Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to religious - fictional, USA

religious - fictional, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
religious - fictional USA 1949 Jackson, Shirley. "The Lottery " in The Lottery and Other Stories. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (1998; first published 1949); pg. 301. Lottery:
"'All right, folks,' Mr. Summers said. 'Let's finish quickly.'

Although the villagers had forgotten the ritual and lost the original black box, they still remembered how to use stones. The pile of stones the boys had made earlier was ready; there were stones on the ground with the blowing scraps of paper that had came out of the box. Mrs. Delacroix selected a stone so large she had to pick it up with both hands and turned to Mrs. Dunbar... The children had stones already, and someone gave little Davy Hutchinson a few pebbles.

Tessie Hutchinson was in the center of a cleared space by now, and she held her hands out desperately as the villagers moved in on her. 'It isn't fair,' she said. A stone hit her on the side of the head.

Old Man Warner was saying, 'Come on, come on, everyone.' Steve Adams was in the front of the crowd of villagers, with Mrs. Graves beside him.

'It isn't fair, it isn't fair,' Mrs. Hutchinson screamed, and then they were upon her. "

religious - fictional USA 1972 Blish, James & Judith Ann Lawrence. "Getting Along " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 568. First Church of the Unreal Absence:
[1] "...at this time the prime movers of an organization called the First Church of the Unreal Absence, which was a gathering-place for spiritualists from all over the Colonies. These people maintained that the dead are not extinguished forever, but instead simply wander, discorporate, in some misty other land from which they may graduate only as they attain to superior understanding of their condition. In the meantime, they may be spoken to by means of seances conducted by psychic mediums, of which latter group my aunt was considered preeminent.

'The First Church,' my aunt was fond of saying, 'is a great leveler of classes. Here the charwoman with psychic force is the superior of the millionaire who lacks it.'

I was prepared to grant this sentiment some nobility, but when I reported it to Buddworth Maracot, he said dryly: 'How many millionaires have you seen there lately?' "

religious - fictional USA 1972 Blish, James & Judith Ann Lawrence. "Getting Along " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 568. First Church of the Unreal Absence:
[2] "Nevertheless, Maracot's position was somewhat compromised by the fact that his daughter Deepily was a member of the First Church. I am unable to account for my friend's having had a daughter at all, for I never had any success in interesting him in the opposite sex--'To me, Coupling,' he said often, 'the BVM will always be the only woman'--but what is important here is that Deepily had challenged him to attend a seance at the First Church and bring to bear the fullest powers of his formidable scepticism to expose it, if he could.

Maracot brought, to the session not only his scepticism, but a veritable brute of a man, bulging with old hockey muscles, whom he had recruited during one of his trips in disguise to the docks along the banks of the Monongohela... This creature was made as welcome to the seance by Deepily and the Pullovers as was everyone else, and Maracot was then invited to search both Mrs. Pullover and her cabinet. "

religious - fictional USA 1972 Blish, James & Judith Ann Lawrence. "Getting Along " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 568. First Church of the Unreal Absence:
[3] "Then we all sat down, the lights were turned to a ghostly dimness, and Mrs. Pullover called upon her 'contact,' a childish spirit named Sam.

'Me wee pee lamb top hole allee samee sensa wonda byembye seeka tomollah, you bet,' piped the little voice.

'Tell me, Sam, dear, is there anyone in the land of mist who wishes to speak to anyone here?' Mrs. Pullover intoned.

'Here ee weary topside bigfella past competent journalist Bergen Record,' Sam squeaked through the trumpet. 'Callself allsame J. R. Transistor, wantee mohtal gaslight explohah infinite storm.'

But no, no one would own to a friend named J. R. Transistor, or even a relative of that name. But at the same moment there emerged from the cabinet an astonishing vision, wrapped from moorcock to gernsback in a coating of ectoplasm.

'Grab him!' cried the voice of my friend, and the soccer player lunged in a full football tackle for the anxious ankles of the spirit. "

religious - fictional USA 1972 Blish, James & Judith Ann Lawrence. "Getting Along " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 569. First Church of the Unreal Absence:
[4] "Since he failed to release my hand as he did so, we soon found ourselves rather more entangled with each other than with the Problem of the White Sheet, but in the confusion managed to make the best resolution of it that presented itself.

* * *

It was sometime later that I asked my friend how he had known that Mrs. Pullover had been generating the voices in the tube by vibrating her diaphragm. 'My dear Felicity,' he said, stuffing his Persian slipper into a pot, 'can you really have missed the clue of the Third Fundamentalism? Then I fear that you are to inattentive to serve as my liaison officer.'

And with this, alas, I was waved away anew and never again saw the best and wisest and most unsatisfactory man that I have ever known. "

religious - fictional USA 1982 Knight, Damon. The Man in the Tree. New York: Berkley Books (1984); pg. 182. Anderson Movement:
[The main character moves toward creating a religion.] "Behind him, on his writing chair, were some penciled notes headed 'Toward a New Religion.' He had not shown these to anyone, even to Maggie. It was curious and a little unsettling to think how his attitudes had changed over the years, as if belief were a function of metabolism. In his teens, he had dismissed religion as a mental aberration; now, although he founded the answers of organized religion full of absurdities, the questions absorbed him.

He had one advantage over all the others who speculated about the unseen world: he knew that it existed. Several times, by accident, he had managed to bring through from another world some object which was not merely a copy of something existing in this world. Among these was a little volume by Marco Pallis which did not appear in any catalog or index... The Phenomenology of Mind " [More here, elsewhere, e.g., pg. 224, 246.]

religious - fictional USA 1982 Simmons, Dan. "The River Styx Runs Upstream " in Prayers to Broken Stones. New York: Bantam (1992; c. 1982); pg. 20. Resurrectionist:
"The Resurrectionists were saying something. Father and Aunt Helen nodded. Mother just stood there, still smiling slightly, and looked politely at the yellow-shirted man as he spoke and joked and patted Father on the back. Then it was our turn to hug Mother...

