Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to religious - fictional, Texas: Dallas-Fort Worth

religious - fictional, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
religious - fictional Texas: Dallas-Fort Worth 1998 Wood, Crystal. Fool's Joust. Denton, Texas: Tattersall Publishing (1998); pg. 21. Knights of the Once and Forever King:
[From the group's home page:] "It is a perilous journey to Avalon (heaven), but those strong enough of heart to take up His sword and follow shall stand at His sie as the Returned King claims His eternal throne when Evil is vanquished. If you are searching for true meaning in your life . . . if you seek fellowship and love with others who are bold . . . if you seek the eternal peace and prosperity that is Avalon . . . then pray that God will lead you to the Once and Forever King!

(In the Dallas-Fort Worth area, hear our Sovereign speak each Sunday at 1:00 a.m. on the KVXP-FM program, 'Voices from Beyond, or visit Joyous Gard, a waystation for apprentice Knights and loyal friends, at 4633 West Redwing Drive in Fort Worth, Texas.) "

religious - fictional Texas: Dallas-Fort Worth 1998 Wood, Crystal. Fool's Joust. Denton, Texas: Tattersall Publishing (1998); pg. 20-21. Knights of the Once and Forever King:
[From the group's home page:] "Every day, TV and newspapers shout about bitter conflicts between nations and ideologies. You are shocked and sickened when you see starvation, crime, disaster, immorality and hatred. These are symptoms of a disease called EVIL . . . and there IS a cure!

You may have heard that someday there will be a final battle between good and evil for supremacy over the earth. The battle is at hand! And leading the force of good is the King whose power and influence ruled the entirety of Western Civilization in the obscure and turbulent years known as the Dark Ages. He has gone beyond life but lives again among the faithful. He is Arthur, the Once and Forever King, and His mighty army is gathering behind Him to lead his people to final victory over Evil. "

religious - fictional Texas: Galveston 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 11. Church of Ishtar:
"'Coffee?' Laura said.

'No, thank you. I never take caffeine.'

'I see.' Laura put the pot aside. 'What can I do for you, Reverend?'

'You and I have much in common,' Reverend Morgan said. 'We share a confidence in Galveston's future. And we both have a stake in the tourist industry... I understand your husband designed this building.'

'Yes, he did.'

'It's 'Organic Baroque,' isn't it? A style that respects Mother Earth. That shows a broad-minded approach on your part. Forward-looking and progressive.'

'Thank you very much.' Here it comes, Laura thought.

'Our Church would like to help you expand services to your corporate guests. Do you know the Church of Ishtar?'

'I'm not sure I follow you,' Laura said carefully. 'We at Rizome consider religion a private matter.' " [Many other refs. to the Church of Ishtar, not all in DB.]

religious - fictional Texas: Galveston 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 11. Church of Ishtar:
"'We Temple women believe in the divinity of the sexual act.' Reverend Morgan leaned back in her bucket seat, stroking her hair with both hands. 'The erotic power of the Goddess can destroy evil.'

The slogan found a niche in Laura's memory. 'I see,' Laura said politely. 'The Church of Ishtar. I know your movement, but I hadn't recognized the name.'

'It's a new name--old principles. You're too young to remember the Cold War.' Like many of her generation, the reverend seemed to have a positive nostalgia for it--the good old bilateral days. When things were simpler and every morning might be your last. 'Because we put an end to it. We invoked the Goddess to take the war out of men. We melted the cold war with divine body heat.' The reverend sniffed. 'Male power mongers claimed the credit, of course. But the triumph belonged to our Goddess. She saved Mother Earth from the nuclear madness. And she continues to heal society today.' "

religious - fictional Texas: Galveston 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 12. Church of Ishtar:
"'Galveston lives by tourism, Mrs. Webster. And tourists expect certain amenities. Our Church has come to an arrangement with the city and the police. We'd like an understanding with your group as well.'

Laura rubbed her chin. 'I think I can follow your reasoning, Reverend.'

'No civilization has ever existed without us,' the reverend said coolly. 'The Holy Prostitute is an ancient, universal figure. The Patriarchy degraded and oppressed her. But we restore her ancient role as comforter and healer.'

'I was going to mention the medical angle,' Laura said.

'Oh, yes,' said the reverend. 'We take the full range of precautions. Clients are tested for syphilis, gonorrhea, chlamydia, and herpes, as well as the retroviruses. All our temples have fully equipped clinics. Sexual disease rates drop dramatically wherever we practice our art--I can show you statistics. We also offer health insurance. And we guarantee confidentiality, of course.' "

religious - fictional Texas: Galveston 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 12. Church of Ishtar:
"'It's a very interesting proposal,' Laura said... 'But it's not a decision I can make on my own. I'll be happy to take your ideas to the Central Committee.' She took a breath... 'You have to understand that Rizome may have some difficulties with this. Rizome favors strong social ties in its associates. It's part of our corporate philosophy. Some of us might consider prostitution a sign of social breakdown.'

The reverend spread her hands and smiled. 'I've heard about Rizome's policies. You're economic democrats--I admire that. As a church, a business, and a political movement, we're a new-millennium group ourselves. But Rizome can't change the nature of the male animal. We've already serviced several of your male associates. Does that surprise you?' She shrugged. 'Why risk their health with amateur or criminal groups? We Temple women are safe, dependable, and economically sensible. The Church stands ready to do business.' "

religious - fictional Texas: Galveston 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 12. Church of Ishtar:
"Laura dug into her desk. 'Let me give you one of our brochures.'

The reverend opened her purse. 'Have a few of ours. I have some campaign pamphlets--I'm running for City Council.'

