Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to religious - fictional, Ma'ak Indawe-3 (30452 FAS-3)

religious - fictional, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
religious - fictional Majipoor 10000 Silverberg, Robert. Lord Valentine's Castle. New York: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 43. Pg. 43: "He turned his attention to the Arch, and studied it until he had memorized its features, the carved images of ancient Powers of Majipoor, heroes of the murky past, generals in the early Metamorph Wars, Coronals who antedated even legendary Lord Stiamot, Pontifexes of antiquity, Ladies offering benign blessings. The Arch, said Shanamir, was the oldest surviving thing in Pidruid and the holiest, nine thousand years old, carved from blocks of black Velathyntu marble that were immune to the ravages of weather. To pass beneath it was to ensure the protection of the Lady and a month of useful dreams. "; Pg. 371: "And as they were exploring one of the most ornate of the buildings in the central area of palaces and temples, Zalzan Kavol, who was leading the way... "; Pg. 375: "'...Then we can debate the nature of the compensating forces of the universe and the tactics of the Divine.' " [Many other refs., not in DB.]
religious - fictional Mars 1993 Bova, Ben. "Conspiracy Theory " in Twice Seven. New York: Avon Books (1998; c. 1993); pg. 62. Martians:
Pg. 61: "'No,' said the professor, in a sad and heavy voice. 'Just the opposite. The shock would be too much for the Martians. We humans are driven by fear and greed and lust, my boy. We would have ground the Martians into the dust, just as we did with the Native Americans and the Polynesians.' "; Pg. 62: "'But you said the Martians were ahead of us.'

'Technologically, yes. But by no more than a century. And ethically they are light-years ahead of us. Most of us, that is. It is the ethical part that would have been their downfall.'

'I don't understand.'

'Can you imagine a delicate, ethically bound Martian standing in the way of a real-estate developer? Or a packager of tourist trips? The average human politician? Or evangelist? To say nothing of most of the military. They would have been off to nuke Mars in a flash!'

'Oh.

'The fragile Martian civilization would have been pulverized...' " [More about Martian religion and ethics, not in DB.]

religious - fictional Mars 2001 Bradbury, Ray. The Martian Chronicles. New York: Bantam (2000; c. 1958); pg. 66. Martian:
"'...Faith had always given us answers to things. But it all went down the drain with Freud and Darwin. We were and still are a lost people.'

'And these Martians are a found people?' inquired the captain.

'Yes. They knew how to combine science and religion so the two worked side by side, neither denying the other, each enriching the other.'

That sounds ideal.'

'It was. I'd like to show you how the Martians did it.'

'My men are waiting.'

religious - fictional Mars 2001 Bradbury, Ray. The Martian Chronicles. New York: Bantam (2000; c. 1958); pg. 66. Martian:
"Spender led him over into a little Martian village built all of cool perfect marble. There were great friezes of beautiful animals, white-limbed cat things and yellow-limbed sun symbols, and statues of bull-like creatures and statues of men and women and huge fine-featured dogs.

'There's your answer, Captain.'

'I don't see.'

'The Martians discovered the secret of life among animals. The animal does not question life. It lives. Its very reason for living is; it enjoys and relishes life. You see--the statuary, the animal symbols, again and again.'

'It looks pagan.'

'On the contrary, those are God symbols, symbols of life. Mars had become too much man and not enough animal on Mars too...' "

religious - fictional Mars 2001 Bradbury, Ray. The Martian Chronicles. New York: Bantam (2000; c. 1958); pg. 67. Martian:
"'...And the men of Mars realized that in order to survive they would have to forgo asking that one question any longer: Why live? Life was its own answer. Life was the propagation of more life and the living of as good a life as possible. The Martians realized that they asked the question 'Why live at all?' at the height of some period of war and despair, when there was no answer. But once the civilization calmed, quieted, and wars ceased, the question became senseless in a new way. Life was now good and needed no arguments.'

'It sounds as if the Martians were quite naive.'

'Only when it paid to be naive. They quit trying too hard to destroy everything, to humble everything. They blended religion and art and science because, at base, science is no more than an investigation of a miracle we can never explain, and art is an interpretation of that miracle. They never let science crush the aesthetic and the beautiful. It's all simply a matter of degree...' "

religious - fictional Mars 2001 Bradbury, Ray. The Martian Chronicles. New York: Bantam (2000; c. 1958); pg. 67. Martian:
"'...An Earth Man thinks: 'In that picture, color does not exist, really. A scientist can prove that color is only the way the cells are placed in a certain material to reflect light. Therefore, color is not really an actual part of things I happen to see.' A Martian, far cleverer, would say: 'This is a fine picture. It came from the hand and the mind of a man inspired. Its ideas and its color are from life. This thing is good.' '

There was a pause. Sitting in the afternoon sun, the captain looked curiously around at the little silent cool town.

'I'd like to live here,' he said.

'You may if you want.' "

religious - fictional Mars 2050 Carr, Carol. "Look, You Think You've Got Troubles " in A Pocketful of Stars (Damon Knight, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1971; c. 1969); pg. 206. Kopchopee:
"'Mor isn't just a rabbi, Daddy. He converted because of me and then found there was demand among the colonists. But he'd never give up his own beliefs, and part of his job is to minister to the Kopchopees who camp outside the village. That's where he was earlier, conducting a Kopchopee menopausal rite.'

'A what!'

'Look, to each his own,' says my wife...

'Kopchopee. He's a Kopchopee priest to his own race and a rabbi to ours, and that's how he makes his living? You don't feel that's a contradiction between the two, Morton?'

'That's right. They both pray to a strong silent god, in different ways of course. The way my race worships, for instance--'

'Listen, it takes all kinds,' says Sadie.

'And the baby, whatever it turns out to be--will it be a Choptapi or a Jew?'