Father took the Resurrectionists into the study. We heard snatches of conversation down the hall.

'. . . if you think of it as a stroke . . .'

'How long will she . . .'

'You understand the tithing is necessary because of the expenses of monthly care and . . .'

The women relatives stood in a circle around Mother. There was an awkward moment until they realized that Mother did not speak. Aunt Helen... touched her sister's cheek. Mother smiled and smiled.

Then Father was back and his voice was loud and hearty. He explained how similar it was to a light stroke... Meanwhile, Father kissed people repeatedly and thanked everyone.

The Resurrectionists left with smiles and signed papers "

religious - fictional USA 1982 Simmons, Dan. "The River Styx Runs Upstream " in Prayers to Broken Stones. New York: Bantam (1992; c. 1982); pg. 24. Resurrectionist:
"In the autumn I went back to Longfellow School, but soon a transferred to a private school. The Resurrectionist families were discriminated against in those days. The kids made fun of us or called us names and no one played with us. No one played with us at the new school either, but they didn't call us names. " [Many other refs., not in DB. The Resurrectionists are the story's primary fictional religious group.]
religious - fictional USA 1982 Simmons, Dan. "The River Styx Runs Upstream " in Prayers to Broken Stones. New York: Bantam (1992; c. 1982); pg. 28. Resurrectionist:
Pg. 28: "We stayed at an ancient hotel right on the boardwalk. The other Resurrectionists in Father's Tuesday group recommended the place, but it smelled of age and rot and rats in the walls. The corridors were a faded green... "; Pg. 29: "Father quit teaching after Simon's death. He never went back after the sabbatical, and his notes for the Pound book sat stacked in the basement with last year's newspapers. The Resurrectionists helped him find a job as a custodian in a nearby shopping mall, and he usually didn't get home before two in the morning.

After Christmas I went away to a boarding school that was two states away. The Resurrectionists had opened the Institute by this time, and more and more families were turning to the. I was later able to go to the University on a full scholarship. Despite the covenant, I rarely came home during those years. Father was drunk during my few visits. "

religious - fictional USA 1982 Simmons, Dan. "The River Styx Runs Upstream " in Prayers to Broken Stones. New York: Bantam (1992; c. 1982); pg. 30. Resurrectionist:
"Our policy with the [Resurrectionist] Institute was honored despite the circumstances, and that helped me through the next few years. My career is more than a job to me--I believe in what I do and I'm good at it. It was my idea to lease some of the empty school buildings for our new neighborhood centers... After work a lot of guys from the Institute go out to bars, but I don't. After I've put away my equipment and scrubbed down the steel tables, I go straight home. My family is here. They're waiting for me. "
religious - fictional USA 1985 Drake, David. The Tank Lords. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 372. Church of the Lord's Universe:
[2] "The Church of the Lord's Universe was officially launched in 1895 in Minneapolis, Minnesota, by the merger of 230 existing protestant congregations--Methodist, Presbyterian, Episcopalian, and Lutheran. In part the new church was a revolt against the extreme fundamentalism peaking at that time. The Universalists sought converts vigorously from the start. Their liturgy obviously attempted to recapture the traditional beauty of Christianity's greatest age, but there is reason to believe that the extensive use of Latin in the service was part of a design to avoid giving doctrinal offense as well. Anyone who has attended both Presbyterian and Methodist services has felt uneasiness at the line, 'Forgive us our debts/trespasses . . .' St. Jerome's Latin version of the Lord's Prayer flows smoothly and unnoticed from the tongue of one raised in either sect. "
religious - fictional USA 1985 Drake, David. The Tank Lords. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 373. Church of the Lord's Universe:
[3] "But the Church of the Lord's Universe had a mission beyond the entertainment of its congregations for an hour every Sunday. The priests and laity alike preached the salvation of Mankind through His works. To Universalists, however, the means and the end were both secular. The Church taught that Man must reach the stars and there, among infinite expanses, find room to live in peace. This temporal paradise was one which could be grasped by all men. It did not detract from spiritual hopes; but heaven is in the hands of the Lord, while the stars were not beyond Man's own strivings. "
religious - fictional USA 1985 Drake, David. The Tank Lords. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 373. Church of the Lord's Universe:
[5] "The Doctrine of Salvation through the Stars--it was never labeled so bluntly in Universalist writings, but the peevish epithet bestowed by a Baptist theologian was not inaccurate--gave the Church of the Lord's Universe a dynamism unknown to the Christian center since the days of Archbishop Laud. It was a naive doctrine, of course. Neither the stars nor anything else brought peace to Man; but realists did not bring men to the stars, either, while the hopeful romantics of the Universal Church certainly helped. "
religious - fictional USA 1985 Drake, David. The Tank Lords. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 373. Church of the Lord's Universe:
[6] "The Universalist credo was expressed most clearly in the BOOK OF THE WAY, a slim volume commissioned at the First Consensus and adopted after numerous emendations by the Tenth. The BOOK OF THE WAY never officially replaced the Bible, but the committee of laymen which framed it struck a chord in the hearts of all Universalists. Despite its heavily Eastern leanings (including suggestions of reincarnation), the BOOK spoke in an idiom ineligible and profoundly moving to men and women who in another milieu would have been Technocrats. "
religious - fictional USA 1988 Godwin, P. Waiting for the Galactic Bus. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 1. Tabernacle of the Born Again Savior:
"She was very active in her chosen faith, the Tabernacle of the Born Again Savior... "
religious - fictional USA 1988 Godwin, P. Waiting for the Galactic Bus. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 68. Tabernacle of the Born Again Savior:
"Satan gestured negligently at the bed, where two forms gave a convincing impression of very dead.

