Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

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religious - fictional, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
religious - fictional galaxy 3099 Simmons, Dan. Endymion. New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 233. Zen Gnosticism:
"'I've always liked the outdoors,' I said truthfully. 'Camping. Being away from things. something about nature makes me feel . . . I don't know . . . connected to something larger.' I stopped before I began sounding like an Orthodox Zen Gnostic. "
religious - fictional galaxy 3099 Simmons, Dan. Endymion. New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 52-53. Zen Gnosticism:
"'Most people I knew were Zen Christians... More Zen than Christian, of course, but not too much of either, actually. Personal pilgrimages were fun. Places of power, finding one's Baedecker point, all of that crap...' "
religious - fictional galaxy 3131 Simmons, Dan. The Rise of Endymion. New York: Bantam (1998 mass market edition; first ed. 1997); pg. 84. Church of the Shrike:
"Behind him, the curling vapors of fog first obscured and then revealed the pale bodies on slabs. 'The Shrike,' he said...

Briareus said, 'The Shrike is no longer under the control of the UI?'

Albedo opened his hands a final time. 'The gods of the future no longer whisper to us, my expensive friend. They war among themselves and the clamor of their battle echoes back through time. If our god's work is to be done in our time, we must do it ourselves.' He looked at the four clone-siblings. 'Are we clear on instructions?'

'Find the girl,' said Scylla.

'And?' said the Coucillor.

'Kill her at once,' said Gyges. 'No hesitation.'

'And if her disciples intervene?'

said Albedo...

'Kill them,' said Briareus.

'And if the Shrike appears?' he said, the smile suddenly fading.

'Destroy it,' said Nemes. " [Other refs., not in DB. See also pg. 100, 108-110, 118, 147-148, 151-152, etc.]

religious - fictional galaxy 3131 Simmons, Dan. The Rise of Endymion. New York: Bantam (1998 mass market edition; first ed. 1997); pg. 408. Church of the Shrike:
Pg. 408: "'...On the day that they gunned down my father on the steps of the Shrike Temple in the Lusian Concourse Mall...' "; Pg. 535: "'As most of us gathered here know, what the Shrike Church once called the Days of Atonement--with us now for almost three centuries--are almost done...' "
religious - fictional galaxy 3131 Simmons, Dan. The Rise of Endymion. New York: Bantam (1998 mass market edition; first ed. 1997); pg. 659. Church of the Shrike:
"It had been prophesied by the Templars, the Ousters, the Shrike Cult Church of the Final Atonement and others that Aenea's mother, Brawne Lamia would bear a child--the One Who Teaches--Aenea, as it turned out. According to the old poet's Cantos, on the day that the second John Keats cybrid had died a physical death and Brawne Lamia had fought her way to the Shrike Temple for refuge, the Shrike cultists had chanted--'Blessed be the Mother of Our Salvation--Blessed by the Instrument of Our Atonement'--the salvation being Aenea herself. "
religious - fictional galaxy 3200 Devenport, Emily. GodHeads. New York: Penguin/Roc (1998); pg. 278. GodHeads:
"...I typed. CAN YOU GIUDE US TO THE MONASTERY?

...Neither of us had much of an idea of what to expect. I had sort of thought they might be like Catholic monks, living in giant stone fortresses, but spending most of their time communing with the Net instead of praying to God. But they had to eat and sleep, had to exercise... I had seen pictures of them the way they had used to be, before Ankere brought the Earlies back to help them get the NET established. They had been filthy, wild-haired, and their eyes had burned with lunacy that was really a weird sort of accelerated sanity. They had existed with a different perception of time from the rest of the universe, not the linear one most of us think as normal; and they hadn't been able to find a way to let anyone else know what they knew or see what they saw. That was why people had called them GodHeads, because they had been perceived as drug addicts, wretches who gave up their lives to eat GodWeed. "

religious - fictional galaxy 3200 Devenport, Emily. GodHeads. New York: Penguin/Roc (1998); pg. 279. GodHeads:
" They [the GodHeads] had raved like religious fanatics, no one had understood them. They had forgotten to bathe, eat, sleep. That's why they had infected Ankere. Not because they wanted her to be one of them, but because they had seen what she was going to do someday. They had seen who she was going to find. They knew she was going to find someone who could help them: The Earlies, those people who had left glyphs hinting of a vastly superior technology all over the ruins of their abandoned cities. Everyone else had thought the Earlies were dead; but the GodHeads knew that the Earlies had just moved to a new neighborhood.

The GodHeads knew that the Earlies loved to communicate, lived to communicate, and that if anyone could help them sort out their Net, the Earlies could.

And the Earlies had helped them. But I wasn't sure how. I don't know what technology had been used to turn the GodHeads into the imposing group they had become... " [Refs. throughout novel.]

religious - fictional galaxy 3300 Brin, David. Heaven's Reach. New York: Bantam (1998); pg. 182. Cult of Ifni:
"The continued upswell of socioreligious fanaticism--including sudden resurgence of interest in the Cult of Ifni--has had a deleterious effect on the business of bookies and oddsmakers all across the Five Galaxies. because of added expenses (defending our own settlements from attack by fleets of zealous predeterminists) we have been forced to increase the house cut on all wagers.

Even the Sa'ent Betting Syndicate cannot continue business as usual in the face of a prophesied Time of Changes. . . . "

religious - fictional galaxy 3300 Brin, David. Heaven's Reach. New York: Bantam (1998); pg. 93. "'Uh, noble lineage?' Harry repeated. No one had ever accused him of that before.

'Of course. You are from Earth! Blessed home of Moses, Jesus, Buddha, Muhammed, Tipler, and Weimberg-Chang! The abode where wolflings burst to sapience in a clear case of virgin birth, without intervention by any other race of Galactic sinners, but as an immaculate gift from the Cosmos itself!'

Harry stepped back, staring in blank amazement. But the Skiano followed.

'The world whence comes a notion that will change the universe forever. A concept that you, dear brother, must come help us share!'

