Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to religious - fictional, New York: New York City

religious - fictional, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
religious - fictional New York: New York City 1991 Miller, John J. "And Hope to Die " in Wild Cards IX: Jokertown Shuffle (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1991); pg. 18. "Church of Jesus Christ, Joker":
"...standing before one of them was a huge figure in priestly robes...

'Father Squid!' Brennan cried.

The priest turned his head toward the reception desk, the nictitating membranes covering his eyes blinking rapidly in surprise. 'Daniel?'

Father Squid was a stout joker, huge in his priestly cassock. A few inches taller than Brennan, he weighed about a hundred pounds more... Father Squid moved quickly for a man his size. He rolled up to the desk with a smooth, fluid gait and said to the nurse, 'Call Tachyon, now.'

She looked from the priest, a well-known figure about Jokertown, to the mysterious stranger... " [Many other refs. to Father Squid, not in DB. He is founder of the Church of Jesus Christ, Joker.]

religious - fictional New York: New York City 1994 Leigh, Stephen. "The Color of His Skin " in Wild Cards: Book II of a New Cycle: Marked Cards (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Baen (1994); pg. 13. "Church of Jesus Christ, Joker":
Pg. 13: "Then it struck him: Jo Ann. She's a member of Father Squid's church.... "; Pg. 14: "'Yes, we do, Senator, and I'm sorry,' she said. 'We're involved because Father Squid asked me for help...' " [Other refs., not in DB.]
religious - fictional New York: New York City 1994 Leigh, Stephen. "The Color of His Skin " in Wild Cards: Book II of a New Cycle: Marked Cards (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Baen (1994); pg. 63. "Church of Jesus Christ, Joker":
"'The Church of Jesus Christ Joker burned last Black Queen Night,' Gregg's voice said over the film. 'We all remember that disaster, when over a hundred innocent jokers were murdered by an arsonist who blocked the church doors and then set fire to the church while those inside were worshipping. The alleged arsonist was found, but not before he killed himself in an accidental explosion. The official explanation is that the arsonist acted alone. But that's not what the chief investigator of the fire believes...' "
religious - fictional New York: New York City 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 19. Divine Daughters:
Pg. 19: "The rest were so drecky it was hard to believe, going right down to one in a shapeless brown bag of a garment toting a big heavy sacking purse, hair cropped to a crewcut, nervous face shiny except where it was chapped or spotted--a Divine Daughter, probably. Nothing short of religion could persuade a normal girl to make herself look so awful. "; Pg. 22: "No Divine Daughter would carry anything that would work at a safe distance--no bolt-gun, no firearms, no grenades. "
religious - fictional New York: New York City 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 22. Divine Daughters:
Pg. 22: "'Blasphemers! Devilspawn! Consciousness is a gift of God and you can't build a soul into a machine!

--a GT plantee wouldn't be invited to scream that...

A telescopic axe with a blade the full length of the folded handle. Hmmm!

Screaming: 'Devil's work! Smash it and repent before you're damned to all eternity! Don't presume to infringe God's--' "; Pg. 87: "'A Divine Daughter tried to wreck Shalmaneser with an axe. Chopped the hand off one of our technicians.' "

religious - fictional New York: New York City 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 27. Divine Daughters:
"He stared at the girl as he approached her.

Divine Daughter. Probably called Dorcas or Tabitha or Martha. Thinking of killing. Thinking of smashing. A typical Christian tradition.

You murdered our Prophet. Ours died old and full of honour. You would kill yours again, and cheerfully. If ours came back I would speak to him like a friend. "

religious - fictional New York: New York City 2015 Westerfeld, Scott. Polymorph. New York: Penguin (1997); pg. 22. Missing Foundation:
"Rumor had it that the amphitheater had once witnessed the sacrificial rites of the Missing Foundation, an anarchist cult that had mutated out of an extremist homeless advocacy group. On the other hand, she had also heard that there was no Foundation, or that it was just a stalking-horse for real estate interests, the police, and authority in general. For her part, she liked to believe that there were many missing Foundations, spawned one from another like rumors in a long, hot summer. "
religious - fictional New York: New York City 2030 Disch, Thomas M. On Wings of Song. New York: St. Martin's Press (1978); pg. 319. Marble Collegiate Church:
"...Daniel was not, in general, a superstitious sort, but he was fast becoming a Christian, at least in the latter-day sense of the word as set forth in the teachings of Reverend Jack Van Dyke. According to Van Dyke, all Christians got to be that way by suspending their disbelief in a preposterous but highly improving fairy tale. This presented no difficulties to Daniel, who took naturally to pretending. His whole life these days was a game of make-believe. He pretended to be black... Why not pretend to be a Christian?... Why not say he was saved, if it might make someone else happy and did him no harm. Wasn't that what most priests and ministers do? "
religious - fictional New York: New York City 2076 Morehouse, Lyda. Archangel Protocol. New York: Penguin Putnam (2001); pg. 24. Lamb of God Church:
"The tubes diverged as traffic detoured around the construction of a ten-story Jesus that would house the main offices of the Lamb of God church. Under the scaffolding, I could see the outline of Christ's features. It struck me how sad his eyes looked, staring out at the tangled skyline of New York. In his hands, a neon sign proudly proclaimed forty thousand served. "
religious - fictional New York: New York City 2076 Morehouse, Lyda. Archangel Protocol. New York: Penguin Putnam (2001); pg. 6. Promise Keepers Church:
"'Some things do,' I managed to say. 'But I'm not running a church. You look like the football and Bible type. Why don't you try the Promise Keepers Church down the road? It's a drive-through.'