'Dead and damned.'

'We can't be,' Roy attempted pathetically. We're members of the Tabernacle of the Born Again Savior. Good Christians.'

Damocles chuckled, a sound like scratching on a coffin lid. 'Our favorite kind.' "

religious - fictional USA 1988 Godwin, P. Waiting for the Galactic Bus. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 108. Tabernacle of the Born Again Savior:
"'You don't look Jewish.'

'My..., she said it!' Jake's laughter was a dry, wondering bark that had no warmth in it. 'She actually said it. You must have been an evangelical.'

'Tabernacle of the Born Again Savior,' Charity owned with wistful pride. 'Not that it helped a whole lot.'

'Indeed.' Jake sank again in his chair. 'Tabernacle of the. . . the more shriveled the existence, the more elaborate the credentials...' "

religious - fictional USA 1988 Martin, George R. R. & John J. Miller. Wild Cards VII: Dead Man's Hand. New York: Bantam Books (1990); pg. 85. "Church of Jesus Christ, Joker":
"A sad day,' Father Squid said as he stepped up beside Jay. The pastor of Our Lady of Perpetual Misery made a liquid squishing sound when he walked. 'Jokertown will be a different place without her...' "
religious - fictional USA 1995 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 143. "Church of God, Crusader/Doomsday Chiliasts":
"'Compared to the Doomsday Chiliasts and the Earth-Firsters, Palmer Joss is the soul of moderation,' "
religious - fictional USA 1996 Ing, Dean. Systemic Shock. New York: Tor (original 1981; 1st Tor edition 1992); pg. 159. Church of God In Revealed Context:
"He read her expression, then pulled a thin faxed pamphlet no bigger than a wallet card from his pocket. She glanced at its cover. 'Um. The Church of God In Revealed Context, eh? Yes, they're one of the biggest splinters in the backside of the LDS. Not as violent as some.'

'Just tell me if that's really from the Book of Mormon, Palma. The centerfold. Read it,' he urged.

Wherefore it is an abridgement of the record of the people of Nephi:
1 Nephi, 17.

He raiseth up a rightous nation, and destroyeth the nations of the wicked. And he did straiten them in the wilderness with his rod; for they hardened their hearts, even as ye have; and the Lord straitened their hearts, even as ye have; and the Lord straitened them because of their iniquity... Ye have seen an angel, and he spake unto you; yea, ye have heard his voice from time to time; and he hath spoken unto you in a still small voice...

'It's disjunct, as I recall,' said Palma. "

religious - fictional USA 1996 Ing, Dean. Systemic Shock. New York: Tor (original 1981; 1st Tor edition 1992); pg. 159-160. Church of God In Revealed Context:
"'It's disjunct, as I recall,' said Palma.

'Junk, hell. Destroying nations with fiery flying serpents is a pretty close description, I'd say. The only thing that doesn't follow is that explanation where they tell you the ship is a ship of state. No kidding, Palma, is it, or isn't it,--'

'DISJUNCT,' she said loudly to silence him,' means separated; disjointed. I don't remember the whole Book of Nephi, but I do know the special wackiness of the Church of God In Revealed context. They do numerology mumbo-jumbo, like numbering phrases and reading off those that are prime numbers, or something equally arbitrary. And sometime they come up with passages that fit when they were never intended to. This particular cult doesn't invent any new text--I think. They just combine pieces of what's already there--usually in order, but that piece about building a ship might be pages away.' "

religious - fictional USA 1996 Ing, Dean. Systemic Shock. New York: Tor (original 1981; 1st Tor edition 1992); pg. 159-160. Church of God In Revealed Context:
"'...They just combine pieces of what's already there--usually in order, but that piece about building a ship might be pages away.'

He mulled this over. 'I guess it'd be easy to check.'

'Yes, but few gentiles do--and Revealed Contexters play strictly by their own rules, so even if their compressed text doesn't match the original, they can claim it's all in the original. They just pull special messages out by numerical revelation.' Their steadfastness in their beliefs, she added, made them take great risks at times; and made them in some ways dangerous.' "

religious - fictional USA 1997 Brin, David. The Postman. New York: Bantam (1985); pg. 231. Holnists:
"
Lost Empire
by NATHAN HOLN

Today, as we approach the end of the Twentieth Century, the great struggles of our time are said to be between the so-called Left and so-called Right--those great behemoths of a contrived, fictitous political spectrum. Very few people seem to be aware that these so-called opposites are, in reality, two faces to the same sick beat. There is a widespread blindness, which keeps millions from seeing how they have been fooled by this fabrication.

But it was not always so. Nor will it always be.

In other tracts I have spoken of other types of systems--of the honor of medieval Japan, of the glorious, wild American Indians, and of shining Europe during the period effete scholars today call its 'Dark Age.' " [One more page of this tract by Holn.]

religious - fictional USA 1999 Anderson, Jack. Millennium. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 35. millennialists:
"Every cause, from the most serious to the most frivolous, seemed to draw thousands of followers to the nation's capital. Early on, Lorenzo thought that the gays were the nuttiest, but they had long been surpassed by the animal-sacrifice crowd, the animal-rights gang, and the Society for Legalized Pederasty. And lately, within the last six months or so, the millennialists had started to emerge from the woodwork.

