Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to religious - fictional, Pern

religious - fictional, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
religious - fictional Pern 3000 McCaffrey, Anne. Dragonsdawn. New York: Ballantine (1988); pg. 105. Pern:
"After the Thanksgivin celebration, the colonists settled down to more routine work. "
religious - fictional Pern 3018 McCaffrey, Anne. Dragonsdawn. New York: Ballantine (1988); pg. 345. Pern:
"11.18.08 Pern
'Holiest of holies,' Telgar murmured respectfully as he held his torch high and still could not iluminate the ceiling. "
religious - fictional Pern 4000 McCaffrey, Anne. "Weyr Search " in Dragon Tales (Isaac Asimov, ed.) New York: Ballantine (1982; c. 1967); pg. 265. Pern:
[Year estimated] "When is a legend legend? When is a myth a myth? How old and disused must a fact be for it to be relegated to the category: Fairy tale? And why do certain facts remain incontrovertible, while others lose their validity to assume a shabby, unstable character?

Rukbat, in the Sagittarian sector, was a golden G-type star... five planets, plus one stray it had attracted... When men first settled on Rukbat's third world, and named it Pern, they had taken little notice of the stranger-planet... Recollections of Earth receded farther from Pernese history with each successive generation until memory of their origins degenerated past legend or myth, into oblivion... the Pernese... developed a highly specialized variety of a life-form indigenous to their adopted planet... dragons...

This, then, is a tale of legends disbelieved and their restoration. Yes--how goes a legend? When is myth? " [Other refs. throughout story, not in DB.]

religious - fictional Pern 4000 McCaffrey, Anne. "Weyr Search " in The Hugo Winners: Volumes One and Two. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971; c. 1967); pg. 593. Pern:
"Honor those the dragons heed,
In thought and favor, word and deed.
Worlds are lost or worlds are saved.
By those dangers dragon-braved.

Dragonman, avoid excess;
Greed will bring the Weyr distress;
To the ancient Laws adhere,
Prospers thus the Dragonweyr. "
religious - fictional Pern 4000 McCaffrey, Anne. "Weyr Search " in The Hugo Winners: Volumes One and Two. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971; c. 1967); pg. 605. Pern:
"By the Golden Egg of Faranth
By the Weyrwoman wise and true,
Breed a flight of bronze and brown wings,
Breed a flight of green and blue.
Breed riders, strong and daring,
Dragon-loving, born as hatched,
Flight of hundreds soaring skyward,
Man and dragon fully matched. "
religious - fictional Pern 4000 McCaffrey, Anne. "Weyr Search " in The Hugo Winners: Volumes One and Two. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971; c. 1967); pg. 567-568. Pern:
"When is a legend legend? When is a myth a myth? How old and disused must a fact be for it to be relegated to the category: Fairy tale? And why do certain facts remain incontrovertible, while others lose their validity to assume a shabby, unstable character?

Rukbat, in the Sagittarian sector, was a golden G-type star... five planets, plus one stray it had attracted... When men first settled on Rukbat's third world, and named it Pern, they had taken little notice of the stranger-planet... Recollections of Earth receded farther from Pernese history with each successive generation until memory of their origins degenerated past legend or myth, into oblivion... the Pernese... developed a highly specialized variety of a life-form indigenous to their adopted planet... dragons...

This, then, is a tale of legends disbelieved and their restoration. Yes--how goes a legend? When is myth?
" [Other refs. throughout story, not in DB.]
religious - fictional Puerto Rico 2046 Bear, Greg. Heads (fiction). New York: St. Martin's Press (1990); pg. 50. Logology:
"The Church prospered and made its beginning moves on Puerto Rico. Logologists established a free hospital and 'psychiatric' training centre on the island in 1946, four years before Puerto Ricobecame the fifty-first state. The island was soon controlled by a solid sixty per cent majority population of Logologists, the greatest concentration of the religion on Earth. Every Puerto Rican representative in the United States Congress since statehood has been a Logologist. "
religious - fictional Riverworld 2008 Farmer, Philip Jose. To Your Scattered Bodies Go. New York: Berkeley Medallion Books (1971); pg. 179. Church of the Second Chance:
"It was not long before Collop told him that he was a member of the Church of the Second Chance.

Burton's eyebrows rose. He had encountered this new religion at many places along the River... The Church had a few simple tenets, some based on fact, most on surmise and hope and wish... the Second Chancers had one advantage over any Terrestrial religion. They had no difficulty in proving that dead men could be raised--not only once but often. " [Many other references to this fictional religion are in book, but not in DB.]

religious - fictional Riverworld 2008 Farmer, Philip Jose. To Your Scattered Bodies Go. New York: Berkeley Medallion Books (1971); pg. 179-180. Church of the Second Chance:
"'And why has mankind been given a Second Chance?' Collop said in his low, earnest voice. 'Does he deserve it? No. With few exceptions, men are a mean, miserable, petty, vicious... lot. Watching them, the gods--or God--should vomit. But in this divine spew is a clot of compassion, if you will pardon me for using such imagery. Man, however base, has a silver wire of the divine in him. It is no idle phrase that man was made in God's image. There is something worth saving in the worst of us, and out of this something a new man may be fashioned.