'Jew, shmoo,' Saidi says with a wave of dismissal. 'All of a sudden it's Hector the Pious--such a megilla out of a molehill.' " [More.]

religious - fictional Mars 2094 Sladek, John. Tik-Tok. London: Victor Gollancz Ltd. (1985; 1st printed 1983); pg. 86. Reformed Darwinism:
"To the new Martian colonists, [Reformed Darwinism] seemed a tailor-made religion. They lived where tribalism and selfishness really counted, where territory was money. Many of them had already served prison sentences for selfish acts. Reformed Darwinism captured their hearts and rudimentary minds. "
religious - fictional Mars 2100 Dick, Philip K. The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch. New York: Random House (1991; c. 1964); pg. 142. Neo-American Church:
"'I know what's going to happen, Mr. Mayerson. Barney. I'm not going to convert anyone to Neo-American Christianity; instead they'll convert me to Can-D and Chew-Z and whatever other vice is current, here, whatever escape presents itself. Sex. They're terribly promiscuous here on Mars, you know; everyone goes to bed with everyone else. I'll even try that; in fact I'm ready for it right now--I just can't stand the way things are . . . did you get a really good look at the surface before nightfall?' "
religious - fictional Mars 2373 Mangels, Andy & Michael A. Martin. Rogue (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 319. New Reformationists:
"'Native Martians prefer to call it the War for Martian Independence. And yes, I'm descended from some of the freedom fighters. They were New Reformationists--religious pacifists--so they were among the last people to join in the war. A few of them even fought at Gundersdotter's Dome and helped turn the tide for Martian sovereignty.' "
religious - fictional Mars 2733 Simmons, Dan. Hyperion. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 134. Zen Gnosticism:
"If Mars was known for anyting in the Worldweb, it was for hunting in the Mariner Valley, Schrauder's Zen Massif in Hellas Basin, and the Olympus Command School. Kassad did not have to travel to Mariner Valley to learn abut hunting and being hunted, he had no interest in Zen Gnosticism... "
religious - fictional Mars 2780 Simmons, Dan. The Fall of Hyperion. New York: Bantam (1991; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 111. Zen Gnosticism:
"Technically, Mars is not in the Web; the oldest extraterrestrial colony of humankind is made deliberately difficult to reach. Zen Gnostic pilgrims traveling to the Master's Rock in Hellas Basin have to 'cast to the Home System Station and take shuttles from Ganymede or Europea to Mars. It is an inconvenience of only a few hours, but to a society where everything is literally ten steps away, it makes for a sense of sacrifice and adventure. Other than for historians and experts in brandy cactus agriculture, there are few professional reasons to be drawn to Mars. With the gradual decline of Zen Gnosticism during the past century, even the pilgrim traffic has grown lighter. No one cares for Mars. "
religious - fictional Mars 3131 Simmons, Dan. The Rise of Endymion. New York: Bantam (1998 mass market edition; first ed. 1997); pg. 146. Zen Christian:
"For centuries after the death of Old Earth, Mars had been such a backwater planet that the WorldWeb had not established farcaster portals there--a desert planet of interest only to the orphans of New Palestine... to Zen Christians returning to Hellas Basin to reenact Master Schrauder's enlightenment at the Zen Massif. "
religious - fictional Midworld 3100 Foster, Alan Dean. Mid-Flinx. New York: Ballantine (1996; c. 1995); pg. 26. United Church:
[Year estimated] "Then he saw the building, a stark triangle whose bladed crest topped out at a modest six stories. The familiar emblem, hourglass-on-globe on a field of green, was emblazoned over the always unlocked entrance. Gratefully, lengthening his stride, he ascended the curving ramp and entered.

Once inside, he slowed to a respectful walk. The sanctuary was empty save for a couple of elderly supplicants. One was on he knees before the altar, praying before a brilliant depth depiction of swirling nebulae and galaxies. The reality injection was two stories tall and rendered in exquisite, awe-inspiring detail. In conjunction with the subdued, concealed illumination, it imparted to the vaulted sanctuary an air of eternal peace and reassurance. Natural light fell from tinted windows high overhead. "

religious - fictional Midworld 3100 Foster, Alan Dean. Mid-Flinx. New York: Ballantine (1996; c. 1995); pg. 26. United Church:
"He'd visited the sanctuaries of the United Church before, though never to attend formal services. No doubt there were several dozen similar sites scattered throughout the city. He was tempted to settle into one of the comfortable seats. At this point even the several thranx body lounges looked inviting. But he decided to move on. The sanctuary itself was too open. " [Many refs. to the United Church in novel, not all in DB. This is the book's main fictional religious group.]
religious - fictional Midworld 3100 Foster, Alan Dean. Mid-Flinx. New York: Ballantine (1996; c. 1995); pg. 29. United Church:
"In return for this largesse of surcease, Flinx knew he was expected to talk, or at least make casual conversation. No more than that. A proper padre would put no pressure on him to pray or do anything else. One of the attractions of the Untied Church was that it was a very low-key organization. It offered help and asked nothing in return except that supplicants act rationally. Not necessarily sensibly, but rationally.

'I am Father Bateleur, my son.' He nodded in the direction of Flinx's occupied shoulder. 'An interesting pet. Is it dangerous?'

'Watchful.'

'Those who wander beyond the sanctuary usually have a reason for doing so.' The older man smiled expectantly.

'There were some men chasing men.' " [More.]

religious - fictional Midworld 3100 Foster, Alan Dean. Mid-Flinx. New York: Ballantine (1996; c. 1995); pg. 33. United Church:
"'Why, padre.' Coerlis spoke to Bateleur... 'This hardly seems in keeping with the tenor of a sanctuary.'

The older man's smile was wan. 'This isn't a sanctuary; it's an office. Do as Father Goshen says.'

The two heavies complied. Bateleur looked satisfied. 'Now then, my sons, you may leave the building wider and, I pray, somewhat chastened in spirit.' He steepled his fingers in front of him.

'Otherwise,' rumbled Father Goshen softly, 'we will be most regretfully compelled to preside over the releasing of your immortal souls.'

'What?' Peeler sounded as unhappy as he looked.