Laura looked the pamphlets over. They were slickly printed. The margins were dotted with ankh symbols, yin-yangs, and chalices. "

religious - fictional Texas: Galveston 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 13. Church of Ishtar:
"Laura scanned the dense text, spotted with italics and words in red. 'I see you favor a liberal drug policy.'

'Victimless crimes are tools of Patriarchal oppression.' The reverend dug in her purse and produced an enameled pillbox. 'A few of these will argue the case better than I can.' She dropped three red capsules on the desktop. 'Try them, Mrs. Webster. As a gift from the Church. Astonish your husband.'

'I beg your pardon?' Laura said.

'Remember the giddiness of first love? The sense that the whole world had new meaning because of him? Wouldn't you like to recapture that? Most women would. It's an intoxicating feeling, isn't it? And these are the intoxicants.' "

religious - fictional Texas: Galveston 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 13. Church of Ishtar:
"'Are you telling me these are love potions?'

The reverend shifted uncomfortably, with a whisper of black silk against vinyl. 'Mrs. Webster, please don't mistake me for a witch. The Church of Wicca are reactionaries. And no, these aren't love potions, not in the folklore sense. They only stir that rush of emotion--they can't direct it at anyone. You do that for yourself.'

'It sounds hazardous,' Laura said.

'Then it's the sort of danger women were born for!' the reverend said. 'Do you ever read romance novels? Millions do, for the same thrill. Or eat chocolate? Chocolate is a lover's gift, and there's reason behind the tradition. Ask a chemist about chocolate and serotonin precursors sometime.' The reverend touched her forehead. 'It all comes to the same, up here. Neurochemistry.' She pointed to the table. 'Chemistry is in those pills. They're natural substances, creations of the Goddess. Part of the feminine soul.' "

religious - fictional Texas: Galveston 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 13. Church of Ishtar:
"'Are they [the pills] legal?' Laura said.

Reverend Morgan picked up a pill with her lacquered nails and ate it. 'No blood test would show a thing. You can't be prosecuted for the natural contents of your own brain. And no, they're not illegal. Yet. Praise the Goddess, the Patriarchy's laws still lag behind advances in chemistry.'

'I can't accept these,' Laura said. 'They must be valuable. It's conflict of interest.' Laura picked them up and stood, reaching over the desk.

'This is the modern age, Mrs. Webster. Gene-spliced bacteria can make drugs by the ton. Friends of ours make them for thirty cents each.' Reverend Morgan rose to her feet. 'You're sure?' She slipped the pills back in her purse. 'Come and see if you change your mind. Life with one male can go stale very easily. Believe me, we know. And if that happens, we can help you... In any of several ways.' "

religious - fictional Texas: Galveston 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 21. Church of Ishtar:
"Laura wondered if she should tell him about the Church of Ishtar. Thinking about the interview revived her sense of sexual repulsion, like the soiled feeling she got from seeing pornography. She decided not to mention it tonight. He was sure to take it all wrong if he thought his overtures made her feel like a hooker. " [More, pg. 29-30, 35, 42, 45, 53, 80, 147, many more.]
religious - fictional Texas: Galveston 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 4. Optimal Persona:
"David... 'I dreamed I saw my Optimal Persona last night.'

'Oh?' Laura said, surprised. 'What was it like?'

'I dunno. About what I expected from the stuff I read about it. Soaring and foggy and cosmic. I was standing on the beach. Naked, I think. The sun was coming up. It was hypnotic. I felt this huge sense of total elation. Like I'd discovered some pure element of soul.'

Laura frowned. 'You don't really believe in that crap.

He shrugged. 'No. Seeing your O.P. [Optimal Persona]--it's a fad. Like folks used to see UFO's, you know? Some weirdo in Oregon says he had an encounter with his personal archetype. Pretty soon, everybody and his brother's having visions. Mass hysteria, collective unconscious or some such. Stupid. But modern at least. It's very new-millennium.' He seemed obscurely pleased.

'It's mystic bullsh--,' Laura told him. 'If it was really your Optimal Self, you should have been building something, right? Not beachcombing for Nirvana.' "

religious - fictional Texas: Galveston 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 4. Optimal Persona:
"David looked sheepish. 'It was just a dream. Remember that documentary last Friday? The guy who saw his O.P. walking down the street, wearing his clothes, using his charge card? I got a long way to go just yet.' ";

[Year indicated on same page:] "'I tripped over a piece of hurricane junk. Buried in the sand. A VCR, actually.'...

'Really? Must have been there since the big one of '02. Twenty years!...' " [Also, pg. 68, 73, 133, 255, 281, 285.]

religious - fictional Texas: Houston 2050 Haldeman, Joe. Forever Peace. New York: Ace Books (1998; first ed. 1997); pg. 30. Enders:
[An Ender threatens a soldier.] "'Mechanics ain't so tough. I was in the army.'

'You know all about it, then.' He took a half-step to the right, I think a feint. I didn't move. 'You don't want to wait for your Rapture? You want to die right now?'

He looked at for a long second. There was nothing in his eyes. 'Oh, [expletive] you anyhow.' He put the knife back in his boot... walked away without looking back.

I turned off the puttyknife... and went into the liquor store.

The clerk had a chrome Remington airspray. '[expletive] Endie. I would've got him.'

'Thanks,' I said. He would've gotten me too, with an airspray. 'You got six Dixies?'

'Sure.' He opened the case... 'Ration card?'

'Army,' I said...

'Figured... You know they got a law I got to let the [expletive] Endies in the store? They never buy anything.'

'Why should they?' I said. 'World's going up in smoke tomorrow, maybe the next day.'

'Right. Meanwhile they steal y' blind...' "

religious - fictional Texas: Houston 2050 Haldeman, Joe. Forever Peace. New York: Ace Books (1998; first ed. 1997); pg. 29-30. Enders:
"South Houston... 'Hey boy,' a deep bass voice said behind me. 'You got ten dollars for me? Maybe twenny?'