The huge evangelist leaned toward Harry, projecting intense fervor through both sound and an ardent light in his eyes.

'The idea of a God who loves each person! Who finds importance not in your race or clan, or any grand abstraction, but every particular entity who is self-aware and capable of improvement.

'The Creator of All...' " [More, pg. 93-94.]

religious - fictional galaxy 3300 Brin, David. Heaven's Reach. New York: Bantam (1998); pg. 229. "The chosen! Those who emblems marked them for great honor and enlightenment, far down amid the Embrace of Tides.

Thus we learned the wondrous glory of our new honored state . . . and the pain yet to be endured.

What no one could explain, from our senior priest-stack on down to the lowest warrior, was why? "

religious - fictional galaxy 3308 Thornley, Diann. Echoes of Issel. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 262. Topawans:
His father's features were solemn... His father's hand came back to his shoulder. "Come here, son, " he said, and guided Tristan toward the bench that ran the length of the bulkhead. He opened his microreader again as they seated themselves, and said, "I came across a passage in my reading a little while ago that I think might help you. " He scrolled the display up once, twice, then said, "Here it is, " and began to read:

" 'When you go up to battle in my name and for my cause I will go with you; I will go before you and behind you. I will be beside you in the dark valleys and on the high mountains and over the great waters. I will be to you as your sword and your shield, for I will protect and defend you. I will make the weak and humble to be strong and courageous, to do mighty works, for I am mightier than all they who will come against you, and will triumph in me.' "

"What is that? " Tristan asked...

"It's called The Law of the Prophets. "

religious - fictional galaxy 3308 Thornley, Diann. Echoes of Issel. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 263. Topawans:
"Tristan scrolled through the text for a few moments, pausing once or twice to read something that caught his eye, until his father said, 'There's one more thing I'd like to give you, Tris.'

He looked up then. 'What's that, sir?'

'My blessing.'

The concept was no stranger to him than the passage of scripture had been, though he'd never experienced it before. 'I'd like that,' he said.

'Listen carefully then,' the admiral said, 'so you can remember.' And he stood, and placed his right hand on Tristan's head, and bowed his own. "

religious - fictional galaxy 3308 Thornley, Diann. Echoes of Issel. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 263. Topawans:
"...he stood, and placed his right hand on Tristan's head, and bowed his own.

'Tristan Lujanic Serege,' he said, 'in the name of our God and with the authority passed on to me in this same manner by those who came before me, I assure you that you are prepared to accept the mission to which you have been called.'

His voice was quiet, as it was when he gave thanks before meals, but it bore an authority that Tristan would only have expected to hear on the bridge of a ship during battle. It sent a shiver through him, like a pulse of pure energy rippling from his head to his foot.

'You've been taught well,' his father said, 'not only by your instructor on Kaleo but also by your mother and the companions you had during your childhood on Ganwold. Remember and draw on their lessons, too, and I promise you that you wil be able to accomplish whatever you may be calle dupon to do, capable in body, mind, and soul...' "

religious - fictional galaxy 3308 Thornley, Diann. Echoes of Issel. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 263. Topawans:
[The admiral continues giving a father's blessing to his son, Tristan:] "'I promise you wisdom to know what actions to take and when to take them, even to guidance at the very moment you need it. Use this only for good, to help your team and those you've being sent to rescue. I promise you that the anxieties which you feel will not overwhelm you or prevent you from carrying out your duties. I promise you that you will not be alone. I, as your father, will be with you in mind and soul; and the One who created the universe, whose literal child you are also, will be with you, to be your defense in times of danger and your peace in times of fear. He above all can be trusted and I promise you this in His name.'

Admiral Serege's voice fell silent; his hand lifted from Tristan's head. Tristan raised his eyes to his father's face.

Serege smiled, extended a hand to draw him to his feet, and wrapped both arms around him in a tight paternal hug. "

religious - fictional galaxy 3308 Thornley, Diann. Echoes of Issel. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 262-263. Topawans:
"'It's called The Law of the Prophets.' His father closed the 'reader carefully. 'It's the instructions and promises given by God.'

Tristan studied him for a moment, remembering a classmate at Aeire City who had said that all Topawans were religious fanatics. His classmate had made that seem bad, even something to be feared, but Tristan had never found anything fearful in his parents' religion.

'I've heard that before,' he said at last. 'Mum had a 'reader like that on Ganwold for a while, until there was a flood that washed away a lot of our belongings. She used to read to me when I was small. . . May I look at it?'

'I'd like you to keep it,' his father said. And he removed the cord from about his own neck and put it over Tristan's head. 'Read from it every day,' he said. 'It's as important to strengthen your soul with truth as it is to strengthen your body with exercise.' "

religious - fictional galaxy 3417 Panshin, Alexei. Star Well. New York: Ace Books (1978; c. 1968); pg. 67. Gosh:
"In 1460 [3417 A.D.], the year previous, a group of disgruntled womanless miners, tired of their own company, had stopped a load of Holy Prostitutes on their way to the Temples of Gosh on Braunfels. After subsequent negotiation, the situation was regularized by the establishment of a local Temple of Gosh--and, in fact, this was the beginning of the rapid expansion of that formerly limited religion as the Priests of Gosh realized their strength of appeal--but the original action was clearly piracy. "
religious - fictional galaxy 3418 Panshin, Alexei. Star Well. New York: Ace Books (1978; c. 1968); pg. 21. Revived Church of Mithra:
"The other [theologian] was a fraudulent old fart named Augustus Srb. Short, fat, intelligent, even magnificent, he wore his mantle as a priest of the Revived Church of Mithra with a verve, a flair, that was not matched by his defense of churchly doctrine.

Mithra was worshiped six centuries before the founding of Rome... Perhaps the one best point of the religion is this: the violet is sacred to Mithra, and consequently the cultivation of flowerbeds is encouraged. " [Other refs. to this church found under 'Mithraism.]

religious - fictional galaxy 3418 Panshin, Alexei. Star Well. New York: Ace Books (1978; c. 1968); pg. 22. Trog:
"...Torve's earnestly presented case for some primitive brand of mumbo jumbo:

'See you, then, the wholeness so far?'

