Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

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religious - fictional, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
religious - fictional galaxy 4870 Le Guin, Ursula K. The Left Hand of Darkness. New York: Ace Books (1976; first pub. 1969); pg. 60. Yomeshta:
"'Do you know the story of the Lord of Shorth, who forced the Foretellers of Asen Fastness to answer the question What is the meaning of life? Well, it was a couple of thousand years ago. The Foretellers stayed in the darkness for six days and nights. At the end all the Celibates were catatonic, the Zanies were dead, the Pervert clubbed the Lord of Shorth to death with a stone, and the Weaver . . . He was a man named Meshe.'

'The founder of the Yomesh cult?'

'Yes,' said Godd, and laughed as if the story was very funny, but I didn't know whether the joke was on the Yomeshta or on me. "

religious - fictional galaxy 4870 Le Guin, Ursula K. The Left Hand of Darkness. New York: Ace Books (1976; first pub. 1969); pg. 67. Yomeshta:
"'...That's what the Yomeshta believe of Meshe: that he saw past and future clear, not for a mement, but all during his life after the Question of Shorth...' "
religious - fictional galaxy 4870 Le Guin, Ursula K. The Left Hand of Darkness. New York: Ace Books (1976; first pub. 1969); pg. 152. Yomeshta:
"Slose, having turned his Yomesh mysticism onto the Envoy's statements, interprets the coming of the Ekumen to earth as the coming of the Reign of Meshe among men, and loses sight of our purpose. 'We must halt this rivalry with Karhide before the New Men come,' he says. 'We must cleanse our spirits for their coming. We must forego shifgrethor, forbid all acts of vengeance, and unite together without envy as brothers of one Hearth.' "
religious - fictional galaxy 4870 Le Guin, Ursula K. The Left Hand of Darkness. New York: Ace Books (1976; first pub. 1969); pg. 162. Yomeshta:
"On Time and Darkness
From The Sayings of Tuhulme the High Priest, a book of the Yomesh Canon, composed in North Orgoreyn about 900 years ago.

Mishe is the Center of Time. That moment of his life when he saw all things clearly came when he had lived on earth thirty years, and after it he lived on earth again thirty years, so taht the Seeing befell in the center of life. And all the ages up until the Seeing were as long as the ages will be after the Seeing, which befell in the Center of Time. And in the Center there is no time past and no time to come. In all time past it is. In all time to come it is. It has not been nor yet will it be. It is. It is all. " [Continues for two more pages.]

religious - fictional galaxy 4870 Le Guin, Ursula K. The Left Hand of Darkness. New York: Ace Books (1976; first pub. 1969); pg. 164. Yomeshta:
"'...The stars that flee and take away their light shone presently.*

...Therefore those that call upon the darkness** are made fools of and spat out from the mouth of Meshe...'


*This is a mystial explanation of one of the theories used to support the expanding-universe hypothesis, first proposed by the Mathematical School of Sith over four thousand years ago and generally accepted by later cosmologists, even though meteorologial conditions on Gethen prevent their gathering much observational support from astronomy. The rate of expansion (Hubble's constant; Rerherek's constant) can in fact be estimated from the observed amount of light in the night sky; the point here involved is taht, if the universe were not expanding, the night sky would not appear to be dark.

**The Handdarata. "

religious - fictional galaxy 4870 Le Guin, Ursula K. The Left Hand of Darkness. New York: Ace Books (1976; first pub. 1969); pg. 164. Yomeshta:
[From the Yomesh Canon.] "There is neither source nor end, for all things are in the Center of Time. As all the stars may be reflected in a round raindrop falling in the night: so too do all the stars reflect the raindrop. There is neither darkness nor death, for all things are, in the light of the Moment, and their end and their beginning are one.

One center, one seeing, one law, one light. Look now into the Eye of Meshe! " [Many other refs., most not in DB.]

religious - fictional galaxy 4870 Le Guin, Ursula K. The Left Hand of Darkness. New York: Ace Books (1976; first pub. 1969); pg. 165. Yomeshta:
"At dinner Shusgis explained: a Yomesh festival was going on, the Solemnity of the Saints and Throne-upholders, and high officials of the Commensality were expected to be seen at the temples. "
religious - fictional galaxy 4870 Le Guin, Ursula K. The Left Hand of Darkness. New York: Ace Books (1976; first pub. 1969); pg. 233. Yomeshta:
"'Your race is appallingly alone in its world... I don't mean scientific thinking only, though you are extraordinary hypothesizers--it's extraordinary that you arrived at any concept of evolution, faced with that unbridgeable gap between yourselves and the lower animals. But philosophically, emotionally: to be so solitary, in so hostile a world: it must affect your entire outlook.'

'The Yomeshta would say that man's singularity is his divinity.'

'Lords of the Earth, yes. Other cults on other worlds have come to the same conclusion. They tend to be cults of dynamic, aggressive, ecology-breaking cultures. Orgoreyn is in the pattern, in its way; at least they seem bent on pushing things around. What do the Handdarata say?' "

religious - fictional galaxy 4870 Le Guin, Ursula K. The Left Hand of Darkness. New York: Ace Books (1976; first pub. 1969); pg. 237. Yomeshta:
"An Orgota Creation Myth

The origins of this myth are prehistorical; it has been recorded in many forms. This very primitive version is from a pre-Yomesh written text found in the Isenpeth Cave Shrine of the Gobrin Hinterlands.