I turned around slowly. He was a head taller than me, maybe forty, lean, muscle suit. Shiny boots up to his knees and the tightly braided ponytail of an Ender: God would use that to haul him up to haven. Soon, he hoped.

'I thought you guys didn't need money.'

'I need some. I need it now.'

'So what's your habit?' I put my hand on my hip. Not natural or comfortable, but close to the putty knife. 'Maybe I got some.'

'You don't got what I need. Got to buy what I need.' He drew a long knife with a slender wavy blade from his boot.

'Put it away. I got ten.' The silly dagger was no match for a puttyknife, but I didn't want to perform a dissection out here on the sidewalk.

'Oh, you got ten. Maybe you got fifty.' He took a step toward me.

I pulled out the puttyknife and turned it on... 'You just lost ten. How much more you want to lose?' "

religious - fictional Thrakia -99927 B.C.E. Wolverton, Dave. The Courtship of Princess Leia. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 140. Thrakians:
"True, Luke had floated through the air, carried Isolder's ship to safety, but couldn't that power have issued from Luke's own twisted mind, rather than from some mystical Force? On Thrakia was a race of insects with genetically transmitted memories who worshiped their own power to speak. Apparently the insects all remembered that in the recent past they had communicated only through scent, and then one day they discovered that they had the ability to communicate by clicking their mandibles. After three hundred years they were all still overawed by the fact that they could communicate this way, and all of them took it as a sign that they had been gifted from some higher being. But it was just their stupid mandibles clacking! "
religious - fictional Tiamat 3500 Vinge, Joan D. The Snow Queen. New York: Dial Press (1980); pg. 11. Tiamat religion:
[Year guessed at.] "The woman nodded. 'I am Clavally Bluestone Summer.' She set her hands against her forehead. 'Ask, and I will answer.'

They did not ask, dazed by the knowledge that she would--could--answer any question they could imagine; or that the Lady Herself would answer them with Clavally's lips, while the sibyl was swept away in a trance... ";

"'But what does it mean?' Sparks [asked].

Clavally shook her head. 'I don't know. The Lady only speaks through me, not to me. That's the Transfer--the way it is.' " ['The Lady' is the deity which appear to be generally worshipped on the planet Tiamat, but not throughout the interplanetary civilization known as the Empire or the Hegemony. Many other refs. to Tiamat religion (which is never formally named) are in this book, most not in DB.]

religious - fictional Tiamat 3500 Vinge, Joan D. The Snow Queen. New York: Dial Press (1980); pg. 12. Tiamat religion:
[Year guessed at.] "Again the bright laughter. 'Good! I'm making this journey through the Windwards to urge all the young Summers, before they settle into life, to remember that they can dedicate themselves to the Sea in another way than as fishers or farmers. They can serve the Lady by serving their fellow human beings as sibyls, as I do. Some of us are born with a special seed inside us, and it only waits for the Lady to touch us and make it grow. When you're old enough maybe you two will hear Her call, and go to a choosing place.' "; Pg. 13: "'By then you'll be sure it isn't just the crying of sea birds you hear. But always remember, in the end it won't be you who will choose the Lady, but th Lady Who will choose you.' "
religious - fictional Tiamat 3500 Vinge, Joan D. The Snow Queen. New York: Dial Press (1980); pg. 14. Tiamat religion:
[Year guessed at.] "'Sparkie, I love you . . . more than anything under the sky.' She kissed him, tasting salt on his lips. 'Let the Sea Mother witness that you hold my willing heart, only you, now and forever.'

He repeated the words, clearly and proudly, and together they sipped sea water from their cupped hands to complete the vow... They had pledged their love for the first time when they were barely old enough to recite the words and everyone had laughed. But they had been true to each other ever since... "

religious - fictional Tiamat 3500 Vinge, Joan D. The Snow Queen. New York: Dial Press (1980); pg. 27. Tiamat religion:
[Year guessed at.] "He could have told them that Starbuck was the Queen's lover, and would be until some quicker, shrewder challenger brought him down and became the new Starbuck--for the Queen was traditionally the Sea Mother incarnate; she had many lovers, as the sea had many islands. "
religious - fictional Tiamat 3500 Vinge, Joan D. The Snow Queen. New York: Dial Press (1980); pg. 29. Tiamat religion:
[Year guessed at.] "'We must cast out the Evil Ones from among us--we must throw their idols into the Sea.' Daft Naimy threw his arms up, shaking fists at the smothered sky; she watched the ragged sleeves of his stained robe tumble back... He called himself the Summer Prophet, and he roamed from island to island across the sea, preaching the word of the Lady as he heard it, distorted by the echoing of divine madness. When she was a child she had feared him, until her mother had told her not to; and laughed at him, until her grandmother had told her not to; and been embarrassed by him, until her own growing understanding had taught her to endure him. "
religious - fictional Tiamat 3500 Vinge, Joan D. The Snow Queen. New York: Dial Press (1980); pg. 30. Tiamat religion:
[Year guessed at.] "She had heard that Daft Naimy [the Summer Prophet] had been born a Winter. She had heard that he had once been a tech-loving unbeliever . . . that he had scorned natural law by shedding the blood of a sibyl [priestess-mystic]. That he had been driven mad by the Lady [the world's goddess] as punishment; that this was how he served his penance. The trefoil symbol the sibyls wore was a warning against defilement, against trespass on sacred ground. They said it was death to kill a sibyl, death to love a sibyl, death to be a sibyl . . . and they meant a living death...

