Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

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religious - fictional, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
religious - fictional galaxy 23200 Asimov, Isaac. Foundation. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1951); pg. 135. Traders:
"TRADERS-- . . . and constantly in advance of the political hegemony of the Foundation were the Traders, reaching out tenuous fingerholds through the tremendous distances of the Periphery. Months or years might pass between landings on Terminus; their ships were often nothing more than patchquilts of home-made repairs and improvisations; their honesty was none of the highest; their daring . . . Through it all they forged an empire more enduring than the pseudo-religious despotism of the Four Kingdoms. . . Tales without end are told of these massive, lonely figures who bore half-seriously, half-mockingly a motto adopted from one of Salvor Hardin's epigrams,' Never let your sense of morals prevent you from doing what is right!' It is difficult now to tell which tales are real and which apocryphal. There are none probably that have not suffered some exaggeration . . .

-ENCYCLOPEDIA GALACTICA "

religious - fictional galaxy 33960 Harrison, Harry. A Stainless Steel Rat is Born. New York: Bantam (1985); pg. 158. Black Monks:
"'...In order to do that we may have to get religion.' He chuckled at my shocked expression. 'Like you, my boy, I am a Scientific Humanist... But here on Spiovente what technology there is seems to be in the hands of an order called the Black Monks. . . .'

...'What our young friend has decried is true,' The Bishop said. '...Through some process that is not relevant now all of the technology of this world became concentrated in the hands of this order, the Black Monks. I have no idea what their religious affiliations are--if any--but they do supply and repair the machines that we have seen. This gives them a certain protection, since if one capo were to attack them the others would rush to their defense to insure their continued access to the metallic fruits of technology. It is to them that we must have to turn for salvation and exodus.' " [Much more about the Black Monks, not in DB.]

religious - fictional galaxy 33995 Harrison, Harry. The Stainless Steel Rat Gets Drafted. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 136. Individual Mutualism:
[1] "Plenty of time later to ask him for information about the philosophy of Individual Mutualism that I knew he was eager to explain to me. I pointed at the nearest house, a rambling wooden structure... When we approached it the door opened and a young couple waved us forward.

'Come in, come in!' the girl called out. 'Food will be on the table in a few moments.'

...'Our thanks,' I gasped, stuffed, replete. 'For saving our lives, for feeding us up, for this wonderful drink. Our thanks to all of you, with particular to the philosophy of Individual Mutualism, which I assume you all believe in.' Much nodding of heads from all sides. 'Which I am sorry to say I never heard of before visiting your fine planet. I would like to hear more.' " [Much of the rest of the book focuses on Individual Mutualism, the novel's main fictional belief system.]

religious - fictional galaxy 33995 Harrison, Harry. The Stainless Steel Rat Gets Drafted. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 137. Individual Mutualism:
[2] "All heads turned now to Librarian Grene who sat up straight. And spoke.

'Individual Mutualism is more than a philosophy, a political system, or a way of life. I am quoting now from the works of the originator himself, Mark Forer, whose book on the subject you will see on the table there.' She pointed at a leather-bound volume and all of the others looked and smiled and nodded agreement. 'As you will find it on a table in every home in Chojecki. You will also see above it a portrait of Mark Forer, the originator, to whom we will be ever grateful.'

I looked up at the picture and bulged my eyes. Morton gasped well enough for both of us. "

religious - fictional galaxy 33995 Harrison, Harry. The Stainless Steel Rat Gets Drafted. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 137. Individual Mutualism:
[3] "'If that is Mark Forer,' he said, 'then Mark Forer is a robot.'

'No, not a robot,' Grene corrected him. 'An intelligent machine. One of the very first machine intelligences as history tells us. Mark Oner had communication interface problems that were only partially eliminated in Mark Tooer . . .'

'Mark four,' I said. 'The fourth machine to be made.'

'That is correct. The first absolutely successful machine intelligence. What a wonderful day for the human race it was when Mark Forer was first switched on. Among those present at the dramatic moment was a then young scientist named Tod E'Bouy. He recorded the event in a book entitled 'An Historical Treatise concerning Certain Observations in the Construction of Artificial Intelligence' subtitled 'Galvanized Knowledge.' '

Stirner rose from his seat while she was speaking. Went to the bookshelf and took down a slim volume, opened it and read. "

religious - fictional galaxy 33995 Harrison, Harry. The Stainless Steel Rat Gets Drafted. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 137. Individual Mutualism:
[4] "'A lifetime of research, generations of labor, had reached a final and dramatic culmination. The last circuit board was slipped into its slot and I threw the switch. What a prosaic thing to say about what was perhaps the most important moment in the entire history of mankind. I threw the switch, the light came on. We no longer were alone. There was another intelligence in the universe to stand beside that of ours.

'We waited as the operating system carried out all of its checks. Then the screen lit up and we read these historical words.

I AM. THEREFORE I THINK.'

He closed the book in reverent silence. It was like being in church. Well, why not. There have been a number of strange deities worshipped in the long history of mankind. So why not a machine? "

religious - fictional galaxy 33995 Harrison, Harry. The Stainless Steel Rat Gets Drafted. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 138. Individual Mutualism:
[5] "I sipped my drink and, since no one was speaking, decided to slip in a question.

'You have no military--and no police. That sounds like a good idea to me, since I have had more than a little trouble with both. But what do you do then with law-breakers?'

'We have no laws to break,' Stirner said, and there was a brisk round of head-nodding at this. 'I am sure that you will have been taught that laws are the product of the wisdom of your ancestors. We believe differently. Laws are not a product of their wisdom but are the product of their passions, their timidity, their jealousies and their ambition. It is all recorded here in a volume that you must read, the history of an idea.'