'Wholeness? Oh, yes, yes. I am attending you with interest. Continue, if you will.'

'Wholeness is everything that exists. Outside is nothingness. But nothingness is ripe, ready to nourishmentalize fruit, and existence is reborn. See you?' Torve asked earnestly.

'Oh, yes.' Srb nodded.

'Wholeness is born and grows, moves through nothingness and feeding on nothingness.'

'Yes.'

'Eventualistically, nothingness can no longer feed wholeness. Movement slows, then stops. Is like great heaviness in stomach after large meal. When movement stops, all collapses. In eye blink, wholeness shrinks to size of seed and all is stasis. Only in great by-and-by is nothingness ready to nourishmentalize again. Has happened seventeen times since wholeness invented itself. Do you see?' "

religious - fictional galaxy 3418 Panshin, Alexei. Star Well. New York: Ace Books (1978; c. 1968); pg. 101. Trog:
"He was a vegetarian, eating no meal whatsoever except for jellied whiteworms, a delicacy with little general appeal, but one he relished. Trogs in general were not vegetarians. Quite the opposite, in fact--they ordinarily relished their meat. Torve was a vegetarian by philosophy, however, for reasons obscure. " [Many other refs. to Torve the Trog and some refs. to Trog culture, throughout novel, other refs. not in DB.]
religious - fictional galaxy 3500 Chalker, Jack L. The Demons at Rainbow Bridge. New York: Baen (1998; c. 1989); pg. 168. Mycohl:
"The Mycohl, on the other hand, worshiped the forces of evil and darkness and served them, for they were a constant, and although it was difficult to see what that had profited them and certainly it wasn't any sort of life he'd ever want for himself, at least it was consistent. People there followed the dark way because they were born into and raised in it. Those of the Mizlaplan had no doubts or questions, no chaos and no rituals to dark gods who ignored them and did little or nothing in return except give them a lifetime of fear. Quite probably most of them, deep down, had no more commitment or true beliefs in their deities than did the Exchange, but at least there was no confusion.

Here, though, within the Mizlaplan, no logical person could doubt the truth of his own beliefs and system. Not when true angels lived amongst the faithful and dispensed justice and mercy and were accessible to high and low alike on a day-to-day basis through the saints. " [Much more.]

religious - fictional galaxy 3500 Chalker, Jack L. The Demons at Rainbow Bridge. New York: Baen (1998; c. 1989); pg. 168. Pg. 60: "'You're telling me!' Hama exclaimed. 'They're falling all around me! I--by the Three Gods of Sumura! The water! The--ackh!' ";

Pg. 168: "'...They spend most of their times in the spiritual world or among the goodfolk, like yourself. I'm a jarring, ever-present reminder to them of what people might become if they don't do their job right.'... They came around a bend and suddenly the Holy Retreat was spread out below them in a shallow, wide valley. The captain had never seen a Holy Retreat before, and he was impressed by the manicured lawns, wooded areas, and impressive facilities. It appeared they would come in by a large athletic field and track that looked as good as any he'd seen... The place was laid out with a large but rustic-looking temple in the center, with dorms and support buildings constructed of wood in a similar style. Had it not been a religious place, he wouldn't have minded spending a week or so there. " [Many other refs., not in DB.]

religious - fictional galaxy 3500 Chalker, Jack L. The Demons at Rainbow Bridge. New York: Baen (1998; c. 1989); pg. 168. Pg. 168-169: "'Is there an angel in residence?' he asked the cabbie.

'Oh, yes, sir,' came the response with obvious pride. 'I, myself, pray to the Venerated One who is here, dwelling within the main altar of that very temple there.'

The captain looked, a bit awed himself at that news, even though there was nothing more to see. He was a cynical, worldly man, a professional sinner and he knew it, but he was nonetheless a true believer. All save the saints lived in sin and would die in sin, and there was no way out of that except the mercy and forgiveness of the gods through their chosen vessels of perfection, the angelic Lords of the Mizlaplan.

For him, any more progress towards salvation would have to wait until the next life at least, since the very thing that was extremely unusual about him and made him the choice of the Arm of Faith, for its work prevented him from ever attaining sainthood in this life. Perhaps that was why he had turned out the way he did. "

religious - fictional galaxy 3500 Chalker, Jack L. The Demons at Rainbow Bridge. New York: Baen (1998; c. 1989); pg. 168. "Everybody had at least a crack at instant cleansing and perfection; everybody except the very few who were like him. In older times the people had declared those like him accursed, agents of evil, and had killed them, but the later interdiction by the Venerated Ones had saved him and others from that fate, although he'd had to work triple all his life to prove his devotion and faith.

There really was no choice for a logical man. Those races and people of the Exchange paid lip service to a million different gods and deities, almost all clearly invented by cultures in their own images to fit their own needs. Many, if not most, of the people had no real religious beliefs at all. "

religious - fictional galaxy 3500 Dietz, William C. Where the Ships Die. New York: Berkley (1996); pg. 11. Traa:
"The moons glowed yellow-white, and La-Ma touched forehead, chest, and abdomen, an action that symbolized the unity between mind, heart, and body.

The priestess allowed her eyes to drift down along barely seen ridges, vertical cliffs... to the high ground where ancient walls protected the Temple of Tranquility and the 3,333 altars within. It had been a fortress once, a place of comparative safety into which the priesthood could retreat, defending both themselves and the triune concepts of peace, harmony, and love. But that was hundreds of years ago, before the great reconciliation, and the unification of the Traa race. "

religious - fictional galaxy 3500 Dietz, William C. Where the Ships Die. New York: Berkley (1996); pg. 12. Traa:
"The processional was an important symbol, made all the more so by the fact that each of the more than 2,500,000 individuals below were part of a three-person triad that included a priest, a warrior, and a commercial being. La-Ma was looking at roughly one-third of the Traa race, in her opinion the most important part, since the Philosopher Sept had responsibility for science, education, healing [and] spiritual & moral health of the Traa people. This fact both amazed and frightened her due to the responsibility involved.