'Whoever has given us this new opportunity to save our souls knows this truth. We have been placed here in this Rivervalley--on this alien planet under alien skies--to work out our salvation. What our time limit is, I do not know nor do the leaders of my Church speculate. Perhaps it is forever, or it may be only a matter of a hundred years or a thousand. But we must make use of whatever time we do have, my friend.' "

religious - fictional Romulan Empire 2287 Bonanno, Margaret Wander. Probe (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1992); pg. 12. Romulan:
Pg. 12: "She was still in the capital, where intrigue and backstabbing and petty revenge constituted a way of life. A whisper was all it would take to send her tumbling back down the slippery slope to un-Orthodoxy. "; Pg. 19: "It was possible, she supposed, that for some very few the 'mourning' was genuine. For most, it was--it had o be!--the necessary show of Orthodoxy, nothing more. As for her own thoughts, they were occupied--as they had been since she had first been informed of the 'honor' to be bestowed upon her--almost exclusively in trying to thread her way through the maze of what the death [of the Praetor] and the subsequent summons might mean to her. "; Pg. 20: "'Lerma has been longer on the Orthodox list than any of his contemporaries.' " [Romulans are the main alien species in this novel. Many refs. to Romulan culture and religion, other refs. not in DB.]
religious - fictional Romulan Empire 2287 Bonanno, Margaret Wander. Probe (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1992); pg. 25. Romulan:
"The funeral lasted two nights and a day. In that time, thousands upon thousands appeared to sign the Book of Death and pass before the wasted waxen figure in its upright sarcophagus in the Central Septum of the Hall of Columns. "
religious - fictional Shora 4000 Slonczewski, Joan. A Door into Ocean. New York: Arbor House (1986); pg. 10. Sharers:
"The paradox of the moonwomen; he would get it straight yet and show Melas a thing or two. Among the beaded skirts and baggy trousers of the crowd he spotted a patch of gray, the cowled robe of Uriel the Spirit Caller. Uruiel communed miraculously with the Spirit of the Patriarch who ruled from Torr, four light-years out in space. He was supposed to call on all the knowledge of the almighty Patriarch. " [This may be a ref. to Valedon religion, not Sharer religion.]
religious - fictional Shora 4000 Slonczewski, Joan. A Door into Ocean. New York: Arbor House (1986); pg. 26. Sharers:
"Before her, beyond the interminable courtyard, rose the face of Palace Iridium. A blunted triangle, to symbolize the neer-seen Patriarch above all, the facade inclined slightly so as to rise like a steep mountain slope. Mosaic tiles, a million shining tesserae set in iridium, depicted scenes from the founding of the Patriarch: the First Nine Protectors, with their planets and legionary symbols, then smaller panels below for the hundreds of planets under protection before Iridis assumed the high Protectorship of Valedon. " [This may be a ref. to Valedon religion, not Sharer religion.]
religious - fictional Shora 4000 Slonczewski, Joan. A Door into Ocean. New York: Arbor House (1986); pg. 84-85. Sharers:
"'Why don't Sharers turn their planet into a paradise? At the very least, they could exterminate seaswallowers.'

Berenice sighed. This was the part she herself found hard to understand. 'Sharers know their own limits; that, perhaps, is their greatest strength. They don't like to alter the life balance. Something worse might replace seaswallowers . . .' Every 'lesser sharer' had its purpose. Sharers claimed, 'But they do use their powers. Haven't certain fishing vessels run into environmental problems of late?'

'Well, well. So Sharers were behind that.'

That made her uneasy; there might be reprisals now. 'Under extreme provocation, my lord. You must understand this: When Valan actions disturb the sea, they threaten not only the livelihood bu tthe very center of being of every Sharer of Shora--' "

religious - fictional Shora 4000 Slonczewski, Joan. A Door into Ocean. New York: Arbor House (1986), book jacket. Sharers:
[Year estimated.] "A Door into Ocean. Thousands of years in the future in a distant part of the galaxy, lies the planet Shora, entirely covered by a world-spanning ocean. The huge and complex ecosystem of Shora is inhabited by the Sharers, an all female race who reproduce by parthenogensis, without males. The Sharers are immensely sophisticated in the life sciences, but have eschewed all unnatural technology. Over millennia of isolation, they have developed a complex philosphical and ethical ssytem, idealistic, communal, and pacifist. " [Extensive description of the Sharer and Valedon cultures and religions in this novel. Only a few refs. added to DB. Book appears to have no explicit references to contemporary Earth religions by name.]
religious - fictional Shora 4000 Slonczewski, Joan. A Door into Ocean. New York: Arbor House (1986), book jacket. Sharers:
[Year estimated.] "But now, as interstellar civilization rises again, the Sharers are faced with a technological and cultural invasion of man from space. They must develop a system of peaceful coexistence. Two of them travel to a nearby planet in the hope of gaining a better understanding of the male invaders. There they invite a young man, Spinel, to return with them so they can learn from each other. This is urgent, for in the space of a few short years, the traders who have set up shop on Shora have been reinforced by armed men from nearby Valedon, of which Shora is a satellite, and are preparing simply to take over.

So begins a war, protracted and graphic, in which one side cannot fight because the concept is inconceivable in their philosophy; a war in which the one fragile contact between Merwen, the Sharer, and Spinel, the man from Valedon, might well provide the only hope of true communication between two radically different cultures. "

religious - fictional Solar System 2050 Knight, Damon. "Cabin Boy " in The Best of Damon Knight. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1976; c. 1951); pg. 34. Spore:
[1] "The Captain had begun, as always, by reciting the Creed.

In the beginning was the Spore, and the Spore was alone.

(And the crew: Praised be the Spore!)

Next there was light, and the light was good. Yea, good for the Spore and the Spore's First Children.
(Praised by the!)
But the light grew evil in the days of the Spore's Second Children.
(Woe unto them!)
And the light cast them out. Yea, exiled were they, into the darkness and the Great Deep.
(Pity for the outcasts in the Great Deep!)