In the beginning there was nothing but ice and the sun.

Over many years the sun shining melted a great crevasse in the ice. In the sides of this crevasse were great shapes of ice, and there was no bottom to it. Drops of water melted from the ice-shapes in the sides of the chasm and fell down. One of the ice-shapes said, 'I bleed.' Another of the ice-shapes said, 'I weep.' A third one said, 'I sweat.'

The ice-shapes climbed up out of the abyss and stood on the plain of ice. He that said 'I bleed,' he reached up to the sun and pulled out handfuls of exrement from the bowels of the sun, and with that dung made the hills and valleys of the earth. "

religious - fictional galaxy 4870 Le Guin, Ursula K. The Left Hand of Darkness. New York: Ace Books (1976; first pub. 1969); pg. 237. Yomeshta:
"An Orgota Creation Myth... He that said 'I weep, he breathed on the ice and meltin it made the seas and the rivers. He that said 'I sweat,' he gathered up soil and sea-water and with them made trees, plants, herbs, and grains of the field, animals, and men. The plants grew in the soil and the sea, the beasts ran on the land and swam in the sea, but the men didnot wake. Thirty-nine of them there were. They slept on the ice and would not move.

Then the three ice-shapes stooped down and sat with their knees drawn up and let the sun melt them. As milk they melted, and the milk ran into the mouths of the sleepers, and the sleepers awoke. That milk is drunk by the children of men alone and without it they will not wake to life... " [This continues for another page.]

religious - fictional galaxy 4870 Le Guin, Ursula K. The Left Hand of Darkness. New York: Ace Books (1976; first pub. 1969); pg. 302. Yomeshta:
"The Gethenian Calendar and Clock... The inconvenience of this system in record-keeping is palliated by various devices, for instance references to well-known events, reigns of kings, dynasties, local lords, etc. The Yomeshta count in 144-year cycles for the Birth of Mesthe (2022 years-ago), in Ekumenical Year 1492), and keep ritual celebrations every twelfth year, but this system is strictly cultic and is not officially employed even by the government of Orgoreyn, which sponsors the Yomesh religion. "
religious - fictional galaxy 5000 Le Guin, Ursula K. The Telling. New York: Harcourt (2000); pg. 102. Akan:
"'...But there was no native theism or deism here. On Aka, god is a word without referent. No capital letters. No creator, only creation. No eternal father to reward and punish, justify injustice, ordain cruelty, offer salvation. Eternity not an endpoint but a continuity. Primal division of being into material and spiritual only as two-as-one, or one in two aspects. No hierarchy of Nature and Supernatural. No binary Dark/Light, Evil/Good, or Body/Soul. No afterlife, no rebirth, no immortal disembodied or reincarnated soul. No heavens, no hells. The Akan system is a spiritual discipline with spiritual goals, but they're exactly the same goals it seeks for bodily and ethical well-being. Right action to its own end. Dharma without karma.'

She had arrived at a definition of Akan religion. For a minute she was perfectly satisfied with it and with herself. " [Many refs. throughout novel. Religion is the primary theme of the novel.]

religious - fictional galaxy 5268 Card, Orson Scott. Speaker for the Dead. New York: Tor (1986); pg. 166. Children of the Mind of Christ:
"...rather freewheeling monastics who ran most of the Catholic schools in the Hundred Worlds. Dom Cristao, besides being an excellent teacher of history, geology, archaeology, and anthropology, was also abbot of the monastery of the Filhos da Mente de Cristo--the Children of the Mind of Christ. His position made him the Bishop's primary rival for spiritual supremacy in Lusitania. In some ways he could even be considered the Bishop's superior; on most worlds there was only one abbot of the Filhos for each archbishop, while for each bishop there was a principal of a school system. But Dom Cristao, like all Filhos, made it a point to be completely deferent to the Church hierarchy. "
religious - fictional galaxy 6000 Vinge, Vernor. A Fire Upon the Deep. New York: Tor (1992); pg. 12. Flenserists:
"The three travelers were headed west, down form the Icefangs towards Flenser's Castle on Hidden Island... Tyrathect claimed to be a school teacher, but somewhere in her... was a killer. The creature was obviously a Flenserist fanatic, standoffish and rigid much of the time. Almost certainly, she was fleeing the purge that followed Flenser's unsuccessful attempt to take ower in the east... Besides, he had wanted to visit Flenser's Domain for years. Maybe one of these two could get him in. So much for the world reviled by the Flenserists... " [Many other refs. to Flenserists, most not in DB.]
religious - fictional galaxy 6000 Vinge, Vernor. A Fire Upon the Deep. New York: Tor (1992); pg. 15. Flenserists:
"'...Do you see the others though, the troopers from Flenser's Castle?... This is all Flenser territory; they must have patrols.'... 'Heh, heh. Our esteemed companion is more than genuine, I fear. I'd bet she's a Flenser Lord, not the low-rank Servant she seems at first glance. I expect that many of her kind are leaking back over the mountains these days, happy to get out of the Long Lakes Republic...' "
religious - fictional galaxy 6000 Vinge, Vernor. A Fire Upon the Deep. New York: Tor (1992); pg. 20. Flenserists:
"The wrecked and wounded were low on the Flenserist priority list... For a momen tPeregrine couldn't think of anything to say; he just gaped at the other. The center of Flenser's worldwide cabal was just a few miles to the northwest. Flenserist power was undisputed for dozens of miles inland, and right now they were virtually surrounded by an army. "; Pg. 21: "Wickwrackrum wondered briefly if--for all their talk of rationalism--the Flenserists would just leave the wreckage of their troops to reassemble itself. "
religious - fictional galaxy 6000 Vinge, Vernor. A Fire Upon the Deep. New York: Tor (1992); pg. 33. Flenserists:
"In some sense, the crafting of souls was nothing new. Brood kenning was a limited form of it... Flenser's contribution to the field--as to most others--had been an essential ruthlessness, a cutting away of all but the most important. He experimented endlessly, discarding all but the most successful results. He depended on discipline and denial and partial death as much as on clever member selection... The turning point came when he and Flenser identified the trio that weighted him down with both conscience and slowness of intellect. One of the three bridged the others. Sending it into silence, replacing it with just the right element, had made the difference. After that, the rest was easy; Steel was born.