Unlike the amazingly fecund humans... the Traa had an extremely low birth rate. Two or three offspring per triad were typical, though there were enough large families to keep the population stable. This was a situation that theoretically made the race vulnerable to attack and caused the warrior & commercial septs no end of worry. Which explained why they advocated commercial domination, or failing that, all-out war.... " [Many other refs., not in DB.]

religious - fictional galaxy 3500 Harrison, Harry. "The Repairman " in Stainless Steel Visions. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 96. Centaurian:
"In addition to the pyramid being around the beacon, there was a nice little religious war going on around the pyramid.

It all began with the land bridge. apparently the local lizards had been living in the distant swamps when the beacon had been built, but the builders hadn't thought much of them... A little geological turnover, a swampy land bridge formed in the right spot, and the lizards began to wander up Beacon Valley. And found religion. A shiny metal temple out of which poured a constant stream of magic water--the reactor-cooling water pumped down from the atmosphere condenser on the roof... A city was built around the temple and, through the centuries, the pyramid was put up around the beacon. A special branch of the priesthood served the temple. All went well until one of the priests violated the temple and destroyed the Holy Waters. " [Much more, pg. 96-104.]

religious - fictional galaxy 3500 Vinge, Joan D. The Snow Queen. New York: Dial Press (1980); pg. 181. Tiamat religion:
[Year guessed at.] "'I can't be a sibyl here.' She pressed a hand against the trefoil tatoo at her throat. 'I left my own world when I should have stayed. I failed my duty, I failed Sparks, I failed. . . . The Lady doesn't hear my prayers. I'm lost, that's why I've lost Her voice... It's wrong; I don't belong here. I won't be happy hear. I'm needed on Tiamat--' " [Apparently this character has gone to the planet Kharemough.]
religious - fictional galaxy 4000 Banks, Iain M. Excession. New York: Bantam (1997; c. 1996); pg. 15. Elench:
[Year estimated.] "The Elench had spent many thousands of years pitting themselves against every kind of technology and every type of civilizational artifact the vast spaces of the greater galaxy could provide, seeking always to understand rather than to overpower, to be changed rather than to enforce change upon others, to incorporate and to share rather than to infect and impose, and in that cause, and with that relatively unmenacing modus operandi, had become perhaps more adept than any--with the possible exception of the mainstream Culture's semimilitary emissaries known as the Contact Section--at resisting outright attack without seeming to threaten it; but for all that the galaxy had been penetrated by so many different explorers in all obvious primary directions to every periphery however distant, enormous volumes of that encompassing arena remained effectively unexplored by the current crop of in-play civilizations, including the Elench... "
religious - fictional galaxy 4000 Banks, Iain M. Excession. New York: Bantam (1997; c. 1996); pg. 73. [Year unknown.] "Sikleyr-Najasa Croepise Ince Stahal da Mapin, Stored thirty-one years ago at the age of three hundred and eighty-six. Revival criterion: on the acclamation of the next Line Messiah-elect on the planet Ischeis. She had been a scholar of that planet's major religion and had wanted to be present at the Elevation of its next Savior, an even which had not been anticipated for another two hundred years or so. "
religious - fictional galaxy 4000 Drew, Wayland. The Memoirs of Alcheringia in The Erthring Cycle (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (c. 1984); pg. 89. [Advanced people use the Tabuly to keep a population on a distant planet in a hunter-gatherer level of civilization, as part of a long-term experiment called the Gaian Expedient. Many other refs., not in DB.] "'They know it as the Tabuly, and of course there are many stories concerning it in their mythology. Certainly it is one of the simplest codices among the tribes.'

All regard the screen, even the assistants, who know to a word what they will see:

1. YOU SHALL NOT LOOK UPON THE GODS.

2. YOU SHALL MOVE ANY PLANT, OR BUR THE SEED OF ANY PLANT.

3. YOU SHALL NOT FEED ANY ANIMAL, OR USE ANY FOR BURDEN, OR KEEP ANY ENCAGED.

4. YOU SHALL NOT FEED UPON THE UNIMORPHS.

5. YOU SHALL NOT GO NEAR THE ISLAND OF THE GODS, OR THE FORBIDDEN REGIONS--THE NORTHERN WAYST, THE MIDDLE WAYST, AND THE LANDS BEYOND.

6. YOU SHALL NOT LIVE IN ANY LODGE, IN ANY PLACE, MORE THAN SIX MONTHS. "

religious - fictional galaxy 4000 Gilman, Carolyn Ives. Halfway Human. New York: Avon Books (1998) Gammadian:
[Book jacket] "Tedla is young, beautiful, and blond--but it is neither he nor she. And Tedla has a remarkable story to tell of witchcraft, lust, and rebellion on a far-of world which has taken its own evolutionary path. There, an asexual class of 'blands' exists to serve their fellow humans, protected and isolated from contact with the rest of the universe. There is no record of any bland ever leaving its sheltered homeworld. Until now. For Tedla has been found in an abandoned alley light-years away from the planet of its birth. And it has just tried to commit suicide.

Val is an expert in alien cultures who has never seen a bland before. Helping it recuperate will be satisfying to her, both professionally and personally. But Val has no idea what shocking truths are hidden inside this sexless, tormented creature. As Val peels away the emotional barriers Tedla has erected, she hears the tale of an innocent caught up in unspeakable crimes and unthinkable actions. "

religious - fictional galaxy 4000 Gilman, Carolyn Ives. Halfway Human. New York: Avon Books (1998); pg. 28. Gammadian:
"'...Your children aren't human?'