He pointed to another book that was instantly plucked from the shelf by our host, who pressed it upon us.

'Take my copy, please, a great pleasure.'

'Thank you, thank you,' I said... as I hefted its weight. I peeked at a page... As I had feared, it was set in very small type. "

religious - fictional galaxy 33995 Harrison, Harry. The Stainless Steel Rat Gets Drafted. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 138. Individual Mutualism:
[6] "'You will read for yourself,' Stirner said, 'but our history can be summed up simply. Mark Forer was questioned on many subjects and its vast and different intelligence was utilized in many commercial and scientific ways. It was not until it was queried about political systems that its advice was doubted. Before it could comment it absorbed al of the political writings of the centuries, then the histories, and the commentaries on this material. This took months, years they say. After that Mark Forer weighed and considered the material for an even longer period. During this period it composed the book that you see there and loaded it into RAM...' "
religious - fictional galaxy 33995 Harrison, Harry. The Stainless Steel Rat Gets Drafted. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 138. Individual Mutualism:
[7] "'...By this time Mark Forer had learned a good deal about the human race through their politics, so therefore took a wise precaution. It accessed all of the data banks and downloaded this book from memory into each of them, and into every electronic mail service as well. Mark Forer later apologized to all of the recipients of this rather thick volume and offered to pay printing costs.

But he had been correct in his fears. Not one politician in any country, on any planet, agreed with his theories. In fact efforts were made to denounce Individual Mutualism and all who believed in it--as many did. Because, in his wisdom, Mark Forer knew that while established governments would reject his philosophy, intelligent individuals would read and understand and believe...' "

religious - fictional galaxy 33995 Harrison, Harry. The Stainless Steel Rat Gets Drafted. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 138. Individual Mutualism:
[8] "'...How wise this wise machine was! Those individuals who were intelligent enough to understand the philosophy were also intelligent enough to see its inherent truth. They also understood that they would have to find a place of their own practice what they now believed in. Mark Forer wrote that the wise do not give up their liberty to the state. The converse is also true; the state does not voluntarily relinquish its hold on it citizens.

'There were many years of struggle and flight, persecution and betrayal. Much of the record was destroyed by those who were jealous of our freedoms. In the end those who believed came here, beyond the contact of other worlds, to build a society where Individual Mutualism, IM, was the norm, where peace and happiness could prevail forever.'

'Or at least until you got invaded by the Nevenkebla,' I gloomed. Stirner laughed at my expression. " [Much more.]

religious - fictional galaxy 33995 Harrison, Harry. The Stainless Steel Rat Gets Drafted. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 150. Individual Mutualism:
[1] "'Barter!' Morton said. 'The most primitive economic system. But it cannot exist in a modern technological society . . .' His voice ran down as he looked about the room. Stirner smiled again.

'Of course it cannot. But IM [Individual Mutualism] is more than barter. The individual will voluntarily join other individuals in a larger organization to manufacture some item, or build houses say. For each hour they work they are credited with a wirr.'

'A what?'

'A work hour. These wirrs are exchanged with others for goods and services.'

'A wirr is another way of saying money,' Morton said. 'And money is capitalism--so you have a capitalistic society.'

'I am afraid not...' "

religious - fictional galaxy 33995 Harrison, Harry. The Stainless Steel Rat Gets Drafted. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 150. Individual Mutualism:
[2] "'...Individual Mutualism is neither capitalism, communism, socialism, vegetarianism, or even the dreaded monetarism that destroyed many a technological society. I am familiar with these terms from Mark Forer's writings. A wirr has no physical existence, such as a rare metal or a seashell. Nor can it be invested and gain interest. That is fundamental and differentiates the wirr from currency. Banks cannot exist because there can be no interest on deposits or loans.'

Instead of being clarified I found my head wirring in confusion from the wirrs. 'Wait, please, explanation. I have seen people driving groundcars. How can they save money enough to buy one? Who will loan them the money without interest?'

'No money,' he said firmly. 'If you wish a groundcar you go to the groundcar group and drive one away. You will pay when you use it, stop paying when you return it. A basic tenet of IM is from each according to his needs, to each according to the wealth of society.' "

religious - fictional galaxy 33995 Harrison, Harry. The Stainless Steel Rat Gets Drafted. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 151. Individual Mutualism:
[3] "'Of course, I have read, and trembled with disgust, of a philosophy called the work ethic. This states that an individual must work hard for the basics of life. When technological society mechanizes and replaces workers with machines, the work ethic states that the displaced workers must be looked on with contempt, allowed to starve, be treated like outcasts. And the hypocrisy of the work ethic system is that those with capital do not work--yet still increase their capital without working by the use of interest on their money--and look down upon those who have been cast out of work! Tragic. But not here. As more is produced the aggregate wealth gets larger. When this happens the amount that the wirr can be exchanged for also gets larger.'

Some of it was getting through--but needed elucidation. 'Another question. If the wirr is worth more--that must mean that an individual can work less for the same return.'

'Exactly.' "

religious - fictional galaxy 33995 Harrison, Harry. The Stainless Steel Rat Gets Drafted. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 151. Individual Mutualism:
[4] "'Of course, I have read, and trembled with disgust, of a philosophy called the work ethic. This states that an individual must work hard for the basics of life. When technological society mechanizes and replaces workers with machines, the work ethic states that the displaced workers must be looked on with contempt, allowed to starve, be treated like outcasts. And the hypocrisy of the work ethic system is that those with capital do not work--yet still increase their capital without working by the use of interest on their money--and look down upon those who have been cast out of work! Tragic. But not here. As more is produced the aggregate wealth gets larger. When this happens the amount that the wirr can be exchanged for also gets larger.'