'I'll blow your head off.'

... Bateleur nodded. 'Father Goshen, Father Delaney, would you show our visitors the way back to the street? Unless they wish to remain in the sanctuary and pray. Properly supervised, of course.' Peeler grunted derisively.

'With pleasure.' Using his gun, Father Delaney prodded the nearest intruder in the back of his neck. 'Move it!' "

religious - fictional Midworld 3100 Foster, Alan Dean. Mid-Flinx. New York: Ballantine (1996; c. 1995); pg. 36. United Church:
"'Could some combination of forces or particles constitute that which we have always referred to as 'evil'?'

'Interesting notion. I suspect I'm even less the physician than you, my young friend. But speaking theologically, these days we tend to regard evil as an embodiment of immorality, not an actual presence.'

'What if it's not?' Flinx pressed his host. 'What if it's a combination of forces, or particles? What if there's such a thing as an evil wave-form? Wouldn't it explain a lot, about how people are influenced & why seemingly rational beings commit inexplicable acts?'

'Be nice if that were the case,' Bateleur admitted. 'Then someone could built an 'evil-meter' or some such similar device. It would be a great help in my line of work. But I'm afraid I simply don't have the specialized knowledge necessary to respond intelligently to your question. I suppose anything that hasn't been overtly disproved is theoretically possible. Tell me, my son: what led you...' "

religious - fictional Midworld 3100 Foster, Alan Dean. Mid-Flinx. New York: Ballantine (1996; c. 1995); pg. 37. United Church:
"'...People commonly tend to think of evil as lying in this direction.' Smiling, Bateleur tapped the floor with a foot.

'What I'm referencing has nothing to do with archaic, traditional concepts of Hell. I'm talking about an actual physical presence that's pure distilled evil. Do you have access to star charts?'

'This is the United Church. Of course we have charts.' Turning, Bateleur made the request of the nearest monitor, then pivoted the screen so Flinx could see it as well.

'How's this?' the padre asked when the screen came to life. "

religious - fictional Midworld 3100 Foster, Alan Dean. Mid-Flinx. New York: Ballantine (1996; c. 1995); pg. 39. United Church:
Pg. 39: "'Moth. It's capital city of Drallar.'

'I've heard of it. A freewheeling sort of place, I believe. Not as receptive to the Church as some others.' ";

Pg. 41: "As an amusing curiosity, Bateleur referred it to local Church headquarters, which in turn dutifully catalogued and filed it via space-minus tight beam to Church science headquarters in Denpasar, on Terra. There it shuttled around in the company of a hundred thousand similar low-key reports, passing the notice of a number of researchers who understandably ignored it.

Except for a certain Father Sandra. She picked it out of a large study file, did some cross-checking on the accompanying visuals, and decided to share the result with Father Jamieson, with whom she'd had an ongoing relationship for nearly a year. "

religious - fictional Midworld 3100 Foster, Alan Dean. Mid-Flinx. New York: Ballantine (1996; c. 1995); pg. 43. United Church:
Pg. 43: "'He claims to know about something out there. You read the printout. He says he's been there. Just not physically.'

'Right.' Banandundra's smile widened. 'His 'soul,' or whatever, went there. Or maybe he died and went there and came back.'

'Thranx researchers don't release experimental data until they're sure of their results. No one is conversant yet with the conclusions of this particular research group. They haven't appeared in the general scientific literature, and this preliminary report has only just been passed along to the Church's Science Department. How did this person Father Bateleur talked with, whoever he is, find out about it?' ";

Pg. 345: "How long could he keep this secret from the likes of the Counselor Druvenmaquez, from Commonwealth Authority, and from the United Church? "

religious - fictional Midworld 3100 Foster, Alan Dean. Mid-Flinx. New York: Ballantine (1996; c. 1995); pg. 46. United Church:
"He took a deep breath. 'All right, Misell. Just be careful what you say to people.' After a moment's thought he added, 'Maybe this kid's trying to start a new religion. Happens all the time.'

'I wouldn't think so. Not after reviewing the copy of Father Bateleur's interview with him. He doesn't strike m as the messianic type at all. Much more inwardly focused. As far as religion goes, I don't think he's trying to explicate any of the tradition ones, either. I think he's convinced he's on to something. Whether it actually is anything more than a coincidental personal hallucination is one of the things I'd badly like to find out. I think there are enough interesting coincidences here to intrigue the department. both this Philip Lynx and what he told Father Bateleur are worth taking a closer look at. At the very least someone of higher rank than a metropolitan padre ought to do an in-depth interview with our well-traveled young man.' "

religious - fictional Minnesota 1985 Drake, David. The Tank Lords. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 372. Church of the Lord's Universe:
[2] "The Church of the Lord's Universe was officially launched in 1895 in Minneapolis, Minnesota, by the merger of 230 existing protestant congregations--Methodist, Presbyterian, Episcopalian, and Lutheran. In part the new church was a revolt against the extreme fundamentalism peaking at that time. The Universalists sought converts vigorously from the start. Their liturgy obviously attempted to recapture the traditional beauty of Christianity's greatest age, but there is reason to believe that the extensive use of Latin in the service was part of a design to avoid giving doctrinal offense as well. Anyone who has attended both Presbyterian and Methodist services has felt uneasiness at the line, 'Forgive us our debts/trespasses . . .' St. Jerome's Latin version of the Lord's Prayer flows smoothly and unnoticed from the tongue of one raised in either sect. "
religious - fictional Missouri: Kansas City 1999 Kessel, John. Good News from Outer Space. New York: Tor (1990; c. 1989); pg. 4. Dadaist:
Pg. 4: "When the car stopped opposite Bob's Sport Shoppe three Dadaist punks got out. One displayed his true self as a geisha, the second dressed like a banker, and the third had disguised himself as a space alien... "; Pg. 186: "...and just the other night in D.C., Dadaist punks had broken in and installed an expensive stereo. "
religious - fictional Missouri: Kansas City 1999 Kessel, John. Good News from Outer Space. New York: Tor (1990; c. 1989); pg. 10. Millennialists:
"At just that moment a group of Millennialists turned the corner: they rolled their cart plastered with pictures of the coming Paradise on Earth, chanting about the Final Days. Their white jumpsuits had green crosses stenciled on the back. "
religious - fictional Missouri: Kansas City 1999 Kessel, John. Good News from Outer Space. New York: Tor (1990; c. 1989); pg. 10. Spiritual Economics:
"'Have you ever heard of Spiritual Economics?' Holman asked.