'No,' Tedla said. 'We are biologically different from you. Our children are not miniature adults, as yours are. They are born sexually undifferentiated. our bodies don't change until puberty, when sexual characteristics appear. Until then, there is no way of knowing whether a child will become male or female--or whether it will be one of the minority who never mature, and remain in a childlike, asexual state forever.'

'So children are neuters?' Val asked.

Tedla seemed shocked. 'No, certainly not. They are proto-humans. They may look like neuters, but they have the potential for humanity.' " [Refs. to Tedla and her culture kind ('blands') throughout novel. This is the focus of the novel.]

religious - fictional galaxy 4000 Gilman, Carolyn Ives. Halfway Human. New York: Avon Books (1998); pg. 109. Gammadian:
"The morning was taken up by tests of psychostability, social adaptation, and moral development. At every step, the tests were interwoven with instruction on the duties and privileges of humanity... Our groups grew smaller and smaller, till at the end of the day I was ushered alone into a room with a robed invigilator who told me to sit down and tell her anything about my childhood I wanted to leave behind me... For each confession she gave me a flower, and told me to drop it in the chapel pool, and the memory of my guilt with it.

When I entered the chapel I found it was night outside, and the dome above was dark; but all the pathways were lit by candles. It was a huge chapel, with a whole landscape of trails and streams and pools in it, so that we could wander quite privately, praying and thinking of our futures. I dropped my flowers into a mossy stream just above a waterfall, and watched them drift... down the channel till they reached the... central pool. "

religious - fictional galaxy 4000 Gilman, Carolyn Ives. Halfway Human. New York: Avon Books (1998); pg. 8. Worwha:
"Outside a fetish shop, a Worwha Shana gbinja stood, wrapped in the gray tubular garment he had donned at puberty and would not remove until he died. It was ragged and stained round the hem and sleeves, but the tough fiber looked like it would outlast the man. He glared at Val with loathing from under a mass of unshorn hair, doubtless wishing her to Worwha hell. There was a story in the xenology department at UIC about a researcher who had lived with the Worwha Shana for four years, and when he left, his Worwha family still called him 'heathen garbage.' "
religious - fictional galaxy 4000 Harrison, Harry. Bill, the Galactic Hero. New York: Avon (1975; c. 1965); pg. 12. Chinger:
"...poster labeled KNOW THE ENEMY. It featured a life-sized illustration of a Chinger, a seven-foot-high saurian that looked very much like a scale-covered, four-armed, green kangaroo with an alligator's head. 'Whose sister would want to marry a thing like that anyway?...'

...'Well you see, gee--it doesn't mean a real sister. It's just part of psychological warfare. We have to win the war. To win the war we have to fight hard... The Chingers are the only non-human race that has been discovered in the galaxy that has gone beyond the aboriginal level, so naturally we have to wipe them out... the human race, that's just the way we do things. If we don't wipe them out they'll wipe us out. Of course they say that war is against their religion and they will only fight in defense, and they have never made any attacks yet. But we can't believe them, even though it is true. They might change their religion or their minds one day, and then where would we be?...' " [More]

religious - fictional galaxy 4025 Bradley, Marion Zimmer. Traitor's Sun. New York: DAW Books (1999); pg. 64. "'I've never heard of that planet [Benda V].'

'I'm not surprised, since it is a pretty out-of-the-way place. Here is what happened, as well I can recall. The Orthodox high priest announced he had a vision from God, that the only way to save the planet form utter destruction was to wage a holy war against all members of the church of Elan, which were the rivals of the Orthodoxy, and had become very powerful on Benda. They were accused of everything from poisoning the grains to murdering Orthodox babies and drinking their blood. And since the media was controlled by the Orthodox, this resulted in a planet-wide bloodbath. About sixty million people were slaughtered in a three-month period--men, women, children.' " [A little more about these groups, pg. 65.]

religious - fictional galaxy 4100 Weber, David. Echoes of Honor. Riverdale, NY: Baen (1998); pg. 68. Church of Humanity Unchained:
Pg. 68: "'Thank you for agreeing to see me on such short notice, Reverend.'

'Believe me, Lady Harrington. It is my pleasure to see you any time, and both I and my office are fully aware of the importance of the work upon which you are engaged. When those factors combine--'

The bald, hook-nosed Reverend and First Elder of the Church of Humanity Unchained tucked Allison's small hand neatly and possessively into his elbow, smiled, and escorted her across the office. They were on the third floor of Harrington Cathedral which, like every cathedral on the face of Grayson, contained a large, comfortable office suite permanently reserved for the Reverend's use on his visits to the steading. "; Pg. 69: "And even if he hadn't been stiff and ill at ease with her, she still would have expected the spiritual head of the Church of Humanity to be more . . . ascetic? Was that the word? No, not quite, but something like it. "

religious - fictional galaxy 4100 Weber, David. Echoes of Honor. Riverdale, NY: Baen (1998); pg. 72. Church of Humanity Unchained:
Pg. 72: "He shook his head at her. 'I suppose it's possible, even probable, that Father church's servants have suppressed . . . unpleasant information from time to time in our history, but if so, they did it without Father Church's approval. Or the Tester's.' Her eyebrows rose against her will, and he chuckled again. 'My Lady, we believe God calls us to the Test of Life, which requires us to test both ourselves and our beliefs and our assumptions as we grow and nature in His love. How could we do that, and what validity would our Tests have, if Father Church itself distorted the data which forms the basis upon which we are to make them?' "; Pg. 73: "'...Yet not even the priests of Father Church, or perhaps especially not the priests of Father Church, may dictate to the conscience of our flock. Nor may we properly decide that this or that bit of knowledge...' " [A few other refs. to this fictional 'Humanity Unchained' church, e.g. pg. 74-75, but not extensive.]
religious - fictional galaxy 4500 Herbert, Brian & Kevin J. Anderson. Dune: House Atreides. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 1. Bene Gesserit:
Pg. 1: "Melange is the financial crux of CHOAM activities. Without this spice, Bene Gesserit Reverend Mothers could not perform feats of observation and human control, Guild Navigators could not see safe pathways across space, and billions of Imperial citizens would die of addictive withdrawal. ";

Pg. 30: "Spacing Guild: one leg of the political tripod maintaining the Great Convention. The Guild was the second mental-physical training school (see Bene Gesserit) after the Butlerian Jihad. ";

Pg. 49: "One observes the survivors, and learns from them.
--Bene Gesserit Teaching "

[Other refs. to Bene Gesserit, not in DB.]

religious - fictional galaxy 4500 Herbert, Brian & Kevin J. Anderson. Dune: House Atreides. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 76. Bene Gesserit:
"Kwisatz Haderach: 'Shortening of the Way.' This is the label applied by the Bene Gesserit to the unknown for which they sought a genetic solution: a male Bene Gesserit whose organic mental powers would bridge space and time.