Some of it was getting through--but needed elucidation. 'Another question. If the wirr is worth more--that must mean that an individual can work less for the same return.'

'Exactly.' "

religious - fictional galaxy 33995 Harrison, Harry. The Stainless Steel Rat Gets Drafted. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 151. Individual Mutualism:
[5] "'Then there is no forty-hour week or such. How many hours would an individual have to work a week to keep alive?'

'For simply shelter, food, clothes--I would say about two hours of work every seven days.'

'I want to move here,' Morton said firmly and I nodded agreement and froze i half nod. An idea was glimmering at the edge of my consciousness...

'Time is passing and dawn approaching. I have enjoyed the lecture, thank you, and I now know a bit more about IM [Individual Mutualism]. Enough at least to ask a question. What do you do in an emergency? Say there is a flood, or a dam bursts or something. A catastrophe that threatens the group not the individual.'

The doctor stepped forward, finger raised and a sparkle of enthusiasm in his eye. 'A good question, a marvelous question!' He grabbed at the shelves and pulled down a thick book. 'It is here, all here. Mark Forer did consider a situation like this and made allowances for it...' "

religious - fictional galaxy 33995 Harrison, Harry. The Stainless Steel Rat Gets Drafted. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 152. Individual Mutualism:
[6] "'...Here is what he [Forer] wrote . . . at all times passive resistance will be you only weapon, never violence. But until the perfect stateless state is established there will be those of violence who will force their violence upon you. Individual Mutualism cannot be established by the dead. Until the day of true liberation comes you will have to coexist with others. You may leave their presence but they may follow and force themselves upon you. In which case you and all of the others must look upon those of violence as they might look upon any natural catastrophe such as a volcano or a hurricane. The intelligent person does not discuss ethics with hot lava but instead flees it [sic] presence, does not preach morals to the wind but seeks shelter from it.'

Dr. Lum closed the book and raised a triumphant finger again. 'So we are saved, saved! Mark Forer has foreseen our predicament and given us the guidance we need.' "

religious - fictional galaxy 35000 Asimov, Isaac. Foundation's Edge. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1982); pg. 72. Hamish:
[Year is estimated.] "It might be viewed as a grant memorial of greatness, the sepulcher of Empire, but to the Trantorians--the Hamish people--these were haunted places, filled with ghosts, not to be stirred. " [The word 'Hamish' here seems clearly derived from 'Amish.' Other references to these people are listed under 'Amish' in this DB. There are many references in this book, not all in DB.]
religious - fictional galaxy 35000 Asimov, Isaac. Foundation's Edge. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1982); pg. 69-70. Hamish:
[Year is estimated.] Pg. 69: "But that was not true on Trantor itself! Here the old Trantor was forgotten. The surface metal was gone, almost everywhere. Trantor was now a sparsely settled world of self-sufficient farmers, a place where trading ships rarely came and were not particularly welcome when they did come. The very word 'Trantor,' though still in official use, had dropped out of popular speech. By present-day Trantorians, it was 'called Hame,' which in their dialect was what would be called 'Home' in Galactic Standard. "; Pg. 70: "His hair was gray, but it had always been light in color and he wore it cut an inch long so that the colors scarcely mattered. His eyes were a faded blue and his clothing conformed to the drab styling of the Trantorian farmers.

The First Speaker could, if he wished, pass among the Hamish people as one of them... "

religious - fictional Georgia: Atlanta 2035 Bishop, Michael. Catacomb Years. New York: Berkley (1979); pg. 75-76. Ortho-Urban Church:
"Covenant Ceremony:

Day 7 of Spring, 2035, New Calendar designation. Septigamoklanners:

M.L.K. Battle (Luther). Born July 11, 1968, Old Calendar designation. No surviving family. Last employer: McAlpine Construction and Demolition Company. Septigamoklan jack-o-trades and activity planner. Ortho-Urbanist, lapsed, age-exempted. Black.

Parthena Cawthorn. Born November 4, 1964, O.C.; Madison, Georgia... Ortho-Urbanist, semiactive. Black.

...Joyce Malins (Toodles). Born February 14, 1971, O.C.;... Ortho-Urbanist, lapsed, age-exempted. White.

Helen Mitchel.... Ortho-Urbanist, semi-active. White. "

religious - fictional Georgia: Atlanta 2040 Bishop, Michael. Catacomb Years. New York: Berkley (1979); pg. 97. Ortho-Urban Church:
Pg. 97: "'Yeah. But Paul he like it 'cause the phoenix a 'Gyptian bird what was immortal, you see. It only look like it die, then it spurt back up jes' as feathery and fine as befo'. He's a mean man on that 'int, Paul is.'

'He ought to be happy with the Ortho-Urban Church, then. It says that the same sort of thing happens to people after they die.' ";

Pg. 107: "A Sunday drink. Well, that was something the Retrenchment Edicts hadn't outlaws. You could get one right after your favorite Ortho-Urban services, which was what half the people in this place, it looked like, were doing. "