'There is the Sinner who worships false gods! See him!' The gnarled hand flew out like an accusing arrow. "

religious - fictional Tiamat 3500 Vinge, Joan D. The Snow Queen. New York: Dial Press (1980); pg. 207. Tiamat religion:
[Year guessed at.] "'The Lady chooses . . .'

'Ah. So on your world your goddess is in charge--or you've always believed that she is. What would you say if I told you that your visions weren't a gift from the gods, but a legacy of the Old Empire.'

Moon realized that she had been holding her breath, let it out suddenly. 'yes! I mean, I--I expected it. Everyone here knows I'm a sibyl; how could they know? You're a sibyl; and you've never heard of the Lady.' She had long ago stopped seeing the Sea Mother literally, a beautiful woman with seaweed hair, clad in spume, rising from the waves in a mer-drawn shell. But even the formless, elemental force she sometimes felt touch her soul would not have left Her element or journeyed so far. If in fact she had ever felt anything, beyond her own longing to feel...

'But how could the Old Empire put sibyls everywhere, if no god did? Weren't they only humans?'

'They were... But in some ways they had the power of gods...' "

religious - fictional Tran 1996 Pournelle, Jerry & Roland Green. Tran. New York: Baen (1996); pg. -3. Yatar:
[Dramatis Personae] Pg. -3: "Apelles, son of Lykon--Priest of Yatar. "; Pg. -2: "Yanulf--Highpriest of Yatar and Chancellor of Drantos...

Archbishop Polycarp--Founder of the movement for the united worship of Yatar and Christ. "; Pg. -1: "Phrados the Prophet--Religious fanatic opposed to the united worship of Yatar and Christ. "

religious - fictional Tran 1996 Pournelle, Jerry & Roland Green. Tran. New York: Baen (1996); pg. 16. Yatar:
Pg. 16: "One end of the room was dominated by a throne on a high dais. Below that was a lower dais with less elaborate chairs. Yanulf, chief priest of Yatar Day father, was already there. So was Sigrim, high priest of Vothan One-eye, Chooser of the Slain. They did not rise when Rick came to the dais. As he took his seat on the lower platform there was a stir at the door. Tylara had arrived. "; Pg. 32: "Yanulf, Archpriest of Yatar, stood defiantly, his arms thrown out wide. 'The Time approaches. And in the Time of Burning, then shall the areas smoke and the lands melt as wax. The waters of ocean shall lap the mountains. Woe to those who have no prepared. Woe to the unbelievers.' "; Pg. 35: "'Go with the blessings of Yatar Skyfather,' Yanulf said. 'Go swiftly, before The Time come on us and we all perish.' " [Much more. Worship of Yatar is the main fictional religion in the novel; there are references to it throughout.]
religious - fictional Tran 1996 Pournelle, Jerry & Roland Green. Tran. New York: Baen (1996); pg. 53. Yatar:
Pg. 53: "...had long boasted a small temple of Yatar where acolytes came for training; a natural place for a center of learning, but open and vulnerable. "
religious - fictional Tran 1996 Pournelle, Jerry & Roland Green. Tran. New York: Baen (1996); pg. 60. Yatar:
"Which would set Gwen hunting bureaucrats among the Roman rebels. The priesthood of Yatar would be another problem. If Rick could forge a Roman alliance, would the priests cooperate? The Romans were Christians who persecuted Yatar and Vothan One-eye as pagan gods. Lord, Rick thought. What must I do? I need the hierarchy of Yatar, to spread science through the land. And will the Christians cooperate?

The priest of Yatar were the key to survival. They must have a strong organization, or the temples couldn't have survived the Rogue Star and the nuclear bombardments, not once but at least three times. With the cooperation of Yanulf and the priesthood much could be accomplished; without it, Rick was in trouble. "

religious - fictional Tran 1996 Pournelle, Jerry & Roland Green. Tran. New York: Baen (1996); pg. 191. Yatar:
"One good thing about Yanulf. Lady Cara was silenced. She wouldn't giggle while the Primate of Drantos invoked the blessings of Yatar. Indeed, she stared as if hypnotized--and yet she probably wouldn't be able to remember a word that Yanulf has said. While Octavia would have been eager to talk, to discuss Yanulf's sermon and compare Yatar to the Roman Jehovah and his son Jesus Christ, to ponder the vision of Bishop Polycarp that the Christ was in fact the Son of Yatar, that Yatar and Jehovah were One--' "
religious - fictional Tran 1996 Pournelle, Jerry & Roland Green. Tran. New York: Baen (1996); pg. 252. Yatar:
Pg. 252: "'As the mother of Christ,' Yanulf said. 'For as you know, the Christ was born of a virgin. Polycarp preaches a doctrine which he calls 'Immaculate Conception,' under which Hestia took on the flesh of a mortal in order to bear a son to Yatar.'

'And you believe this?'

Yanulf frowned. 'I know not what to believe. one thing is certain, the prophecies of The Time are true. And they were revealed by Yatar himself. The Romans know much of The Time, and thus must once have known Yatar.' He shrugged. 'Perhaps Polycarp is correct, their Jehovah is Yatar. The names are not unlike.' ";

Pg. 362: "There were also rumors of a fanatical religious leader, who was welding the horde into a crusade against the new idea of Christ as the Son of Yatar. Rick hoped the rumors were just that; religious warfare was one ingredient the Tran stew didn't need. "

religious - fictional Trantor 23000 Asimov, Isaac. Prelude to Foundation. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 173. Mycogenian:
"'...I can't answer your specific question, however, because I've never made any special investigation of Mycogen. Still, from what little I've seen of the place and from my knowledge of religions in history, I wouldn't be surprised if the Mycogenian was religious in character.'

'Would it surprise you if Mycogenian legends were also religious in character?'

'No, it wouldn't.

'And therefore not based on historical matter?'