When Flenser had left to convert the Long Lakes Republic, it was only natural that his most brilliant creation should take over here. For five years Steel had ruled Flenser's heartland. "

religious - fictional galaxy 6000 Vinge, Vernor. A Fire Upon the Deep. New York: Tor (1992); pg. 84. Flenserists:
"...and put the Flenser members aboard a more manageable pack.

Yet she stayed. Steel meant to use the aliens and their ship to spread Flenser's nightmare worldwide. But his plan was fragile, with risks on every side. If there was anything she could do to destroy it and the Flenser Movement she would.. "

religious - fictional galaxy 6000 Vinge, Vernor. A Fire Upon the Deep. New York: Tor (1992); pg. 88. Flenserists:
"But most didn't realize what a small part tose dark spaces played in the Movement's science. To properly dissect a soul, you need more than benches with blood gutters. The results from the lower levels were simply the first steps in Flenser's intellectual quest. There were great questions in the world, things that had bothered packs for thousands of years. How do we think? Why do we believe? Why is one pack a genius and another an oaf? Before Flenser, philosophers argued them endlessly and never got closer to the truth. Even Woodcarver had pranced around the issues, unwilling to give up her traditional ethics. Flenser was prepared to get the answers. In these labs, nature itself was under interrogation. "
religious - fictional galaxy 6000 Vinge, Vernor. A Fire Upon the Deep. New York: Tor (1992); pg. 26-27. Flenserists:
"Just a mile across the water they could see Hidden Island. Part of him dismissed the sight as a commonplce; part of him stumbled in awe. This was the center of it, the worldwide Flenser movement. Up in those dour towers, the original Flenser had done his experiments, written his essays . . . and schemed to rule the world...

A banner of red and yellow rose over the fort...

'That's Flenser's flag . . . his personal presence banner!'

'That's impossible.' Flenser had been assassinated in the Republic six tendays earlier...

Up by the fort, a single pack pranced between the ranks of soldiers and whitejackets. Silver and gold glinted on its shoulders. Scriber edged a member behind a piling and surreptitiously brought out his eye-tool. After a moment: 'Soul's end . . . it's Tyrathect.'

'She's no more the Flenser than I am,' said Peregrine. "

religious - fictional galaxy 13500 Herbert, Frank. Dune. Philadelphia: Chilton Book Co. (1965); pg. 497. Bene Gesserit:
"The Bene Gesserit, who privately denied they were a religious order, but who operated behind an almost impenetrable screen of ritual mysticism, and whose training, whose symbolism, organization, and internal teaching methods were almost wholly religious "
religious - fictional galaxy 13500 Herbert, Frank. Dune. Philadelphia: Chilton Book Co. (1965); pg. x. Bene Gesserit:
[Definitions in 'Terminology of the Imperium'] "BENE GESSERIT: the ancient school of mental and physical training established primarily for female students after the Butlerian Jihad destroyed the so-called 'thinking-machines' and robots. "

B.G.: idiomatic for Bene Gesserit except when used with a date. With a date it signifies Before Guild and identifies the Imperial dating system based on the genesis of the Spacing Guild's monopoly. "

religious - fictional galaxy 13500 Herbert, Frank. Dune. Philadelphia: Chilton Book Co. (1965); pg. xx. Bene Gesserit:
[Definitions in 'Terminology of the Imperium'] "MISSIONARIA PROTECTIVA: the arm of the Bene Gesserit order charged with sowing infectious superstitions on primitive worlds, thus opening those regions to exploitation by the Bene Gesserit (See Panoplia prophecticus.) "; pg. xxii: "PANOPLIA PROPHETICUS: term covering the infectious superstitions used by the Bene Gesserit to exploit primitive regions (See Missionaria Protectiva.) "
religious - fictional galaxy 13500 Herbert, Frank. Dune. Philadelphia: Chilton Book Co. (1965); pg. xxii-xxiii. Bene Gesserit:
[Definitions in 'Terminology of the Imperium'] "PROCTOR SUPERIOR: a Bene Gesserit Reverend Mother who is also regional director of a B.G. school (Commonly: Bene Gesserit with the Sight)...