The millennialists weren't bad folk. In fact, most of them struck him as being good people.

It was just that their beliefs seemed a little . . . well, unbelievable.

According to them, on December 31 of this year at 11:59 p.m., the show was over. God was going to ring down the curtain, collect the faithful few, and move on to other galactic engagements. "

religious - fictional USA 1999 Kessel, John. Good News from Outer Space. New York: Tor (1990; c. 1989); pg. 49. American Atheist Party:
"Other [newspaper] stories littered his desk:... 'Jehovah's Witnesses Torn by Schism.' 'High-Tech pioneer Founds American Atheist Party.' "
religious - fictional USA 1999 Kessel, John. Good News from Outer Space. New York: Tor (1990; c. 1989); pg. 400. Church of the New Age:
"'I represent the Church of the New Age. You've heard of us?'

'No.'

'We believe,' he said, 'that the Millennium has indeed come, but it has come to each person individually. That God's agents, extraterrestrials, have met us all individually in the last years, and that we have been measured and judged. That all that has happened is part of His plan--' " [More.]

religious - fictional USA 1999 Kessel, John. Good News from Outer Space. New York: Tor (1990; c. 1989); pg. 24. Millennialists:
"These notes concerned various religious movements, in particular the Millennialist preachings of the Reverend Jimmy-Don Gilray. The Millennialists believed that, as foretold in the scriptures, the end of the world was coming. The signs were there. The Antichrist was alive, and the movements offered various candidates to fill in the role in the drama of the Last Days. The Reverend Jimmy-Don tied the prophecies in with the wave of UFO reports that had swept the world in recent years. His followers called him a prophet. They said he heralded the new order, a thousand years of peace and freedom under the rule of the Lord, after which would come the final judgment. " [Millennialists: more, e.g., pg. 21, 44-45. Many other refs. to fictional groups, not in DB.]
religious - fictional USA 1999 Kessel, John. Good News from Outer Space. New York: Tor (1990; c. 1989); pg. 52. Millennialists:
"'Christ caused the stones to speak. The Antichrist makes statues walk--what does he call it?'

'Artificial intelligence!'

'Did ever a term more accurately describe the fraud it was designed to cover up? Artificial intelligence. AI. AI from the AC. Of course that's just an accident.'

'There are no accidents.'

'Christ raised the dead. And the Antichrist raises the dead. He calls it revival--'

The congregation roared in derision. "

religious - fictional USA 1999 Randle, Kristen D. Breaking Rank. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1999); pg. 1. Clan:
"...if living with the shadow of the Clan hadn't been so much like having a time bomb planted in the middle of the kitchen.

It wasn't romance, either--for Casey, who was a nice girl, there shouldn't have been anything remotely romantic about the Clan. To the levelheaded folk in her little northern town, the Clan was decidedly strange, which made it seem just as decidedly threatening. No matter how quiet the Clan remained, decent people call it 'lurking,' and they kept half an eye there, just in case... " [The 'Clan' are the central fictional cultural group of the novel. Many refs. to them throughout book, only a few examples in DB.]

religious - fictional USA 1999 Randle, Kristen D. Breaking Rank. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1999); pg. 2. Clan:
"Whatever else the members might have had in common, there was a definite behavioral code that seemed to bind them all together. The most obvious thing was that they all wore black, except for bracelets of intricately braided threats--mostly black, but with one color or another shot through the black in what was evidently a deliberate pattern. The hair varied, but the distinct Clan mark was the tiny bead-tipped braid they always wore at the left temple, another pattern of deliberate color.

The schools had tried to address this, hoping to break up a social aberration by enforcing dress codes, but the Clan serenely ignored any such efforts. The schools had then threatened expulsion, but expulsion didn't bother the Clan, nor did threat of parent conferences or failing grades, or really, anything else; it didn't seem the school could take anything away from the Clan that it cared about losing. Certainly the young Clan were in school... no one could call them truant. "

religious - fictional USA 1999 Randle, Kristen D. Breaking Rank. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1999); pg. 2. Clan:
"Perhaps the most disturbing thing about them was their silence. The young ones never spoke on school grounds. Never laughed. Never mocked, even with their eyes. Never even threatened. It was rare to see them talking, even among themselves in other places--though, in the course of business, the older ones seemed articulate enough when they needed to be.

As uncomfortable as its presence made people, on real action had ever been taken against the Clan, simply because the Clan had never done anything that could justify real action. Its members weren't openly violent or destructive or antilaw; they simply existed. And maybe that was what scared people the most--waiting to see what the Clan would finally do. But for twelve years, the Clan had done nothing. "

religious - fictional USA 1999 Randle, Kristen D. Breaking Rank. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1999); pg. 3. Clan:
"But for twelve years, the Clan had done nothing. Literally nothing. The remedial classes were rife with Clan because their grades were a resounding baseline; no one in the Clan ever lifted a pencil in class except to draw pictures that no teacher got to see. No Clan member answered questions. Not one of them even opened a book. The Clan just sat Hour after hour. It nearly drove the teachers out of their minds. Every year, a new teacher would come in, fresh out of college and ready; halfway through the year, he'd be looking for a transfer.

And through all the twelve years of its existence, there was no known record of any normal kid having shared so much as eye contact with a Clan member. Never a conversation, certainly never a relationship of any kind. "

religious - fictional USA 1999 Randle, Kristen D. Breaking Rank. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1999); pg. 1-2. Clan:
"Over the years, several agencies had tried to deal with the Clan, but the Clan made no deals. It stood apart, like an odd, fervent religion, and held its own against everything. The few Clan in the community at large kept to themselves but did their jobs with uncommon competence. All of the members were young--most school age--and exclusively male, with no racial distinction. The common denominator seemed to be area of town, which could have meant geographical location or income level or both. "
religious - fictional USA 1999 Randle, Kristen D. Breaking Rank. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1999); pg. 101-102. Clan:
"'So,' she went on quietly, 'do you believe in God?'