'Spiritual Economics?'

'Yes. The basic notion is that a person's spiritual well-being is dependent on her taking in more love than she expends. In this way she incurs a spiritual profit. The object of Spiritual Economics is to maximize spiritual profits. This leads to a steady growth in well-being and, at the time of death, a surplus that can be passed on to any designated successors.'

He looked at her... 'Are you serious?'

He smiled. 'Surely.'

'You try to get more love than you give? That sounds a little cold blooded.' " [Much more.]

religious - fictional Mu Cassiopeiae II (Akron) 2100 Sanders, Winston P. "The Word to Space " (first published 1960) in Other Worlds, Other Gods: Adventures in Religious Science Fiction (Mayo Mohs, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1971); pg. 90. Akronites:
"'...The theocracy must be planet-wide. Otherwise we'd be getting different messages from some other country on Akron. If they have interstellar radio equipment, they must also have weapons by which an ideological dictatorship could establish itself over a whole world, as Communism nearly did here in the last century... We just had the bad luck to contact them at the exact point in their history when they were governed by this crusading religion.' "
religious - fictional Mu Cassiopeiae II (Akron) 2100 Sanders, Winston P. "The Word to Space " (first published 1960) in Other Worlds, Other Gods: Adventures in Religious Science Fiction (Mayo Mohs, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1971); pg. 91. Akronites:
"Hard to believe that someone who looked like this had written in dead seriousness:

'The next word in the sentence from Aejae xliii, 3 which we are considering is 'ruchiruchin,' an archaic word concerning whose meaning there was formerly some dispute. Fortunately, the advocates of the erroneous theory that it means 'very similar' have now been exterminated and the glorious truth that it means 'quite similar' is firmly established.' "

religious - fictional Mu Cassiopeiae II (Akron) 2100 Sanders, Winston P. "The Word to Space " (first published 1960) in Other Worlds, Other Gods: Adventures in Religious Science Fiction (Mayo Mohs, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1971); pg. 80-81. Akronites:
"'--begat Manod, who reigned over the People for 99 years. And in his day lawlessness went abroad in the land, wherefore the Quaternary One smote the People with ordseem (Apparently a disease --Tr.) and they were sore afflicted. And the preacher Jilbmish called a great prayer meeting. And when the People were assembled he cried unto them: 'Woe betide you, for you have transgressed against the righteous command of the Secondary and Tertiary Ones, namely you have begrudged the Sacrifice and you have failed to beat drums (? --Tr.) at the rising of Nomo, even as your fathers were commanded; wherefore, this evil is come upon you.' Sheemish, xiv, 6.

"Brethren beyond the stars, let us ponder this text together. For well you know from our previous messages that ignorance of the Way, even in its least detail, is not an excuse in the sight of the Ones... "

religious - fictional Mu Cassiopeiae II (Akron) 2100 Sanders, Winston P. "The Word to Space " (first published 1960) in Other Worlds, Other Gods: Adventures in Religious Science Fiction (Mayo Mohs, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1971); pg. 80-81. Akronites:
Pg. 81: "'Carry Our Way unto the ends of creation, that ye may save from the Eternal Hunger all created beings doomed by their own unwittingness.' Chubu iv, 2. Now the most elementary exegesis of the words of Jilbmish clearly demonstrated-- "

Father James Moriarty, S.J., sighed and laid down the typescript. Undoubtedly the project team of linguists, cryptographers, anthropologists, theologians and radio engineers was producing translations as accurate as anyone would ever be able to. At least until the barriers of space were somehow overleaped and men actually met the aliens, face to face on their own planet. Which wasn't going to happen in the foreseeable future. "; Pg. 82: "Though Project Ozma had been going on since before he was born--for a century and a third, in fact... "; Pg. 86: "When the original Project Ozma first picked up signals from... Mu Cassiopeiae--way back in the 1960's... "

religious - fictional Mu Cassiopeiae II (Akron) 2100 Sanders, Winston P. "The Word to Space " (first published 1960) in Other Worlds, Other Gods: Adventures in Religious Science Fiction (Mayo Mohs, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1971); pg. 88-89. Akronites:
"'...No sign of any improvement, is there?'

'Nope,' Okamura said. 'As of 25 years ago, at least, Akron's still governed by a fanatical theocracy out to convert the universe.' He sighed. 'I imagine you know the history of Ozma's contact with them? For the first 75 years or so, everything went smoothly. Slow and unspectacular... but progress was being made in understanding their language. And then--when they figured we'd learned it well enough--they started sending doctrine. Nothing but doctrine, ever since. Every message of theirs a sermon, or a text from one of their holy books followed by an analysis that my Jewish friends tell me makes the medieval rabbis look like romantic poets... It's a grim sort of religion. I daresay anyone who opposes its ministers is in danger of burning at the stake, or whatever the Akronite equivalent may be.' "

religious - fictional Nem Ma'ak Bratuna 2368 Ferguson, Brad. The Last Stand (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1995); pg. 3. Lethanta:
"It had been Kerajem's generation which, when it had come to maturity and power, had at last eased the relentless preparation for war instituted and maintained for millennia by their forefathers. Kerajem himself had helped to form the more liberal policies of modern times when e was younger. There had been great opposition, mostly by the old, the self-interested, and the superstitious, but reform had finally come. As a result, living conditions for the people were generally much better than they had been when Kerajem was a boy.