REVEREND MOTHER: originally, a proctor of the Bene Gesserit, one who has tranformed an 'illuminating poison' within her body, raising herself to a higher state of awareness. Title adopted by Fremen for their own religious leaders who accomplished a similar 'illumination.' (See also Bene Gesserit and Water of Life.) "

religious - fictional galaxy 13500 Herbert, Frank. Dune. Philadelphia: Chilton Book Co. (1965); pg. xxix. Bene Gesserit:
[Definitions in 'Terminology of the Imperium'] "VOICE: that combined training originated by the Bene Gesserit which permits an adept to control others merely by selected tone shadings of the voice...

WALLACH IX: ninth planet of Laujin, site of the Mother School of the Bene Gesserit. "

religious - fictional galaxy 13500 Herbert, Frank. Dune. Philadelphia: Chilton Book Co. (1965); pg. xx, xxv. Bene Gesserit:
[Definitions in 'Terminology of the Imperium'] "MISSIONARIA PROTECTIVA: the arm of the Bene Gesserit order charged with sowing infectious superstitions on primitive worlds, thus opening those reigions to exploitation by the Bene Gesserit (See Panoplia prophecticus.) "; pg. xxii: "PANOPLIA PROPHETICUS: term covering the infectious superstitions used by the Bene Gesserit to exploit primitive regions (See Missionaria Protectiva.) "; Pg. xxv: "SHARI-A: that part of the panoplia propheticus which sets forth the superstitious ritual " [There are many other references to this, not in DB.]
religious - fictional galaxy 13500 Herbert, Frank. Dune. Philadelphia: Chilton Book Co. (1965); pg. x - xix. Fremen:
[Definitions in 'Terminology of the Imperium'] Pg. x: "AULIYA: In the Zensunni Wanderers' religion, the female at the left hnd of God; God's handmaiden. ";

Pg. xiv: "FIQH: knowledge, religious law; one of the half-legendary origins of the Zensunni Wanderers' religion...

FREMEN: the free tribes of Arrakis, dwellers in the desert, remnant of the Zensunni Wanderers. ('Sand Pirates' [in] the Imperial Dictionary.) "; Pg. xvii: IBN QIRTAIBA: 'Thus go the holy words . . .' Formal beginning to Fremen religious incantation (derived from panoplia propheticus)...

ILM: theology, science of religious tradition; one of the half-legendary origiins of the Zensunni Wanderers' faith. "; Pg. xix: "LISAN AL-GAIB: 'The Voice from the Outer World.' In Fremen messianic legends, an off-world prophet. sometimes translated as 'Giver of Water' (see Mahdi)...

MAHDI: in the Fremen messianic legend, 'The One Who Will Lead Us to Paradise. "

religious - fictional galaxy 13500 Herbert, Frank. Dune. Philadelphia: Chilton Book Co. (1965); pg. xx, xxiii. Fremen:
[Definitions in 'Terminology of the Imperium'] Pg. xx: "MIHNA: the season for testing Fremen youths who wish admittance to manhood...

MISR: the historical Zensunni (Fremen) term for themselves: 'The People.' "; Pg. xxiii: QUIZARA TAFWID: Fremen priests (after Muad'Dib)...

RAMADHAN: ancient religious period marked by fasting and prayer; traditionally, the ninth month of the solar-lunar calendar. Fremen mark the observance according to the ninth meridian-crossing cycle of the first moon...

REVEREND MOTHER: originally, a proctor of the Bene Gesserit, one who has tranformed an 'illuminating poison' within her body, raising herself to a higher state of awareness. Title adopted by Fremen for their own religious leaders who accomplished a similar 'illumination.' (See also Bene Gesserit and Water of Life.) "

religious - fictional galaxy 13500 Herbert, Frank. Dune. Philadelphia: Chilton Book Co. (1965); pg. xxiv, xxv. Fremen:
[Definitions in 'Terminology of the Imperium'] "RUH-SPIRIT: in Fremen belief, that part of the individual which is always rooted in (capable of sensing) the metaphysical world. (See Alam al-Mithal.)...

SADUS: judges. The Fremen title refers to holy judges, equivalent to saints.

SALUSA SECUNDUS: third planet of Gamma Waiping; designated Imperial Prison Planet after removal of the Royal Court of Kaitain. Salusa Secundus is homeworld of House Corrino, and the second stopping point in migrations of the Wandering Zensunni. Fremen tradition says they were slaves on S.S. for nine generations. "; Pg. xxv: "SAYYADINA: feminine acolyte in the Fremen religious hierarchy...

SHAH-NAMA: the half-legendary First Book of the Zensunni Wanderers. "

religious - fictional galaxy 13500 Herbert, Frank. Dune. Philadelphia: Chilton Book Co. (1965); pg. xxv. Fremen:
[Definitions in 'Terminology of the Imperium'] "SHAI-HULUD: sandworm of Arrakis, the 'Old Man of the Desert,' 'Old Father Eternity,' and 'Grandfather of the Desert.' Significantly, this name, when referred to in a certain tone or written with capital lettes, designates the earth deity of Fremen hearth supestitions. Sandworms grow to enormous size (specimens longer than 400 meters have been seen inthe deep desert) and live to great age unless slain by one of their fellows or drowned in water, which is poisonous to them. Most of the sand on Arrakis is credited to sandworm action. "
religious - fictional galaxy 13500 Herbert, Frank. Dune. Philadelphia: Chilton Book Co. (1965); pg. xxvi. Fremen:
[Definitions in 'Terminology of the Imperium'] "SIETCH: Fremen: 'Place of assembly in time of danger.' Because the Fremen lived so long in peril, the term came by general usage to designate any cave warren inhabited by one of their tribal communities.