'The Clan doesn't,' he said...

'Do you?' she asked.

He grinned at her. 'I suspect I might... Do you?'...

'Definitely,' she said. "

religious - fictional USA 2000 Bishop, Michael. Catacomb Years. New York: Berkley (1979); pg. 13. Ortho-Urban Church:
[Timeline] "2000-2020: Rise of Urban & Conclave of Ward Representatives. Founding of Ortho-Urban Church. New-style seasonal calendar implemented. Popularity of neo-swing and pop-op-rah... " [Many refs. throughout novel, most not in DB. Ortho-Urbanism is one of two main fictional religious groups in book.]
religious - fictional USA 2000 Dick, Philip K. "The Pre-Persons " in The Golden Man. New York: Berkley (1980; c. 1974); pg. 295. Church of the Watchers:
"'His parents got him in just before the new law went into effect. They couldn't take him now, legally. They couldn't take you now. Look--you have a soul; the law says a twelve-year-old boy has a soul. So he can't go to the County Facility. See? You're safe. Whenever you see the abortion truck, it's for someone else, not you. Never for you. Is that clear. It's come for another younger child who doesn't have a soul yet, a pre-person.'

'It's a legal matter,' his mother said briskly. 'Strictly according to age. And you're past the age. The Church of Watchers got Congress to pass the law--actually, they, those church people, wanted a lower age; they claimed the soul entered the body at three years old, but a compromise bill was put through. The important thing for you is that you are legally safe, however you feel inside; do you see?' "

religious - fictional USA 2004 Dick, Philip K. The Zap Gun. New York: Bluejay Books (1985; c. 1965); pg. 61. Ol' Orville:
"'Ask,' Maren said, 'the Orville a question. Ol' Orville is the rage. People cloister themselves for days with it, doing nothing but asking and getting answers. It replaces religion.'

'There is no religion,' he said, feeling serious. His experience with the hyper-dimensional realm had disabused him of any dogmatic or devotional faith. if anyone living was qualified to claim knowledge of the 'next world' it was he, and as yet he had discovered no transcendent aspect to it.

Maren said, 'Then tell it a joke.'

'Can't I just put it back where I found it?'

'You really don't care how they plowshare your items.'

'No, that's their business...'

...Maybe he could ask Ol ' Orville that question. He said to the hard, small sphere in his hand. 'Am I making a mistake by feeling sorry for myself? By fighting city hall? By talking with a Soviet official during my coffee break?' He waited; nothing occurred. " [More about Ol' Orville, pg. 61-69, etc.]

religious - fictional USA 2009 England, Terry. Rewind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 228. Soldiers of God:
[News report.] "'There's much more to the message [from the Soldiers of God], about four hours worth. FBI agent Jack Theodoric has been assigned to the investigation. Jack, does the FBI have any doubts about what 'replacement' means?'

'None whatsoever, Marinka. It means make them dead.'

'What is the status of the Soldiers of God now?'

'We have most of the group in custody charged with murder and conspiracy to commit murder. There's about four more people we're searching hot and heavy for'

'Is it a safe assumption some of the evidence the agency declines to discuss led you to this group?'

'Better than safe, it's a fact. I'll go ahead and give you an example. A lock of hair was removed from the victim. We found that lock in a silver dish on an altar in the room the group uses as a church. These are not professional killers. This is one reason we think we can nip this group before they bud out.' "

religious - fictional USA 2009 England, Terry. Rewind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 224-225. Soldiers of God:
Pg. 224: "'Six have died, two are missing, a cult [the Soldiers of God] is out for blood and that Allan Goth guy is counting down the deaths...' "; pg. 225: "'You said you were fairly certain about Myra's killers?'

'The cult or whatever left enough clues a blind person could follow. You heard what we said about the religious objects? Dead give-aw--uh, I man, solid clues. We expect to announce arrests within the week. We are pressing the case, Miranda, in order to thwart copycat killers.' "

religious - fictional USA 2009 England, Terry. Rewind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 227-228. Soldiers of God:
[News report.] "'Members of the cult who are suspects in the death of Myra Caslon have all pleaded innocent to charges of first-degree murder. FBI officials and Salt Lake City prosecutors are remaining mum about the indictments. However, someone in the Soldiers of God, the group claiming credit for, as they call it, the kill, sent out vid-DVDs to several media outlets. On it, Meg Parker, one of the suspects who still remains in jail, explains why the killing took place. This is an excerpt from that disk.'

'You cannot accuse us of murder. We cannot murder that which is not human. Father van Kellin [an Evangelical preacher] has no doubts, why should we?... Did not the Pope himself say that these beings cannot be true to God's creation? Are there not scientists who are saying these people cannot be human because you cannot make an adult into a child? These minds do not doubt. We should not doubt. We will not doubt. We will take the action that God has demanded of us.' "

religious - fictional USA 2009 England, Terry. Rewind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 228-229. Soldiers of God:
[News report.] "'I understand there is a mixture of religious affiliations in the group [Soldiers of God].'

'Eight Protestants of various stripes, three Catholics, two Jews, one who calls himself a New Age minister, three Mormons.'

'No Muslims, as prior reports had indicated?'

'No Muslims, no Anglicans, no Unitarians.' "

religious - fictional USA 2010 Brackett, Leigh. The Long Tomorrow. New York: Ballantine (1974); pg. 164. Ishmaelites:
"'What do you mean... it depends?'

