Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

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religious - fictional, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
religious - fictional galaxy 2600 Zettel, Sarah. Reclamation. New York: Warner Books (1996); pg. 136. "'I am Teacher Heart kenu Heart of the Seablade kenu Fortunate Speaker dena Shadow of the World's Wall,' said her husband. 'I speak for the Temple and the Teachers. Because this war is provoked by the Aunorante Sangh we say that the power-gifted are free to act against them. We also say that Narroways no longer hears the Word in the Temple and those attached to her, like all Heretics, must die.' " [More]
religious - fictional galaxy 2700 Emerson, Jane. City of Diamond. New York: DAW (1996) Curosa/Redemptionists:
Book jacket: "It has been six centuries since the alien Curosa imparted the wisdom of their dying race to Adrian Sawyer, gifting him and his millions of disciples with three massive intergalactic city-ships to spread the Curosa Truth across the starways. But over time these ships strayed from their original missionary purpose, and the two largest, City of Diamond and City of Opal, became embroiled in a vicious struggle for political dominance.

Now Adrian Mercati, a charismatic but inexperienced young man, has been chosen by the dying Protector of Diamond as his successor. To strengthen Adrian's position, the Protector, shortly before his death, told his protege the suspected location of a mysterious alien artifact known only as the sawyer Crown--possession of which could give both Adrian and the Diamond indisputable superiority over the Opal... " [The fictional Curosa religion is central to the novel's plot.]

religious - fictional galaxy 2700 Emerson, Jane. City of Diamond. New York: DAW (1996); pg. 21. Curosa/Redemptionists:
"'Tell them I'm a corporal in Inventory, respectable as anyone.'

'That doesn't explain why you can't attend church.'

'How should they know I don't attend church unless you tell them, Ma? Maybe I go to Saint Tom's up on court level.'

His mother poured tea into a cracked china cup. 'You haven't escorted me to Christmas service in two years. You're not a ghost anymore, what can I tell people?'

He stretched out his legs and examined his boots broodingly. Damned souls aren't allowed to attend church, as his mother very well knew. Mrs. Hastings said. 'It's unnatural, Stratton, consorting with demons the way you do. It tears the meat from my heart whenever I think about it.'

Spider did not reply to this. It was his demonic connections that made possible this snug compartment on the very border of the middle-class territory, far from the level where he'd been born as the son of an unknown father and a mother on the Sin List... " [Other refs. throughout novel.]

religious - fictional galaxy 2700 Emerson, Jane. City of Diamond. New York: DAW (1996); pg. 34. Curosa/Redemptionists:
"At the final step, Tal and Fischer halted, leaving Adrian to step forward and accept the embrace of Lord Cardinal Theodore Richard Arno, chief envoy and head of the Ecclesiastical Council of the City of Opal... He felt Arno make a sketchy blessing motion as the cardinal released him, and his gaze went to Bishop Aldgate, who looked like a man gnashing his teeth. As chief bishop of the Diamond, and Adrian's official spiritual adviser, Aldgate ought to be doing any blessing that was going to be done here. More feathers to be soothed later, Adrian thought. Everybody wants to be loved. He stepped back from Arno's embrace, and threw a smile toward Aldgate...

'My son,' intoned the Lord Cardinal, choosing a politically unfortunate term of address.

Throwing that territorial weight around again. 'My dear Lord Cardinal,' said Adrian. 'Our beloved brother of Opal. The Diamond rejoices to see you well. Families should not be divided.' "

religious - fictional galaxy 2700 Emerson, Jane. City of Diamond. New York: DAW (1996); pg. 84. Curosa/Redemptionists:
Pg. 84: "The woman of the stallion and the rose looked at him sharply. There was something about his voice-- This kid couldn't be more than a teenager, and yet this was not the way an interview with a Cities hayseed ought to progress. In spite of what he said, could he be some VIP? Maybe she shouldn't have called him a Blood Christian; she knew these Redemptionists didn't like that. 'No offense for the long detention. We wouldn't want to let terrorists in, like Cathal Station, would we?' ";

Pg. 25: [Epigraph] "Exporting a religion across cultures can lead to unfortunate consequences. Exporting a religion across species would seem disastrous.

WANG CHANG'AN,
'The False Promise of Redemptionism' "

religious - fictional galaxy 2700 Emerson, Jane. City of Diamond. New York: DAW (1996); pg. 162. Curosa/Redemptionists:
Pg. 162: "'A headband, a shirt--'

'No, on his hand. The one that goes into the bog. He's wearing a Curosa glove.'

Io peered closer. It was true, on his right hand there was a black, shiny glove that ended at his wrist--no, it went back to mid-forearm-- 'It's changed its length!'

'One of the biological legacies of the Curosa. Most people only see the blood-sharing in church, but we really depend on any number of inheritances from our teachers.'

'May their mission forever continue,' said Iolanthe automatically.