'What they're selling can't help me.' "

religious - fictional Newmanhome 2103 Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 190. Holy Apocalyptic Catholic Church of the Great Transporter:
"The largest of the underground 'towns'--the one belonging to the sect they called the Holy Apocalyptic Catholic Church of the Great Transporter--was under what had once been downtown Homepowrt. The Great Transporters weren'the only more or less independent tribe (or nation, or religion--anyway, a separate enclave that these paltry few had insisted on subdividing themselves into)... The Greats would not work on Sundays... because their religions forbade it " [Some other refs. not in DB.]
religious - fictional Newmanhome 2103 Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 190. People's Republic:
"The largest of the underground 'towns'--the one belonging to the sect they called the Holy Apocalyptic Catholic Church of the Great Transporter--was under what had once been downtown Homepowrt. The Great Transporters weren't the only more or less indepenent tribe (or nation, or religion--anyway, a separate enclave that these paltry few had insisted on subdividing themselves into). Allahabad and the Reformers were along the shore, due west of the old town. The Peeps (actually they called themselves the People's Republic, and what their religion was exactly Viktor could not really tell.)... the Peeps had elected to consider Tuesday their day off because, although they had no comprehensible religion of their own they had an obsessive need to make sure none of the others had any privileges they could not share. " [Many other refs., some not in DB. See esp. pg. 192 to 220.]
religious - fictional Newmanhome 2200 Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 197. Holy Apocalyptic Catholic Church of the Great Transporter:
"Of course, their ways of keeping the population down differed from community to community... And the Great Transporters, so to speak, attacked the problem from the other end. Their religion forbade them to take life--well, except in war, of course. For that reason they didn't use contraception, nor did they practice abortion; they had babies, lots of babies, and when they pruned their populations it was among the adults--at least, mostly among the near adults, anyway; if a Great Transporter child managed to survive his rebellious adolescence he had a fair chance of a natural death, sixty or seventy Nemanhome years later.

What the Great Transporters did was dispose of their criminals, and they had a lot of criminals. In their community there were 280 statutory crimes punishable by their supreme penalty--it came to about one crime for every two persons in the community, and the sentence was passed frequently. "

religious - fictional Newmanhome 2200 Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 196. Holy Apocalyptic Catholic Church of the Great Transporter:
"But for most of their lives the sects stayed firmly apart. Great Transporters married Great Transporters, Moslems Moslems. "
religious - fictional Newmanhome 2200 Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 197. Holy Apocalyptic Catholic Church of the Great Transporter:
"Of course, the sentence wasn't death. Not exactly, anyway. Execution was another of the life-taking sins that was prohibited. They had a better way. They put their criminals in the freezer.

It was fortunate for the Great Transporters that there was so much unused freezer space. The freezers had been big to begin with. Then they had been further enlarged when Newmanhome began to get too cold to support outside life, and tens of thousands of cattle and other livestock were slaughtered and frozen. The freezers had their own independent, long-lasting lines to the geothermal power plant; they were fully automatic and would last for ages.

But that was one more of the many sources of friction among the communities, because the Greats were rapidly filling them up. "

religious - fictional Newmanhome 2200 Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 198. Holy Apocalyptic Catholic Church of the Great Transporter:
"The four communities rubbed abrasively against each other in plenty of other ways. The Great Transporters hated to see unbelievers profane their Sabbath. "
religious - fictional Newmanhome 2200 Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 233. Holy Apocalyptic Catholic Church of the Great Transporter:
"'Are you saying the Great Transporter isn't God?' the woman demanded. An old man down the table stood up, his white mustaches quivering.

'I don't like this kind of talk!' he announced. 'I'm going back to work!'