'On whether they've been 'struck' or not. Mostly they just wander and pray and do a lot of real holy starving. But then all of a sudden one of 'em'll start screaming and frothing and fall down kicking, and that's a sign they've been struck by the Lord's special favor. So the rest of 'em whoop and screech and beat themselves with thorny branches or maybe whips--whips, you see, is the only personal article their religion allows them to own--and when they're worked up enough they all pile down and butcher some rancher that's affronted the Lord by pampering this flesh with a sod roof and a full belly. They can do a real nice job of butchering, too.' "

religious - fictional USA 2010 Brackett, Leigh. The Long Tomorrow. New York: Ballantine (1974); pg. 164. Ishmaelites:
"Lee shivered. The faces of the Ishmaelites frightened him. He remembered the faces of the farmers when they marched into Refuge, and how their stony dedication had frightened him. But they were different. Their fanaticism roused up only when it was prodded. These people lived by it, lived for it, and served it without rhyme, reason or thought.

He hoped they would not fight.

They did not. The two wild-looking men and the women--a wiry creature with sharp shin bones showing under her shroud when she walked, and a tangle of black hair blowing over her shoulders--were too far away for any of their talk to be heard, but after a few minutes the leader of the train turned and spoke to the men behind him, and two of them turned and came back to the wagon. "

religious - fictional USA 2010 Brackett, Leigh. The Long Tomorrow. New York: Ballantine (1974); pg. 165. Ishmaelites:
"'Their religion don't seem to call for them starving quite to death, and every gang of them--this is only one band, you understand--does own a couple of guns. I hear they never shoot a young cow, though, but only the old bulls, which are tough enough to mortify anybody's flesh.'

'But powder,' said Len. 'Don't they use it on the ranchers, too?'

The old man shook his head. 'They're knife-and-claw killers, when they kill. I guess they can get closer to their work that way. Besides, they only get enough powder to barely keep them going... Oh Lord, there's Amity calling me. She's probably scared to death.' He turned and went immediately. Len watched the New Ishmaelites.

'Where did they come from?' he asked, trying to remember what he had heard about them. They were one of the very earliest extreme sects, but he didn't know much more than that.' "

religious - fictional USA 2010 Brackett, Leigh. The Long Tomorrow. New York: Ballantine (1974); pg. 165. Ishmaelites:
"'Some of them were here to begin with,' Hostetter said. 'Under other names, of course, and not nearly so crazy because the pressures of society sort of held them down, but a fertile seed bed. Others came here of their own accord when the New Ishmaelite movement took shape and really got going. A lot more were driven here out of the East, being natural-born troublemakers that other people wanted to be rid of.' " [Other refs. not in DB, e.g., pg. 212, 222-223.]
religious - fictional USA 2010 Stephenson, Neal. The Big U. New York: Random House (1984); pg. 94. Temple of Unlimited Godhead:
"The Student Senate was crammed with SUBbies and members of an outlaw Mormon splinger group called the Temple of Unlimited Godhead (TUG). Each of these groups claimed to represent all the students. As Sarah explained, no one in his right mind was interested in running for Student Senate, explaining why it was filled with fanatics and political science majors. Fortunately, SUB and TUG canceled each other out almost perfectly.

'I'm tired of having all aspects of my life ruled by this administration that doesn't give a [crap] for human rights, and I think it's time to do something about it,' said the first speaker. There was a little applause from the front and lots of jeering. A hum filled the air as the TUG began to OMMMM . . . at middle C--a sort of sonic tonic which was said to clear the air of foul influences and encourage spiritual peace... " [Many other refs., not all in DB.]

religious - fictional USA 2010 Stephenson, Neal. The Big U. New York: Random House (1984); pg. 95. Temple of Unlimited Godhead:
"Finally the older gentleman held up three fingers. The TUGgie shoved his fist between his arm and body and spoke loudly and sharply into the mike.

'I'd like to announce that I have caughta bat here in my hand, and now I'm going to bite the head off it right here as a sacrifice to the God of Communism.'

Below, the SUBbie found himself in absolute darkness, and tripped over a power cord. Simultaneously the TUGgie squined as all lights were swung around to bear on him. He smiled and began to talk in a calm chantlike voice. 'Well, well, well. I've got a confessino. I'm not really going to bite the head off a bat, because I don't even have one, and I'm not a Communist.' There was now a patter of what sounded like canned TV laughter from the TUG section. "

religious - fictional USA 2010 Stephenson, Neal. The Big U. New York: Random House (1984); pg. 96. Temple of Unlimited Godhead:
"The speaker yielded to another TUGgie, who stood rigidly with a stack of 3-X-5 cards and began to drone through them. 'At one time the leftist organizations of American Megaversity could claim that they represented some of the students. But the diverse organizations of the Left soon found that they all had one member who was very strident and domineering and who would push the others around until he or she had risen to a position of authority within the organization. These all turned out to be secretly members of the Stalinist Underground Battalion who had worked themselves into the organizations in order to merge the Left into a single bloc with no diversity or freedom of thought. The SUB took over a women's issues newsletter and turned it into the People's Truth Publication, a highly libelous so-called newspaper. In the same way . . .'