'Indeed. You'll note the glove is alive, made up of thousands of tiny parasites. They consume a very small amount of the wearer's blood, and in return they function as a flexible, fully sealed barrier. Otherwise, the material in the bog would damage him.' ";

Pg. 485: "'First, if a Curosa legacy exists, it should belong to the Hollow Hills. I told you I was a Redemptionist. Second... no Curosa legacy will be safe if the Republic takes over our world.' "

religious - fictional galaxy 2700 Niven, Larry. "Neutron Star " in The Hugo Winners: Volumes One and Two. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971; story copyright 1966); pg. 547. Pierson's puppeteer:
[Year estimated] "I can't blame them for staring. A number of aliens were in the store, mainly shopping for souvenirs, but they were staring too. A puppeteer is unique. Imagine a headless, three-legged centaur wearing two Cecil the Seasick Sea Serpent puppets on his arms, and you'll have something like the right picture. But the arms are weaving necks, and the puppets are real heads, flat and brainless, with wide flexible lips. The brain is under a bony hump set between the bases of the necks. This puppeteer wore only its own coat of brown hair, with a mane that extended all the way up it spine to form a thick mat over the brain. I'm told that they way they wear the mane indicates their status in society, but to me it could have been anything from a dock worker to a jeweler to the president of General Products. " [Other refs., not in DB.]
religious - fictional galaxy 2732 Simmons, Dan. Hyperion. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 51. Zen Gnosticism:
"The Zen Gnostics would say that this emptiness is a good sign; that it presages openness to a new level of awareness, new insights, new experiences. "; Pg. 79: "...the thrill of exorcism, the mindless whirl of Dervish possession, the puppet-dance ritual of Tarot, and the almost erotic surrender of seance, speaking in tongues, and Zen Gnostic trance. "
religious - fictional galaxy 2733 Simmons, Dan. Hyperion. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 20. Assured Reincarnation Institute:
"Martin Silenus... '...I have been a Catholic, a revelationist, a neo-Marxist,... and a dues-paying subscriber to the Assured Reincarnation Institute...' "
religious - fictional galaxy 2733 Simmons, Dan. Hyperion. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 20. Church of Jake's Nada:
"Martin Silenus... '...I have been a Catholic, a revelationist, a neo-Marxist, an interface zealot, a Bound Shaker, a satanist, a bishop in the Church of Jake's Nada...' "
religious - fictional galaxy 2733 Simmons, Dan. Hyperion. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 4. Church of the Shrike:
"You have been chosen to return to Hyperion as a member of the Shrike Pilgrimage,' continued the voice.

The hell you say, thought the Consul and rose to leave the pit.

'You and six others have been selected by the Church of the Shrike and confirmed by the All Thing,' said Meina Gladstone. 'It is in the interest of the Hegemony that you accept.' "; Pg. 6: "'We need your help,' said Meina Gladstone. 'It is essential that the secrets of the Time Tombs and the Shrike be uncovered. This pilgrimage may be our last chance. If the Ousters conquer Hyperion, their agent must be eliminated and the Time Tombs sealed at all cost. The fate of the Hegemony may depend upon it.' " [The Church of the Shrike, officially known as the Church of the Final Atonement, is the central fictional religious group in this novel and there are references to it through. Most refs. not in DB.]

religious - fictional galaxy 2733 Simmons, Dan. Hyperion. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 7. Church of the Shrike:
"...he lay thinking about how insane it would be to return to Hyperion. During his eleven years as consul on that distant and enigmatic world, the mysterious Church of the Shrike had allowed a dozen barges of offworld pilgrims to depart for the windswept barrens around the Time Tombs, north of the mountains. No one had returned. And that had been in normal times, when the Shrike had been prisoner to the tide of time and forces no one understood... The Consul thought of the Shrike, free to wander everywhere on Hyperion, of the millions of indigenies and thousands of Hegemony citizens helpless before a creature which defied physical laws and which commmunicated only through death, and he shivered despite the warmth of the cabin. "
religious - fictional galaxy 2733 Simmons, Dan. Hyperion. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 19. Church of the Shrike:
"'...does anyone here know why he or she was chosen by the Shrike Church and the All Thing to go on this voyage?... Even more fascinating, is anyone here a member or follower of the Church of the Shrike? I, for one, am a Jew, and however confused my religious notions have become these days, they do not include the worship of an organic killing machine.'

[Each of the 7 people on the pilgrimage explain that they are not Shrike followers.] 'My point has been made, I believe,' said Sol Weintraub. 'None of us admits to subscribing to the Shrike cult dogma, yet the elders of that perceptive group have chosen us over many millons of the petitioning faithful to visit the Time Tombs . . . and their fierce god . . . in what may be the last such pilgrimage.' "

religious - fictional galaxy 2733 Simmons, Dan. Hyperion. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 223. Church of the Shrike:
"'Can you tell me what aspect of the Shrike legend you planned to use in your poem?'...

'Sure,' I said. 'according to the Shrike Cult gospel that the indigenies started, the Shrike is the Lord of Pain and the Angel of the Final Atonement, come from a place beyond time to announce the end of the human race. I liked that conceit.'

'The end of the human race,' repeated King Billy.