And Mirian, glowering as he led Viktor away from the table, warned, 'You have to watch what you say, man! I'm as tolerant as the next fellow, you know that--but you don't want a charge of heresy and corruption of faith, do you?' "

religious - fictional Newmanhome 2200 Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 235. Holy Apocalyptic Catholic Church of the Great Transporter:
"Inside each tunnel was row on row of capsules. Each one held a human body--convicted 'criminals' mostly--with crosses for the Greats and the Reforms, crescents for the Moslems, and five-pointed stars for the Peeps. "
religious - fictional Newmanhome 2200 Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 194-195. Holy Apocalyptic Catholic Church of the Great Transporter:
Pg. 194: "They glanced at each other diffidently, conscious that they were certainly bending the rules, if not breaking them outright; Mordi, the Great Transporter girl, was particularly uneasy, because she was the one from Viktor's own commune. "; Pg. 195: "Even slaves have to eat, and finally Vandot announced that the workday was done. Because Mordi had an errand to run Viktor followed the little girl, Moon-bet, back through the tunnels to the caverns of the Great Transporters. She was nervous there, among the hostile black-shrouded enemies of her people. " [This religion is based on Catholicism, but refs. to it are listed under its own name, except when specifically called 'Catholics' later on.]
religious - fictional Newmanhome 2200 Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 193. People's Republic:
"'Of course he does. that is right. The Four-Power Council will perhaps discuss your situation when they meet.'

'And when will that be?'

'Oh, they meet all the time,' she informed him. 'Except holidays, I mean, they meet on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays. But when they will come to your case I do not know. They have much to discuss about important questinos, for both the Peeps and the Reforms are now on overload.' "

religious - fictional Newmanhome 2200 Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 194. People's Republic:
"The three returning children stopped in the doorway, scandalized. The boy in the kilts of the People's Republic called menacingly, 'I will report this!' "
religious - fictional Newmanhome 2200 Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 196. People's Republic:
"The four sects did work together on common needs. The chambers of the Four-Powers Council were common and kept separate from the living quarters of the sects. so were the food-producing caves, or most of them... and the People's Republic chose not to share grain and bean fields of the others... But for most of their lives the sects stayed firmly apart. Great Transporters married Great Transporters, Moslems Moslems. The citizens of the People's Republic married no one, because they didn't believe in marriage, but they made love (on occasions directed by their leaders) only with their own. "
religious - fictional Newmanhome 2200 Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 197. People's Republic:
"Of course, their ways of keeping the population down differed from community to community... The People's Republic did their best at abstinence, with males and females housed firmly apart except on designated nights, when a couple who had deserved well of the state were allowed to do well with each other. "
religious - fictional Newmanhome 2200 Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 198. People's Republic:
"The four communities rubbed abrasively against each other in plenty of other ways. The Great Transporters hated to see unbelievers profane their Sabbath. The Moslems lost their tempers when they saw anyone drinking alcohol; the Peeps were constantly irate about the wasteful, sinful 'luxuries' of the other three groups... "
religious - fictional Newmanhome 2200 Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 223. People's Republic:
"'...And the others--well, the Peeps are the ones who talked the council into trying to use the fuel for microwave power... " [Many other refs., some not in DB. See esp. pg. 192 to 220.]
religious - fictional Newmanhome 2200 Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 235. People's Republic:
"Inside each tunnel was row on row of capsules. Each one held a human body--convicted 'criminals' mostly--with crosses for the Greats and the Reforms, crescents for the Moslems, and five-pointed stars for the Peeps. "
religious - fictional Nicoji 2200 Bell, M. Shayne. Nicoji. New York: Baen (1991); pg. 27. help:
"The help held up his hand. 'Being better,' it chittered.

I knew it would be. The help had such fast metabolisms--they healed faster than anything I'd seen. " [There are many references to the 'help' throughout the novel, most not in DB. They are the central, dominant alient species, and a major thematic element of the book.]

religious - fictional Nicoji 2200 Bell, M. Shayne. Nicoji. New York: Baen (1991); pg. 92. help:
"The help chittered and scratched their heads and finally got on the branches above me, grabbed the rope, and pulled. Amoral, I thought. The help are amoral, self-centered, and alien. "
religious - fictional Nicoji 2200 Bell, M. Shayne. Nicoji. New York: Baen (1991); pg. 116. help:
"Help house? What did he mean? The place where his people lived? We'd never seen any young or old help, or any females. Sam and I had teased them about the famles, but when we asked where they lived the help would only rock back and forth, pounding the logs of our raft and making vaugue motions in directions that took in half the pantano... The help were natives. THey'd have had to deal with lagarto poison before. So they just might be able to help Sam. "
religious - fictional Nicoji 2200 Bell, M. Shayne. Nicoji. New York: Baen (1991); pg. 194. help:
"He opened his eyes and looked at me. I laid him back and crawled out for the Coke. The wild guys had washed the buckets and filled them with water. I took them and pushed them ahead of me as I crawled back in the cave. I bathed Kena's face and hands, then popped the top of the Coke can. Kena opened his eyes. Some of the Coke fizzled down the side of the can, and I licked it off.