--Terminology of the Imperium "

religious - fictional galaxy 4500 Herbert, Brian & Kevin J. Anderson. Dune: House Atreides. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 76. Bene Gesserit:
"...straight toward the arched doorway of the Bene Gesserit administration building.

She was late and ran, even though it was unseemly for a woman of her status to be seen rushing about like a red-faced schoolgirl. Mother Superior and her selected council would be waiting in the chapter chamber--for a meeting that could not begin without Anirul. Only she had the Sisterhood's complete breeding projections and the full knowledge from Other Memory in her head.

The sprawling Mother School complex on Wallach IX was the base of Bene Gesserit operations throughout the Imperium. The historic first sanctuary of the Sisterhood had been erected here, dating from post-Butlerian Jihad days at the beginnings of the great schools of the human mind. Some of the buildings in the training enclave were thousands of years old... " [Much more.]

religious - fictional galaxy 4500 Herbert, Brian & Kevin J. Anderson. Dune: House Atreides. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 144. Fremen:
Pg. 143: "Kynes thought the Fremen might have a different mind-set, though. The reclusive desert dwellers were said to be fierce to their own ways. They had wandered from world to world in their long history, been downtrodden and enslaved before making Arrakis their home--a planet they had called Dune since ancient times. These people had the most at stake here... If Kynes could only enlist Fremen aid--and if there were as many of these mysterious people as he suspected--changes might be made on a global scale. ";

Pg. 144: "By contrast, the three Fremen youths were putting up more of a fight than the ground rat, but they had only simple knives and still-suits, no body-shields or armor. The desert natives had no chance against the fighting skills and weaponry of Harkonnen soldiers.

But they did not surrender.

The Fremen snatched at the ground and threw sharp rocks with deadly aim... " [Many other refs., not in DB.]

religious - fictional galaxy 4500 Herbert, Brian & Kevin J. Anderson. Dune: House Atreides. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 241. Fremen:
"The other Fremen now stared at Kynes with reverence. 'Look! God has shown us what to do,' one woman exclaimed. 'He has guided Uliet. He has spoken to Pardot Kynes.'

'Umma Kynes,' someone said. Prophet Kynes.

One man stood up and glared at the others gathered around. 'We would be fools not to listen to him now.'

Runners departed and dashed through the sietch. Not understanding the Fremen religion, Kynes couldn't grasp it all.

From that point on, however, he didn't think he would have trouble getting anyone to listen to him. "

religious - fictional galaxy 4500 Herbert, Brian & Kevin J. Anderson. Dune: House Atreides. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 20. Orange Catholic Bible:
Pg. 20: [Frontispiece] "Thou shalt not make a machine in the likeness of a human mind.'

--Chief commandment resulting from the Butlerian Jihad, found in the Orange Catholic Bible ";

Pg. 58: "His mother Helena spent much time fussing over him, seeing omens in many things, and quoting passages she considered important from the Orange Catholic Bible. "; Pg. 59: "...But Helena still objected on various grounds, often quoting passages from the Orange Catholic Bible to justify her opinions... Bringing up one son and running the ducal household already took up most of her time, which could otherwise have been spent studying the Orange Catholic Bible and other religious texts. ";

Pg. 87: "'Just because you have become accustomed to a thing, does not make it right, Paulus. The Orange Catholic Bible says nothing about morality being defined by personal convenience.' " [Other refs., not in DB.]

religious - fictional galaxy 4500 Herbert, Brian & Kevin J. Anderson. Dune: House Atreides. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 182. Orange Catholic Bible:
"'Some of the new technologies go beyond what is forbidden by the Great Revolt. We are creating thinking machines. We don't need to understand the blueprints and designs, because we know what they will do!... Since we are suboids, we have no participation in profits from Ixian technology. We have simple lives and few ambitions--but we do have our religion. We read the Orange Catholic Bible and know in our hearts what is right.' "
religious - fictional galaxy 4500 Herbert, Brian & Kevin J. Anderson. Dune: House Atreides. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 30. Spacing Guild:
"Spacing Guild: one leg of the political tripod maintaining the Great Convention. The Guild was the second mental-physical training school (see Bene Gesserit) after the Butlerian Jihad. The Guild monopoly on space travel and transport and upon international banking is taken as the beginning point of the Imperial Calendar.

--Terminology of the Imperium " [Other refs., not in DB, e.g., pg. 83-84.]

religious - fictional galaxy 4500 Herbert, Brian & Kevin J. Anderson. Dune: House Atreides. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 212. Spacing Guild:
"The Spacing Guild has worked for centuries to surround our elite Navigators with mystique. They are revered, from the lowest Pilot to the most talented Steersman. They live in tanks of spice gas, see all paths through space and time, guide ships to the far reaches of the Imperium. But no one knows the human cost of becoming a Navigator. We must keep this secret, for if they really knew the truth, they would pity us.

--Spacing Guild Training Manuel
Handbook for Steersmen (Classified) "

religious - fictional galaxy 4500 Herbert, Brian & Kevin J. Anderson. Dune: House Atreides. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 338. Zensunni:
Pg. 338: "Man is but a pebble dropped in a pool. And if man is but a pebble, then all his works can be no more.