Tommy had mumbled his responses with the rest of them, thinking rebellious thoughts. There was nothing evil about the light; they lived by it still. What must have happened--the Captain himself admitted as much... was that the earliest ancestors of the race, spawned in the flaming heart of the Galaxy, had grown too efficient for their own good. "

religious - fictional Solar System 2050 Knight, Damon. "Cabin Boy " in The Best of Damon Knight. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1976; c. 1951); pg. 34. Spore:
[2] "They had specialized, more and more, in extracting energy from starlight and the random metal and other elements they encountered in space; and at last they absorbed, willy-nilly, more than they could use. So they had moved, gradually and naturally, over many generations, out from the intensely radiating region into the 'Great Deep'--the universe of thinly scattered stars. And the process had continued, inevitably; as the level of available energy fell, their absorption of it grew more and more efficient.

Now, not only could they never return to their birthplace, but they could not even approach a single sun as closely as some planets did. Therefore the planets, and the stars themselves, were objects of fear. That was natural and sensible. But why did they have to continue this silly ritual, invented by some half-evolved, superstitious ancestor, of 'outcasts' and 'evil'? "

religious - fictional Solar System 2050 Knight, Damon. "Cabin Boy " in The Best of Damon Knight. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1976; c. 1951); pg. 34. Spore:
[3] "The Captain finished:

Save us from the Death that lies in the Great Deep . . .
(The creeping Death that lies in the Great Deep!)
And keep our minds pure . . .
(As pure as the light in the days of the Spore, blessed be He!)
And our course straight . . .
(As straight as the light, brothers!)
That we may meet our lost brothers again in the Day of Reuniting.
(Speed that day!)

Then the pause, the silence that grew until it was like the silence of space. At last the Captain spoke again, pronouncing judgment against Tommy, ending , 'Let him be whipped.' " [Other refs. not in DB.]

religious - fictional Solar System 2050 Knight, Damon. "Cabin Boy " in The Best of Damon Knight. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1976; c. 1951); pg. 35. Spore:
"He thought again of the problem that had obsessed him ever since he had seen the alien, five-pointed creatures in the metal ship. Intelligent life was supposed to be sacred. That was part of the Creed, and it was stated in a sloppy, poetic way like the rest of it, but it made a certain kind of sense. no crewman or captain had the right to destroy another for his benefit, because the same heredity was in them all. They were all potentially the same, none better than another.

And you ate metal, because metal was nonliving and certainly not intelligent. But if that stopped being true . . . "

religious - fictional Solar System 2100 Dick, Philip K. The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch. New York: Random House (1991; c. 1964); pg. 125. Neo-American Church:
"'I belong to the Reformed Branch of the Neo-American Church, the New Christian Church of the United States and Canada. Actually our roots are very old: in A.D. 300 our forefathers had bishops that attended a conference in France; we didn't split off from the other churches as late as everyone thinks. So you can see we have Apostolic Succession.' She smiled at him in a solemn, friendly fashion. " [Many other refs. about these characters, and about this fictional church. See other refs. to this church under 'Christianity' in DB.]
religious - fictional Solar System 2100 Dick, Philip K. The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch. New York: Random House (1991; c. 1964); pg. 126. Neo-American Church:
"'There's a Neo-American mission church in the Fineburg Crescent and therefore a vicar, a priest; I expect to be able to take Holy Communion at least once a month. And confess twice a year, as we're supposed to, as I've been doing on Terra. Our church has many sacraments . . . have you taken either of the two Greater Sacraments, Mr. Mayerson?'

'Uh--' he hesitated.

'Christ specified that we observe two sacraments,' Anne Hawthorne explained patiently. 'Baptism--by water--and Holy Communion. The latter in memory of Him . . . it was inaugurated at the Last Supper.'

'Oh. You mean the bread and the wine.'

'You know how the eating of Can-D translates--as they call it--the partaker to another world. It's secular, however, in that it's temporary and only a physical world. The bread and the wine--'

'I'm sorry, Miss Hawthorne... but I'm afraid I can't believe in that, the body and blood business. It's too mystical for me.' "

religious - fictional Solar System 2100 Dick, Philip K. The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch. New York: Random House (1991; c. 1964); pg. 127. Neo-American Church:
"'If you're going to try Can-D,' Anne said, 'and put your faith for a new life into it, can I induce you to try baptism and confirmation into the Neo-American Christian Church? So you could see if your faith deserves to be put into that, too? Or the First Revised Christian Church of Europe which of course also observes the two Greater Sacraments. Once you've participated in Holy Communion--'

'I can't,' he said. I believe in Can-D, he said to himself, and, if necessary, Chew-Z. You can put your faith in something twenty-one centuries old; I'll stick with something new. And that is that. "

religious - fictional Solar System 2100 Dick, Philip K. The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch. New York: Random House (1991; c. 1964); pg. 127. Neo-American Church:
"Anne said, 'To be frank, Mr. Mayerson, I intend to try to convert as many colonists as possible away from Can-D [a new powerful drug] to the traditional practices; that's the central reason I declined to put together a case that would exempt me from the draft.' She smiled at him, a lovely smile which, in spite of himself, warmed him. 'Is that wrong? I'll tell you frankly: I think the use of Can-D indicates a genuine hunger on the part of these people to find a return to what we in the Neo-American Church--'

'I think,' Barney said, gently, 'you should let these people alone.' And me, too, he thought. I've got enough trouble as it is; don't add your religious fanaticism and make it worse. But she did not look like his idea of a religious fanatic, nor did she talk like one. He puzzled. Where had she gotten such strong, steady convictions? He could imagine it existing in the colonies, where the need was so great, but she had acquired it on Earth. "

religious - fictional Solar System 2100 Dick, Philip K. The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch. New York: Random House (1991; c. 1964); pg. 128. Neo-American Church:
"'Being a colonist on Mars,' he said, 'isn't going to be like living on Terra. Maybe when I get there--' He ceased; he had intended to say, Maybe I'll be more interested in your dogmatic church. But as yet he could not honestly say that... he rebelled from an idea that was still foreign to his makeup. And yet--

'Go ahead... Finish your sentence.'