Social reform had finally come in the conviction that the old stories of doom and destruction had been merely the exaggerated stuff of hoary legend, tales of horror believed only by the stupid, the gullible, and the obsessed. However, the world had discovered the terrible truth 33 years before, when the first signals from space had been detected... Those who would destroy the world were real, and they were coming. Now they were almost here... "

religious - fictional Nem Ma'ak Bratuna 2368 Ferguson, Brad. The Last Stand (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1995); pg. 17. Lethanta:
[1] "They all headed quickly to the War Room, which was located at the center of the Shrine. The Planetary Defense Complex, as it was more formally known... This was the second Shrine. The original had been built on the same spot more than a millennium before, shortly after the caverns had been discovered by explorers. There had been an actual shrine here then. The Shrine had served as the Holy See of a totalitarian theocracy that controlled the planet at that time and for centuries thereafter. The many generations of monks who had lived, worked, and died at the first Shrine had spent their entire lives praying to ward off the day when the enemy might find their world and destroy it. "
religious - fictional Nem Ma'ak Bratuna 2368 Ferguson, Brad. The Last Stand (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1995); pg. 30. Lethanta:
Pg. 29-30: "'It's a beautiful world down there,' Deanna Troi said... looking at Nem Ma'ak Bratuna on a small viewscreen. 'Much of it looks untouched, despite the pollution along the coasts.'

'There are large, arable areas that have apparently never been settled,' Picard said. 'I must admit I find that rather strange. The population is over two billion--a rather hefty number--and these people certainly have the technological ability to go anywhere they wish on the planet.'

Data spoke up. 'The southern continents, in particular, are largely unoccupied by the natives. The concentration of population the northern hemisphere is highly unusual. The Nem Ma'ak Bratunans have congregated in mineral-rich areas along the coastal mountain ranges of the three northern continents.' "

religious - fictional Nem Ma'ak Bratuna 2368 Ferguson, Brad. The Last Stand (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1995); pg. 59. Lethanta:
"'The question remains, sirs,' Data continued. 'How do your legends say you got here, to this planet?'

Kerajem looked at them for a long moment. 'I can't answer that adequately,' he said. 'In fact, I probably can't answer that at all. We have a number of ancient writings that may bear on this matter, however.'

'I would like to see those writings,' Picard said.

'We can provide them to you,' Kerajem said. 'They are contained in a religious tract that was used when the old theocracy ruled our world. The old religion was purged after the revolution, but there must be some copies of the old scrolls left somewhere.'

'I have one,' old Rikkadar said quietly. 'I've always had one.'

Jemmagar sat back forward. 'That's not allowed, you know.' "

religious - fictional Netherlands 2050 Bova, Ben. "Acts of God " in Sam Gunn Forever. New York: Avon (1998; c. 1995); pg. 22. Daughters of the Mother:
Pg. 22: "'On your feet, all of you, godless humanists!' shouted their leader, a heavyset blonde. 'You are the prisoners of the Daughters of the Mother!' "; Pg. 24: "These Daughters of the Mother looked like religious fanatics to me, the kind who were willing to die for their cause--and therefore perfectly willing to kill anybody else for their cause. ";

Pg. 31: "The Peacekeeper officer... shook her head. 'Neither the Daughters of the Mother nor the Warriors of God are listed in our computer files.'

'Terrorists,' Greg Molina said. 'Religious fanatics.'

'Amateurs,' said Josella Ecks... [Many other refs., not in DB.]

religious - fictional New Jersey 1974 Morrow, James. Only Begotten Daughter. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1990); pg. 23. Revelationists:
Pg. 18: "He jabbed his index finger contemptuously toward the front lawn. 'You one of those Revelationists, Mr. Katz?'

'No. Jewish.' Murray cocked an ear to the protesters' chants, a sound like enraged surf...

'Damn lunatics--they should go back to the Middle Ages where they belong.' "; Pg. 23: "The Reverend Billy Milk, chief pastor of the First Ocean City Church of Saint John's Vision, reached inside his sheepskin coat and caressed his steel detonator. God's wrath was sticky and cold, like an ice-cube tray just removed from the freezer. "; Pg. 25: "So: there would be a boundary to cross after all, that terrible seam along which the laws of God and the ordinances of men parted like halves of the Red Sea. A Revelationist always knew which waves to ride, however turbulent and high. " [This Reverend, and his followers, who are called 'Revelationists' are against artificial insemination. Many refs., not in DB.]

religious - fictional New Jersey 1974 Morrow, James. Only Begotten Daughter. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1990); pg. 24. Revelationists:
"The Lord tested Revelationists more severely than he did other believers. If a Revelationist's pregnant wife died delivering a premature baby, the ordeal did not end there. No, for Billy's infant son had been subsequently placed in an incubator, where the supplementary oxygen had choked the undeveloped blood vessels in his eyes; his son had been scarred by air... Billy Milk had a yacht, and a church, and a sightless son, and nothing. " [The Revelationists are the central fictional religious group in the novel. From book cover:] "Julie can cure cancer, restore sight to the blind, but desperately wants to talk to her Mother, who remains silent. Even when the Revelationists--a neo-Christian cult--invade Atlantic City prepared to burn it to the ground, killing everyone. "
religious - fictional New Jersey 1974 Morrow, James. Only Begotten Daughter. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1990); pg. 30. Revelationists:
"A battle was coming, then. Babylon besieged and sacked. Billy's brain shook with it, the smoke of her burning, the cries of her slain citizens. Your typical denominational Protestant could never face it. Every Sunday millions of them sat in their pews staring at Bibles, refusing to confront the final book, but there it was, in every tepid little Episcopalian and Methodist church: the Revelation to Saint John, that compendium of apocalypse and slaughter, of blood-robed armies marching on Babylon, of sinners cast into the lake of fire and crushed in the winepress of the wrath of God. But Billy's Revelationists could face it. Oh, yes, oh, yes . . .