SIHAYA: Fremen: the desert springtime with religious overtones implying the time of fruitfulness and 'the paradise to come.' "

religious - fictional galaxy 13500 Herbert, Frank. Dune. Philadelphia: Chilton Book Co. (1965); pg. xxvii. Fremen:
[Definitions in 'Terminology of the Imperium'] "ULEMA: a Zensunni doctor of theology.

UMMA: one of the brotherhood of prophets (A term of scorn in the Imperium, meaning any 'wild' person given to fanatical prediction.) "

religious - fictional galaxy 13500 Herbert, Frank. Dune. Philadelphia: Chilton Book Co. (1965); pg. xxx. Fremen:
[Definitions in 'Terminology of the Imperium'] "ZENSUNNI: followers of a schismatic sect that broke away from the teachings of Maometh (the so-called 'Third Muhammed') bout 1381 B.G. The Zensunni religion is noted chiefly for its emphasis on the mystical and a reversion to 'the ways of the fathers.' Most scholars name Ali Ben Ohashi as leader of the original schism but there is some evidence that Ohashi may have been merely the male spokesman for his second wife, Nisai. " [There are many references to Fremen religion and culture throughout the book, not not in DB.]
religious - fictional galaxy 13500 Herbert, Frank. Dune. Philadelphia: Chilton Book Co. (1965); pg. 497. Orange Catholic Bible:
"Any comparison of the religious beliefs dominant in the Imperium up to the time of Maud'Dib must start with the major forces which shaped those beliefs:

1. The followers of the Fourteen Sages, whose Book was the Orange Catholic Bible, and whose views are expressed in the Commentaries and other literature produced by the Commission of Ecumenical Translation (C.E.T.)... "

religious - fictional galaxy 13500 Herbert, Frank. Dune. Philadelphia: Chilton Book Co. (1965); pg. 498. Orange Catholic Bible:
"Then came the Butlerian Jihad--two generations of chaos. The god of machine-logic was overthrown among the masses and a new concept was raised:

'Man may not be replaced.'

These two generations of violence were a thalamic pause for all humankind. Men looked at their gods and their rituals and saw that both were filled with that most terrible of all equations: fear over ambition.

Hesitantly, the leaders of religions whose followers had spilled the blood of billions began to exchange views. It was a move encouraged by the Spacing Guild, which was beginning to build its monopoly over all interstellar travel, and by the Bene Gesserit who were banding the sorceresses.

Out of those first ecumenical meetings came two major developments:

1. The realization that all religions had at least one common commandment: 'Thou shalt not disfigure the soul.'

2. The Commission of Ecumenical Translators. "

religious - fictional galaxy 13500 Herbert, Frank. Dune. Philadelphia: Chilton Book Co. (1965); pg. 498. Orange Catholic Bible:
Pg. 498: "The Commission of Ecumenical Translators.

C.E.T. convened on a neutral island of Old Earth, spawning ground of the mother religions. " [There is a long passage describing how the C.E.T. produces a common book of scripture from older scripture -- the Orange Catholic Bible.]; Pg. 501: "Ninety generations later, the O.C. Bible and the Commentaries permeated the religious universe. "