'Yeah. He's Michael the Archangel and Moroni and Satan and Masked Entropy and the Frankenstein monster all rolled into one package,' I said. 'He hands around the Time Tombs waiting to come out and wreak havoc when it's mankind's time to join the dodo and the gorilla and the sperm whale on the extinction HIt Parade list.' "

religious - fictional galaxy 2733 Simmons, Dan. Hyperion. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 269. Church of the Shrike:
"In the months which followed Sol became obsessive about obtaining information on Hyperion, the Time Tombs, and the Shrike. As a trained researcher, he was astounded that there was so litle hard data on so provocative a topic. There was the Church of the Shrike, of course--there were no temples on Barnard's World but many in the Web--but he soon found that seeking hard information in Shrike cult literature was like trying to map the geogaphy of Sarnath by visiting a Buddhist monastery. Time was mentioned in Shrike Church dogma, but only in the sense that the Shrike was supposed to be '. . . the Angel of Retribution from Beyond Time' and that true time had ended for the human race when Old Earth died and that the four centuries since had been 'false time.' "
religious - fictional galaxy 2733 Simmons, Dan. Hyperion. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 281. Church of the Shrike:
"The largest Church of the Shrike in the Web [of worlds] was on Lusus and Sol farcast there... The building itselfwas not much larger than an Old Earth cathedral, but it seemed gigantic with its effect of flying buttresses in search of a church, twisted upper stories, and support walls of stained glass... " [More description of the building's exterior and interior.]; Pg. 281: "The bishop [said] 'Titles are unimportant, M. Weintraub. Addressing us as 'Your Excellency' is quite acceptable for a nonbeliever. We must advise you, however, that the formal name of our modest group is the Church of the Final Atonement and the entity whom the world so blithely calls . . .the Shrike . . . we refer to . . . if we take his name at all . . . as the Lord of Pain or, more commonly, the Avatar...' "
religious - fictional galaxy 2733 Simmons, Dan. Hyperion. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 20. Zen Gnosticism:
"Martin Silenus... '...I helped create Zen Gnosticism before any of your parents were born...' " [Book contains many references to Zen Gnosticism, as its founder is one of the main characters of the book. Most refs. not in DB.]
religious - fictional galaxy 2733 Simmons, Dan. Hyperion. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 199. Zen Gnosticism:
"I joined religions. Hell, I helped create religions. The Zen Gnostic Church was expanding exponentially and I became a true believer, appearing on HTV talk shows and searching for my Places of Power with all of the devoutness of a pre-Hegira Muslim pilgrimaging to Mecca. "; Pg. 200: "...farcasting to unlikely corners of the Web and then spending weeks staying in luxury accommodations and lesing EMVs to find my Places of Power in remote areas of backwaters worlds.

I found none. I renounced Zen Catholicism about the same time Helenda divorced me. "; Pg. 268: "Linna, who had become an ardent Zen Gnostic, cried and left early. "

religious - fictional galaxy 2780 Simmons, Dan. The Fall of Hyperion. New York: Bantam (1991; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 43. Assured Reincarnation Institute:
"Diana Philomel's body was as perfect as cosmetic surgery and an ARNist's skills could make it. "
religious - fictional galaxy 2780 Simmons, Dan. The Fall of Hyperion. New York: Bantam (1991; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 336. Church of the Shrike:
"'Interesting, is it not,' said the Bishop, 'that three of humankind's most profound religions are represented here today?' 'Yes,' said Dure. 'Profound, but hardly representational of the beliefs of the majority. Out of almost a hundred and fifty billion souls, the Catholic Church claims fewer than a million. The Shri--ah . . . The Church of the Final Atonement perhaps five to ten million. And how many Templars are there, M. Hardeen?'

'Twenty-three million,'... "

religious - fictional galaxy 2780 Simmons, Dan. The Fall of Hyperion. New York: Bantam (1991; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 12. Church of the Shrike:
Pg. 12: "I shrugged. 'The primary difference is that in this case we are dealing with Hyperion,' I said.

Senator Richeau, one of the women present, nodded as if I had explained myself in full. 'You're afraid of the Shrike,' she said. 'Do you belong to the Church of the Final Atonement?'

'No,' I said, 'I'm not a member of the Shrike Cult.' ";

Pg. 15: "'But the fact is, you are in contact with the Keats persona, and through him, with the Shrike pilgrims.' " [Many other refs., not in DB. This is the central fictional religious group of the novel.]

religious - fictional galaxy 2780 Simmons, Dan. The Fall of Hyperion. New York: Bantam (1991; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 91. Church of the Shrike:
"'The Time Bombs are for certain,' said the physicist. 'I have no knowledge of the Shrike. My own guess is that it's a myth fueled by the same hunger for superstitious verities that drive other religions.' "
religious - fictional galaxy 2780 Simmons, Dan. The Fall of Hyperion. New York: Bantam (1991; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 229. Church of the Shrike:
"'That's not Templar terminology or theology,' said Dure. 'He's using Shrike Cult language.' The priest caught Sol's eye. 'That explains some of the mystery . . . especially from Brawne's tale. For some reason, the Templars have been in collusion with the Church of the Final Atonement . . . the Shrike Cult.' "
religious - fictional galaxy 2780 Simmons, Dan. The Fall of Hyperion. New York: Bantam (1991; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 58. Zen Christian:
"'Genetically, you are fully human,' said Gladstone.

it was not a question. I did not respond.

'Jesus Christ was said to be fully human,' she said, 'And also fully divine. Humanity and Godhead at intersection.'

I was amazed at her reference to that old religion. Christianity had been replaced first by Zen Christianity, then Zen Gnosticism, then by a hundred more vital theologies and philosophies. "

religious - fictional galaxy 2780 Simmons, Dan. The Fall of Hyperion. New York: Bantam (1991; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 336. Zen Gnosticism:
"'...Out of almost a hundred and fifty billion souls...'