Alas, alas that great city Babylon, that mighty city, for in one hour is thy judgment come! "

religious - fictional New Jersey 1984 Morrow, James. Only Begotten Daughter. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1990); pg. 57. Julie Katz:
"From pole to pole, Christians are feeding the hungry and clothing the naked. Just last week, Wyvern heard a Baptist minister say it was wrong to kill.

True, the sect called Revelationism holds some promise, but the devil doesn't trust it. 'Revelationism,' he tells the snagged fish, 'is a flash in the pantheon. No, there must be a new religion, a faith as apocalyptic as Christianity, fierce as Islam, repressive as Hinduism, smug as Buddhism. There must be a church of Julie Katz. "

religious - fictional New Jersey 1991 Morrow, James. Only Begotten Daughter. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1990); pg. 84. Julie Katz:
"She [Julie Katz] sniffed... 'I've been good, I've been bad--nothing gets her attention. What am I supposed to do, sacrifice a goat?'

'Perhaps you should start a religion. You know--reveal your mother to the world.'

'How can I reveal her when I don't know what she's like?'

'Use your imagination. Everybody else does.' " [Julie's mother is, apparently, God.]

religious - fictional New Jersey 1992 Morrow, James. Only Begotten Daughter. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1990); pg. 96. Julie Katz:
"'Julie was sent to start a religion. It's the only way she'll know peace.'

'Your friend god's never told her that.'

'Heaven communicates indirectly--through people like you and me.'

'and we should tell Katz to start a religion?'

'Exactly.'

'What sort of religion?'

'A big one. Apocalyptic. Like, say, Christianity.' " [Much more about Julie Katz starting a new religion.]

religious - fictional New Jersey 1996 Bova, Ben. "The Great Moon Hoax or A Princess of Mars " in Twice Seven. New York: Avon Books (1998; c. 1996); pg. 86. Martians:
"The average Martian has an ethical quotient about equal to St. Francis of Assisi. They're the average Martian. While they're only a century or two ahead of us technologically, they're light-years ahead of us morally, socially, ethically. There hasn't been a war on Mars in more than a thousand years. There hasn't been been a case of petty theft in centuries. " [Many other refs. to Martian ethics and religion, not in DB.]
religious - fictional New Jersey 2012 Morrow, James. Only Begotten Daughter. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1990); pg. 227. Revelationists:
"The Reverend Billy Milk--mayor of New Jerusalem, grandpastor of the revelationist Church, executive producer of the Circus of Joy, and chairman of the New Jersey Inquisition--shuffled morosely onto the west balcony of the Holy Palace and surveyed the city below. In his good eye the sun blazed hotly, ricocheting off the shining walls and soaring towers... " [In the last section of this novel, the state of New Jersey has seceded from the United States and become a theocracy under Revelationist rule.]
religious - fictional New Marrakech 3039 Anderson, Kevin J. & Rebecca Moesta. Titan A.E.: Akima's Story. New York: Ace (2000); pg. 33. Solbrechtian:
Pg. 33: "Overhead... she saw a large ship approaching, a medical emergency vessel from nearby Solbrecht. Responding to the Drej attack, some medical specialists had launched their vessel in hopes of charging for rescue services; they would never have risked the ire of the Drej simply for humanitarian reasons. "; Pg. 35: "'We have no way to get off the colony,' she transmitted again, the frantic Solbrecht orderly turned away as more casualties were brought in. He offered a variety of confusing gesture with all four arms. Over the channel she heard moans from injured Humans aboard the medial ship. Solbrecht doctors called orders, shouting for Human medicharts. None of the aliens seemed to have any specialty in Human anatomy.

...The amber-eyed orderly looked as if he wanted to disconnect the communications system entirely. 'I have work to do here. Your continued interruptions endanger lives...' "

religious - fictional New Marrakech 3039 Anderson, Kevin J. & Rebecca Moesta. Titan A.E.: Akima's Story. New York: Ace (2000); pg. 36. Solbrechtian:
Pg. 36: "Multiarmed Solbrecht doctors rushed past the orderly. The alien turned around and finally, with a last gesture at Akima, said, 'Even if we had ambulance shuttles to spare, we could not come down to treat victims. All of our facilities are up here, all of our medicine, and surgeons, and operating chambers. We can help your friend only if you are able to get him here, to the hospital ship.' ";

Pg. 39: "'I've talked to the hospital ship from Solbrecht. They'll treat Mohammed, but only if we can get him up there ourselves... We can't wait for someone to rescue us.' " [Other refs. to the Solbrecht, not in DB.]

religious - fictional New Mexico 1995 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 140. "Church of God, Crusader/Doomsday Chiliasts":
"Like doctors and lawyers, the vendors of religion rarely criticize one another's wares, Joss observed. But one night he attended services at the new Church of God, Crusader, to hear the younger Billy Jo Rankin, triumphantly returned from Odessa, preach to the multitude. Billy Jo enunciated a stark doctrine of Reward, Retribution, & the Rapture. But tonight was a healing night. The curative instrument, the congregation was told, was the holiest of relics--holier than a splinger of the True Cross, holier even than the thigh bone of Saint Teresa... What Billy Jo Rankin brandished was the actual amniotic fluid that surrounded and protected the Lord. The liquid had been carefully preserved in an ancient earthenware vessel that once belonged, so it was said, to Saint Ann. The tiniest drop of it would cure what ails you, he promised, through a special act of Divine Grace. This holiest of holy waters was with us tonight. " [Many other refs. to Rankin; other refs. not in DB.]
religious - fictional New Mexico: Atocha 1925 Williams, Walter Jon. Days of Atonement. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 5. Church of the Apostles of Elohim and the Nazarene:
"The new town, built in the 1920s, was mean to be a wonder, a showplace of modernity. All the buildings fronted the central plaza were faced in art deco, a streamlined assembly of winged radiators and bulbous Flash Gordon cupolas, Bel Geddes speed lines and gondolas from soaring Raymond Leowy zeppelins. Even the Catholic church was streamlined, and the Church of the Apostles of Elohim and the Nazarene, right next to it, was even more extreme, with a pair of bell towers that looked like bottle-nosed rockets about to launch. Atocha, the designers implied, was not afraid of the twentieth century, of the World of Tomorrow. "
religious - fictional New Mexico: Atocha 2010 Williams, Walter Jon. Days of Atonement. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 25. Church of the Apostles of Elohim and the Nazarene:
"'I don't wanna say anything about you guys [Church of the Apostles of Elohim and the Nazarene] or the Mormons,' he said, 'but I'm a Catholic, and we say you're both cults.'