'No, Jake!' Kena's voice was barely a whisper, but his eyes were wide and he looked at me in utter disbelief that I was drinking a brown, fizzy liquid.

'It's good,' I said. 'Here--'

He turned his head away and let the Coke run down his cheeks. Some got on his lips, and he started spitting. Other help were watching me now, blinking in the light. One reached up and tried to knock the can from my hands.

'Jake, no,' Kena said. 'Jake, no.'

I gave up on the Coke, put down the can, gave Kena some water, and carried him outside... "

religious - fictional Nicoji 2200 Bell, M. Shayne. Nicoji. New York: Baen (1991); pg. 202-203. help:
"'I had money to wire myself so I could come here and do solo research on help intelligence, Ph.D. I signed on as a worker so the company wouldn't suspect and interfere with my research. I thought I could make fast money harvesting nicoji, buy my way back to Earth after a couple years, be a big surprise to everybody--settle whether the help are intelligent or merely imitative... It would have been a scientific coup, studying the help in their native habitat, not in cages run by company-bought researchers.'...

'The help are intelligent, of course,' I said.

'And the company knows it...' "

religious - fictional Nicoji 2200 Bell, M. Shayne. Nicoji. New York: Baen (1991); pg. 33-34. help:
"Something was glitering in the little mango tree. I walked over to see what it was. The help had put shards all over the branches. I wondered what kind of fruit they expected to grow from that, or whether this was part of some religious ritual with human trash. "
religious - fictional Nicoji 2231 Bell, M. Shayne. Nicoji. New York: Baen (1991); pg. 242. help:
"Eloise came back thirty-one years later... She had found six old help in a zoo that flew among the new worlds displaying curiosities. The zookeepers hadn't known what the help were, at least that's what they said, till Eloise saw them and identified them and brought them home.

The help, of course, did not make her go through customs in Jake Station, the elegant station they were learning to run above Nicoji, built by medicines all the worlds blessed them for. They took her, the Great Lady--the Lady whose work had given them unalterable rights to their world, who had spent years advising the first two help ambassadors to Earth--down corridors and through waiting rooms all named Jake (the help had named ever nameable thing on the station Jake--Jake 10 or 12 [corridors], Docking Bay Jake 3, Jake's [a restaurant])... "

religious - fictional North America 2010 Stephenson, Neal. The Big U. New York: Random House (1984); pg. 117. Temple of Unlimited Godhead:
"'Who the hell are you?' said Krupp. 'Are you from that squalid North Dakotan cult thing?'

They were shocked, even Operative 3, and stared uncomprehendingly. Deep concern showed in the lined, earnest face of the man in the plaid flannel. Finally he stepped forward. 'Yessirree. We are indeed followers of Temple of Unlimited Godhead, and proud of it too. With all due respect, just what do you mean by 'squalid'?'

'It's like a dead dog in the sitting room, son. Look, why don't you all just let that boy go? That's right.'

'Regretfully, the released him. Operative 3 stood up, shivering violently. He could not exactly thank Krupp. After hoping from foot to foot he spun and continued his flight down the hall as though nothing had happened. "

religious - fictional North America 2010 Stephenson, Neal. The Big U. New York: Random House (1984); pg. 118. Temple of Unlimited Godhead:
"The SUB hooted at Krupp's wicked intolerance for religious diversity while the rest of the audience applauded. The TUGgies were galvanized, and spoke up for their renegade sect as eloquently as they knew how.

'But that man was a Communist! We found his card.'

'Look at it this way. If TUG brainwashes people, how do you explain the great diversity of our membership, which comes from towns and farms of all sizes all over the Dakotas and Saskatchewan?'

'TUG is fully consistent with Judeo-Christo-Mohammedan-Bahaism.' " [Many other refs. to TUG, not all in DB.]

religious - fictional North America 2010 Stephenson, Neal. The Big U. New York: Random House (1984); pg. 118. Temple of Unlimited Godhead:
"'TUG is fully consistent with Judeo-Christo-Mohammedan-Bahaism.'

'Communism is the greatest threat in the world today.'

'The goals of Messiah Jorgenson Five are fully consistent with the aims of American higher education.'

'Our church is noncoercive. We believe of our own free, uh, pamphlet . . . explains our ideas in layman's language.'

'Visit North Dakota this summer for fun in the sun. Temple Camp.'

'Who is the brainwasher, our church, which teaches that we may all be Messiah/Buddhas together, or today's media society with its constant emphasis on materialism?'