--Zensunni Saying ";

Pg. 380: "The ultimate question: Why does life exist? The answer: For life's sake.

--Anonymous
thought to be of Zensunni origin ";

Pg. 384: "Secretly, Anirul had consulted a Feng Shui master about the old birthing facility. A withered old man with Terrasian features, he was a practitioner of an ancient Zensunni philosophy which held that architecture, furniture placement, and maximum utilization of color & light... " [More.];

Pg. 513: "Truth is a chameleon.
--Zensunni Aphorism "

religious - fictional galaxy 4500 Herbert, Brian & Kevin J. Anderson. Dune: House Atreides. New York: Bantam (1999) [Book jacket] "DUNE: HOUSE ATREIDES
An aging tyrant sits on the Golden Lion Throne and rules all of the known universe, while his son grows dangerously impatient for the crown. A quasi-religious order of black-robed women move their secret breeding program one momentous step closer to creating a god-child they call the Kwisatz Haderach. And a minor family among the nobility, House Atreides, choose a course of honor that will bring it to destruction at the hands of its mortal enemy, House Harkonnen--or take it to new heights of power. " [Many religious refs. in novel, not in DB.]
religious - fictional galaxy 4510 Herbert, Brian & Kevin J. Anderson. Dune: House Harkonnen. New York: Bantam (2000) Bene Gesserit:
[Book jacket] "At last Shaddam sits on the Golden Lion Throne, his precarious position as ruler of the Known Universe dependent on producing a male heir. But his leadership is further threatened by the ambitious Baron Vladimir Harkonnen, whose insatiable thirst for dominance leads him to plot against some of the most powerful forces in the Imperium, hoping to elevate his own ruthless House to unprecedented heights of power. His primary targets: House Atreides and the mysterious Bene Gesserit Sisterhood. The Sisterhood are unaware of this threat as they prepare to culminate the work of centuries in the creation of a god-child who will sweep away emperors, houses, and history itself in a terrifying new order of religious tyranny. " [Extensive refs. throughout novel, not in DB.]
religious - fictional galaxy 4510 Herbert, Brian & Kevin J. Anderson. Dune: House Harkonnen. New York: Bantam (2000); pg. 2. Fremen:
Pg. 2: "In pampered societies Liet would have been considered just a boy, but life among the hard-edged Fremen had given him a tightly coiled adulthood that few others achieved even at twice his age. He was better equipped to handle an emergency than his father... Liet gave the hatch lock a final tug, satisfied that it would hold against the storm. 'The Fremen call that El-Sayal, the 'rain of sand.' ' "; Pg. 5: "...for the great Planetologist, whom the Fremen revered as their Umma, their prophet. " [Extensive Fremen refs., not in DB.]
religious - fictional galaxy 4510 Herbert, Brian & Kevin J. Anderson. Dune: House Harkonnen. New York: Bantam (2000); pg. 9. Orange Catholic Bible:
[Epigraph] "Behold, O Man, you can create life. You can destroy life. But, lo, you have no choice but to experience life. And therein lies both your greatest strength and your greatest weakness.

--Orange Catholic Bible,
Book of Kimla Septima, 5:3 " [Other refs. to the Orange Catholic Bible, not in DB.]

religious - fictional galaxy 4510 Herbert, Brian & Kevin J. Anderson. Dune: House Harkonnen. New York: Bantam (2000); pg. 3. Zensunni:
Pg. 3: "When the Zensunni Wanderers had come here after generations of slavery, they'd hoped to build a world where they could be free.

But that had been before the discovery of the spice melange... ";

Pg. 355: "Freedom is an elusive concept. Some men hold themselves prisoner even when they have the power to do as they please and go where they choose, while others are free in their hearts, even as shackles restrain them.
--Zensunni Wisdom from the Wandering " [Many other refs., not in DB.]

religious - fictional galaxy 4870 Le Guin, Ursula K. The Left Hand of Darkness. New York: Ace Books (1976; first pub. 1969); pg. 89, 95, 138. Hainish:
Pg. 89: "Conditions may have been fairly mild for their first 40 or 50,000 years here. By the time the ice was advancing again, the Hainish Withdrawal was complete and the Colonists were on their own, an experiment abandoned. "; Pg. 95: "...and trying perhaps to exculpate our Hainish ancestors from the guilt of barbarism... "; Pg. 138: "'None of us did, until the Hainish and the Cetians arrived... Open trade is really what I'm here to try to set up. Trade not only in goods, of course, but in knowledge, technologies, ideas, philosophies, art, medicine, science, theory...' "
religious - fictional galaxy 4870 Le Guin, Ursula K. The Left Hand of Darkness. New York: Ace Books (1976; first pub. 1969); pg. 55. Handdara:
"I had been longer in Karhide now than the Investigators had, and I doubted that there was anything to the stories of Fortellers and their prophecies. Legends of prediction are common throughout the whole Household of Man. God speaks, spirits speak, computers speak. Oracular ambiguity or statistical probability provides loopholes, and discrepancies are expunged by Faith. However, the legends were worth investigating. I hadn't yet convinced any Karhider of the exhistence of telepathic communication; they wouldn't believe it till they 'saw' it: my position exactly, regarding the Fortellers of the Handdara. "
religious - fictional galaxy 4870 Le Guin, Ursula K. The Left Hand of Darkness. New York: Ace Books (1976; first pub. 1969); pg. 57. Handdara:
"They were practicing the Handdara discipline of Presence, which is a kind of trance--the Handdarata, given to negatives, call it an untrance--involving self-loss (self-augmentation?) through extreme sensual receptiveness and awareness. Though the technique is the exact opposite of most techniques of mysticism it probably is a mystical discipline, tending toward the experience of Immanence; but I can't categorize any practice of the Handdarata with certainty. Goss spoke to the person in scarlet As he broke from his intense ovelessness and looked at us and came slowly towards us, I felt an awe of him. "
religious - fictional galaxy 4870 Le Guin, Ursula K. The Left Hand of Darkness. New York: Ace Books (1976; first pub. 1969); pg. 60. Handdara:
"'Do you know the story of the Lord of Shorth, who forced the Foretellers of Asen Fastness to answer the question What is the meaning of life? Well, it was a couple of thousand years ago. The Foretellers stayed in the darkness for six days and nights. At the end all the Celibates were catatonic, the Zanies were dead, the Pervert clubbed the Lord of Shorth to death with a stone, and the Weaver . . . He was a man named Meshe.'