'Talk to me again,' Barney said, 'when I've lived down in the bottom of a hovel on an alien world for a while. When I've begun my new life... as a colonist.'

...'All right. I'll be glad to.'

...the two of them sat in silence... Anne Hawthorne, the fanatic girl missionary to Mars, read a book. He peered at the title, and saw that it was Eric Lederman's great text on colonial living, Pilgrim without Progress. God knew where she had gotten a copy; the UN had condemned it, made it incredibly difficult to obtain. And to read a copy of it here on a UN ship--it was a singular act of courage; he was impressed. "

religious - fictional Solar System 2100 Dick, Philip K. The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch. New York: Random House (1991; c. 1964); pg. 135. Neo-American Church:
"'Chew-Z is garbage; it's habit-forming, toxic, and what's worse leads to lethal, escape-dreams, not of Terra but of--' she gestured with the pistol. 'Grotesque, baroque fantasies of an infantile, totally deranged nature. Explain to me why this is derision.

He said nothing; he merely shrugged. It was interesting, however, the ideological devotion on her part; it amused him. In fact, he reflected, its fanaticism was in sharp contrast to the attitude which the girl missionary aboard the Terra-Mars shi had shown. Evidently subject matter had no bearing; he had never realized this before. "

religious - fictional Solar System 2100 Dick, Philip K. The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch. New York: Random House (1991; c. 1964); pg. 141. Neo-American Church:
"'We can evolve, as the rich do; it could be done on a mass basis.' She put down the a Kempis book abruptly. 'But I don't want that, either; a chitinous shell and the rest. Isn't there any answer, Mr. Mayerson? You know, Neo-Christians are taught to believe they're travelers in a foreign land. Wayfaring strangers. Now we really are; Earth is ceasing to become our natural world, and certainly this never will be. We've got no world left!' She stared at him, her nostrils flaring. 'No home at all!' "
religious - fictional Solar System 2100 Dick, Philip K. The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch. New York: Random House (1991; c. 1964); pg. 144. Neo-American Church:
Pg. 144: "'She joined us at the end; she's a pal of Mayerson's; he met her on the flight. She's quite nice but she's a religious nut; you'll see... Not too bad looking. I was really curious to see her; I imagined her as more, well, austere.' "; Pg. 145: "'You don't want a Neo-Christian nut to live with you. We've had experience with that; we ejected a couple of them last year. They can cause terrible trouble here on Mars. Remember, we shared her mind . . . she's a dedicated member of some high church or other, with all the sacraments and the rituals, all that old outdated junk; she actually believes in it.' "
religious - fictional Solar System 2151 Aldiss, Brian. "Cognitive Ability and the Light Bulb " in Supertoys Last All Summer Long. New York: St. Martin's Griffin (2001; c. 2000); pg. 153. God's Exiles:
"In the Second Renaissance taking place in the third decade of the twenty-second century, the spiritual order of God's Exiles perfected an ion drive and equipped another interstellar ship, Pilgrim. Pilgrim was launched from Plutonian orbit in 2151. It carried with it the embryos of new species of animals, fruits and human beings. The entire journey was governed by quantors; God's Exiles did not inflict years of imprisonment on humans, as the Conqueror had done. "
religious - fictional Solar System 2436 Bester, Alfred. The Stars My Destination. New York: Berkley Publishing (1975; c. 1956); pg. 23. Scientific People:
"A devil face peered at him. Cheeks, chin, nose, and eyelids were hideously tattooed like an ancient Maori mask. Across the brow was tattooed JOSEPH. The 'O' in JOSEPH had a tiny arrow thrust up from the right shoulder, turning it into the symbol of Mars, used by scientists to designate male sex.

'We are the Scientific Race,' Joseph said. 'I am Joseph; these are my people.'

He gestured, Foyle gazed at the grinning crowd surrounding his littler. All faces were tattooed into devil masks; all brows had names blazoned across them...

'You are the first to arrive alive in fifty years. You are a puissant man. Very. Arrival of the fittest is the doctrine of Holy Darwin. Most Scientific.'

...'Choose,' Joseph said. 'The Scientific People practice Natural Selection. Be scientific in your choice. Be genetic.' " [Other refs., not in DB.]

religious - fictional Solar System 2436 Bester, Alfred. The Stars My Destination. New York: Berkley Publishing (1975; c. 1956); pg. 22. Scientific People:
"Between Mars and Jupiter is spread the broad belt of the asteroids. Of the thousands, known and unknown, most unique in the Freak Century was the Sargasso Asteroid, a tiny planet manufactured of natural rock and wreckage salvaged by its inhabitants in the course of two hundred years.

