even get a drink without running this gauntlet. I tell you, it's a remarkable sinner who gets that far without shedding his change.' "
religious - fictional USA 2086 Heinlein, Robert A. Stranger in a Strange Land. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1961); pg. 230. Church of the New Revelation (Fosterite):
Referring to slot machines in the church: "'But we don't take his money and give him nothing. Take a look--' Boone shouldered his way to a machine, tapped the woman playing it. 'Please, Daughter.'

She looked up, annoyance changed to a smile. 'Certainly, Bishop.'

'Bless you. You'll note,' Boone went on, as he fed a quarter into the machine, 'that whether it pays off in worldly goods or not, a sinner is rewarded with a blessing and a souvenir text.'

The machine stopped; lined up in the window was: GOD-WATCHES-YOU.

'That pays three for one,' Boone said and fished the pay-off out of the receptacle, 'and here's your text.' He tore of a paper tab and handed it to Jill. 'Keep it, little lady, and ponder it.'

Jill sneaked a glance before putting it into her purse: 'But the Sinner's belly is filled with filth --N.R. XXII 17' "

religious - fictional USA 2086 Heinlein, Robert A. Stranger in a Strange Land. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1961); pg. 232. Church of the New Revelation (Fosterite):
Sitting at the bar inside the Archangel Foster Tabernacle of the Church of the New Revelation: "'Senator,' Jill said carefully, 'Would your hospitality extend to a martini?'

'Would it! Best martinis in the world--we don't use vermouth. We bles 'em instead. Double martini for the little lady. Bless you, son, and make it fast. We've time for a quick one, then pay our respects to Archangel Foster and on into the Sanctuary to hear the Supreme Bishop.'

The drinks arrived and the jackpots' pay-off. They drank with Boone's blessing, then he wrangled over the 300 dollars, insisting that al prizes belonged to Jubal. Jubal settled it by depositing it all in a love-offering bowl.

Boone nodded approvingly. 'That's a mark of grace, Doc. We'll save you yet. Another round, folks?' "

religious - fictional USA 2086 Heinlein, Robert A. Stranger in a Strange Land. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1961); pg. 232. Church of the New Revelation (Fosterite):
In the Sanctuary of the Archangel Foster Tabernacle: "He led them around a curved passage into a room. It was large, luxurious in style that reminded Jill of undertakers' parlors but was filled with cheerfull music. The theme was Jingle Bells with a Congo beat added... The far wall was glass and appeared to be not even that. Boone said briskly, 'Here we are, folks--in the Presence... And there he is... just as he was when he was called up to Heaven.'

Boone gestured with his cigar. 'Don't he look natural? Preserved by a miracle, flesh incorruptible. That's the very chair he used when he wrote his Messages... and that's the pose he was in when he went to Heaven. He's never been moved--we built the Tabernacle right around him... removing the old church, naturally, and preserving its sacred stones.'

Facing them about 20 feet away, seated in a chair remarkably like a throne, was an old man. He looked as if he were alive... "

religious - fictional USA 2086 Heinlein, Robert A. Stranger in a Strange Land. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1961); pg. 237. Church of the New Revelation (Fosterite):
"The man stood up. 'Our first hymn,' he said briskly, 'is sponsored by Manna Bakeries, makers of Angel Bread, the loaf of love with our Supreme Bishop's smiling face on every wrapper and containing a valuable premium coupon redeemable at your nearest neighborhood Church of the New Revelation. Brothers and Sisters, tomorrow Manna Bakeries with banches throughout the land start a giant, price-slashing slae of pre-equinox goodies. Send your child to school with a bulging box of Archangel Foster cookies, each one blessed and wrapped in an appropriate text--and pray that each goodie he gives away may lead a child of sinners nearer to the light.' "
religious - fictional USA 2086 Heinlein, Robert A. Stranger in a Strange Land. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1961); pg. 238. Church of the New Revelation (Fosterite):
"After the hymn there were announcements, Heavenly messages, another commercial, and awarding of door prizes. A second hymn 'Happy Faces Uplifted' was sponsored by Datttelbaum's Department Stores where the Saved Shop in Safety since no merchandise is offered which competes with a sponsored brand--a children's Happy Room in each branch supervised by a Saved sister.

The priest moved to the front of the platform and cupped his ear.

'We. . . want. . . Digby!

'Who?'

'We-Want-DIG-BY!'