'If you'll accept this free book it will reveal truths you may never have thought about before.'

'I couldn't help noticing that you were looking a little down and out, kinda lonely. You know, sometimes it helps to talk to a stranger.' "

religious - fictional North America 2010 Stephenson, Neal. The Big U. New York: Random House (1984); pg. 117-118. Temple of Unlimited Godhead:
"'Look,' Krupp continued. 'We've got a security force here. We've got organized religions that have been doing just fine for millennia. Now what we don't need is a brainwashing franchise, or any of your Kool-Aid-stoned outlaw Mormon Jesuits. I know times are hard in North Dakota, but they're hard everywhere, and it doesn't call for new religions. Of course, you have some very fine points on the subject of Communism. Now, this does not mean we will in any way fail to extend you full religious and politial freedoms as with the old-fashioned nonprofit religions.' "
religious - fictional North America 2125 Anderson, Poul. Harvest of Stars. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 45. Avantism:
"Fleetingly, not for the first time, he knew that what made and kept him a dedicated Avantist was none of these proven propositions, not really. It was a logical non sequitur--a vision, if you will--and therefore nonrational. But Xuan's scheme allowed for nonrationality, irrationality, and the chaos of nonlinear systems. They were powerful elements in the course of events; his reasoning took them fully into account. What had captured Sayre's imagination was Xuan's afterword. The thinker was at last simply speculating, the prophet was no longer prophesying but imagining. He agreed that nobody alive in an imperfect and limited present can foresee what will happen in a future that has approached perfection and abolished limitations. Still, one dared look ahead, and in fact there had been those already in the 19th and 20th centuries who did. They saw dimly, Xuan more clearly, the Transfiguration--a thousand years hence, a million?... the whole cosmos evolving... "
religious - fictional North America 2125 Anderson, Poul. Harvest of Stars. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 45. Avantism:
"A surprise jolted Sayre back into Guthrie's hereness. 'I did study the math,' he heard the download reply. That had not been said earlier, no matter how intensive the interrogation. 'After all, as a doctrine it was acquiring more true believers every day. Your Avantist Association was becoming a political force to reckon with, uh-huh. Though mainly because of the half-believers, the hordes who supposed the scheme must have something going for it because everybody said it was objective and scientific, didn't they? I'd better check it out for myself. So I got a logician to help me, and we waded through the psychotensor matrices, the lao-hu operator, the quantitative studies, enough of the whole scheer to give me a pretty fair notion, before I decided my time was worth more than this.'

'Which proves you learned nothing,' Sayre retorted. 'Did you never ask yourself why those ideas appealed to so many?' "

religious - fictional North America 2125 Anderson, Poul. Harvest of Stars. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 46. Avantism:
"'No. For the first time, we have a theory that explains the facts of history.'

'Some of the facts. Astrology or a flat Earth explain some of the facts too. The rest of Xuanism is just about as useful as they are. Or as disastrous, rather. Exactly how well has the union done under its Avantist government? Where have all your restructuring and redistributions and reorientations brought you, except deeper into the swamp?... And your purpose was never scientific anyway. It was religious. Crank religious. Why, your power elite don't call themselves a board or a council but a synod. Interesting connotations, hey? As for your pipe dream of a world-intelligence that'll eventually embrace the whole universe--' "

religious - fictional North America 2125 Anderson, Poul. Harvest of Stars. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 45-46. Avantism:
"Sayre retorted. 'Did you never ask yourself why those ideas [Avantism] appealed to so many?'

'Sure I did, and came up with the usual reasons. Oh, yes, the world was in a bad way, in the wake of the Renewal and the Jihad and the other hydrophobias it'd been through. This country wasn't the worst off, but it had better days to remember than most did, which made its people feel like they'd fallen further and harder. Xuan had made some predictions that were more or less right and issued some prescriptions that weren't totally absurd. North Americans always have been suckers for salvationism. Enough of them swallowed Xuanism--or, I should say, its sound-bite slogans--that your gang got itself elected, never mind how. The last halfway free election the country had.'

'Nonsense. The public saw what was being accomplished.'