They were savages, the only savages of the twenty-fourth century: descendants of a research team of scientists that had been lost and marooned in the asteroid belt two centuries before when their ship had failed. By the time their descendants were rediscovered they had built up a world and a culture of their own, and preferred to remain in space, salvaging and spoiling, and practicing a barbaric travesty of the scientific method they remembered from their forbears. They called themselves The Scientific People. The world promptly forgot them. " [Other refs. to this group of people, not in DB.]

religious - fictional Solbrecht 3038 Anderson, Kevin J. & Rebecca Moesta. Titan A.E.: Cale's Story. New York: Ace (2000); pg. 30. Solbrechtian:
[Cale is on Vusstra.] "He chose two installments from 'Lives of Greatness,' his favorite series. One of them was about Wens [founder of Vusstra's environmental movement]. The other was about Onluck'mur, a classical xenopsychologist who had risen to fame on Solbrecht. "
religious - fictional Solbrecht 3038 Anderson, Kevin J. & Rebecca Moesta. Titan A.E.: Cale's Story. New York: Ace (2000); pg. 37. Solbrechtian:
"'Earth technology wasn't nearly as advances as the technology on Vusstra or Solbrecht or Fauldro. The Drej can't have thought we were a threat. So why pick on us?' "
religious - fictional Solbrecht 3039 Anderson, Kevin J. & Rebecca Moesta. Titan A.E.: Akima's Story. New York: Ace (2000); pg. 65. Mantrin:
"'Whoa, whoa!' a sharp voice replied from the side of the thoroughfare. 'I care that you learn how to steer that thing.'

Startled, Akima looked up into the pointed face of a Mantrin female whose balled fists were planted firmly on her hips. At least Akima thought she was a Mantrin, judging from her huge legs and long, slashing tail. She'd met only one before, since few visited Human Drifter colonies. To Akima, they looked like gigantic, intelligent kangaroos with exaggerated arms, triple-jointed legs, yellow eyes, and fearsomely sharp teeth set in a narrow, beaklike face. " [Many other refs. to Stith, this Mantrin character, most not in DB. She is one of novel's main characters, and a main character in the movie Titan A.E..]

religious - fictional Solbrecht 3039 Anderson, Kevin J. & Rebecca Moesta. Titan A.E.: Akima's Story. New York: Ace (2000); pg. 65. Mantrin:
"'Akima was long past the point of being afraid for herself... 'Look, I promise I'll learn how to steer if you help me find a doctor for my friend...'

'Uh-huh,' the alien said, but she unclenched fists and leaned over to examine Ishaq. She cocked her head, gestured for Akima to follow, and ducked into a small alley. 'On second thought,' she said, reappearing a moment later. 'You'd better let me do that.' The big Mantrin grabbed the cart handles from Akima and pushed it into the alley.

Akima wanted to ask where they were going, but something told her she could trust this alien, no matter how dangerous she appeared. At one point, the Mantrin paused, turned back to Akima, and said merely, 'Stith.' " [Her name.]; Pg. 66: "Stith's triangular yellow eyes fixed Jemfuh with a piercing gaze. "

religious - fictional Solbrecht 3039 Anderson, Kevin J. & Rebecca Moesta. Titan A.E.: Akima's Story. New York: Ace (2000); pg. 68. Mantrin:
[Stith, a Mantrin:] "'...When I didn't knuckle under , Golbus destroyed my business, burned my shop, and left me with only a couple of fancy handweapons I was carrying at the time.' She waved one clawed hand to indicate holsters at her shoulders and waist, which held amazingly wicked-looking blasters and disrupters. "
religious - fictional Solbrecht 3039 Anderson, Kevin J. & Rebecca Moesta. Titan A.E.: Akima's Story. New York: Ace (2000); pg. 66. Solbrechtian:
"...Stith sealed the doors again. 'Hey, Jemfuh!' she called.

A portly four-armed Solbrechtian waddled into the room. 'Stith! Uh, always a pleasure doing business with you.' He had a wary look on his gaunt, gray face. 'A risk these days, but also a pleasure.'

'Look, I need some medical supplies to treat my Human friend here... No questions asked.'...

The Solbrechtian shot Stith a questioning look. 'If I get all of this, how will it affect my account?'

Stith considered. 'I'll write off a third of your debt...'...

'He's sort of a local herbalist,' Stith explained. 'A bit mercenary, too, but he's a good guy. We'll be safe here.' "

religious - fictional Suriname 2187 Wolverton, Dave. "On My Way to Paradise " in Writers of the Future: Volume III (Algis Budrys, ed.). Los Angeles: Bridge Publications (1987); pg. 387. Body Purists:
"'You got a comlink in your head?' Tamara asked. Flaco nodded. 'Then you're a cyborg,' she said, as if she'd made a point. I remembered a news clip I'd once seen of Surinamese Body Purists. Upon conversion to their cult, new members pulled out their comlinks and their cranial jacks, their prosthetic kidneys or whatever they had, and lived totally without mechanical aid. I wondered if she were a Body Purist, and I suddenly understood why she wanted a regenerated hand instead of a prosthetic--the thought of her body being welded to a machine terrified her; it desecrated the temple of her spirit.

'A comlink doeshn't make you a shyborg,' Flaco said.

'That's where it starts. First a comlink. Then an arm. Then a lung. One piece at a time.' "

religious - fictional Tarot 2077 Anthony, Piers. God of Tarot. New York: Berkley (1982; c. 1977); pg. 94. Christian Apostolic Church in Zion:
"'...I must acquaint you in more detail with our religious situation here... We are a colony of schisms, of splinter sects... This appeal seems to have been strongest to the weakest sects, or in any rate, the smallest numerically. Thus we have few Roman Catholics, Mohammedans, Buddhists, or Confucians, but many Rosicrucians, Spiritualists, Moonies, Gnostics, Flaming Sworders--'

'Flaming Sworders? Is that a Tarot image...?'

'Not so. I apologize for using unseemly vernacular. It is my prejudice against those faiths, which you must discount. The Flaming Sword is the publication of the Christian Apostolic Church in Zion, whose guiding precept is that the Earth is flat, not spherical.'