'Louder! Make him hear you!'

'WE-WANT-DIG-BY!' Clap, clap, stomp, stomp! 'WE-WANT-DIG-BY!' Clap, clap, stomp, stomp--

It went on and on until the building rocked... Lights went down, curtains parted; a blinding radiance picked out the Supreme Bishop, waving clasped hands over his head and smiling at them.

They answered with the lion's roar and he threw them kisses. On his way to the pulpit he stopped, raised one of the possessed women still writhing slowly... "

religious - fictional USA 2094 Sladek, John. Tik-Tok. London: Victor Gollancz Ltd. (1985; 1st printed 1983); pg. 141. Assembly of Time Saints:
"Then came the case of Reverend Humm, leader of a sect called the Tachyonites. The Tachyonites, or to give them their proper name, the Assembly of Time Saints, were one of the more stiff-necked little groups our century has thrown up. One of their founders must have stumbled across some scientific textbook or even some science fiction story in which there is speculation about tachyons and time travel. Tachyons, being hypothetical particles that move faster than light, are supposed to go back in time. If they existed, such tachyons would enable us to change our own past. "
religious - fictional USA 2094 Sladek, John. Tik-Tok. London: Victor Gollancz Ltd. (1985; 1st printed 1983); pg. 142. Assembly of Time Saints:
"Needless to say, this doctrine involved a lot of paradoxes of faith, not to mention physical contradictions. A man with lung cancer was supposed to be able to cure himself by simply praying away a lifetime of smoking--though if every sufferer did it, the world would be knee-deep in unsmoked cigarettes. The Tachyonites never worried about complexities like that, however. Health, wealth and wisdom were theirs for the asking, without having to go to bed early!

In theory, that is. In practice, the earthly head of the Tachyonites, Reverend Francis X. Humm, was now in town and dying. Only a few close elders knew this, and they were keeping it secret. If Humm died, the entire fabric of their church might crumble away. If he openly consulted a doctor, another crisis of faith. " [More about this church, pg. 142-146.]

religious - fictional USA 2094 Sladek, John. Tik-Tok. London: Victor Gollancz Ltd. (1985; 1st printed 1983); pg. 141-142. Assembly of Time Saints:
"These people seized on the idea that prayer is tachyonitic. They believed that they themselves were capable of living outside time. The phrase born again took on a peculiar emphasis in their creed. 'Make no provision for tomorrow,' the Bible told them, and they did not. After all, if you can change yesterday, why worry about tomorrow? Indeed, if you can change yesterday, why worry about anything? There need be no more disease, poverty, death.

I don't know all the details of their curious gospel. At death, they believed, the soul simply moved outside time and wandered at will. Finally it would migrate to some earlier time and re-enter the body. "

religious - fictional USA 2175 Dick, Philip K. "The Last of the Masters " in The Golden Man. New York: Berkley (1980; c. 1954); pg. 187. Anarchist League:
[The Anarchist League, first mentioned by name on pg. 185, is central to this story.] Pg. 187: "'Yeah, we smashed all the government robots. There weren't many of them. They were used only at high levels. When a lot of facts had to be integrated.'

The youth's eyes bulged. 'You saw them? You were there when they smashed the robots?'

Penn laughed. 'Tolby means the League. That was two hundred years ago.'

The youth grinned nervously. 'Yeah. Tell us about the marches.' ";

Pg. 191: "Here, within the ring of hills, Bors had constructed an accurate and detailed reproduction of a society two centuries gone. The world as it had been in the old days. The time of governments. The time that had been pulled down by the Anarchist League. " [More.]

religious - fictional USA 2175 Dick, Philip K. "The Last of the Masters " in The Golden Man. New York: Berkley (1980; c. 1954); pg. . Anarchist League:
"'Individuals! A club, not subject to law. Voluntary membership. We have a disciplined organization. Every aspect of our economic life operates at maximum efficiency. We--you--have your thumb on everything. All you have to do is give the order. Set the machine in motion.'

Bors nodded slowly. 'It's true the anarchist can't coordinate. The League can't organize in an efficient structure. It's a paradox. Government by anarchists . . . Anti-government, actually. Instead of governing the world they tramp around to make sure no one else does.'

'Dog in the manger.'