'The Zen Gnostics claim forty billion followers... But what kind of religion is that, eh? No churches. No priests. No holy books. No concept of sin.'

Dure smiled. 'It seems to be the belief most attuned to the times. And has been for many generations now.' "

religious - fictional galaxy 2780 Simmons, Dan. The Fall of Hyperion. New York: Bantam (1991; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 58. Zen Gnosticism:
"'Genetically, you are fully human,' said Gladstone.

it was not a question. I did not respond.

'Jesus Christ was said to be fully human,' she said, 'And also fully divine. Humanity and Godhead at intersection.'

I was amazed at her reference to that old religion. Christianity had been replaced first by Zen Christianity, then Zen Gnosticism, then by a hundred more vital theologies and philosophies. "

religious - fictional galaxy 2780 Simmons, Dan. The Fall of Hyperion. New York: Bantam (1991; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 265. Zen Gnosticism:
"The Web in this century had many of the religious overtone of the Rome of Old Earth just before the Christian Era: a policy of tolerance, a myriad of religions--most, like Zen Gnosticism, complex and inwardly turned rather than the stuff of proselytism--while the general tenor was one of gentle cynicism and indifference to religious impulse. "
religious - fictional galaxy 2780 Simmons, Dan. The Fall of Hyperion. New York: Bantam (1991; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 107-108. Zen Gnosticism:
"'Monsignor, your church . . . Catholic, early Christian isn't it? . . . don't you have some delightful old doctrine about mankind achieving a more exalted evolutionary status?'

...'Why yes,' he said, 'the teachings of St. Teilhard discuss an evolution toward the Omega Point.'

'And is the Omega Point similar to our Zen Gnostic idea of practical satori?' asked Sudette Chier.

...'Not really too similar,' "

religious - fictional galaxy 2800 Brin, David. Startide Rising in Earthclan (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (first pub. 1983); pg. 51. Dreamer Cult:
[Year is estimated.] "Akki had told him, once, that sometimes the sea itself seemed to be calling for help. Some humans claimed to have felt it, too--particularly those who took dolphin RNA in the rites of the Dreamer Cult. "
religious - fictional galaxy 2800 Brin, David. Startide Rising in Earthclan (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (first pub. 1983); pg. 58. Jophur:
[Year is estimated.] "'Slay them!' The Jophur high priest demanded. 'Slay the isolated Thennanin battlecruisers on our sixth quadrant!'

The Jophur chief of staff bowed its twelve-ringed trunk before the high priest.

'The Thennanin are our allies-of-the-moment! How can we turn on them without first performing the secret rituals of betrayal? Their ancestors will not be appeased!'

The Jophur high priest expanded its six outer sap-rings. It rose high upon its dais at the rear of the command chamber.

'There is no time to perform the rites! Now, as our alliance finishes sweeping this sector...'

The chief of staff pulsed in agitation, its outer sap-rings discoloring with emotion.

'We may change alliances as it suits us, agreed. We may betray our allies, agreed. We may do anything to win the prize, agreed. But we may not do so without performing the rituals! The rituals are what make us the appropriate vessels for the will of the ancients!..' "

religious - fictional galaxy 2800 Brin, David. Startide Rising in Earthclan (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (first pub. 1983); pg. 58. Jophur:
[Year is estimated.] "The dais shook with the high priest's anger.

'My rings decide! My rings are those of priesthood! My rings . . .'

The oration-peak of the pyramidal high priest eruped in a geyser of hot, multi-hued sap. The explostion spewed sticky amber liquor across the bridge of the Jophur flagship.

'Continue fighting.' The chief of staff waved the crew back to work with its sidearm. 'Call the Quartermaster of Religiosity. Have it send up rings to make up a new priest. Continue fighting while we prepare to perform the rituals of betryal.'

The chief of staff bowed to the staring section chiefs. 'We shall appease the ancestors of the Thennanin before we turn on them.

'But remember to make certain the Thennanin themselves do not sense our intentions!' "

religious - fictional galaxy 2800 Brin, David. The Uplift War in Earthclan (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (first pub. 1987); pg. 490. Cult of Ifni:
[Year is estimated.] Pg. 490: "In his heart a secret fear had started to grow: a superstition that he had confided in nobody. Did the universe balance all things? Did it take away to compensate for whatever it gave? The Cult of Ifni was supposed to be a starfarer's joke. And yet sometimes things seemed so contrived! "; Pg. 498: "For all of Ifni's starfield, nobody had expected the Tytlal to choose dolphins! "
religious - fictional galaxy 2800 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Parafaith War. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 56. Farhkans:
"What did medical screening have to do with the Farhkans? Who knew much about them, except that they were remarkably humanoid beings living in toward Galactic center who had been around a long time, and who had demonstrated, with rather convincing firepower, a few centuries earlier, that their desire to be left alone except through formal contacts was something that had to be respected... he'd never really seen a Farhkan, not in person. According to the holos, they had pale gray skin and dark iron-gray hair that was short and bristly over their entire body, except around their mouth and single nostril. They had two eyes and teeth that looked like greenish crystals which framed a double-hinged mouth. "
religious - fictional galaxy 2800 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Parafaith War. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 66. Farhkans:
"The iron-gray hair and square face were the most human features of the Farhkan. Trystin tried to ignore the red eyes and wide single-nostril nose that seemed to flap with each breath. The crystalline teeth were not quite fangs or tusks, and seemed blunt.