He was eventually cut of by Sarah. SUB spokespersons stated their views passionately, then another TUGgie. "

religious - fictional USA 2010 Stephenson, Neal. The Big U. New York: Random House (1984); pg. 119. Temple of Unlimited Godhead:
"Nearly everyone in the SUB raised his/her hand, but Yllas Freedperson, Operatives 1 and 2 and two others arose and made their loud way up to the back of the hall for an emergency conference. They were deeply concerned; they stopped short of being openly suspicious, a deeply fascist trait, but it occurred to them that what had just happened might strongly suggest the presence of a TUG deep-cover mole in the SUB [Stalinist Underground Battalion]! "
religious - fictional USA 2010 Stephenson, Neal. The Big U. New York: Random House (1984); pg. 230. Temple of Unlimited Godhead:
"'We've got ...loads of really powerful enemies, says Big Wheel. Like the Administration and the Temple of Unlimited Godhead and a bunch of nerds and some other people. We have to kill all of them.' "
religious - fictional USA 2010 Stephenson, Neal. The Big U. New York: Random House (1984); pg. 247. Temple of Unlimited Godhead:
"Mobs of hungry students broke through the picket lines empty-handed, obviously bent on eating scab food. The unionists were still so pissed off from the early fight that more scuffling and debris-throwing ensued. Twenty TUGgies carrying anti-communist signs took advantage of the confusion to set up a barrier around the SUB information table and erect their OM generator, a black box with big speakers used to augment their own personal OMs, which they now OMed through megaphones. A picket-sign duel broke out; it became clear that the SUB had reinforced their picket signs to make them into dangerous weapons. At a sign from their leader, Messiah #654, the TUGgies produced sawed-off pool cues and displayed highly developed kendo abilities. "
religious - fictional USA 2010 Stephenson, Neal. The Big U. New York: Random House (1984); pg. 248. Temple of Unlimited Godhead:
"The Haitians and Vietnamese, who had built up fierce hatred for the Terrorists, took the opportunity to rush into the central brawl. The SUB tried to block them, without success. The TUGgies charged after the SUB to make sure they didn't do anything illegal. The fight was frenzied now... Upstairs in the towers, the SUB/Terrorist extremists...

Obviously SUB and TUG were prepared. Both groups hoped to capture the kitchen by entering through the serving bays and vaulting the steam tables... The SUB got there first, shot the lock out and kicked the door; but there was a senior TUGgie barricaded behind a steam table, with a heavy machine gun aimed at them and a smiling protege holding the ammo belt. The gunner watched cheerfully as the SUBbies jumped back and rolled away the door, butheld his fire until the TUGgies behind them had jumped through the breach and scurried out of the line of fire. " [See also pg. 249-252, 261.]

religious - fictional USA 2010 Stephenson, Neal. The Big U. New York: Random House (1984); pg. 248. Temple of Unlimited Godhead:
"The Haitians and Vietnamese, who had built up fierce hatred for the Terrorists, took the opportunity to rush into the central brawl. The SUB tried to block them, without success. The TUGgies charged after the SUB to make sure they didn't do anything illegal. The fight was frenzied now... Upstairs in the towers, the SUB/Terrorist extremists...

Obviously SUB and TUG were prepared. Both groups hoped to capture the kitchen by entering through the serving bays and vaulting the steam tables... The SUB got there first, shot the lock out and kicked the door; but there was a senior TUGgie barricaded behind a steam table, with a heavy machine gun aimed at them and a smiling protege holding the ammo belt. The gunner watched cheerfully as the SUBbies jumped back and rolled away the door, but held his fire until the TUGgies behind them had jumped through the breach and scurried out of the line of fire. " [See also pg. 249-252, 261, 269, 296, 305-306.]

religious - fictional USA 2010 Stephenson, Neal. The Big U. New York: Random House (1984); pg. 95-96. Temple of Unlimited Godhead:
"'I just did that as a little demonstration, to show you folks how easy it is to get the attention of the media. We can come and talk about serious issues and do real things, but what gets TV coverage are violent eye-catching events, a thing which the Communists who wish to destroy our society understand very well. But I'm not here to give a speech. I'm here to propose an amendment . . .' Here he was dive-bombed by the bat, who veered away at the last moment; the speaker jumped back in horror, to the amusement of almost everyone. The TUGgies laughed too, showing that, yes, they did have a sense of humor no matter what people said. The speaker struggled to regain his composure.

'...Resume the speech! The amendment!' shouted the older man.

'My budge proposal is that we take away all funding for the Stalinist Underground Battalion and distribute it among the other activities groups.'

The lecture hall exploded in outraged chanting, uproarious applause, and OM. "

religious - fictional USA 2010 Williams, Walter Jon. Days of Atonement. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 212. Church of the Apostles of Elohim and the Nazarene:
"Loren thought about it, wondered what it meant for him. 'Have you ever seen a miracle?' he asked.

Rickey grinned. 'No. It was the absence of miracles that convinced me of their existence... I was brought up an Apostle, of course, back in Susquehanna, but I didn't take much stock in matters of faith... The idea that God sent an angel to some half-literate farmer in upste Pennsylvania in order to deliver a worldwide revelation--pretty silly, don't you think?... And the good things that were associated with the church, the welfare and community work and so on...' "

religious - fictional USA 2010 Williams, Walter Jon. Days of Atonement. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 216. Church of the Apostles of Elohim and the Nazarene:
"'You have to understand that our church has always been torn between its gnostic origins--Samuel Catton's revelations and miracles--and its own establishment impulse. With the death of Catton and the foundation of the college, the church establishment became dominant. Miracles, you see, change things. They tear things up, turn everything upside down. An established church doesn't like tales of miracles, at leat not outide of scripture, in the here and now. They're so. . . uncontrolled... the Apostles were rebels against even the Mormons, which should make us even more antiestablishment. Our social prorams were a century ahead of their time.' "
religious - fictional USA 2010 Williams, Walter Jon. Days of Atonement. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 63-64. Church of the Apostles of Elohim and the Nazarene:
"Ricky... brough a kind of restraint and intellectuality to his sermons that Loren wasn't certain he liked. The previous pastor, an old Pennsylvania Dutchman named Baumgarten, would have jumped up and down, waved his arms, poured sweat by the bucketful, and got to the subject of Hell long before this.