'As you say, they're actually a voluntary club of totally unorganized individuals. Without law or central authority. They maintain no society--they can't govern. All they can do is interfere with anyone who tries. Troublemakers. But... It was this way before. Two centuries ago. They were unorganized. Unarmed. Vast mobs, without discipline or authority. Yet they pulled down all the governments. All over the world.' "

religious - fictional USA - Southwest 2043 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 53. Ecosophia:
"'But . . .' A hint of a smile entered Trevor's voice. 'Don't those things evolve? Wasn't it just a matter of time?'

Maggie chewed her lip, annoyed. This was the issue they had all argued back and forth, and continued to argue in the weekly meetings as the mission grew closer: whether she could divert the process of industrialization from its destructive path--not merely delay it by a generation or two but actually accomplish a paradigm shift. It was a tall order. But they had finally reached consensus--no small achievement for the one hundred and forty-one inhabitants of Ocosophia. She was proud of them. And impatient now with Trevor's questioning. " [Many other refs., not in DB.]

religious - fictional USA - Southwest 2043 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 7. Ecosophia:
"Why hadn't she thought of toughening her feet before the journey, walking around Ecosophia barefoot?... She had felt the lethargy once before, during the long trek from California across the desert to Ecosophia... " [According to the book jacket, 'Ecosophia' is a "desperate commune in the United States, in the Southwest, in the year 2043. From its name they evidently have an environmentally-oriented philosophy. The plot has Maggie Foster traveling back in time to tamper with the construction of the world's first Iron Bridge, so that it will topple in an earthquake, discredit iron, and postpone the Industrial Revolution.]
religious - fictional USA - Southwest 2043 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 29. Ecosophia:
"And even after her escape into the desert, to Ecosophia. Ecosophia itself owed its precarious existence to its location in the Radlands, where hardly anybody ventured. Squatting on the verge. "
religious - fictional USA - Southwest 2043 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 47. Ecosophia:
"She missed Ecosophia. The people. The great fig tree sprawling from the atrium, its boughs following the steel catwalks. She missed the Beethoven string quartets and access to databases... yet she sensed a vitality here [in 1773 England] that was missing back home--most obvious in the children. She had never had the opportunity to watch children play. "; Pg. 48: "She recognized the sound from an old disc of birdsongs they used to play in the atrium at Ecosophia. "
religious - fictional USA - Southwest 2043 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 60. Ecosophia:
"She got most of her exercise indoors, where the air was cleaner. Ecosophia eschewed automation whenever possible: human muscle took the place of servomotors and automatic sensors in performing such tasks as opening and closing vents and watering plants; exercise equipment was designed to generate rather than consume electricity. Mental tasks were rotated, to foster mindfulness and community.

But Ecosophia could make you antsy. Maggie liked the vastness out here. The enormity of the sky. The sense of connection with the Anasazi, who had struggled to eke out an existence in this canyon nine hundred years ago. "

religious - fictional USA - Southwest 2043 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 62. Ecosophia:
"Ecosophia required constant tinkering: dealing with the white flies and fungus, keeping everything in balance--not just the physical entity but also the spiritual life. The constant reinterpretation of its four guiding principles: Openness, Sustainability, Mindfulness, and Community. The frustration of having to decide everything by consensus. Yet somehow they muddled along. And they might muddle along for many more years. But there were no children. The average age of Ecosophia's inhabitants was sixty-six. Maggie was one of the youngest. "
religious - fictional USA - Southwest 2043 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 74. Ecosophia:
"Back in Ecosophia, they had agreed on two restrictions: Introduce no new technology and Limit the intervention strictly to the bridge. Two simple rules they had all agreed on, and she had violated both of them! "
religious - fictional USA - Southwest 2043 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 113. Ecosophia:
"Quaker principles overlapped with those that guided Ecosophia. It was no accident, she realized. Quakers were among Ecosophia's original founders. Still, she was surprised to see how many of those principles were in place: Friends decided things by consensus; they were committed to nonviolence; they emphasized mindfulness and community. "
religious - fictional USA - Southwest 2043 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 62-63. Ecosophia:
"And Ecosophia maintained its isolation at a cost. One whole bank of photovoltaics had been cannibalized in order to maintain the other three; spare parts for machinery had to be obtained on the free market at exorbitant prices and usually at some risk of revealing Ecosophia's location.