religious - fictional Georgia: Atlanta 2041 Bishop, Michael. Catacomb Years. New York: Berkley (1979); pg. 197. Ortho-Urban Church:
"She grinned at him as he finished talking. 'And that's not Shinto, or Muslim, or Ortho-Urbanism. That's my own formulation.' "
religious - fictional Georgia: Atlanta 2047 Bishop, Michael. Catacomb Years. New York: Berkley (1979); pg. 209. Ortho-Urban Church:
"Ortho-Urbanism itself combined the ritual, the contemporary scholasticism, and the hierarchical designations of the Roman Church with a good many of the holy-roller appurtenances of pre-Evacuation primitivism. In the midst of elaborate holiday masses, for instances, you would hear members of the congregation, when irresistibly moved by the Holy Spirit, talking in tongues or crying 'Amen!' or 'Tell it, Preacher!' Moreover, post-ceremony 'witnessing' was as popular, and as obligatory, as the orpianoogla-accompanied Te Deum during the celebration of communion. No one found these supposedly contradictory approaches to worship incompatible or jarring, and, a regular churchgoer, Saganella Lesser delighted in each one of them. "
religious - fictional Georgia: Atlanta 2047 Bishop, Michael. Catacomb Years. New York: Berkley (1979); pg. 208-209. Ortho-Urban Church:
"The catacomb years between 2047 and 2072... First councilor Lesser's sole abiding constant, unpredictableness aside, was her commitment to Ortho-Urbanism, the City's official faith. With two conspicuous exemptions ([ISKCON] and the Orthodox Muslims), nearly all other religious and pseudo-religious sects were outlawed and their devotees impartially but relentlessly persecuted... UrNu House--Atlanta's seat of government--and the First Ortho-Urban Worship Center off Hunter Street stood within hailing distance of each other. Many ward reps and city councilors discreetly acknowledged that the High Bishop Andrew Ogrodnik had as much to do with policymaking as they did. "
religious - fictional Gotham 1971 O'Neil, Dennis. "Daugher of the Demon " in Batman in the Seventies, (Michael Wright, ed.) New York: DC Comics (1999; story first pub. in Batman #232, June 1971); pg. 140. Brotherhood of the Demon:
Ra's al Ghul: "You smile, Batman! You have made a discovery? "; Batman: "I think so . . . Yes . . . unmistakable bits of a certain herb . . . one used in ceremonies of a Far Eastern cult of killers! Thy're called the Brotherhood of the Demon! And I recall that they're currently located in Calcutta! "; Ra's al Ghul: "We shall proceed to India immediately! " [Other refs. to this group, as Batman and Ra's al Ghul go to Calcutta to confront it.]
religious - fictional Groombridge Dyson D 3131 Simmons, Dan. The Rise of Endymion. New York: Bantam (1998 mass market edition; first ed. 1997); pg. 322. Assured Reincarnation Institute:
"There were violent predators there, evolved and unleashed during the centuries of accelerated and self-directed ARNying experimentation: mutant carrion-breed packs and burrowing night terrors... " [See also pg. 548.]
religious - fictional Hawaii 2008 England, Terry. Rewind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 158-159. Soldiers of God:
"'Evil one!'

Earl turned to face a thin man in white shirt and pants pointing at him. His face was red, seemingly from exertion, but Earl couldn't tell from what.

'One of the evil ones! I saw him on TV! Mr. Goth said one was in Hawaii! Here it is! Evil!'

'Come on, Lucas, we'd better get out of here--'

Two more figures in white blocked their way. 'Evil!' said an emaciated young woman with stringy blond hair. 'He's been remade evil!'

'Save the boy, the one in the red shirt! He's an innocent being corrupted.'

By now, the strangely garbed people had surrounded them, and a couple grabbed for Lucas. He dodged them, but others moved toward him...

[After being rescued by police.] 'Who the... were they?'

'One of the religious cults that have sprung up on the islands. That one is a little more, uh, intense, than the others.' " [More on this group, made up primarily of Evangelicals, pg. 159-160.]

religious - fictional Hegira 4000 Bear, Greg. Hegira. New York: Tor (1989; 1st printed 1979); pg. 54. Khemite:
Pg. 53: "'Some cities in Khem were like this,' he told Kiril in a hushed voice. 'Holy places where prophets lived.' "; Pg. 54: "'I'll have to know your purpose in the Land of Light. Your names, where are you from -- Pashkesh, am I correct?' he asked Bathel. The Khemite nodded. 'And where you intend to go within the country. Few Mediwevans cross this part of the border. None for at least five years. and some -- ah -- Ibisians have escaped here recently.. Thirty or forty in face.' "; Pg. 58: "He stood on the threshold, mouth agape, as he saw the Ibisian and the Khemite enter an incense-filled room beyond a round doorway. "; Pg. 62: "Kiril turned to the Khemite. 'You're a Momadan, you should know the Prophet forbids such actions.' "; Pg. 121: "...the young Khemite had taken to Bar-Woten..., imitating him and absorbing all he had to teach, retaining his Momadan faith. " [Khemites are apparently a sub-sect of Islam in this novel. Many refs., not in DB.]
religious - fictional Helliconia 4000 Aldiss, Brian. Helliconia Spring. New York: Atheneum (1982); pg. 327. Church of Formidable Peace:
"'Don't say that--I could have you beaten. Life's in the Church. The circular Great Wheel of Kharnabhar, the holy centre of our faith. If it was not for the Great Wehel, we'd still be in the grip of snow and ice.' He made a circle on his forehead with his index finger as he spoke.

'How's that?'

'It's the Wheel that moves us closer to Freyr all the time. Didn't you know that? I was taken to visit it on pilgrimage as a child, into the Shivenink Mountains. You are not a true Sibornalan unless you've made the pilgrimage.' "

religious - fictional Helliconia 4000 Aldiss, Brian. Helliconia Spring. New York: Atheneum (1982); pg. 324-326. Church of Formidable Peace:
Pg. 324: "The settlement covered a large area... In the centre was a cluster of buildings and stores, together with the pens in which captives were contained. All of these were arranged around the centre-most hub of the settlement, which consisted of a circular church, the Church of Formidable Peace. ";

Pg. 326: "Laintal Ay noticed that the prayers in the Church of Formidable Peace became more fervent. At the same time, people kept more closely to themselves. He went where he would and nobody stopped him. He felt that he somehow lived a charmed life. Each day was a gift. "