'Some positive things, yeah. Mostly of the flashy sort, tenements, reclamation, universal genetic counseling, et cetera...' "

religious - fictional North America 2125 Anderson, Poul. The Stars Are Also Fire. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 89. Avantism:
"It was bad enough when Fireball turned spacecraft against the Avantists. Justified though the action might have been, the outrage it globally provoked brought an end of Fireball and of sovereign Luna. "
religious - fictional North America 2125 Anderson, Poul. The Stars Are Also Fire. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 309. Avantism:
"But Fireball brought down the Avantists, and the modern world was not totalitarian... "
religious - fictional North America 2130 Anderson, Poul. The Stars Are Also Fire. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 211. Avantism:
"The movement toward such partial secession had been particularly marked in North America in the period of upheaval that followed the fall of the Avantists. "
religious - fictional North America 2130 Anderson, Poul. The Stars Are Also Fire. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 211. Bramlanders:
"The movement toward such partial secession had been particularly marked in North America in the period of upheaval that followed the fall of the Avantists. Among those who found themselves involved were ex-guerrillas of the resistance, assorted nonconformists, and certain outlaws who hoped to gain legitimacy under the new conditions. They pooled their resources and acquired a large tract of land. The Third Republic didn't hinder them. As fragmented as the nation was by that time, it couldn't... The Bramlanders didn't mind that. They were seeking a life they could feel was natural. They founded villages, wide-spread over the territory, few of them with a population above 500 adults, a size at which all could participate in public business... "
religious - fictional North America 2250 Anderson, Poul. The Stars Are Also Fire. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 211-212. Bramlanders:
"In the course of generations, like-minded outsiders joined them while the dissatisfied departed; and thus the culture evolved... Evolution, though, takes its own blind courses, and selection working on random mutations and genetic drift can go in curious directions. Today, what vestiges of democracy survived in Bramland were purely ceremonial. It was rituals, taboos, & rankings that satisfied the ordinary member's desire for a well-defined station and purpose in life, a sense of community and of worth. Some men practice crafts and trades, but incidentally to their real callings--as warriors, sacerdotes, occasional hunters. Women found fulfillment in their mystical sororities and as housewives, sexual artists, occasional mothers. The mayor of a town might or might not listen to its elders, but he was its absolute ruler. He had won to that status by challenging & defeating the former incumbent in a set of athletic contests that frequently ended in death. "
religious - fictional North America 2733 Simmons, Dan. Hyperion. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 183. Assured Reincarnation Institute:
"The North American Preserve... It was said that about eight thousand people still resided in that mysterious continent, but half of these were rangers. The rest included renegade ARNists [Assured Reincarnation Institute] who plied their trade by resurrecting species of plants and animals long absent from their antediluvian North American haunts... "
religious - fictional North Carolina 1998 Bradley, Marion Zimmer & Holly Lisle. In the Rift. New York: Baen (1998); pg. 181. Christian Brotherhood of Purified Souls:
"'When that article came out, I did a little checking myself, just like Madilee Marson. I looked into Ogden Snead and bobby Sumner and Warren Plonkett. They're all members of the same church. Well, it calls itself a church, but it's a nasty little radical organization that doesn't have much to do with religion at all, as far as I can tell. It's called the Christian Brotherhood of Purified Souls, and I think the word 'Christian' is tacked on there just to get them a tax-exempt status. These people don't believe in brotherhood or tolerance or love or anything real Christians believe in. They're a paramilitary hate organization with an ugly definition for what it takes to be purified, and some very cultlike practices--regular members have to sell all their belongings and give the money to the Brotherhood; they go through a long, arduous indoctrination period, and bad things have been known to happen to the members who, once in, try to get out.' " [Other refs. not in DB.]
religious - fictional North Carolina 1999 Kessel, John. Good News from Outer Space. New York: Tor (1990; c. 1989); pg. 289. Millennialist:
"'--Elsewhere in riot news, the Governor of North Carolina, speaking from Asheville, has declared a state of emergency in the wake of last night's fighting in Raleigh. Since Tuesday's victory of Millennialist candidates in special elections, the Raleigh-Durham area has been in turmoil... The Governor ordered those elements of the National Guard still loyal to the state to cordon off the Research Triangle area and give refuge to the victims of the religious persecution that has swept the region . . .' "
religious - fictional Oregon 2011 Brin, David. The Postman. New York: Bantam (1985); pg. 126. Cyclops:
"Still, there was a faint hum of electricity on all sides as white-coated techs carted equipment to and fro. Against every well was stacked tribute from the surrounding towns and hamlets--payment for the benign guidance of Cyclops.

More machinerey of all kinds--plus a small tithe of food and clothing for Cyclop's human helpers--came in every day. And yet, from all Godon had herd, this salvage was easly spared by the people of the valley. After all, what use had they for the old machines, anyway?

No wonder there were no complaints of a 'tyranny by machine.' The supercomputer's price was easily met. And in exchange, the valley had its Solomon--and perhaps a Moses to lead them out of this wilderness. " [Many other refs. to Cyclops, a supercomputer apparently dispensing wisdom for this community. Most refs. not in DB.]

religious - fictional Oregon 2011 Brin, David. The Postman. New York: Bantam (1985); pg. 131. Cyclops:
"The foyer of the House of Cyclops--once the OSU Artificial Intelligence Laboratory--was a striking reminder of a more elegant era. The gold carpet was freshly facuumed and only slightly frayed. Bright fluorescents shone on fine furniture in the paneled lobby, where peasants and officials from villages as far as forty miles away nervously twisted rolled-up petitions as they waited for their brief interviews with the great machine.