'That wouldn't necessarily follow. The core of the legends might still be authentically historic, allowing for distortion and supernaturalistic intermixture.'

'Ah,' said Seldon and seemed to retire into his thoughts. "

religious - fictional Trantor 23000 Asimov, Isaac. Prelude to Foundation. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 175. Mycogenian:
"'But who is going to describe the early world for you? If the Mycogenians have some coherent picture of the primordial galaxy, Sunmaster certainly won't reveal it to a tribesman. No Mycogenian will. This is an ingrown society--how many times have we already said it?--and its members are suspicious of tribesmen to the point of paranoia. They'll tell us nothing.'

'I will have to think of away to persuade some Mycogenians to talk. Those Sisters, for instance.'

'They won't even hear you, male that you are, any more than Sunmaster hears me. And even if they do talk to you, what would they know but a few catch phrases?'

'I must start somewhere.'

...'Well, let me think. Hummin says I must protect you and I interpret that as meaning I must help you when I can. What do I know about religion? That's nowhere near my specialty...' " [See other refs. to Mycogenian religion under 'religious' in DB. Other refs. not in DB.]

religious - fictional Trantor 23000 Asimov, Isaac. Prelude to Foundation. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 176. Mycogenian:
"'Do you think Mycogen has [sacred] books of that sort?'

'To be truthful,' said Dors thoughtfully, 'I have never heard of any. I might have if they existed openly--which means they either don't exist or are kept secret. In any case, it seems to me you are not going to see them.' "

religious - fictional Trantor 23000 Asimov, Isaac. Prelude to Foundation. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 160. Mycogenian:
"'Is Mycogen on this level entirely residential, then?'

'And on a few others. We are what you see. Every Brother and his family lives in equivalent quarters; every cohort in its equivalent community; all have the same ground-cars and all Brothers drive their own. There are no servants and none are at ease through the labor of others. None may glory over another.'

Seldon lifted his shielded eyebrows at Dors and said, 'But some of the people wear white, while some wear gray.'

'That is because some of the people are Brothers and some are Sisters.'

'And we?'

'You are a tribesman and a guest. You and you'--he paused and then said--'companion will not be bound by all aspects of Mycogenian life...' "

religious - fictional Trantor 23000 Asimov, Isaac. Prelude to Foundation. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 187. Mycogenian:
"Raindrop Forty-Three said in a voice that rose into higher registers but remained low, 'I thought so. I thought that was what you meant, but I couldn't believe it. You're accusing us of having religion. Why didn't you say so? Why didn't you use the word?'

She waited for an answer and Seldon, a little confused at the onslaught, said, 'Because that's not the word I use. I call it 'supernaturalism.' '

'Call it what you will. It's religion and we don't have it. Religion is for the tribesmen, for the swarming sc--'

The Sister paused to swallow as though she had come near to choking and Seldon was certain the word she had choked over was 'scum.'

She was in control again. Speaking slowly and somewhat below her normal soprano, she said, 'We are not a religious people. Our kingdom is of this Galaxy and always have been. If you have a religion--' "

religious - fictional Trantor 23000 Asimov, Isaac. Prelude to Foundation. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 188. Mycogenian:
"'...If you have a religion--'

Seldon felt tapped. Somehow he had not counted on this. He raised a hand defensively. 'Not really. I'm a mathematician and my kingdom is also of this Galaxy. It's just that I thought, from the rigidity of your customs, that your kingdom--'

'Don't think it, tribesman. If our customs are rigid, it is because we are mere millions surrounded by billions. Somehow we must mark ourselves off so that we precious few are not lost among your swarms and hordes. We must be marked off by our hairlessness, our clothing, our behavior, our way of life. We must know who we are and we must be sure that you tribesmen know who we are. We labor in our farms so that we can make ourselves valuable in your eyes and thus make certain that you leave us alone. That's all we ask of you . . . to leave us alone.'

'I have no intention of harming you or any of your people I seek only knowledge, here as everywhere.' "

religious - fictional Trantor 23000 Asimov, Isaac. Prelude to Foundation. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 188. Mycogenian:
"'So you insult us by asking about our religion, as though we have never called on a mysterious unsubstantial spirit to do for us what we cannot do for ourselves.'

'There are many people, many worlds who believe in supernaturalism in one form or another . . . religion, if you like the word better. We may disagree with them in one way or another, but we are as likely to be wrong in our disbelief as they in their belief. In any case, there is no disgrace in such belief and my questions were not intended as insults.'

But she was not reconciled. 'Religion!' she said angrily. 'We have no need of it.'

Seldon's spirits, having sunk steadily in the course of this exchange, reached bottom. This whole thing, this expedition with Raindrop Forty-Three had come to nothing.

But she went on to say, 'We have something far better. We have history.'

And Seldon's feelings rebounded at once and he smiled. "

religious - fictional Trantor 23000 Asimov, Isaac. Prelude to Foundation. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 192. Mycogenian:
"'...For many worlds, the ancient historical records--the truly ancient historical records--have decayed into myths and legends, often becoming part of a set of religious beliefs or of supernaturalism. But if Mycogen does not have a religion, then--'

'I said we have history.'

Seldon said, 'Twice you've said you have history. How old?'

'It goes back twenty thousand years.'

'Truly? Let us speak frankly. Is it real history or is it something that has degenerated into legend?'

'It is real history, of course.' "

religious - fictional Trantor 23008 Asimov, Isaac. Forward the Foundation. New York: Doubleday (1993); pg. 45. Mycogenian:
"'But why, then, do the Breakaways have to hide the fact that they're from Mycogen? They're not persecuted that I know of.'