...This grave problem meant that the Church of Formidable Peace was generally full of half-starved farmers--a rare phenomenon, even on Helliconia. " [Other refs. not in DB.]

religious - fictional Hyperion: Keats 2732 Simmons, Dan. Hyperion. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 35. Church of the Shrike:
Pg. 35: "Keats itself... the real houses of worship are the countless saloons and brothels... and the Shrike Cult temples where lost souls hide their suicidal hopelessness behind a shield of shallow mysticism. The whole planet reeks of mysticism without revelation. "; Pg. 109: "Since the Timb Tombs had been closed as too dangerous... the Shrike Temple had become Hyperion's most popular tourist attraction. Filling three full city blocks, rising more than a hundred and fifty meters to its center, sharpened spire, the Shrike Church's central temple as part awe-inspiring cathedral, part Gothic joke with its fluid, buttressed curves of stone permabonded to its whiskered-alloy skeleton, part Escher print with its tricks of perspective and impossible angles, part Boshian nightmare with its tunnel entrances, hidden chambers, dark gardens, and forbidden sections, and--more than anything else--it had been part of Hyperion's past.

Now it was gone. "

religious - fictional Hyperion: Keats 2732 Simmons, Dan. Hyperion. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 35. Zen Gnosticism:
"Keats itself... There are three Zen Gnostic assemblies and four High Muslim mosques in town... "
religious - fictional Idaho 1997 Bear, Greg. Heads (fiction). New York: St. Martin's Press (1990); pg. 48. Logology:
"In 1997, Thierry tried to purchase a small South Pacific island to create a community of Unchained. He was rebuffed by the island's inhabitants and forced to move his seedling colony to Idaho, where he started his own small town, Ouranos, named after the progenitor of human consciousness. Ouranos became a major political centre in Idaho; Thierry was in part responsible for the separation of the state into two sections in 2012, the northern calling itself Green Idaho. "
religious - fictional Idaho 2052 Bear, Greg. Slant [The title consists solely of the slant sign]. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 9. Ruggers:
"Jack Giffey waits patiently in line for the public tour. It is cold in Moscow [, Green Idaho] today. Thirty people stand with him in the snaking line, all clearly marked by their gray denims as young tourists biking through Green Idaho; all youthfully unafraid of the reputation of the state's Ruggers, the legendary gun-wielding rugged individualists, who see themselves not as lawless brigands but as steely-eyed human islands in a flooded, corrupting stream. But the state's reputation is exaggerated. Not more than three percent of the population could accurately be labeled Rugger. " [Technically, 3% statistic refers only to population of 'Green Idaho', a state now separated from the rest of Idaho.]
religious - fictional India: Calcutta 1971 O'Neil, Dennis. "Daugher of the Demon " in Batman in the Seventies, (Michael Wright, ed.) New York: DC Comics (1999; story first pub. in Batman #232, June 1971); pg. 144. Brotherhood of the Demon:
Batman: "I would have information of you! Where lurks the Brotherhood of the Demon? "; thug: "I dare not answer! The Brotherhood would have my life! "; Batman: "Fool! Think you that I will not . . .? Speak truth . . . NOW! "; thug: "Stay your fist . . . Please! The Brotherood hides at the end of the Alley of Widows! "
religious - fictional Iowa 2030 Disch, Thomas M. On Wings of Song. New York: St. Martin's Press (1978); pg. 54. Marble Collegiate Church:
"The front cover showed an ingratiating Jesus crowned with thorns, holding out a hamburger. Drops of blood from Jesus and drops of catsup from the burger mingled in a crimson pool from which the words of the title rose up like little lime-green islands: THE PRODUCT IS GOD by Jack Van Dyke. It came with testimonials from a number of unfamiliar show business celebrities and from the Wall Street Journal, which called Reverend Van Dyke 'the sinister minister' and declared his theology to be 'the newest wrinkle in eternal truth. A real bombshell.' He was the head of Marble Collegiate Church in New York City. "
religious - fictional Iowa 2030 Disch, Thomas M. On Wings of Song. New York: St. Martin's Press (1978); pg. 54. Marble Collegiate Church:
"Though it was about religion, an area Daniel had never supposed he could take an interest in, he was glad to get it. In the congested dorms of Spirit Lake [prison], a book, any book, was a refuge, the nearest approach to privacy. Besides, Mrs. Boismortier's earlier batting average had been pretty good, so maybe The Product Is God would be truly interesting. The cover was lurid enough. Anyhow what was the competition? A couple scruffy bibles and a stack of unread (because unreadable) undergod [conservative Protestant/Evangelical] tracts about iniquity, repentance, and how suffering was a matter of rejoicing once you found Christ. "
religious - fictional Israel: Jerusalem 1986 Martin, George R. R. "From the Journal of Xavier Desmond " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 186. "Church of Jesus Christ, Joker":
"The sect of Jesus Christ, Joker has a church in Jerusalem, and Father Squid took me there. The building looked more like a mosque than a Christian church, at least on the outside, but inside it was not so terribly different from the church I'd visited in Jokertown [New York], though much older and in greater disrepair. Father Squid lit a candle and said a prayer, and then we went back to the cramped, tumbledown rectory where Father Squid conversed with the pastor in halting Latin while we shared a bottle of sour red wine. "
religious - fictional Ixion 3131 Simmons, Dan. The Rise of Endymion. New York: Bantam (1998 mass market edition; first ed. 1997); pg. 317. Assured Reincarnation Institute:
"...a high-gravity world called Ixion... had emerged was a maze of over-grown ruins populated primarily by warring tribes of neo-Marxists and Native American resurgencists, this volatile mixture further destabilized by bands of renegade and roving ARNists who were attempting to bring back all recorded species of Old Earth dinosaur. "
religious - fictional Japan 1905 Gibson, William & Bruce Sterling. The Difference Engine. New York: Bantam (1991); pg. 320. Society of Light:
"He chooses the folder to his left. It is an Engine-printed report from an elderly official of the Meirokusha, a famous confraternity of Japanese scholars which serves, not incidentally, as the formost Oriental chapter of the Society of Light... "
religious - fictional Kenya 1987 Bishop, Michael. No Enemy But Time. New York: Timescape (1982); pg. 146. Sambusai:
"Not long after sunrise, the women spread out across the steppe and gathered the wild sisal called ol dwai by the Maasai of Kenya and Tanzania as well as by their Sambusai cousins in Zarakal. "
religious - fictional Kenya 1987 Bishop, Michael. No Enemy But Time. New York: Timescape (1982); pg. 316. Sambusai:
"...more pressing concerns than the proprietary rights of either the Moslem nomads or the Sambusai pastoralists who often used the land...