'But how, then, could they emigrate to another planet? They would not believe other planets existed!'

'You must ask a member of that cult; perhaps he can provide you with a versimilitudinous rationale...' "

religious - fictional Tarot 2077 Anthony, Piers. God of Tarot. New York: Berkley (1982; c. 1977); pg. 95. Holy Order of Vision:
Pg. 95-96: "'I had the impression that Planet Tarot was an English-language colony; are the religions represented here primarily Western?'

'They are. About eighty per cent derive from Occidental Christian origins; the rest are scattered. In that sense, most believe in some form of Christ, as you do; that is why I said your Order is a good one for our purpose, though I question that purpose. You will likely find a Christian God, but you have no local Church to cater to, so you are relatively objective. The reputation of your Order has preceded you. Visionists are known not to interfere with other faiths, while yet remaining true to their own faith. I believe you will be approved.' "

religious - fictional Tarot 2077 Anthony, Piers. God of Tarot. New York: Berkley (1982; c. 1977); pg. 97. Holy Order of Vision:
"'To me, God is All; He favors no particular sect. The Holy Order of Vision is not a sect in that sense; we seek only for the truth that is God, and feel that the form is irrelevant. While we honor Jesus Christ as the Son of God, we also honor the Buddha, Zoroaster, and the other great religious figure; indeed, we are all children of God. So we seek only to know whether God does manifest here; we do not seek to channel Him, and would not presume to pass upon the merits of any religious sect.' "
religious - fictional Tau Ceti 2025 Ing, Dean. "Lost in Translation " in Firefight 2000. New York: Baen (1987; c. 1985); pg. 134. Cetian:
"The [Tau] Cetians produced one final piece of abstract art, a huge blob of varicolored tiles by some philosopher-priest, and they reproduced it as proudly and as often as we copy the Mona Lisa. And then their commentaries began to decay fast. " [Extensive other refs. to Cetian culture, not in DB.]
religious - fictional Tau Ceti 2780 Simmons, Dan. The Fall of Hyperion. New York: Bantam (1991; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 4. Assured Reincarnation Institute:
"The guests who alighted from these craft were not less flamboyant and impressive than their vehicles: personal styles ranged from pre-Hegira conservative evening wears... to this week's highest fashion from TC2 draped on figures molded by the Web's most famous ARNists. " [Other refs., not in DB, eg., pg. 149, 153, 346, 465.]
religious - fictional Tau Ceti 2799 Simmons, Dan. Endymion. New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 253. Church of the Shrike:
"Tau Ceti Center had been a sophisticated, wanton world during the days of the Web. Few religions had taken hold there except the most self-indulgent or violent ones--the Church of the Final Atonement--the Shrike Cult-had been popular among the bored sophisticates. "
religious - fictional Tau-14 3038 Anderson, Kevin J. & Rebecca Moesta. Titan A.E.: Cale's Story. New York: Ace (2000); pg. 40. Mantrin:
"The inside of Tau-14 was no less impressive than its outer shell... Also, Cale saw more different creatures on this station than he had ever seen in one place in his life. In the shipping docks alone, Cale saw Akrennians, Vusstrans, Solbrechtians, Rybets, Humans, and Mantrins, as well as other species he had only seen in padbooks or holoscrolls before. "
religious - fictional Tau-14 3038 Anderson, Kevin J. & Rebecca Moesta. Titan A.E.: Cale's Story. New York: Ace (2000); pg. 40. Solbrechtian:
"...Tau-14... In the shipping docks alone, Cale saw Akrennians, Vusstrans, Solbrechtians, Rybets, Humans, and Mantrins, as well as other species... " [Other ref., pg. 160.]
religious - fictional Tau-14 3038 Anderson, Kevin J. & Rebecca Moesta. Titan A.E.: Cale's Story. New York: Ace (2000); pg. 40. Vusstrans:
"...Tau-14... In the shipping docks alone, Cale saw Akrennians, Vusstrans, Solbrechtians, Rybets, Humans, and Mantrins, as well as other species... "
religious - fictional Tennessee 2054 Dick, Philip K. & Ray Nelson. The Ganymede Takeover. New York: Ace Books (1967); pg. 73. Neeg-part:
"'What is your religion, Miss Hiashi?' he asked as he casually filled his pipe.

'Neeg-part,' she said defiantly. 'If I wasn't Neeg-part I wouldn't be here.'

'But on all the forms you have ever filled out before now you've listed your religion as Buddhism. Have you abandoned Buddhism?'

'There were no Ganys on Earth when Buddha lived,' Joan answered. 'Now a person is either a Neeg-part or nothing.'

'I tend to take a different view, Miss Hiashi.' He paused to light his pipe. 'I don't regard Neeg-partism as a religion at all, but rather as a mental disease, a subtle form of psychic masochism.'

'And you intend to cure me of it, is that right?'

'With your cooperation.'

'I'm sorry,' Joan said, 'but cooperation is one thing you're not going to get.' " [Many other refs. to Neeg-partism throughout novel, not in DB.]

religious - fictional Tennessee 2054 Dick, Philip K. & Ray Nelson. The Ganymede Takeover. New York: Ace Books (1967); pg. 16. Sexual Freedom Society:
"He couldn't place the face; the nipples, however, were familiar. Ah, he now remembered. It was Miss Holly Something-or-Other, the Vice-President of the local chapter of the Sexual Freedom Society. Perhaps in order to avoid the appearance of complete nudity she wore a pair of horn-rimmed, oval-lensed sunglasses...