Ihara shut the door behind Trystin. 'This is Rhule Ghere, Lietenant Desoll. He is roughly my equivalent with the Farhkan . . . hegemony.'

Trystin nodded. The term 'hegemony' was the closest description that matched any human term, although the Farhkans seemed to employ what seemed to Trystin something like an ultrahigh-tech, self-policing, consensus-based, anarchistic democracy based on environmental understanding and an overall technology that the Eco-Tech Coalition could only drool over from a distance. "

religious - fictional galaxy 2800 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Parafaith War. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 98. Farhkans:
[Passage from the Farhkan book of scripture.] "Examination of the genetic codes of all intelligent beings thus far discovered indicates a genetic predisposition to procreation at a precoded span in each organism's life. Although that procreation range occurs comparatively later in the life of an organism with greater cognitive capacity, inall organisms studied to date that range coincides with the range of greatest physical health . . .

Thus, achieving individual organic physical nondegredation ('physical immortality'), defined as removal of all genetic tendencies for organic self-destruction on the cellular level, will by definition increase the reproductive rate beyond a neutral populace growth rate.

Over a sufficient period of time, any organism with a positive level of populatoin growth--no matter how small that growth rate--unless checked by outside forces, will come to require virtually all the resources within its ability to acquire . . . "

religious - fictional galaxy 2800 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Parafaith War. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 98. Farhkans:
[Passage from Findings of the Colloquy, the Farhkan book of scripture.] "Any habitat can support a small number of virtual immortals or a much larger number of mortals . . . Technology depends on a certain critical mass, however, often smaller than the number of immortals that can be supported by a given habitat. . . .

The dilemma faced by any species with the ability to achieve individual physical immortality is whether to reject such physical immortality, to adapt genetic codes to lower poplace growth, to develop cultural norms for stable populace growth, or to use technology to accomodate increasing habitat needs. . . .

The use of technology to increase usable habitat will, in sufficient time, result in conflict with other species, and, in historical practice, the elimination of either the attacking or defending species as a threat to the other. . . "

religious - fictional galaxy 2800 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Parafaith War. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 236. Farhkans:
"The alien's tongue flickered, not quite touching the green crystalline teeth. 'Are all human cultures composed of thieves, Lietenant?'

Trystin took a deep breath. Why did all the Farhkans focus on theft and ethics? 'As I told Dr. Ghere, I suspect that all intelligent cultures must practice theft in some basic degree in order to survive.'

'Are you a thief?' "

religious - fictional galaxy 2800 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Parafaith War. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 355. Farhkans:
[Passage from Findings of the Colloquy, the Farhkan book of scripture.] "Can violence and the use of force to effect change upon the universe be left to the young? Do you see what was, what is, and what might yet be? Have they suffered, watched evil fall upon the good, or good upon the evil?

Or should the burden of violence be let to those who can bear it most lightly--upon those who have closed their minds or their feelings? How then can they understand the suffering that they must inflict?

Should the burden of force be laid upon the short-lived, who will not see the consequences of their actions? How can they dispense force with compassion if they can escape the knowledge of what they do? . . .

The greater the force brought to bear, the older and wider must be the entity who wields it. wisdom allows sorrow. Age allows experience, and knowledge reinforces wisdom and exerperience. . . . "

religious - fictional galaxy 2800 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Parafaith War. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 356. Farhkans:
"'Those who would bear the burden of roce must be those who are strong and do not seek it, for those who seek force would misuse it, and those who are weak would shy from what they must do. . . .'

Findings of the Colloquy
[Translated from the Farkhan]
1227 E.N.P. "

religious - fictional galaxy 2800 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Parafaith War. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 98-99. Farhkans:
[Passage from Findings of the Colloquy, the Farhkan book of scripture.] "'Can a species which refuses to adapt, either through genetic, biological, or cultural means, its reproductive expansion to its habitats be termed intelligent? Can mere survival of a species which employs diverse technology be termed a proof of intelligence? If one subculture of a species in conflict with another subculture demonstrates the ability and the will to limit its expansion, should we regard favorably behaving and the unfavorably behaving subcultures as differing species? How can a species, even ours, ethically justify the use of force against another species on the ground that the other species will in time use force to eliminate our species? Should we. . .

Those are the questions this colloquy has attempted to bring forth for discussion. . . .'

Findings of the Colloquy
[Translated from the Farhkan]
1227 E.N.P. "

religious - fictional galaxy 2800 Niven, Larry. Ringworld. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston (1970); pg. 216. Kdaptist:
"The kzin considered. 'I concede the point. Have you heard of the Kdapt-Preacher heresy?'

'No.'

'In the dark days that followed the Fourth Truce with Man, Mad Kdapt-Preacher headed a new religion. He was executed by the Patriarch himself in single combat, since he bore a partial name, but his heretical religion survives in secret to this day. Kdapt-Preacher believed that God the Creator made man in his own image.'

'Man? But--Kdapt-Preacher was a kzin?'

'Yes. You kept winning [the Man-Kzin wars], Louis. For three centuries and four wars you had been winning. Kdapt's disciples wore masks of human skin when they prayed. They hoped to confuse the Creator long enough to win a war.' ";

Pg. 246: "Louis laughed... 'You're a Kdaptist,' he said. 'Admit it.'

'I was raised so, but the teachings did not take.'