'No, they're not. In fact, there's no general impression that Mycogenians are inferior. It's worse than that. The Mycogenians aren't taken seriously. They're intelligent--everyone admits that--highly educated, dignified, cultured, wizards with food, almost frightening in their capacity to keep their sector prosperous--but not one takes them seriously. Their beliefs strike people outside Mycogen as ridiculous, humorous, unbelievably foolish. And that view clings even to Mycogenians who are Breakaways. A Mycogenian attempts to seize power in the government would be crushed by laughter. Being feared is nothing. Being despised, even, can be lived with. But being laughed at--that's fatal. Joranum wants to be First Minister, so he must have hair...' " [Other refs., not in DB.]

religious - fictional Triple 2100 Bear, Greg. Heads (fiction). New York: St. Martin's Press (1990); pg. 45. Logology:
"I knew the rest of the story; it was in files on recent history I had studied in secondary. In 2090, Logolists on Mars had taken out a thousand-year development lease on Io from the Triple [i.e. the Earth, Moon & Mars]; violent, useless Io, visited only twice in history by human explorers. The new leaseholders set up a human-occupied station on Io in 2100. The station was lost with all occupants during the formation of a new Pelean-class sulphur lake. Seventy-five loyal Logologists died and were never recovered; they are still thre, entombed in black sulphur. The Logologists never admitted to looking for lost gods. "
religious - fictional United Kingdom 1996 Bear, Greg. The Forge of God. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 148. Satanic Invader's League:
"The New York Daily News, October 12, 1996:

Sources in the State Department... have confirmed that there is a connection between the disappearance and alleged government captivity of four people and the secret visit by President Crockerman to Death Valley earlier this week. Other informed sources have confirmed that both of these incidents are connected with the Australian extraterrestrials. In a related story, the Reverend Kyle McCabey of Edinburgh, Scotland, founder of the Satanic Invader's League, claims that his new religious sect now numbers its followers at a hundred thousand throughout the United Kingdom and the Irish Republic. The Satanic Invader's League believes that the Australian extraterrestrials are representatives of Satan sent to Earth to, in the Reverend's words, 'soften us up for Satan's conquest.' "

religious - fictional United Kingdom: England 1905 Gibson, William & Bruce Sterling. The Difference Engine. New York: Bantam (1991); pg. 99. Society of Light:
"Both women wear gilded sandals, and white draperies, somewhat akin to Greek toga, but strongly influenced by French neo-classicism. They are, in fact, the garments of female adepts of the Society of Light, the secret inner body and international propaganda arm of the Industrial radical Party... Lady Ada, her arms bare save for a signet-ring on her right forefinger, places a laurel wreath about the brow of a marble bust of Isaac Newson. Despite the careful placement of the camera, the strange garb does not flatter Lada Ada... Lady Ada was forty-one years old in late June 1855, when this daguerreotype was taken. " [Other refs. not in DB.]
religious - fictional United Kingdom: England 1905 Gibson, William & Bruce Sterling. The Difference Engine. New York: Bantam (1991); pg. 320. Society of Light:
"Mallory has only recently dismissed a purportedly clandestine meeting with the Society of Light. As the final Hierarch of this dwindling confraternity, tonight he wears the formal robes of office. His woolen chasuble of royal indigo is fringed in scarlet. A floor-length indigo skirt of artificial silk, similarly fringed, is decorated with concentrac bands of semi-precious stones. He has set aside a domed crown of beaded gold-plate, with a neck-guard of overlapping gilt scales... He chooses the folder to his left. It is an Engine-printed report from an elderly official of the Meirokusha, a famous confraternity of Japanese scholars which serves, not incidentally, as the formost Oriental chapter of the Society of Light... "
religious - fictional United Kingdom: England 1946 Orwell, George. Animal Farm. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (Copyright1946; 15th printing); pg. 18. Animalism:
"These three had elaborated old Major's teachings into a complete system of thought, to which they gave the name Animalism. Several nights a week, after Mr. Jones was asleep, they held secret meetings in the barn and expounded the principles of Animalism to the others... 'If this Rebellion is to happen anyway, what difference does it make whether we work for it or not?', and the pigs had great difficulty in making them see that this was contrary to the spirit of Animalism. " [Most other refs. not in DB. This is a parable of Communism.]
religious - fictional United Kingdom: England 1946 Orwell, George. Animal Farm. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (Copyright1946; 15th printing); pg. 148. Animalism:
"'...Are the Seven Commandments the same as they used to be, Benjamin?'

For once Benjamin consented to break his rule and he read out to her what was written on the wall. There was nothing there now except a single Commandment. It ran:

ALL ANIMALS ARE EQUAL
BUT SOME ANIMALS ARE MORE EQUAL THAN OTHERS
"
religious - fictional United Kingdom: England 1946 Orwell, George. Animal Farm. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (Copyright1946; 15th printing); pg. 27-28. Animalism:
"...the pigs had succeeded in reducing the principles of Animalism to Seven Commandments. These Seven Commandments would not be inscribed on the wall; they would form an unalterable law by which all the animals on Animal Farm must live for ever after... They ran thus:

THE SEVEN COMMANDMENTS

1. Whatever goes upon two legs is an enemy.
2. Whatever goes upon four legs, or has wings, is a friend.
3. No animal shall wear clothes.
4. No animal shall sleep in a bed.
5. No animal shall drink alcohol.
6. No animal shall kill any other animal.
7. All animals are equal. "

religious - fictional United Kingdom: England 1972 Adams, Richard. Watership Down. New York: Macmillan Publishing Co. (1972); pg. 23-24. rabbit:
"The Story of the Blessing of El-ahrairah

'Long ago, Frith made the world. He made all the stars, too, and the world is one of the stars. He made them by scattering his droppings over the sky and this is why the grass and the trees grow so thick on the world. Frith makes the rivers flow. They follow him as he goes through the sky, and when he leaves the sky they look for him all night. Frith made all the animals and birds, but when he first made them they were all the same. The sparrow and the kestrel were friends and they both ate seeds and flies. And the fox and the rabbit were friends and they both ate grass. And there was plenty of grass and plenty of flies, because the world was new and Frith shone down bright and warm all day.' " [This creation myth continues pg. 24-26. This entire book is about rabbits, and their culture, society, religion, etc. Other refs. not in DB.]

religious - fictional United Kingdom: England 2054 Willis, Connie. Doomsday Book. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 168-169. Church of the Millennium:
"'Here's your Scripture. It's from the King James this year. The Church of the Millennium insisted on it...'