religious - fictional galaxy 13500 Herbert, Frank. Dune. Philadelphia: Chilton Book Co. (1965); pg. 500. Orange Catholic Bible:
"The O.C. Bible... revisions leaned on accepted symbolisms (Cross, Crescent, Feather Rattle, the Twelve Saints, the thin Buddha, and the like)... "
religious - fictional galaxy 13500 Herbert, Frank. Dune. Philadelphia: Chilton Book Co. (1965); pg. xxi. Orange Catholic Bible:
[Definitions in 'Terminology of the Imperium'] "ORANGE CATHOLIC BIBLE: the 'Accumulated Book,' the religious text produced by the Commission of Ecumenical Translators. It contains elements of most ancient religions, including the Maometh Saari, Mahayana Christianity, Zensunni Catholicism and Buddislamic traditions. Its supreme commandment is considered to be: 'Thou shalt not disfigure the soul.' "
religious - fictional galaxy 13500 Herbert, Frank. Dune. Philadelphia: Chilton Book Co. (1965); pg. xxiv-xxv. Saudaukar:
[Definitions in 'Terminology of the Imperium'] "SARDAUKAR: the soldier-fanatics of the Padishah Emperor. They were men from an environmental background of such ferocity that it killed six out of thirteen persons by the age of eleven. Their military training emphasized ruthlessness and a near-suicidal disregard for personal safety. They were taught from infancy to use cruelty as a standard weapong, weakening opponents with terror. At the apex of their sway over the affairs of the Universe, their swordsmanship was said to match that of the Ginaz tenth level and their cunning abilities at in-fighting were reputed to approach those of a Bene Gesserit adept. Any one of them was rated a match for any ten ordinary Landsraad military conscripts. By the time of Shaddam IV, while they were still formidable, their strength had been sapped by overconfidence, and the sustaining mystique of their warrior religion had been deeply undermined by cynicism. "
religious - fictional galaxy 13500 Herbert, Frank. Dune. Philadelphia: Chilton Book Co. (1965); pg. 497. Spacing Guild:
"Any comparison of the religious beliefs dominant in the Imperium up to the time of Maud'Dib must start with the [5] major forces which shaped those beliefs:... 3. The agnostic ruling class (including the Guild) for whom religion was a kind of puppet show to amuse the populace and keep it docile, and who believed essentially that all phenomena--even religious phenomena--could be reduced to mechanical explanations... "
religious - fictional galaxy 13500 Herbert, Frank. Dune. Philadelphia: Chilton Book Co. (1965); pg. xvi. Spacing Guild:
[Definitions in 'Terminology of the Imperium'] "GUILD: the Spacing Guild, one leg of the political tripod maintaining the Great Convention. The Guild was the second mental-physical training school (see Bene Gesserit) after the Butlerian Jihad. The Guild monopoly on space travel and transport and upon international banking is taken as the beginning point of the Imperial Calendar. "
religious - fictional galaxy 13500 Herbert, Frank. Dune. Philadelphia: Chilton Book Co. (1965); pg. xxx. Zensunni:
[Definitions in 'Terminology of the Imperium'] "ZENSUNNI: followers of a schismatic sect that broke away from the teachings of Maometh (the so-called 'Third Muhammed') bout 1381 B.G. The Zensunni religion is noted chiefly for its emphasis on the mystical and a reversion to 'the ways of the fathers.' Most scholars name Ali Ben Ohashi as leader of the original schism but there is some evidence that Ohashi may have been merely the male spokesman for his second wife, Nisai. " [Most references to Zensunni religion are listed under 'Fremen.']
religious - fictional galaxy 13560 Herbert, Frank. Dune Messiah. New York: Ace (1987; c. 1969); pg. 3. Bene Gesserit:
"You Priests do not make common cause with the Bene Gesserit Sisterhood. They, too, survive by concealing what they do. But they cannot conceal the fact that the Lady Jessica was a Bene Gesserit-trained adept. You know she trained her son in the sisterhood's ways. My crime was to discuss this as a phenomenon, to expound upon their mental arts and their genetic program. You don't want attention called to the fact that Maud'dib was the Sisterhood's hoped for captive messiah, that he was their kwisatz haderach before he was your prophet. " [Extensive other refs., not in DB.]
religious - fictional galaxy 13560 Herbert, Frank. Dune Messiah. New York: Ace (1987; c. 1969); pg. 1. Fremen:
Pg. 1: "I was caught by the shallowness of the common view of this planet which arises from its popular name: Dune. Not Arrakis, notice, but Dune. History is obsessed by Dune as desert, as birthplace of the Fremen. Such history concentrates on the customs which grew out of water scarcity and the fact that Fremen led semi-nomadic lives in stillsuits which recovered most of their body's moisture. "; Pg. 4: "...you Fremen degenerate, you Priest with no god except yourself! You have much to answer for. It was a Fremen ritual which gave Paul his first massive dose of melange, thereby opening him to visions of his futures. It was a Fremen ritual by which that same melange awakened the unborn Alia in the Lady Jessica's womb... Ahhh, I know you Fremen. You think Maud'dib is yours because he mated with Chani, because he adopted Fremen customs. But he was an Atreides first and he was trained by a Bene Gesserit adept. " [Extensive other refs., not in DB.]
religious - fictional galaxy 13560 Herbert, Frank. Dune Messiah. New York: Ace (1987; c. 1969); pg. 181. Orange Catholic Bible:
"His mind turned to a paraphrase of the passage from the Orange Catholic Bible: What senses do we lack that we cannot see another world all around us? "
religious - fictional galaxy 13560 Herbert, Frank. Dune Messiah. New York: Ace (1987; c. 1969); pg. 91. Zensunni:
Pg. 91: "'Zensunni philosopher,' Paul mused... 'You've examined your own role and motives?' ";

Pg. 92: "'Bondage, my Lord? The cleansed mind makes decisions in the presence of unknowns and without cause and effect. Is this bondage?'

Paul scowled. It was a Zensunni saying, cryptic, apt--immersed in a creed which denied objective function in all mental activity. Without cause and effect! Such thoughts shocked the mind. Unknowns! Unknowns lay in every decision, even in the oracular vision. ";

Pg. 94: "But then, how else could a Zensunni-mentat respond? Even in a ghola, a mentat could speak no less than the truth, especially out of Zensunni inner calm. This was a human computer, mind and nervous system fitted to the tasks relegated long ago to hated mechanical devices. To condition him also as a Zensunni meant a double ration of honesty... " [More, e.g., pg. 95-96, 163-165, 280, 325-327.]