Not that Loren particularly enjoyed the contemplation of Hell. But since the Reverend Samuel Catton had been taken on a tour of Hell and various other parts of the cosmos by the Master in Gray who had dictated the Authorized Revelations, the existence of the Land of Fire was a necessary part of the faith, and Loren sometimes wondered by Ricky never seemed to mention it. "

religious - fictional USA 2010 Willis, Connie. "Samaritan " in Fire Watch. New York: Bluejay (1984; story copyright 1979); pg. 224. United Ecumenical Church:
"The fundamentalist Charismatic movement had gained strength all through the eighties. They had been committed to the imminent coming of the End, with its persecutions and Antichrist. On a sultry Tuesday in 1989 they had suddenly announced that the End was not only in sight, but here, and that all true Christians must unite to do battle against the Beast. The Beast was never specifically named, but most true Christians concluded he resided somewhere among the liberal churches. There was fervent prayer on Methodist front lawns. Young men ranted up the aisles of Episcopal churches during mass. A great many stained glass windows... were broken. A few churches burned. " [Thereafter the liberal Protestant churches joined to form the United Ecumenical Church.]
religious - fictional USA 2010 Willis, Connie. "Samaritan " in Fire Watch. New York: Bluejay (1984; story copyright 1979); pg. 225. United Ecumenical Church:
"The Rapture lost considerable momentum when two years later the skies still had not rolled back like a scroll and swallowed up the faithful, but the Charies [Charismatics] were a force the newly born United Ecumenical Church refused to take lightly. She was a rather hodgepodgy church, it was true, but she stood like a bulwark against the Charies. "
religious - fictional USA 2010 Willis, Connie. "Samaritan " in Fire Watch. New York: Bluejay (1984; story copyright 1979); pg. 225. United Ecumenical Church:
"'There wasn't anything?' Rev. Hoyt asked. 'But the bishops can at least make a ruling, can't they?'

'The bishops have no authority over you in this matter. The United Church of Christ insisted on self-determination in matters within an individual church, including election of officers, distribution of communion, and baptism. It was the only way we could get them in,' [into the Ecumenical Church] she finished apologetically.

'I've never understood that. There they were all by themselves with the Charismatics moving in like wolves. They didn't have any choice. They had to come in. So how did they get a plum like self-determination?'

'It worked both ways, remember. We could hardly stand by and let the [Charismatics] get them. Besides, everyone else had fiddled away their compromise points on trespassers versus debtors and translations of the Bible. You Presbyterians, as I recall, were determined to stick in the magic word 'predestination' everywhere you could.' "

religious - fictional USA 2011 Sawyer, Robert J. The Terminal Experiment. New York: HarperCollins (1995); pg. 309. Worldwide Church of Christ:
"NET NEWS DIGEST... Baptize yourself in the privacy of your own home! New product includes formal baptism ceremony on videotape, plus holy water blessed by an authentic priest. Approved by the Worldwide Church of Christ. $199.95. Money-back guarantee. " [The name of this group may be patterned after the actual 'Worldwide Church of God'.]
religious - fictional USA 2019 Burton, Levar. Aftermath. New York: Warner Books (1997); pg. 127. Earthies:
"The tattoo meant that the man was an Earthie, a member of the 'screw the establishment, let's grow our hair long and live with Mother Nature' group that popped up shortly after the beginning of the new millennium. Earthies were a blending of the hippie movement of the 1960s and the New Age movement of the 1990s. Extreme pacifists, they lived on communal farms, growing their own vegetables--and in some cases their own marijuana--turning their back on government, world problems and society in general. They held no jobs, but existed entirely on the land and what money they could make selling fruits and vegetables. Needless to say, those who live din states with moderate temperatures and longer growing seasons fared much better than their brothers and sisters in colder climates. "
religious - fictional USA 2019 Burton, Levar. Aftermath. New York: Warner Books (1997); pg. 127. Earthies:
"Unlike hippies, Earthies did not take to the streets to protest the war. They didn't burn flags, hold rallies or march on Washington. Instead they retreated deeper into the countryside, becoming an almost invisible element in society, tuning in on the harmonic energies of the solar system through yoga, meditation, Celtic ceremonies and a host of other spiritual nonsense. Only after the fighting stopped did members of their society start to reappear in public. " [Other refs., not in DB. See also pg. 129-135, etc.]
religious - fictional USA 2019 Burton, Levar. Aftermath. New York: Warner Books (1997); pg. 156. Earthies:
"'You used to be an Earthie. Don't they believe in clairvoyance and thought projection?'

'Believe in it? Yes. Can any of them actually do it? No. At least none of the ones I know. It's like the Bible thumpers who believe in God though they've never actually seen him.' "

religious - fictional USA 2024 Clarke, Arthur C. & Mike McQuay. Richter 10. New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 214. Cosmies:
Pg. 59: "'...a Jewess.'

Newcombe's jaw muscles tightened. 'She's a Cosmie.'

'Judaism is a race, not a religion.' ";

Pg. 214: "'Is that when you became a Cosmie?'

'No,' She laughed, moving around to sit beside him on the couch. 'My father was Jewish by birth, not my mother, which left me nowhere in a matrilineal culture. I always remember my dad as a Cosmie. He converted when I was very young. Guess that's why I gravitated that way. Cosmies are friendly enough folks, like Unitarians with vision. It didn't stop me from losing a scholarship because they said I was Jewish, though.' "



religious - fictional, continued

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