The commune's existence was known to relatively few people. Among the Dineh, eleven--Trevor among them--had joined; the others continued to honor the treaty that allowed the Ecosohpians to live on tribal land in exchange for medical services. From the Navajo traders Ecosophia obtained computer chips, clothing, bricks of guano and other fertilizer, and bales of plastic trash for recycling--in exchange for the few commodities that Ecosophia was able to offer, such as genetically engineered fruit trees. "

religious - fictional USA - West 2032 Butler, Octavia. Parable of the Talents. New York: Seven Stories Press (1998); pg. 87. Christian America:
"Spokesmen for Christian America have announced that the Church will be opening homeless shelters and children's homes--orphanages--in several states, including California, Oregon, and Washington. This is just a beginning, they say. They hope in time to 'extend a helping hand to the people of every state in the union, including Alaska.' I heard this on a newsdisk... Time to begin to clean up the Christian America image, I suppose. I just hope the California shelters and orphanages will be put where they're most needed--down around San Diego, Los Angeles, and San Francisco. I don't want them up here. Christian America is made up of scary people, and I find it impossible to believe that they intend only to do good and to help others. "
religious - fictional Utah 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 33. Combined Christian Church:
"Dr. Abernathy, his superior, the priest of the Charlottesville Combined Christian Church, stood there in his black cassock. 'Is this too late to call on you?' Dr. Abernathy said, his round, small bunlike face gracious in its formal concern not to be a bother.

'Come in,' Pete held the door wide. 'You know Miss Rae, Doctor.'

'The Lord be with you,' Dr. Abernathy said to her...

'Immediately, correctly, she answered, 'And with thy spirit.' She rose. 'Good evening, Doctor.'

'I heard,' Dr. Abernathy said, 'that you are considering entering our church, taking confirmation and then the greater sacraments.' " [Many other refs. to the 'Combined Christian Church' throughout novel. This name appears first here, and is used rarely. Mostly, it has simply been called the 'Christian Church', because there are so few Christians left after the World War III holocaust. Many other refs. to this church under 'Christianity' in DB.]

religious - fictional Utah 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 34. Combined Christian Church:
"'You would be welcome,' he said to her.

'Thank you, Doctor,' Lurine said.

'But to be confirmed you would need half a year of intensive religious instruction. On many topics: the sacraments, the rituals, the basic tenets of the Church. What we believe and also why. I hold adult-instruction classes two afternoons a week.' He added, with a trace of embarrassment, 'I have at present one adult receiving instruction. You could catch up very quickly; you have a bright fertile mind. Meanwhile, you could attend services . . . however, you could not come to the rail, could not take Holy Communion; you realize that.'

'Yes.' She nodded.

'Have you been baptized?'

'I--' She hesitated. 'Frankly, I don't know.'

'We would baptize you with the special service for those who have been baptized before. With water. Anything else--such as rose petals, as they used to do it before the war in Los Angeles--that does not count...' "

religious - fictional Utah 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976) Servants of Wrath:
[Book jacket.] "Here, in the aftermath of World War II's devastating holocaust, the atomic energy commission (ERDA) that masterminded it has given rise to a mysterious new religion, with the ERDA's bizarre and charismatic head worshiped as the Deus Irae, or God of Wrath. . .

Drawn unwillingly into a perilous pilgrimage to discover the true identity of Deus Irae is Tibor McMasters, a legless and armless mural artist, and Pete Sands, a young Christian secretly assigned to protect Tibor from any mishaps... " [Many refs. in novel to this new, fictional religion centered on ERDA. Most refs. not in DB.]

religious - fictional Utah 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 1. Servants of Wrath:
"And at the doorway of the sacristy Father Handy glanced against the morning sunlight from Wyoming to the north as if the sun came from that direction, saw the church's employee, the limbless trunk with knobbed head...

A bad day, Father Handy thought. For he had to declare bad news to Tibor McMasters. Turning, he reentered the church and hid himself; Tibor, on his cart, had not seen him...

He himself, the priest; he enjoyed the sun. The smell of hot, large clover from the surrounding pastures of Charlottesville, Utah. The tink-tink of the tags of the cows . . . he sniffed the air as it filled his church and yet--not the sight of Tibor but the awareness of the limbless man's pain; that caused him worry.

There, behind the altar, the miniscule part of the work which had been accomplished; five years it would take Tibor, but time did not matter in a subject of this sort: through eternity... " [Father Handy is not Catholic, but belongs to Servants of Wrath.]



religious - fictional, continued

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