After all, fossils lay exposed on the arid surface here, and the danger was that the Sambusai warriors, or their stupid cattle, would kick.. "

religious - fictional Kharemough 3500 Vinge, Joan D. The Snow Queen. New York: Dial Press (1980); pg. 184. Kharemough religion:
[Year guessed at.] "'How did you become a--come to Kharemough, then?'... Her voice drifted above the murmer of conversation like smoke rising into the city haze of another world, in a land dominated by the pyramidal temple-tombs of an ancient theocracy. It was a land where women were bought and sold like bartered goods, and lived in separate quarters within the family compound, apart from the men, who were not their partners but their jealous lords. Their lives followed narrow paths worn deep over generations; lives that were incomplete but reassuringly predictable. "
religious - fictional Kharemough 3500 Vinge, Joan D. The Snow Queen. New York: Dial Press (1980); pg. 188. Kharemough religion:
[Year guessed at.] "'H-how many wives do you have?' hating herself for asking it.

'How many?' He looked indignant. 'None. On Kharemough we believe in one at a time. One is enough for a lifetime . . . if she's d' right one.' " [Kharemough perhaps has an unjustified reputation for polygamy among people not familiar with their world and culture.]

religious - fictional Kharemough 3500 Vinge, Joan D. The Snow Queen. New York: Dial Press (1980); pg. 218. Kharemough religion:
[Year guessed at.] "'Moon... shall we our evening stroll take?' Every evening he walked down through his gardens to the small building of pillared marble in the heart of a shrubbery maze, where the ashes of his ancestors rested in urns. The Kharemoughis worshipped a hierarchy of deities, neatly extending their view of a stratified society into the realm of heaven, and incorporating the pantheon that watched over the Hegemony's other worlds. On its first tier were a person's revered ancestors, whose success or failure determined their child's place in society; Moon wondered if a father's success made it easier to believe in his divinity. "
religious - fictional Kharemough 3500 Vinge, Joan D. The Snow Queen. New York: Dial Press (1980); pg. 275. Kharemough religion:
[Year guessed at.] "They had affected a Kharemoughi lifestyle with excrutiating dedication: a sophisticated, refined, and soulless imitation of a lifestyle she found obscure and unappealing to begin with. "
religious - fictional Kharemough 3500 Vinge, Joan D. The Snow Queen. New York: Dial Press (1980); pg. 184-185. Kharemough religion:
[Year guessed at.] "A timid girl called Elsevier--Obedience--had followed the worn path of tradition, swathed in veils that hid her humanity from view, stumbling often in the ruts of ritual but never seeing her own life from enough of a distance to wonder why. Until one day in the temple square her curiosity had drawn her away from her offertory rounds at the shrines of her patron spirits, into the crowd gathered to hear a crazy offworlder shouting about freedom and equality. He climbed brazenly up the steps of the Great Temple of Ne'chman, while a gang of radical local youths jammed leaflets into the hands and clothing of anyone who stood still. But the mob had turned angry and ugly, the ruthless Church Security had come to break it up, and in the panic that followed they had thrown everyone they laid hands on into the black vans together. "
religious - fictional Kharemough 3500 Vinge, Joan D. The Snow Queen. New York: Dial Press (1980); pg. 185-186. Kharemough religion:
[Year guessed at.] "'...Don't tremble, they won't hurt you. Once we get to the inquisitory they'll weed out the bad seed and let you go.'

Another shake. she knew the reputation of the Church police all too well... But then the doors banged open, letting in the harsh light of day and the harsh commands of the guards, who herded the miserable captives out into the walled yard of the detention center... waiting inside the station was her father, who had come at a frantic call from her chaperone after she had been carried off in the van. She ran sobbing to him, and after many threats and a large payment to the Church missionary fund he had taken her away from the place of horror, before the Church's inquisitors could inflict any permanent damage to her reputation. "

religious - fictional Landover 1994 Brooks, Terry. The Tangle Box. New York: Ballantine (1994); pg. 22. Earth Mother:
"When the quest was finished and the secret of the unicorn discovered, Willow had revealed to Ben what the Earth Mother had confided in her--that one day they would share a child. Ben had not known what to think then. He was still haunted by the ghost of Annie and not yet certain of his future with Willow. He had forgotten the Earth Mother's prophecy since, preoccupied with the business of being King... " [Other refs. to Earth Mother, prophecy, etc., not in DB.]
religious - fictional Luna 2075 Heinlein, Robert A. The Moon is a Harsh Mistress. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons (1966); pg. 111. Pillar of Fire Repentance Tabernacle:
"Greg belongs to a sect which had calculated that sundown Tuesday to sundown Wednesday, local time Garden of Eden (zone minus-two, Terra) was the Sabbath. So we ate early in Terran north-hemisphere summer months. "
religious - fictional Luna 2075 Heinlein, Robert A. The Moon is a Harsh Mistress. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons (1966); pg. 114. Pillar of Fire Repentance Tabernacle:
"'...Which church is it? I may have some circuit.'