... At last, the pretty receptionist... motioned them through the doors at the end of the foyer. As Gordon and his guide passed down the long hallway to the interview chamber, two men approached from the other end. One was a Servant of Cyclops, wearing the familiar black-trimmed white coast. The other--a citizen...--frowned over a long sheet of computer printout.

'I'm still not sure I understand, Dr. Grober. Is Cyclops sayin' we dig the well near the north hollow or not? His answer isn't any too clear, if you ask me.' "

religious - fictional Oregon 2011 Brin, David. The Postman. New York: Bantam (1985); pg. 132. Cyclops:
"'Now Herb, you tell your people it isn't Cyclops's job to figure everything down to the last detail. He can narrow down the choices, but he can't make the final decisions for you.'

The farmer tugged at his overtight collar. 'Sure, everybody knows that. But we've gotten straighter answers from him in th' past. Why can't he be clearer this time?'

'Well for one hting, Herb, it's been over twenty years since the geological maps in Cyclops's memory banks were updated. Then you're also certainly aware that Cyclops was designed to talk to high-level experts, right? So of course a lot of his explanations will go over our heads . . . sometimes even we scientists who survived.' "

religious - fictional Oregon 2011 Brin, David. The Postman. New York: Bantam (1985); pg. 152. Cyclops:
"Lazarensky shook his head. 'You know better, of course. Without Cyclops the task was impossible. All we could do was present a shell. An illusion.

'It offered a way to survive in the coming dark age. All around us was chaos and suspicion. The only leverage we poor intellectuals had was a weak, flickering thing called Hope.'

'Hope!' Gordon laughed bitterly. Lazarensky shrugged.

'Petitioners come to speak with Cyclops, and they speak with me. It isn't hard, usualy, to get give good advice, to look up simple techniques in books, or to mediate disputes with common sense. They believe in the impartiality of the computer where they would neve trust a living man.'

'And when you can't come up with a commonsense answer, you go oracular on them.'

Again the shrug. 'It worked at Delphi and at Ephesus, Gordon. And honestly, where is the harm?...' "

religious - fictional Oregon 2011 Brin, David. The Postman. New York: Bantam (1985); pg. 181. Cyclops:
"To Gordon it was a marvel. Here, in public, the man actually seemed hurt, defensive of his mechanical oracle . . . which people of the valley still revered like great Oz...

'Now, I'd be the last one to criticize Cyclops. I'm sure he's crankin' out the ideas as fast as he can. But I just can't see where this... "

religious - fictional Oregon 2011 Brin, David. The Postman. New York: Bantam (1985); pg. 8. Holnists:
"The man's clothing confirmed what Gordon remembered from those blurred seconds of the attack. At least his assailants weren't wearing army surpluss camouflage . . . the trademark of Holn survivalists. They must be just regular, run of the mill, may-they-please-roast-in-Hell bandits. "; Pg. 9: "Their behavior confirmed that the sons of bitches weren't true survivalists. Certainly not Holnists. If they had been, he'd probably be dead by now. " [Holnists are the fictional primary religious-cultural group in this book, and are mentioned throughout, not all refs. in DB.]
religious - fictional Oregon 2011 Brin, David. The Postman. New York: Bantam (1985); pg. 176. Holnists:
"'According to this book, America was having a cultural renaissance, just before the Doomwar. Sure, there was Nathan Holn, preaching his mad doctrine of super machismo--and there were problems with the Slavic Mystics overseas--but for the most part it was a brilliant time!...' "
religious - fictional Oregon 2011 Brin, David. The Postman. New York: Bantam (1985); pg. 225. Holnists:
"Bezoar raised one hand before Gordon could speak. 'Have no fear of retribution. Our Holinst philospohy does not believe in it. You defeated two survivalists in a straight fight. That makes you a peer in our eyes. Why do you think you were treated as men after you were captured, and not gelded as serfs or as sheep?' "
religious - fictional Oregon 2011 Brin, David. The Postman. New York: Bantam (1985); pg. 42-43. Holnists:
"The Mayor of Gilchrist went on:

We are having extreme difficulty with local gangs of 'Survivalists.' Fortunately, these infestations of egotists are mostly too paranoid to band together. They're as much trouble to each other as to us, I suppose. Still, they are becoming a real problem.

Our deputy is regularly fired on by well armed men in army surplus camouflage clothing. No doubt the idiots think he's a 'Russian Lackey' or some such nonsense.