'Your Scripture comes direcly after the bell ringers. It's been changed. Church of Millennium again. Luke 2:1-19.' He went off to distribute hymnals.

religious - fictional United Kingdom: England 2086 Heinlein, Robert A. Stranger in a Strange Land. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1961); pg. 253. Church of the New Revelation (Fosterite):
"L'Unita and Hoy published identical denunciations of Short's elevation,... Times of India snickered at it, and the Manchester Guardian simply reported it--the Fosterites in England were few but extremely militant. "
religious - fictional United Kingdom: England 2100 Burgess, Anthony. A Clockwork Orange. New York: W. W. Norton & Co. (1963; c. 1962); pg. 80. Prison Religion:
Pg. 80: "'Right, you lot. We'll end with Hymn Number 435 in the Prisoners' Hymnal.' Then there was a crash and a plop and a whish whish whish while the plennies picked up and dropped and lickturned the pages of their grazzy malenky hymnbooks and the bully fierce warders creeched: 'Stop talking there, bastards. I'm watching you, 920537.' Of course I had a disc ready on the stereo, and then I let the simple music for organ only come belting out... " [More.]; Pg. 81: "The idea was, I knew, that this charlie was after becoming a very great holy chelloveck in the world of Prison Religion, and he wanted a real horrorshow testimonial from the Governor, so he would go and govoreet quietly to the Governor now and then about what dark plots were brewing among the plennies, and he would get a lot of this cal from me... " [Many other refs. to Prison Religion, not in DB.]
religious - fictional United Kingdom: England 2100 Burgess, Anthony. A Clockwork Orange. New York: W. W. Norton & Co. (1963; c. 1962); pg. 83. Prison Religion:
"He would have gone on with a lot more of this cal, but we could slooshy the next lot of plennies marching clank clank down the iron stairs to come for their bit of Religion. He said: 'We'll have a little chat about this some other time. Now you'd better start the voluntary.' So I went over to the starry stereo and put on J. S. Bach's Wachet Auf Choral Prelude and in these grahzny vonny bastard criminals and perverts came shambling like a lot of broke-down apes, the warder or chassos like barking at them and lashing them. And soon the prison charlie was asking them: 'What's it going to be then, eh?' And that's where you came in.

We had four of these lomticks of like Prison Religion that morning, but the charlies said no more to me about this Ludovico's Technique, whatever it was, O my brothers. "

religious - fictional United Kingdom: England 2100 Burgess, Anthony. A Clockwork Orange. New York: W. W. Norton & Co. (1963; c. 1962); pg. 127. Prison Religion:
"'Oh, if only I could believe that.' And you could viddy the Governor give him a look like meaning that he would not climb so high in that Prison Religion as he thought he would. "
religious - fictional United Kingdom: London 1875 Blaylock, James P. Homunculus. New York: Ace Books (1986); pg. 31. New Church:
"He employed no agents to sell the coin, preferring to distribute it at greater profit and peril through the faithful--his lambs, who understood that they did the work of Shiloh, the New Messiah. They'd be very pretty coins, once they'd been plated, and would further the work of God. The time approached when such work would be at an end. The Reverend Shiloh had honed the coming of the apocalyptic dirigible to the day. " [Other refs., not in DB.]
religious - fictional United Kingdom: London 1875 Blaylock, James P. Homunculus. New York: Ace Books (1986); pg. 105. New Church:
"'I'm a member of the New Church,' said he, thrusting forth his tracts. 'The New Church that won't have a chance to get old.'

...'The end is near,' he announced, grinning. The idea of Armageddon seemed to appeal to him. 'You've days to save your immortal soul. The New Church, I tell you, is the way. He, Shiloh, the New Messiah, is the way! He raiseth people from the grave! He redeemeth the dead!...' "