religious - fictional galaxy 13560 Herbert, Frank. Dune Messiah. New York: Ace (1987; c. 1969); pg. 295. Zensunni:
"'The Zensunni approach to birth,' he said... 'is to wait without purpose in the state of highest tension. Do not complete with what is happening. To compete is to prepare for failure. Do not be trapped by the need to achieve anything. This way, you achieve everything.' "
religious - fictional galaxy 13575 Herbert, Frank. Children of Dune. New York: Berkley (1976); pg. 12. Bene Gesserit:
"Would she sense Stilgar's doubts? She was a Bene Gesserit witch, graduate of the Sisterhood's deepest training, and a Reverend Mother in her own right. Such females were acute and they were dangerous. Would she order him to fall upon his own knife as the Umma-Protector of Liet-Kynes had been ordered? " [Extensive refs., not in DB.]
religious - fictional galaxy 13575 Herbert, Frank. Children of Dune. New York: Berkley (1976); pg. 10. Fremen:
Pg. 10: "Here lay the magnet for dreams of grandeur throughout the known universe. Here lay temporal riches, secular authority and that most powerful of all mystic talismans: the divine authenticity of Muad'Dib's religious bequest. In these twins--Leto and his sister Ghanima--an awesome power focused. While they lived, Muad'Dib, though dead, lived in them. "; Pg. 54: "'but what bout the Fremen?'

'We'll drown them in their Muad'Dib's religion!'

'Easier said than done, my dear Tyekanik.'

'I see,' he said. 'Were back to that old argument.'

'House Corrino has done worse things to gain power,' she said.

'But to embrace this . . . this Mahdi's religion!'

'My son respects you,' she said.

...'I want you to embrace this Muad'Dib religion,' she said. " [Extensive Fremen/Muad'Dib refs. throughout novel.]

religious - fictional galaxy 13575 Herbert, Frank. Children of Dune. New York: Berkley (1976); pg. 11. Fremen:
"The ayat and burhan of Life held few mysteries for him. Once he'd been proud to think of himself as Fremen, to think of the desert as a friend, to name his planet Dune in his thoughts and not Arrakis, as if it was marked on all the Imperial star charts.

How simple things were when our Messiah was only a dream, he thought. By finding our Mahdi we loosed upon the universe countless messianic dreams. Every people subjugated by the jihad now have dreams of a leader to come... I am a Naib of the Fremen... " [Extensive religious refs. and Fremen refs. throughout novel.]

religious - fictional galaxy 13575 Herbert, Frank. Children of Dune. New York: Berkley (1976); pg. 22. Fremen:
"The sietch at the desert's rim
Was Liet's, was Kynes's,
Was Stilgar's, was Maud'Dib's
And, once more, was Stilgar's.
The Naibs one by one sleep in the sand,
But the sietch endures.

--from a Fremen song "

religious - fictional galaxy 13575 Herbert, Frank. Children of Dune. New York: Berkley (1976); pg. 29. Fremen:
"The Fremen must return to his original faith, to his genius in forming human communities; he must return to the past, where that lesson of survival was learned in the struggle with Arrakis. The only business of the Fremen should be that of opening his soul to the inner teachings. The worlds of the Imperium, the Landsraad and the CHOAM Confederacy have no message to give him. They will only rob him of his soul.

--The Preacher at Arrakeen "

religious - fictional galaxy 13575 Herbert, Frank. Children of Dune. New York: Berkley (1976); pg. 96. Fremen:
"'Then speak from this religion,' Farad'n said.

'As My Prince commands. He turned, looked at this youthful holder of all the dreams which now were distilled into the path which Corrino would follow. 'Church and state, My Prince, even scientific reason and faith, and even more: progress and tradition--all of these are reconciled in the teachings of Muad'Dib. He taught that there are no intransigent opposites except in the beliefs of men and, sometimes, in their dreams. One discovers the future in the past, and both are part of a whole.' "

religious - fictional galaxy 13575 Herbert, Frank. Children of Dune. New York: Berkley (1976); pg. 47. Orange Catholic Bible:
Pg. 47: "And I beheld another beast coming up out of the sand; and he had two horns like a lamb, but his mouth was fanged and fiery as the dragon and his body shimmered and burned with great heat while it did hiss like the serpent.

--Revised Orange Catholic Bible ";

Pg. 67: "...had been overheard to mutter the fateful lines from the Orange Catholic Bible: 'Maleficos non patieris vivere.' " [Other refs. to this, not in DB.]

religious - fictional galaxy 13575 Herbert, Frank. Children of Dune. New York: Berkley (1976); pg. 113. Zensunni:
"'But . . . I'm looking directly at you. Of course I see you!' She glared at him. His words reflected knowledge of the Zensunni Codex as she'd been taught it in the Bene Gesserit schools: play of words to confuse one's understanding of philosophy. " [Few other refs., e.g., pg. 377, 422.]
religious - fictional galaxy 15200 Herbert, Frank. The Heretics of Dune. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1984) Bene Gesserit:
[Book jacket] "It is several millennia after the fall of the God Emperor Leto II, ruler of the Imperium for 3500 years, whose destiny was to guide mankind onto his prescient 'Golden Path.' In the wake of his death has come the horror of the Scattering and the Famine Times, but there still remains the Bene Gesserit, the Spacing Guild and CHOAM. Now bands of people are returning from the Scattering with visions of conquest; the strange, secretive Bene Tleilax decide the time has come for their ascendancy; and the wise women of the Bene Gesserit have resurrected yet another Duncan Idaho ghola to ensure the proper coarse for man. A power play of some immeasurable consequence is in motion... " [Many refs. throughout novel, not in DB.]
religious - fictional galaxy 15200 Herbert, Frank. The Heretics of Dune. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1984); pg. 11. Bene Gesserit:
"Strange how the word 'heresy' came to mind when thinking of Schwangyu, Lucilla thought. Could there be heresy among the Reverend Mothers? The religious overtones of the word seemed out of place in a Bene Gesserit context. How could there be heretical movements among people who held a profoundly manipulative attitude toward all things religious?