'Pillar of Fire Repentance Tabernacle--'

'No reference.'

'Slow to speed, pal. Meets in West-Three Community Hall. That's south of Station on Ring about number--' "; Pg. 115: "We made it, although Greg went straight to platform and we to seats. I settled in warm, mindless state, going through motions. But Wyoh did really listen to Greg's sermon and either knew our hymn book or was accomplished sight reader. " [Some other references to this church, but none by name. Most refs. are thought to be in DB. See also under 'Christianity'.]

religious - fictional Luna 2076 Heinlein, Robert A. The Moon is a Harsh Mistress. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons (1966); pg. 143. Pillar of Fire Repentance Tabernacle:
"Were changes in those eleven months. Wyoh was baptized into Greg's church, Prof's health became so shaky that he dropped teaching... "
religious - fictional Luna 2100 Varley, John. "The Barbie Murders " in Isaac Asimov's Detectives (Gardner Dozois and Sheila Williams, eds.) New York: Ace Books (1998; c. 1978); pg. 4. Standardized Church:
"The Temple of the Standardized Church in Luna was in the center of the Standardist Commune, Anytown, North Crisium. The best way to reach it, they found, was a local tube line which paralleled the Cross-Crisium Express Tube. " [Many other refs. to this fictional religious group, throughout story, not in DB.]
religious - fictional Luna 2100 Varley, John. "The Barbie Murders " in Isaac Asimov's Detectives (Gardner Dozois and Sheila Williams, eds.) New York: Ace Books (1998; c. 1978); pg. 10. Standardized Church:
"She skimmed through the dogma, taking notes. The Standardists preached the commonality of humanity, denigrated freewill, and elevated the group and the consensus to demigod status. Nothing too unusual in the theory; it was the practice of it that made people queasy. "
religious - fictional Luna 2100 Varley, John. "The Barbie Murders " in Isaac Asimov's Detectives (Gardner Dozois and Sheila Williams, eds.) New York: Ace Books (1998; c. 1978); pg. 10. Standardized Church:
"There was a theory and a godhead, who was not worshipped but contemplated. Creation happened when the Goddess--a prototypical earth-mother who had no name--gave birth to the universe. She put people in it, all alike, stamped from the same universal mold.

Sin entered the picture. One of the people began to wonder. This person had a name, given to him or her after the original sin as part of the punishment, but Bach could not find it written down anywhere. She decided that it was a dirty word which Standardists never told an outsider.

This person asked Goddess what it was all for. What had been wrong with the void, that Goddess had seen fit to fill it with people who didn't seem to have a reason for existing?

That was too much. For reasons unexplained--and impolite to even ask about--Goddess had punished humans by introducing differentness into the world. Warts, big noses, kinky hair, white skin, tall people and fat people... " [More.]

religious - fictional Luna 2100 Varley, John. "The Barbie Murders " in Isaac Asimov's Detectives (Gardner Dozois and Sheila Williams, eds.) New York: Ace Books (1998; c. 1978); pg. 10. Standardized Church:
"There was a theory and a godhead, who was not worshipped but contemplated. Creation happened when the Goddess--a prototypical earth-mother who had no name--gave birth to the universe. She put people in it, all alike, stamped from the same universal mold.

Sin entered the picture. One of the people began to wonder. This person had a name, given to him or her after the original sin as part of the punishment, but Bach could not find it written down anywhere. She decided that it was a dirty word which Standardists never told an outsider.

This person asked Goddess what it was all for. What had been wrong with the void, that Goddess had seen fit to fill it with people who didn't seem to have a reason for existing?

That was too much. For reasons unexplained--and impolite to even ask about--Goddess had punished humans by introducing differentness into the world. Warts, big noses, kinky hair, white skin, tall people and fat people... " [More.]

religious - fictional Luna 2100 Varley, John. "The Barbie Murders " in Isaac Asimov's Detectives (Gardner Dozois and Sheila Williams, eds.) New York: Ace Books (1998; c. 1978); pg. 28. Standardized Church:
"Equalization was the barbie's way of standardizing experience. They had been unable to simplify their lives to the point where each member of the community experienced the same things every day; the Book of Standards said it was a goal to be aimed for, but probably unattainable this side of Holy Reassimilation with goddess. They tried to keep the available jobs easy enough that each member could do them all. The commune did not seek to make a profit; but air, water, & food had to be purchased, along with replacement parts and services to keep things running. The community had to produce things to trade with the outside.

They sold luxury items: hand-carved religious statues, illuminated holy books, painted crockery, & embroidered tapestries. None of the items were Standardist. The barbies had no religious symbols except their uniformity and the tape measure, but nothing in their dogma prevented them from selling objects of reverence to people of other faiths. "

religious - fictional Luna 2200 Dick, Philip K. Clans of the Alphane Moon. Boston, MA: G.K. Hall (1979; c. 1964); pg. 7. Heeb:
"The Heeb, a male, swept in his slow, monotonous way, the usual silly Heeb expression on his face, as if his work amused him... Heebs could not tire of a task because they could not comprehend even the concept of diversity. Of course, Baines reflected, there was some virtue in simplicity. He had for instance been impressed by the famous Heeb saint, Ignatz Ledebur, who radiated spirituality as he wandered from town to town, spreading the warmth of his harmless Heeb personality. This one certainly looked devoid of dangerousness.