'Sure they didn't...' "

religious - fictional galaxy 2800 Niven, Larry. Ringworld. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston (1970); pg. 25. kzinti:
Pg. 4: "...kzinti with their hair-trigger killer instincts... "; Pg. 25: "'Incredible,' said the kzin... 'If the Patriarchy tried to force such a law on kzinti, we would exterminate the Patriarchy for its insolence. " [Kzinti are one of the major species in this novel. The kzinti Speaker-To-Animals is one of the main characters, and there are many references to kzinti culture and beliefs, most of which are not in DB.]
religious - fictional galaxy 2800 Niven, Larry. Ringworld. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston (1970); pg. 3. Pierson's puppeteer:
"Facing him from the middle of the room was something neither human nor humanoid. It stood on three legs, and it regarded Louis Wu from two directions, from two flat heads mounted on flexible, slender necks. Over most of its startling frame, the skin was white and glove-soft; but a thick coarse brown mane ran from between the beast's necks, back along its spine, to cover the complex-looking hip joint of the hind leg. The two forelegs were set wide apart, so that the beast's small, clawed hooves formed almost an equilateral triangle... This was a puppeteer, a Pierson's puppeteer. Its brain and skull were under the hump. It was not an animal; it was at least as intelligent as a man... One does not meet a Pierson's puppeteer every day. The species have been gone from known space for longer than Louis Wu had been alive. " [This puppeteer individual, Nessus, is one of the main characters in the book, which has many refs. to puppeteer culture. Other refs. not in DB.]
religious - fictional galaxy 2800 Niven, Larry. Ringworld. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston (1970); pg. 4. Pierson's puppeteer:
"The puppeter considered. 'I suppose I must. First you should know that I have protection. My armament would stop you should you attack me.'

Louis Wu made a sound of digust. 'Why would I do that?'

The puppeteer made no answer.

'Now I remember. You're cowards. Your whole ethical system is based on cowardice.'

'Inaccurate as it is, that judgment will serve us.' "

religious - fictional galaxy 3000 Delany, Samuel R. "Ruins " in They Fly at Ciron. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 211. [Actual year indeterminate.] "'The ruins of Kirke's temple are an evil place. There are stories of lascivious priestesses walled up within the basement catacombs as punishment for their lusts. But that was hundreds of years ago. Nothing's there now but mice and spiders.'

Clikit gazed down into the bowl between his thumbs.

'The old temple has been in ruin for over a century,' the woman went on. 'This far out of the city, there's no one to keep it up. Really, we tell the children to stay away from there. But every year or so some stranger falls through some unseen hole or weak spot in some crypt, to break an arm or leg.' "

religious - fictional galaxy 3000 Felice, Cynthia. Iceman. New York: Ace (1991); pg. 81. Ballendian:
"'I'm sorry, Uncle Ramon,' she said, bowing her head slightly. It was common courtesy for Ballendian women to keep their eyes downcast when speaking to men, a harmless gesture of respect she'd always been taught, though secretly she believed it was so that men could stare openly at her bosom, which they didn't do in the Corps, where the custom of lowering eyes was not practiced. " [Many other refs., not in DB. Appears to be the novel's main fictional culture.]
religious - fictional galaxy 3000 Felice, Cynthia. Iceman. New York: Ace (1991); pg. 133. Ballendian:
[Year estimated.] "'They were ashamed,' Jacinta said. 'Ballendians felt similarly about children born out of wedlock.' " [Other refs. to religion and culture of Ballendians, and to that of some other groups among this novel's far-future, galaxy-spanning human civilizations. These are all fictional groups, other refs. not in DB.]
religious - fictional galaxy 3000 Felice, Cynthia. Iceman. New York: Ace (1991); pg. 74-75. Ballendian:
"'You lie for me,' she said. 'What else might you do?'

'You lied too,' he said, furious with her now. 'And how do I know you're not lying about how much your uncle wants this marriage? What if I go to ask for your hand, and he has me shot for offending his precious honor? You are, after all, a Ballendian lady, and I'm a Neanderthal.'

For a moment she was silent. 'I'm sorry,' she said finally. 'You warned me not to treat you like a Ballendian man, and I just did, and you misunderstood. A Ballendian man would have offered his oath, and that would be all that I'd need to go ahead.'

'I'm not a goddamned Ballendian. I'm a Neanderthal. We aren't supposed to have any honor,' he said.

'I already know better,' she said. 'You lied for me.'

'A minute ago I could have sworn you were holding that against me,' he said.

'No,' she said. 'It's even written in the bloodlaws that a man may use any means to uphold a woman's honor. A Ballendian would have understood...' "