Loren glared at him. 'You don't want me to tell you what my religion says about the Pope.'

'Loren,' said Coover, 'that nice steak of yours is getting cold.'

'One of the great minds of the sixteenth century,' Loren said.

Sandoval looked offended. Byrne turned to him. 'I'm a Lutheran,' he said. 'Am I a cultist, too?'

'You're okay, ese,' Sandoval said. 'You're justa heretic.'

He and Byrne cackled. Byrne took a flask out of his pocket and added whiskey to their coffee cups. "

religious - fictional New Mexico: Atocha 2010 Williams, Walter Jon. Days of Atonement. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 59. Church of the Apostles of Elohim and the Nazarene:
"The Church of the Apostles of Elohim and the Nazarene as Atocha's largest church. The Apostles, unlike the Saints and the Holy Romans, had been imported specially in the 1880s, when Riga Brothers began their copper operation. The gold and silver miners already living here were too unreliable... Riga Brothers, whose board chairman was an Apostle, proposed importing entire families of coreligionists from upstate New York and northern Pennsylvania--stable family people, the kind you could count on to form a community. Maybe five hundred families had answered the call, singing hymns as they rode to Atocha on the train. "
religious - fictional New Mexico: Atocha 2010 Williams, Walter Jon. Days of Atonement. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 371. Church of the Apostles of Elohim and the Nazarene:
"...the past that held the county in the grips of its unseen field--the Hohokam and Apaches, the miners delving for silver and copper, the unseen Anaconda, the Mormon polygamists and Spanish patrons, the upright Apostles singing psalms as they came on the train from Pennsylvania... "
religious - fictional New Scotland 2882 Niven, Larry & Jerry Pournelle. The Mote in God's Eye. New York: Simon and Schuster (1974); pg. 10. Church of Him:
"2882: Howard Grote Littlemead founds Church of Him on New Scotland. "
religious - fictional New York 1831 Williams, Walter Jon. Days of Atonement. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 14. Church of the Apostles of Elohim and the Nazarene:
"That meeting took place in Palmyra, New York, where a thirty-one-year-old Pennsylvanian, Samuel Catton, had gone to hear the preaching of Joseph Smith... A that meeting, Catton found himself sitting next to a quiet, eagle-eyed, smooth-faced gentleman in gray broadcloth, a man who led him away from... Smith and took him on a tour of the universe. He was known to Catton's followers as the Master in Gray, though Joseph Smith later identified him simply as Satan. Among the Authorized Revelations written by Samuel Catton were the commandments to return to the Jewish sabbath and other holy days, though with a few improvements.

Catton was preferred over Smith by those who thought their prophets should be grave and serious. Smith laughed and joked, and stripped off his coat and wrestled any challenger... drinking beer and wine--Catton did none of those things, nor was ever accused of them. "

religious - fictional New York 1885 Williams, Walter Jon. Days of Atonement. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 59. Church of the Apostles of Elohim and the Nazarene:
"The Church of the Apostles of Elohim and the Nazarene... had been imported specially in the 1880s, when Riga Brothers began their copper operation... Riga Brothers, whose board chairman was an Apostle, proposed importing entire families of coreligionists from upstate New York and northern Pennsylvania... "
religious - fictional New York: New York City 1985 Dick, Philip K. The Man Who Japed. New York: Ace Books (1956); pg. 29. Morec:
"Police are investigating the deliberate mutilation of the official statue of Major Jules Streiter, the founder of Moral Reclamation and the guiding leader of the revolution of 1985. Located in the Park of the Spire, the monument, a life-size statue of bronzed plastic, was struck from the original mold created by the founder's friend and life-long companion, Pietro Buetello in March of the year 1990... "
religious - fictional New York: New York City 1986 Cover, Arthur Byron. "Jesus Was an Ace " in Wild Cards V: Down and Dirty (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 96. "Church of Jesus Christ, Joker":
"His name was Quasiman. Once he had had another name, but all he could remember about his previous self was that he had been an explosives expert. Currently he was a caretaker of the Church of Our Lady of Perpetual Misery, and of him Father Squid relished saying, time and time again, 'The bomb squad's loss has been the God squad's gain.' " [Some other refs., not in DB, e.g. pg. 109.]
religious - fictional New York: New York City 1986 Martin, George R. R.; Melinda Snodgrass, et al. Wild Cards III: Jokers Wild. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 68. "Church of Jesus Christ, Joker":
"On another corner the Church of Jesus Christ Joker had a booth already up and running, handing out literature to anyone who could be stopped. Their results were guaranteed too, but in the afterlife. "
religious - fictional New York: New York City 1986 Martin, George R. R.; Melinda Snodgrass, et al. Wild Cards III: Jokers Wild. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 169. "Church of Jesus Christ, Joker":
"She needed a haven... The sign in front of a small brick-and-stone building on Orchard Street made her pause. This, she thought, was exactly what she needed.