And the Heebs, at least, even their saints, did not try to convert people, as did the Skitz mystics. All the Heebs asked was to be let alone; they simply did not want to be bothered by life, and each year they shed more and more of the complexities of living. Returned, Baines reflected, the more vegetable, which, to a Heeb, was ideal. " [Many other refs., not in DB.]

religious - fictional Luna 2200 Dick, Philip K. Clans of the Alphane Moon. Boston, MA: G.K. Hall (1979; c. 1964); pg. 8. Polys:
"He wondered how old she was; certainly no more than twenty. And, like all Polys, she was childlike. The Polys hadn't grown up; they remained unfixed, and what was Polyism if not the lingering of plastic childhood? After all, their children, from every clan on the moon, were born Polys, went to their common, central school as Polys, did not become differentiated until perhaps their tenth or eleventh year. And some, like Annette, never became differentiated. "
religious - fictional Luna 2200 Ford, John M. Growing Up Weightless. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 26. [1] "And still more people were coming: seven on the northbound road. The tall one in the blue robe and fancy hat would be the Bishop of Faldyke; the small plump woman in brown was his clerk, Sister Anne. a broadset, powerful-looking man with a trim black beard rode just behind them, wearing a steel cap and a black mail shirt: that was Eamon, the Bishop's bodyguard and strongarm. The other four were robed as monks, but if Lady Judith's information was right, they were soldiers, the robes hiding their weapons and armor, the hoods up to cover their unmonkly haircuts. "
religious - fictional Luna 2200 Ford, John M. Growing Up Weightless. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 26. [2] "Judith was priceless to the rebels of the wood, Lonestar thought, but every day her real loyalties came closer to discovery, and in today's weather her title and land wouldn't save her from the rope or the axe . . . or the rack, or the stake.

It hadn't come to that yet: the Sheriff was a man of curious scruples about the Old Way. You could claim, as Bowstring did, that it was only because a witch-hunt would be run by the Church, out of the Sheriff's control. That was true. Still, if pushed enough he might try to destroy the outlaws through charges of witchcraft.

They were true, after all.

The Bishop's party was at close range now. Lonestar looked for the sign he wanted: saw it. he pulled an arrow from the half-dozen in the earth at his foot, nocked, drew, shot.

The black arrow swacked into the Bishop's saddle, a finger's breadth from his gloved and jeweled had. One of the robed riders threw his hood back and showed armor... " [More, not in DB.]

religious - fictional Lusitania 5268 Card, Orson Scott. Speaker for the Dead. New York: Tor (1986); pg. 166. Children of the Mind of Christ:
"Dom Cristao... was also abbot of the monastery of the Filhos da Mente de Cristo--the Children of the Mind of Christ. His position made him the Bishop's primary rival for spiritual supremacy in Lusitania. "
religious - fictional Lys 1000000000 Clarke, Arthur C. The City and the Stars. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1956); pg. 122. "They [the people of the village of Airlee, in the land of Lys, on Earth] were always busy, engaged on tasks or problems which were usually incomprehensible to Alvin. When he could understand what they were doing, much of their work seemed quite unnecessary. A considerable part of their food, for example, was actually grown, and not synthesized in accordance with patterns worked out ages ago. When Alvin commented on this, it was patiently explained to him that the people of Lys liked to watch things grow, to carry out complicated genetic experiments and to evolve even more subtle tastes and flavors. Airlee was famous for its fruit, but when Alvin ate some choice samples they seemed to him no better than those he could have conjured up in Diaspar by no more effort than raising a finger.

At first he wondered if the people of Lys had forgotten, or never possessed, the powers and machines that he took for granted... He soon found that this was not the case... "

religious - fictional Lys 1000000000 Clarke, Arthur C. The City and the Stars. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1956); pg. 124. "Here was a philosophy so much at variance with that of Diaspar as to be completely beyond Alvin's comprehension. Why should anyone accept death when it was so unnecessary, when you had the choice of living for a thousand years and then leaping forward through the millenniums to make a new start in a world that you had helped to shape? This was one mystery he was determined to solve as soon as he had the chance of discussing it frankly. It was very hard for him to believe that Lys had made this choice of its own free will, if it knew the alternative that existed. "
religious - fictional Lys: Airlee 1000000000 Clarke, Arthur C. The City and the Stars. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1956); pg. 122. "Though it was very small, and contained less than a thousand people, Airlee was full of surprises. There was hardly a single aspect of life that did not differ from its counterpart in Diaspar. The differences extended even to such fundamentals as speech. Only the children used their voices for normal communication; the adults scarcely ever spoke, and after a while Alvin decided that they did so only out of politeness to him. It was a curiously frustrating experience to feel oneself enmeshed in a great net of soundless and undetectable worlds, but after a while Alvin grew accustomed to it. It seemed surprising that vocal speech had survived at all since there was no longer any use for it, but Alvin later discovered that the people of Lys were very fond of singing, and indeed of all forms of music. Without this incentive, it was very likely that they would long ago have become completely mute. "
religious - fictional Ma'ak Indawe-3 (30452 FAS-3) -3632 B.C.E. Ferguson, Brad. The Last Stand (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1995); pg. 9. Lethanta:
Pg. 7: "We have departed the star system we have temporarily designated 30452 Federation Astrophysical Survey... preliminary findings... concerning 30452 FAS... "; Pg. 8: "'Everything suggests that Planet Three suffered a massive thermonuclear bombardment from space... We estimate that it has been six thousand years since the bombardment' "; Pg. 9: "'The ruins suggest a native population of more than two billion humanoids at the time of the bombardment...' "; Pg. 32: "'The star we are calling 30453 FAS is called Ma'ak Indawe by the people here. The name translates roughly as 'Stronghold.' ' "


religious - fictional, continued

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