'The founder of the Yomesh cult?'

'Yes,' said Godd, and laughed as if the story was very funny, but I didn't know whether the joke was on the Yomeshta or on me. "

religious - fictional galaxy 4870 Le Guin, Ursula K. The Left Hand of Darkness. New York: Ace Books (1976; first pub. 1969); pg. 69. Handdara:
"'Faxe, tell me this. You Handdarata have a gift that men on every world have craved. You have it. You can predict the future. And yet you live like the rest of us--it does'nt seem to matter--'

'How should it matter, Genry?' "

religious - fictional galaxy 4870 Le Guin, Ursula K. The Left Hand of Darkness. New York: Ace Books (1976; first pub. 1969); pg. 70. Handdara:
"'The Asker pays what he can afford, as you know. Kings have in fact come to the Foretellers; but not very often. . . .'

'What if one of the Foretellers is himself a powerful man?'

'Indwellers of the Fastness have no rank or status. I may be sent to Erhenrang to the kyorremy; well, if I go, I take back my status and my shadow, but my fortellings at an end. If I had a question while I served in the kyorremy, I'd go to the Orgny Fastness there, pay my price, and get my answer. But we in the Handdara don't want answers. I's hard to avoid them, but we try to.'

'Faxe, I don't think I understand.'

'Well, we come here to the Fastnesses mostly to learn what questions not to ask.'

'But you're the Answerers!'

'You don't see yet, Genry, why we perfected and practice Fortelling?'

'No--'

'To exhibit the perfect uselessness of knowing the answer to the wrong question.' "

religious - fictional galaxy 4870 Le Guin, Ursula K. The Left Hand of Darkness. New York: Ace Books (1976; first pub. 1969); pg. 71. Handdara:
"'The unknown,' said Faxe's soft voice in the forest, 'the unforetold, the unproven, that is what life is based on. Ignorance is the ground of thought. Unproof is the ground of action. If it were proven that there is no God there would be no religion. No Handdara, no Yomesh, no hearthgods, nothing. But also if it were proven that there is a God, there would be no religion. . . . Tell me, Genry, what is known? What is sure, predictable, unevitable--the one certain thing you known concerning your future, and mine?'

'That we shall die.'

'Yes. There's really only one question that can be answered, Genry, and we already know the answer. . . . The only thing that makes life possible is permanent, intolerable uncertainty: not knowing what comes next.' "

religious - fictional galaxy 4870 Le Guin, Ursula K. The Left Hand of Darkness. New York: Ace Books (1976; first pub. 1969); pg. 153. Handdara:
"To oppose something is to maintain it... To be an atheist is to maintain God. His existence or his nonexistence, it amounts to much the same, on the plane of proof. Thus proof is a word not often used among the Handdarata, who have chosen not to treat God as a fact, subject either to proof or to belief: and they have broken the circle, and go free.

To learn which questions are unanswerable, and not to answer them: this skill is most needful in times of stress and darkness. "

religious - fictional galaxy 4870 Le Guin, Ursula K. The Left Hand of Darkness. New York: Ace Books (1976; first pub. 1969); pg. 164. Handdara:
[From the Yomesh Canon, a passage that refers to the Handdarata.] "'......Therefore those that call upon the darkness** are made fools of and spat out from the mouth of Meshe, for they name what is not, calling it Source and End.

There is neither source nor end, for all things are in the Center of Time...'

**The Handdarata. " [Book has many other refs. to Handdarata, and to Handdara religion, most not in DB.]

religious - fictional galaxy 4870 Le Guin, Ursula K. The Left Hand of Darkness. New York: Ace Books (1976; first pub. 1969); pg. 233. Handdara:
"'...What do the Handdarata say?'

'Well, in the Handdara . . . you know, there's no theory, no dogma. . . . Maybe they are less aware of the gap between men and beasts, being more occupied with the likenesses, the links, the whole of which living things are a part.' Tormer's Lay had been all in my mind, and I said the words,

Light is the left hand of darkness
and darkness the right hand of light.
Two are one, life and death, lying
together like lovers in kemmer,
like hands joined together,
like the end and the way.

My voice shook as I said the lines, for I remembered as I said them that in the letter my brother wrote me before his death he had quoted the same words.

Ali brooded, and after some time he said, 'You're isolated, and undivided. Perhaps you are as obsessed with wholeness as we are with dualism.' "

religious - fictional galaxy 4870 Le Guin, Ursula K. The Left Hand of Darkness. New York: Ace Books (1976; first pub. 1969); pg. 54-55. Handdara:
"I didn't know how the Handdarata felt about tourists. I knew very little about them in fact. The Handdara is a religion without institution, without priests, without hierarchy, without vows, without creed; I am still unable to say whether it has a God or not. it is elusive. It is always somewhere else. Its only fixed manifestation is in the Fastnesses, retreats to which people may retire and spend the night or a lifetime. I wouldn't have been pursuing this curiously intangible cult into its secret places at all, if I hadn't wanted to answer the question left unanswered by the Investigators: What are the Foretellers, and what do they actually do? "
religious - fictional galaxy 4870 Le Guin, Ursula K. The Left Hand of Darkness. New York: Ace Books (1976; first pub. 1969); pg. 85. Sith:
"Yegey poured out another dram around of lifewater. Orgota noblemen drank that precious fire, brought five thousand miles over the foggy seas from Sith, as if it were beer. "


religious - fictional, continued

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