...Heresy. Dissidence was not the proper word. This was something that could shatter the Gene Gesserit. Revolt against Taraza, against the Reverend Mother Superior? Unthinkable! Mother Superiors were cast in the mold of monarch. Once Taraza had accepted counsel and advice and then made her decision, the Sisters were committed to obedience. "

religious - fictional galaxy 15200 Herbert, Frank. The Heretics of Dune. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1984); pg. 36. "Church of Shai-hulud, the Divided God":
"With renewed interest, he returned to his studies of that mysterious planet, and its miserable Church of Shai-hulud, the Divided God. Worms. The God Emperor had become those worms! The idea filled Duncan with awe. Perhaps here was something worthy of worship. The thought touched a chord in him. What had driven a man to accept that terrible metamorphosis?

...In every spare study moment, Duncan pored over whatever the library produced for him: the Holy Book of the Divided God, the Guard Bible... "

religious - fictional galaxy 15200 Herbert, Frank. The Heretics of Dune. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1984); pg. 64. Fremen:
"Fremen stood tall atop Shaitan's back supported by slender poles with hooked ends. The priests decreed that this had been done before Leto II shared His consciousness with the God of the desert. " [Many other refs., not in DB.]
religious - fictional galaxy 15200 Herbert, Frank. The Heretics of Dune. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1984); pg. 36. Orange Catholic Bible:
"In every spare study moment, Duncan pored over whatever the library produced for him: the Holy Book of the Divided God, the Guard Bible, the Orange Catholic Bible and even the Apocrypha. He learned about the long defunct Bureau of the Faith and 'The Pearl that IS the Sun of Understanding.' "
religious - fictional galaxy 15200 Herbert, Frank. The Heretics of Dune. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1984); pg. 59. Zensunni:
"Knowing that his councillors also recalled this catechism of the Great Belief, Waff reminded them of the Zensunni admonition.

'Behind such assumptions lies a faith in words that the powindah do no question. Only the Shariat question and we do so silently.'

His councillors nodded in unison.

Waff inclined his head slightly and continued: 'The act of saying that things exist that cannot be described in words shakes a universe where words are the supreme belief.'

'Powindah poison!' his councillors shouted.

He had them all now and Waff hammered home his victory by demanding: 'What is the Sufi-Zensunni Credo?'

They could not speak it but all reflected on it: To achieve s'tori no understanding is needed. S'tori exists without words, without even a name. " [Many other refs., not in DB, e.g. pg. 185, 297, 320.]

religious - fictional galaxy 15200 Herbert, Frank. The Heretics of Dune. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1984); pg. 58. Zensunni:
"He could see that all of them were reflecting on their Sufi origins, recalling the Great Belief and the Zensunni ecumenism that had spawned the Bene Tleilax. The people of this kehl knew the God-given facts of their origins but generations of secrecy assured that no powindah shared their knowledge. "
religious - fictional galaxy 15200 Herbert, Frank. The Heretics of Dune. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1984); pg. 155. Zensunni:
"'You are not amused,' she said. 'But cling to your doubts anyway. Doubt is necessary to a philosopher.'

'So the Zensunni assure us.'

'All mystics agree on it, Miles. Never underestimate the power of doubts. Very persuasive. S'tori holds up doubts and surety in a single hand.'

Really quite surprised, he asked: 'Do Reverend Mothers practice Zensunni rituals?' He had never even suspected this before.

'Just once,' she said. 'We achieve an exalted form of s'tori, total. It involves every cell.'

'The spice agony,' he said.

'I was sure your mother told you. Obviously, she never explained the affinity with the Zensunni.' "

religious - fictional galaxy 23008 Asimov, Isaac. Forward the Foundation. New York: Doubleday (1993); pg. 151. Joranumite:
"'I don't know, but it doesn't seem right that just a few people should have all the say over all the worlds.'

'Are you willing to fight for your beliefs? Or do you just like to talk about them?'

'No one asked me to do anything,' said Raych.

'Suppose someone did. How important do you think your beliefs democracy--or Joranumite philosophy--are?'

'I'd fight for them--if I thought it would do any good.' "

religious - fictional galaxy 23008 Asimov, Isaac. Forward the Foundation. New York: Doubleday (1993); pg. 163. Joranumite:
"'...The Joranumite movement is predominantly lower-class--a proletarian movement, so to speak. And Andorin is an aristocrat of aristocrats. What would he be doing with the Joranumites?'

'If he's one of the Wyan Mayorality family, he might aspire to the Imperial throne, might he not?'

'They've been aspiring for generations. You remember Rashelle, I trust. She was Andorin's aunt.'

'Then he might be using the Joranumites as a stepping-stone, don't you think?'

'If they exist. And if they do--and if a stepping-stone is what Andorin wants--I think he'd find himself playing a dangerous game. The Joranumites--if they exist--would have their own plans and a man like Andorin...' "



religious - fictional, continued

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