Tall and tawny, with Earth-mother brown hair falling loosely to the small of her back, Miss Holly stood over him with a gentle smile... Miss Holly was, he decided, the only good argument he had yet come across for the principles of the Sexual Freedom Society, but she was, simply in being as she was, a very persuasive, if not conclusive, one... "

religious - fictional Tennessee 2054 Dick, Philip K. & Ray Nelson. The Ganymede Takeover. New York: Ace Books (1967); pg. 148. Sexual Freedom Society:
"He had begun to learn how to do nothing. The Sexual Freedom Society had not understood how to achieve it, but Joan Hiashi did; now she was teaching him... "
religious - fictional Tennyson 2200 Anthony, Patricia. Conscience of the Beagle. New York: Ace Books (1995; co. 1993); pg. 21. Tennysonian Christian:
"Every other colonial babbles. So why aren't these people talking? Around the table the Chosen's cabinet sits in varying degrees of unease.

At my right shoulder a minister busies himself by alternately doodling flowers on his Sheet and tapping the erase button...

What have I said that annoys him? The Chosen of God scowls. His scowl continues long past where it should have stopped. It pulls the heavy lips down and down.

'I want to know how you plan to proceed. 'The Chosen steeples his pudgy hand. "

religious - fictional Tennyson 2200 Anthony, Patricia. Conscience of the Beagle. New York: Ace Books (1995; co. 1993); pg. 23. Tennysonian Christian:
"'Abomination.' The Chosen of God slumps. His belly forms a moat of fat below his chest. 'Constructing a man. It's an abomination. I say you, where is the soul in all of that?'

Beagle's soul. Is that why Yi named me team leader? No. HF isn't that diplomatic.

'I suppose you'd have to ask the construct, sir, and see if he has discovered his.'

The Chosen of God shoots to his feet. The ministers cower...

'A psychic and a construct,' the Chosen's lips purse in disgust. 'And you, like Lucifer, are rotten with the sin of pride. I wonder if you haven't made up your mind already.' I tense as Marvin stalks his way to my side of the table. " [Many other refs., not in DB.]

religious - fictional Tennyson 2200 Anthony, Patricia. Conscience of the Beagle. New York: Ace Books (1995; co. 1993); pg. 27. Tennysonian Christian:
"'When Ed the Chosen died, Marvin managed five True prophecies, three more than his closest competitor. He forgets how many times he was wrong.. A few years ago he told me that when he opens his mouth, God speaks... I think Marv's crazy.'

...Vanderslice has finally come to the point. 'So that's the gossip.'

He leans toward me. Backlit by the morning sun, his brown curly hair is a halo. 'No. Listen. If Marvin thinks he's the right hand of God, he has to believe in mercy.'

...' 'Into Thy hands, I commit my spirit,' remember? Marv takes that to heart. He'd punish a sinner. He's done it before. But he's absolutely incapable of hurting someone to save himself. No matter how many thou-shalt-nots Marvin's made of, no matter how inflexible or self-righteous or even silly he might be, God commanded submission. And Marvin isn't going to let Him down. Once you understand Marvin, really understand him, you'll see the conclusion my investigation reached is all wrong.' "

religious - fictional Tennyson 2200 Anthony, Patricia. Conscience of the Beagle. New York: Ace Books (1995; co. 1993); pg. 30. Tennysonian Christian:
"'When the God's Warriors started looking into the terrorist acts,' Vanderslice says, 'they probed the DEEP program in the net of one of the first victims, and found plans for a coup hidden in a subsub file. The Warriors got scared because this wasn't just some malcontent or blasphemer they were dealing with. The conspirator had status... So that's when Marv asked me to take over the investigation, because the God's Warriors are just cops--no offense--and even Marv was starting to worry. You could nail him to a cross. He'd let you. But he never had any burning desire to be a martyr.' "
religious - fictional Tennyson 2200 Anthony, Patricia. Conscience of the Beagle. New York: Ace Books (1995; co. 1993); pg. 31. Tennysonian Christian:
"'EPATs. We're implanted,' Vanderslice says, touching a tiny scar on his wrist. 'Eternal Prayer And Tithe. HF told you, right? It tracks where we are every minute of every day. Being an Earther, that'll probably lead you to the wrong conclusion. Truth is, nobody cares. Nobody wants to know where an EPAT goes. We're god-fearing, trustworthy citizens, otherwise our EPAT would be taken away. It's the Banished out of Bosom that the government worries about. They're the ones they keep an eye on. At least until now.' "
religious - fictional Tennyson 2200 Anthony, Patricia. Conscience of the Beagle. New York: Ace Books (1995; co. 1993); pg. 34. Tennysonian Christian:
"'Hendrix was always a little questionable. Not quite the ideal Tennysonian Christian. Marvin wouldn't hurt somebody to protect himself, but he's always punished heresy. And there was lots of heresy in Paulie Hendrix's DEEP.' "
religious - fictional Tennyson 2200 Anthony, Patricia. Conscience of the Beagle. New York: Ace Books (1995; co. 1993); pg. 77. Tennysonian Christian:
"'Paulie was motivated to see the Tennyson government fall. So was I. We worked for years at it.' Her gaze shifts. She looks across the empty dark street. 'Perhaps 'rebellion' is too strong a word. It was no secret how either one of us felt. Paulie skirted the limits of the Apostasy Laws. In private, he broke them. But no one ever knew. It was never a crime to complain about the government. Everyone just considered it outre.' "
religious - fictional Tennyson 2200 Anthony, Patricia. Conscience of the Beagle. New York: Ace Books (1995; co. 1993); pg. 78. Tennysonian Christian:
"'What a delightful Freudian slip. God, Major. Don't look at me like that. We use a heating coil, lubricant and Smart Plastic. I put the device over the man and let it go. Oral sex is a misdemeanor here. The average Tennysonian male has no idea how it feels...' "
religious - fictional Tennyson 2200 Anthony, Patricia. Conscience of the Beagle. New York: Ace Books (1995; co. 1993); pg. 182. Tennysonian Christian:
"Of course. A Tennysonian. Must have been taught that sex is wrong. Must have been difficult for her, wanting it so bad. Ashamed of it. "
religious - fictional Texas 1996 Leon, Mark. The Unified Field. New York: Avon Books (1996); pg. 31. Church of the Golden Grail:
"'Cliff belongs to the Church of the Golden Grail,' Alan said.