religious - fictional United Kingdom: London 1875 Blaylock, James P. Homunculus. New York: Ace Books (1986); pg. 189. New Church:
"If he had to run, his goose was cooked. The line of corpses gaped at him--half of them deprived of the dubious joys of becoming members of the Church of the New Messiah, the other half of going into the unremunerative employ of Kelso Drake. "
religious - fictional United Kingdom: London 2546 Huxley, Aldous. Brave New World. New York: HarperCollins (1999; c. 1932, 1946); pg. 31. Fordian:
Pg. 31: "He let out the amazing truth. For a very long period before the time of Our Ford, and even for some generations afterwards, erotic play between children had been regarded as abnormal (there was a roar of laughter); and not only abnormal, actually immoral (no!): and had therefore been rigorously suppressed. "; Pg. 34: "'You all remember,' said the Controller, in his strong deep voice, 'you all remember, I suppose, that beautiful and inspired saying of Our Ford's: History is bunk. History,' he repeated slowly, 'is bunk.' "
religious - fictional United Kingdom: London 2546 Huxley, Aldous. Brave New World. New York: HarperCollins (1999; c. 1932, 1946); pg. 51. Fordian:
"There was a thing, as I've said before, called Christianity... All crosses their tops cut and became T's. There was also a thing called God... We have the World State now. And Ford's Day celebrations, and Community Sings, and Solidarity Services. " [Hundreds of years before this novel takes place, Christianity died out as the worship of Henry Ford became the dominant religion in the world. Many refs. throughout novel to Fordianism, most not in DB.]
religious - fictional United Kingdom: London 2546 Huxley, Aldous. Brave New World. New York: HarperCollins (1999; c. 1932, 1946); pg. 178. Fordian:
"'And now, my friends,' said the Arch-Community-Songster of Canterbury, in that beautiful ringing voice with which he led the proceedings at Ford's Day Celebrations, 'No, my friends...' "
religious - fictional United Kingdom: London 2546 Huxley, Aldous. Brave New World. New York: HarperCollins (1999; c. 1932, 1946); pg. 191. Fordian:
"'Oh, for Ford's sake,' said Lenina... " [Many instances throughout novel of Ford's name being invoked as a profanity, in the same way that 'God' would be. Ford has replaced God in this future society.]
religious - fictional United Kingdom: London 2546 Huxley, Aldous. Brave New World. New York: HarperCollins (1999; c. 1932, 1946); pg. 223. Fordian:
"On the table under the window lay a massive volume bound in limp black leather-surrogate, and stamped with large golden T's. He picked it up and opened it. My Life and Work, by Our Ford. The book had been published at Detroit by the Society for the Propagation of Fordian Knowledge. Idly he turned the pages, read a sentence here, a paragraph there, and had just come to the conclusion that the book didn't interest him, when the door opened, and the Resident World Controller for Western Europe walked briskly into the room. "
religious - fictional United Kingdom: London 2546 Huxley, Aldous. Brave New World. New York: HarperCollins (1999; c. 1932, 1946); pg. 258. Fordian:
[In this future society, Fordianism has replaced Christianity. Hence, the name of the Fordian Science Monitor is based on the Christian Science Monitor.] "...four other reporters, representing the New York Times, the Frankfurt Four-Dimensional Continuum, The Fordian Science Monitor, and The Delta Mirror, called that afternoon at the lighthouse and met with reception of progressively increasing violence.

From a safe distance and still rubbing his buttocks, 'Benighted fool!' shouted the man from The Fordian Science Monitor, 'why don't you take soma?'

...the Savage... picking up a thick hazel switch, strode forward.

The man from The Fordian Science Monitor made a dash for the helicopter. "

religious - fictional USA 1949 Jackson, Shirley. "The Lottery " in The Lottery and Other Stories. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (1998; first published 1949); pg. 291. Lottery:
"The people of the village began to gather in the square, between the post office and the bank, around ten o'clock; in some towns there were so many people that the lottery took two days and had to be started on June 26th, but in this village, where there were only about three hundred people, the whole lottery took less than two hours, so it could begin at ten o'clock in the morning and still be through in time to allow the villagers to get home for noon dinner. "
religious - fictional USA 1949 Jackson, Shirley. "The Lottery " in The Lottery and Other Stories. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (1998; first published 1949); pg. 293. Lottery:
"Mr. Martin and his oldest son, Baxter, held the black box securely on the stool until Mr. Summers had stirred the papers thoroughly with his hand. Because so much of the ritual had been forgotten or discarded, Mr. Summers had been successfully in having slips of paper substituted for the chips of wood that had been used for generations. Chips of wood, Mr. Summers had been all very well when the village was tiny, but now that the population was more than three hundred and likely to keep growing, it was necessary to use something that would fit more easily into the black box. "
religious - fictional USA 1949 Jackson, Shirley. "The Lottery " in The Lottery and Other Stories. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (1998; first published 1949); pg. 294. Lottery:
"There was a great deal of fussing to be done before Mr. Summers declared the lottery open. There were the lists to make up--of heads of families, heads of households in each family, members of each household in each family. There was the proper swearing-in of Mr. Summers by the postmaster, as the official of the lottery; at one time, some people remembered there had been a recital of some sort, performed by the official of the lottery, a perfunctory, tuneless chant that had been rattled off duly each year; some people believed that the official of the lottery used to stand just so when he said or sang it, others believed that he was supposed to walk among the people, but years and years ago this part of the ritual had been allowed to lapse. "
religious - fictional USA 1949 Jackson, Shirley. "The Lottery " in The Lottery and Other Stories. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (1998; first published 1949); pg. 294. Lottery:
"There had been, also, a ritual salute, which the official of the lottery had had to use in addressing each person who came up to draw from the box, but this also had changed with time, until now it was felt necessary only for the official to speak to each person approaching. Mr. Summers was very good at all this; in his clean white shirt and blue jeans, with one hand resting carelessly on the black box, he seemed very proper and important as he talked interminably to Mr. Graves and the Martins. " [There are more references to the 'lottery' tradition practiced in this story, in which one person chosen by lot is stoned to death by fellow townspeople. The story contains no apparent references to any actual religion, and the people apparently practice none. Jackson likely realized that no authentic contemporary religious culture, whether Christianity, Judaism, Islam, etc. would allow lottery-based ritual killings of this sort.]
religious - fictional USA 1949 Jackson, Shirley. "The Lottery " in The Lottery and Other Stories. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (1998; first published 1949); pg. 297. Lottery:
"'They do say,' Mrs. Adams said... 'that over in the north village they're talking of giving up the lottery.'

Old Man Warner snorted. 'Pack of crazy fools,' he said. 'Listening to the young folks, nothing's good enough for them. Next thing you know, they'll be wanting to go back to living in caves... There's always been a lottery...'

'Some places have already quit lotteries,' Mr. Adams said.

'Nothing but trouble in that,' Old Man Warner said stoutly. 'Pack of young fools.' "



religious - fictional, continued

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