It was a church. The sign in front said Our Lady of Perpetual Misery. It looked Catholic. Jennifer had been brought up as Protestant, but her family hadn't been very religious and she herself harbored no deep religious feelings. None, at any rate, that would prevent her from seeing refuge in a Catholic church. " [Other refs., most not in DB. See also pg. 171.]

religious - fictional New York: New York City 1986 Martin, George R. R.; Melinda Snodgrass, et al. Wild Cards III: Jokers Wild. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 170. "Church of Jesus Christ, Joker":
"The central figure was a crucified Christ, but a Christ like Jennifer had never seen. He--Jennifer thought of Him as He, though she wasn't exactly sure if the pronoun applied in this case--was naked but for a scrap of linen draped around his loins. He had an extra set of shriveled arms sprouting from his rib cage and an extra head on his shoulders. Both heads had aesthetically lean features. One was bearded and masculine, the other was smooth-cheeked and feminine. Blood trickled down both faces because of the crown of thorns that each head wore. Four pairs of breasts ran down the front of the Christ's body, each pair smaller than the one above. There was a gaping red wound running blood into the lowest breast on the figure's right side. The Christ was not crucified upon a cross, but rather upon a twisting helix, a convoluted ladder, or, Jennifer realized, a representation of DNA. "
religious - fictional New York: New York City 1986 Martin, George R. R.; Melinda Snodgrass, et al. Wild Cards III: Jokers Wild. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 170. "Church of Jesus Christ, Joker":
"There were other figures in the background of the scene, subordinate to the Christ figure. One was a slight, lean figure dressed in gaudy clothes... But like the Roman god Janus this Tachyon had two faces. One was serene and angelic in profile. It smiled sweetly and had an expression of benevolent kindness. The other was the leering face of a demon, bestial and angry, dripping saliva from an open mouth ringed with sharp teeth. The Tachyon figure held an unburning sun in his right hand, the side of the angel face. In the left he held jagged lightning.

...Inscribed above the tableau were the words: Our Lady of Perpetual Misery. Below that, in slightly smaller letters, was Church of Jesus Christ, Joker.

Jennifer... had heard a little about this offshoot of orthodox Catholicism that had been embraced by many jokers who had a religious bent. The Catholic hierarchy, of course, wanted nothing to do with the Church of Jesus Christ, Joker... "

religious - fictional New York: New York City 1988 Martin, George R. R. & John J. Miller. Wild Cards VII: Dead Man's Hand. New York: Bantam Books (1990); pg. 26. "Church of Jesus Christ, Joker":
"The Church of Our Lady of Perpetual Misery was nearly empty. A few scattered penitents were kneeling on the scarred wooden pews, head--or heads--bowed in silent prayer to the god who was more real to them than the clean-featured Jesus of the old Bible. The hunchback called Quasiman was puttering about the altar, humming to himself as he dusted the tabernacle. Dressed in a sharply pressed lumberjack shirt and clean jeans, he moved in a stiff, jerky manner, dragging his left leg behind him. The wild card virus had twisted his body, but had also given him extraordinary physical strength and the ability to teleport. He put the tabernacle down and watched Brennan as he approached the altar.

'Hello,' Brennan said. 'I'm here to see Father Squid.'... [This book has many more references to the Church of Jesus Christ, Joker, a fictional denomination led by Father Squid, ministering to the 'jokers', those disfigured by the wild card virus. Most refs. not in DB.]

religious - fictional New York: New York City 1988 Martin, George R. R. & John J. Miller. Wild Cards VII: Dead Man's Hand. New York: Bantam Books (1990); pg. 28. "Church of Jesus Christ, Joker":
"'Sascha. He does belong to your church, doesn't he?'

'Sascha Starfin is a faithful churchgoer,' the priest said, 'though upon thinking about it, it has been quite a while since he's partaken of Communion.' "; "Father Squid raised his hand in benediction. 'God go with you. I shall say a prayer for you. And... for Chrysalis's murderer. With you on her trail, he shall certainly need someone to pray for the repose of his soul.' "

religious - fictional New York: New York City 1988 Martin, George R. R. & John J. Miller. Wild Cards VII: Dead Man's Hand. New York: Bantam Books (1990); pg. 119. "Church of Jesus Christ, Joker":
"...into Our Lady of Perpetual Misery [in] Jokertown... The church was packed [for the funeral]. The pews already full, Brennan and Jennifer found standing room in the back next to the droning fans... Chrysalis's casket sat near the altar, covered with a carpet of flowers. There was a vast, hurried mumbling as the Living Rosary Society told their beads as they said their prayers for the repose of Chrysalis's soul... Father Squid brought up the rear, wearing his finest surplice. It was embroidered with a scene depicting a nat Madonna turning her back on Joker Jesus while a pair of jokers and a small, delicate, red-haired man wearing a white lab coat took Him from the helix and wrapped Him in funery cerements. "
religious - fictional New York: New York City 1988 Martin, George R. R. & John J. Miller. Wild Cards VII: Dead Man's Hand. New York: Bantam Books (1990); pg. 119-120. "Church of Jesus Christ, Joker":
"The Mass began. It was similar to the infrequent Catholic masses Brennan had attended as a child, but with some unfamiliar twists of symbolism and ritual. Everyone took off their masks with the first prayer...

During the Mass there were only a few references, veiled in strange symbolism, to the Mother, reflecting the ambiguous role she played in the Church of Jesus Christ, Joker, theology. Praise for the Father was effusive and tainted with an air of placation, as if He were a vengeful God of the Old Testament, the God who saved with one hand and damned with the other.

During Communion, the altar boys and girls went out into the congregation bearing small hampers that had been blessed by Father Squid. The hampers contained loaves of bread that the servers passed out to the people siting at the heads of the pews, who broke off bits for themselves before sending them on. "

religious - fictional New York: New York City 1988 Martin, George R. R. & John J. Miller. Wild Cards VII: Dead Man's Hand. New York: Bantam Books (1990); pg. 226. "Church of Jesus Christ, Joker":
"Brennan entered the church and watched Quasiman for a few minutes s he washed the stained-glass window that depicted the passion of Jesus Christ, Joker. "


religious - fictional, continued

Search Adherents.com

Custom Search
comments powered by Disqus
Collection and organization of data © 23 April 2007 by Adherents.com.   Site created by custom apps written in C++.  
Research supported by East Haven University.
Books * Videos * Music * Posters

We are always striving to increase the accuracy and usefulness of our website. We are happy to hear from you. Please submit questions, suggestions, comments, corrections, etc. to: webmaster@adherents.com.