They have taken to hunting game on a massive scale, killing everything in the forest and doing a typically rotten job of butchering and preserving the meat. Our own hunters come back disgusted over the waste, often having been shot at without provocation...

He put the letter down.

So it had been that way here, too... this plague of 'survivalists'--particularly those following the high priest of violent anarchy, Nathan Holn. "

religious - fictional Pennsylvania 1885 Williams, Walter Jon. Days of Atonement. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 59. Church of the Apostles of Elohim and the Nazarene:
"The Church of the Apostles of Elohim and the Nazarene... had been imported specially in the 1880s, when Riga Brothers began their copper operation... Riga Brothers, whose board chairman was an Apostle, proposed importing entire families of coreligionists from upstate New York and northern Pennsylvania... "
religious - fictional Pennsylvania 2010 Williams, Walter Jon. Days of Atonement. New York: Tor (1991); pg. , 63, 214. Church of the Apostles of Elohim and the Nazarene:
Pg. 214: "'...I went back to Pennsylvania, to Catton College.' " [A church-run college.]; Pg. 63: "Ricky had spent years in the Peace Corps and working in soup kitchens for the needy before going to Catton College in Pennsylvania and the ministry. "
religious - fictional Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 219. hrossa:
"The hrossa didn't seem to talk about anything like doctrinal beliefs in their own language either; hross religion appeared to be entirely a matter of feeling. These feelings of theirs about the world communicated a good deal to the team, but the 'content' communicated was the wrong sort to take them further with the study in the form and manner in which they had been pursuing it, and now they were in a hurry...

To the Quakers, the feelings of the hrossa were readily recognizable as religious, mingling elements of reverence, respect, gratitude, and so forth, with less familiar ones it was harder to put English names to. But there was nothing to analyze, nothing they could come to grips with; all was insubstantial... " [The hrossa are the native intelligent species on Pennterra. This entire book, of course, deals extensively with hross culture, biology, beliefs, practices, etc. Other refs. not in DB.]

religious - fictional Peridon's Folly -99940 B.C.E. Anderson, Kevin J. "Therefore I Am: The Tale of IG-88 " in Star Wars: Tales of the Bounty Hunters (Kevin J. Anderson, ed.) New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 35. Twi'lek:
"Bolton Kek was sound asleep... He snore softly and snuggled up against another biological figure, a female. IG-88 ran a quick analysis and identified her as a green-skinned Twi'lek dancing girl with wormlike tails trailing from the back of her skull. How these biologicals consort with each other, IG-88 thought...

The Twi'lek dancing girl awoke and shrieked obscenities at him in a language whose translation he did not hold in his databanks. "

religious - fictional Pern 3000 McCaffrey, Anne. Dragonsdawn. New York: Ballantine (1988); pg. 4. Pern:
[Year is estimated.] "The trip was one-way--it had to be, considering the cost of getting over six thousand colonists and supplies to such an out-of-the-way sector of the galaxy. Once they reached pern the fuel left in the great transport ships would be enough only to achieve and maintain a synchronous orbit above their destination while people and cargo were shuttled down to the surface... The Pern expedition was composed of committed and resourceful people who had chosen to eschew the high-tech societies of the Federated Sentient Planets. they expected to manage on their own. And though their destination in the Rukbat system was rich enough in ores and minerals to support an agriculturally based society, it was poor enough and far enough from the center of the galaxy that it should escape the greed of the technocrats. "
religious - fictional Pern 3000 McCaffrey, Anne. Dragonsdawn. New York: Ballantine (1988); pg. 7. Pern:
"A beautiful world! And theirs! By all the Holies, this time we won't botch it! she assured herself fervently. With all that magnificent, productive land, the old imperatives don't apply. No, she added in private cynicism, people are already discovering new ones. "
religious - fictional Pern 3000 McCaffrey, Anne. Dragonsdawn. New York: Ballantine (1988); pg. 7. Pern:
"Differences! Why did there always have to be distinctions, arrogantly displayed as superiorities, or derided as inferiorities? Everyone would have the same opportunity, no matter how many stake acres they could claim as charterer or had been granted as contractor. On Pern, it would truly be up to the individual to succeed, to prove his claim and to manage as much land as he and his cared for. That would be the catholic distinction. Once we've landed, everyone will be too bloody busy to fret over 'differences,' she consoled herself... "


religious - fictional, continued

Search Adherents.com

Custom Search
comments powered by Disqus
Collection and organization of data © 23 April 2007 by Adherents.com.   Site created by custom apps written in C++.  
Research supported by East Haven University.
Books * Videos * Music * Posters

We are always striving to increase the accuracy and usefulness of our website. We are happy to hear from you. Please submit questions, suggestions, comments, corrections, etc. to: webmaster@adherents.com.