religious - fictional galaxy 3000 Foster, Alan Dean. The Howling Stones. New York: Ballantine (1998; c. 1997); pg. 84. Parramati:
"'Parramati society is based on hierophanes. Everything in the world is seen as a manifestation of the sacred. Each is a hierophane and each has power. With access to so much power, they see no need to invite in outside influences.' " [Many other refs., not in DB. The Parramati are the primary fictional culture of the novel.]
religious - fictional galaxy 3000 Freireich, Valerie J. Impostor. New York: Penguin Putnam (1997); pg. 7. Jonist:
Pg. 7: "She entered the Academy precincts as a Supplicant, asking her way in an accented voice that caused the Jonists she questioned to hesitate before they answered... 'I'm looking for Revered Researcher Gangler. Please?' "; Pg. 8: "A True Jonist "; Pg. 9: "'A true Jonist,' Marcer continued, 'looks for Order, not higher meaning. Wishful thinking leads to distorted research; be careful not to fall into the trap so prevalent among the ancients: the fallacy of evolutionary progress.... Remember... whatever meaning our lives have comes from the Jonist search for Order, but there is no meaning inherent in our ability to search. Human beings are not at the top of any ladder, we are simply what is here. For now... Researcher Brice, doesn't Jon Hsu's General Principles say that the standard human form is the ideal for examining the universe and finding Order? doesn't that imply that it's the best?' " [Other refs. to Jonism throughout novel, not in DB.]
religious - fictional galaxy 3000 Freireich, Valerie J. Impostor. New York: Penguin Putnam (1997); pg. 305. Jonist:
Pg. 298: "'Two! You drive a hard bargain, Researcher; it's in the blood, I suppose. All Jews do.' Marcer didn't correct him; he no longer felt particularly Jonist. Jonists scorned passion; Academics especially were supposed to feel only cool intellectual interest in the universe. ";

Pg. 305: "The session began. The world delegates and guests sat, stood, then sat again in an unpatterned paean to their god Order and its messenger, Jon Hsu. The Supplicant smiled: it seemed to be a rudimentary rak'ah prayer. She supposed every culture needed rituals, no matter how they rationalized them. "

religious - fictional galaxy 3000 Freireich, Valerie J. Impostor. New York: Penguin Putnam (1997) Paradise:
[Book jacket] "Marcer Brice, an academic researcher in the Polite Harmony of Worlds, is an Altered Human, possessing an echo-locating ability that makes him the subject of suspicion and fear. But he never expected to be banished to the unknown enemy worlds of the Emirates simply for the crime of being different.

Here he finds a culture of fanatics, where cruel, beautiful women known as Houris are worshipped like angels, while their male offsprings, called the Sons, wield power over life and death. Pursued through this sinister world by those who would use his gift for their own reasons, Marcer desperately tries to find a way back to the Harmony... " [Fictional religious refs. throughout novel, not in DB. The book jacket doesn't point this out, but the 'fanatics' described here are a fictional group of Muslims who preach that this planet is actually the Paradise spoken of in the Qur'an.]

religious - fictional galaxy 3000 Le Guin, Ursula K. "The Word for World is Forest " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 38. Hainish:
"Some unknown race, or maybe the Cetians or the Hainish had decided to move in on Earth's colonies. " [Also pg. 54.]
religious - fictional galaxy 3000 Rocklynne, Ross. "Ching Witch! " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 14. Zephran:
Pg. 14: "'He knew who it was: the non-Zephran who had brought his ship and who had made unkind remarks that no Zephran would make to a worshiped Earthling. Where was he, who was he?

In that crowd of worshiping faces, Chug had no idea.

If he could just find somebody who wasn't worshiping him. ";

Pg. 23: "'Surely you remember the Greek god Zephyrus who was jealous of Hyacinthus and caused his death. Zephrans think of Earth as Hyacinthus.' " [More, not in DB.]

religious - fictional galaxy 3000 Saberhagen, Fred. Berserkers: The Beginning. New York: Baen (1998; c. 1967, 1979); pg. 156. "'Indeed? That is good news.' The priest's eyes strayed to the mountain, and to the sun, as if he calculated how much time he could spare. But he said, with no sound of impatience: 'Tell me about it, if you wish.'

When he heard that the flash in the sky was Duncan's sign, the priest frowned. Then he seemed to keep himself from smiling. 'My son, that light was seen by many. Today the elders of a dozen villages of most of the Tribe, have come to the Temple Village. Everyone has seen something different in the sky flash, and I am now going to pray in a cave, because of it.'

The priest remounted, but when he had looked at Duncan again, he waited to say: 'Still, I was not one of those chosen to see the sky-gods' sign; and you were. It may be a sign for you as well as for others, so do not be disappointed if it is not only for you. Be faithful in your duties, and the sign will come.' " [Other refs., but not extensive.]

religious - fictional galaxy 3000 Simmons, Dan. "Remembering Siri " in Prayers to Broken Stones. New York: Bantam (1992; c. 1983); pg. 116. Zen Christian:
"The last time I saw Siri she was 70 standard years old. She was 70 years old and still she had never: traveled offworld, used a comlog, tasted any alcoholic drink except wine; interfaced with an empathy surgeon, stepped through a farcaster door, smoked a cannabis stick, received gene tailoring, plugged into a stimsim, received any formal schooling, taken any RNA medication, heard of Zen Christianity, or flown any vehicle except an ancient Vikken skimmer belonging to her family. "
religious - fictional galaxy 3000 Vance, Jack. "The Moon Moth " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1961); pg. 131. Sirenese:
[Year estimated.] "'Who is Kershaul?'

'The fourth of our little group of expatriates,' replied Welibus; 'an anthropologist. You've read Zundar the Splendid? Rituals of Sirene? The Faceless Folk? No? A pity. All excellent works. Kershaul is high in prestige and I believe visits Zundar from time to time. Wears a Cave Owl, sometimes a Star Wanderer, or even a Wise Arbiter.'