'What the hell is that!' Ira couldn't keep his voice down.

'If I tell you, Ira,' Cliff said, 'it is strictly off the record, OK?'

'Sure,' Ira said.

'We are an ancient order, going at least as far as the Knights Templar. I personally believe our lineage stretches back to the pre-Christian era, even to the ancient Greek Mystery Cults, but that's not really so important. The crucial thing is our central, binding belief--tenet, dogma--whatever you want to call it.'

'Yeah?' Ira said.

'We believe that our destiny is there.' He pointed up. 'Humans were never meant to stay bound to the surface of planet earth. We were supposed to begin the migration to outer space thousands of years ago. But something went wrong. There was a glitch in the evolution of human intelligence. We got stuck to the planet, forgot our true destiny, and the rest, as they say, is history.' " [Much more, not in DB.]

religious - fictional Texas 2005 Gibson, William. Virtual Light. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 9. Fallonites:
"Sublett was Texan, a refugee from some weird trailer-camp video-sect. He said his mother had been getting ready to deed his ass to the church, whatever that meant.

Sublett wasn't too anxious to talk about it, but Rydell had gotten the idea that these people figured video was the Lord's preferred means of communicating, the screen itself a kind of perpetually burning brush. 'He's in the de-tails,' Sublett had said once. 'You gotta watch for Him close.' Whatever form this worship had taken, it was evident that Sublett had absorbed more television than anyone Rydell had ever met, mostly old movies on channels that never ran anything but. " [Many other refs., not all in DB.]

religious - fictional Texas 2005 Gibson, William. Virtual Light. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 19. Fallonites:
"'Mama saw Cyrinda Burdette. In this mall over by Waco. Got her autograph, too. Kept it up on the set with the prayer-hankies and her hologram of the reverend Wayne Fallon. She had a prayer-hanky for every damn thing. One for the rent, one to keep the AIDS off, the TB . . .' "

...Something about the postcards gave Rydell the creeps; they made the guy look like a cross between Elvis and some kind of Catholic saint, skinny and with his eyes too big.

...Sublett shuddered. 'Reverend Fallon always said--'

'Screw Reverend Fallon,' Rydell said, hitting the ignition. 'Son of a bitch just makes money selling prayer-hankies to people like your momma. You knew that was all bull----, didn't you, otherwise why'd you come out here?' "

religious - fictional Texas: Dallas-Fort Worth 1998 Wood, Crystal. Fool's Joust. Denton, Texas: Tattersall Publishing (1998); pg. 12. Knights of the Once and Forever King:
"'...Then he started coming home and telling us all these stories about King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table.'

'Like in English Literature class?'

'That's what I thought at first, but he kept on and on about it. Then he told me he'd met some people who claimed to be King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table.'

Trick and Tay glanced at each other, but returned their attention to Bob, who went on. 'He said they were called The Knights of the Once and Future King. It sounded to me like one of those 'Dungeons and Dragons'-style role-playing games that can go on for weeks at a time. He'd played them before, but he always got bored with the, so I didn't worry much at first...' " [Many more refs. to this group in novel, most not in DB. This is the central fictional religious group in the book.]

religious - fictional Texas: Dallas-Fort Worth 1998 Wood, Crystal. Fool's Joust. Denton, Texas: Tattersall Publishing (1998); pg. 13. Knights of the Once and Forever King:
"'...Then he asked me if I believed we were living in the last days as described in Revelations, and I said I didn't know--I don't understand that apocalyptic stuff. He said that King Arthur will be the leader of the final battle, and the battle is coming soon. He said that when King Arthur claims his eternal throne, the age of chivalry will return to the whole world.'

...'...and Gina told her about the Knights of the Once and Forever King game he was playing. The counselor said she hadn't heard of it, but that it probably wasn't a game, that it might be some kind of New Age or militia group, and to get him away from those people by any means possible.' "

religious - fictional Texas: Dallas-Fort Worth 1998 Wood, Crystal. Fool's Joust. Denton, Texas: Tattersall Publishing (1998); pg. 20. Knights of the Once and Forever King:
"'The FBI database didn't have squat about the Knights of the Once and Forever King, but I gave the Gopher and Yahoo a bunch of keyword combinations and found their homepage.'

...'What did you find?'

'It's sort of a classified ad. here, read it.'...

At the top of the first sheet, an elaborate coat-of-arms was printed as a fuzzy, low-resolution graphic, but Trick could tell that the principal emblem on it was a dragon. Below the graphic was the headline, 'What Are You Searching For?', and beneath that he read:

If you are searching for:
- high adventure
- companionship
-a purpose in life
- a chance to live FOREVER

. . . you will find them all if you will accept the bold challenge that awaits each seeker who finds and surrenders to THE KNIGHTS OF THE ONCE AND FOREVER KING! "



religious - fictional, continued

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