'He's taken to an Equatorial Serpent,' said Rolver. 'The variant with the gilt tusks..' " [Many refs. in story to Sirenese religion, language, culture, etc. Other refs. not in DB.]

religious - fictional galaxy 3017 Niven, Larry & Jerry Pournelle. The Mote in God's Eye. New York: Simon and Schuster (1974); pg. 86. Church of Him:
"'A Himmist would call it the Face of Him. They do not refer directly to their God. A good Church member does not believe that it is anything but the Coal Sack.'

'They call it the Face of God everywhere else. Good Church member or not.'

'Elsewhere in the Empire there are no Himmists. If ye'll walk this way, we should reach the Church of Him before dark.'

...Renner asked, 'How did the Himmists get started?'

'Legend has it,' Potter said, and stopped. 'Aye, it may not be all legend. What the Himmists say is that one day the Face of God [an alien spacecraft] awoke.'

'Um?'

'He opened His single eye.'

'That would figure, if the Moties were actually using laser cannon to propel a light sail. Any dates on that?' "

religious - fictional galaxy 3017 Niven, Larry & Jerry Pournelle. The Mote in God's Eye. New York: Simon and Schuster (1974); pg. 87. Church of Him:
"The Church of Him was both imposing and shabby. It was built of quarried stone to withstand the ages, and it had done so; but the stone was worn, sandblasted by storms; there were cracks in the lintel and cornices and elsewhere; initials an obscenities had been carved into the walls with lasers and other tools.

The priest was a tall, round man with a soft, beaten look to him. But he was unexpectedly firm in his refusal to let them in. It did not good when Potter revealed himself as a fellow townsman. The Church of Him and its priests had suffered much at the hands of townsmen. "

religious - fictional galaxy 3017 Niven, Larry & Jerry Pournelle. The Mote in God's Eye. New York: Simon and Schuster (1974); pg. 88. Church of Him:
"The Face of Him occupied half the wall. It looked like a huge holograph. The stars around the edge were slightly blurred, as would be the case with a very old holograph. And there was the holograph sense of looking into infinity.

The Eye in that Face blazed pure green, with terrifying intensity. Pure green with a red fleck in it... Remembering the decayed building with its shabby interior, Rener said, 'The Church of Him seems to have fallen on evil days since Littlemead saw the light.'

'Aye. In 2902 the light went out. One hundred and fifteen years ago. That event was verra well documented...'

'...To the Himmists it must have seemed that God had gone to sleep again.' " [Howard Grote Littlemead was the founder.]

religious - fictional galaxy 3039 Anderson, Kevin J. & Rebecca Moesta. Titan A.E.: Akima's Story. New York: Ace (2000); pg. 54. Solbrechtian:
Pg. 54: "Then, using her connections among the cargo pilots, she was able to wrangle their first assignment: making a small cargo delivery to the nearby planet Solbrecht. They received one quarter of the delivery fee up front; the rest of the credits would be deposited into their account with a New Marrakech moneylender after the delivery. "; Pg. 55: "En route to nearby Solbrecht on their first bona fide business run... ";Pg. 56: "'...alien traders at the New Marrakech spaceport told me that any pilot who's willing to work hard can make a fortune on cargo runs from Solbrecht.' " [More on Solbrecht, and its city Zechaat, pg. 57-74.]
religious - fictional galaxy 3043 Perry, Steve & Dal Perry. Titan A.E.. New York: Ace (2000); pg. 20. Mantrin:
"'I have just the girl for you. Best Weapons Specialist in the colony.'

'That's probably not saying much.'

'She's a Mantrin.'

'Oh, well, in that case, bring her along.'

Stith would love this...

Stith bitched about the hurry-up, but the chance to run a ship's guns got her there in six minutes flat. Mantrins lived to shoot... Stith, the Mantrin master gunner had always reminded Akima of a cross between two animals she'd seen in a picture book she'd seen in her childhood, a kangaroo, and a bird--she had a huge beak for a mouth and heavy, muscular legs and tail. The Mantrin race was known for their ability to make war, so Korso was lucky to have her on board. Stith could shoot the eye out of a flea at at fifty paces, and you pick which eye. " [Many other refs. to this Mantrin character throughout novel, not in DB.]

religious - fictional galaxy 3043 Perry, Steve & Dal Perry. Titan A.E.. New York: Ace (2000); pg. 96. Solbrechtian:
"Gune pointed at a tiny speck of silver on Cale's palm. 'This is Pl'ochda. And this'--the finger stabbed a little farther away--'this is Solbrecht!...' "
religious - fictional galaxy 3099 Simmons, Dan. Endymion. New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 22. Church of the Shrike:
Pg. 22: "'That's all I remember . . . oh, the Shrike Palace.'

The old man showed a turtle's sharp smile. 'One mustn't forget the Shrike Palace or our old friend the Shrike, must one?...' "; Pg. 115: "'The Shrike?' It was the android who spoke. 'To my knowledge, in legend and the old records, the creature called the Shrike never left Hyperion--usually staying in the area within a few hundred kilometers around the Time Tombs.' " [Other refs., not in DB.]

religious - fictional galaxy 3099 Simmons, Dan. Endymion. New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 52-53. Zen Christian:
"'Most people I knew were Zen Christians... More Zen than Christian, of course, but not too much of either, actually. Personal pilgrimages were fun. Places of power, finding one's Baedecker point, all of that crap...' "


religious - fictional, continued

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