Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

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Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
religious - fictional galaxy 2375 Dillard, J. M. Star Trek: Insurrection. New York: Pocket Books (1998). Based on the movie; story by Rick Berman & Michael Piller; screenplay by Michael Piller.; pg. 23. Evora:
"Meanwhile, Troi continued the briefing. 'The people are known as the Evora,' she repeated, carefully articulating the pronounciation... '...population three hundred million...' "
religious - fictional galaxy 2375 Dillard, J. M. Star Trek: Insurrection. New York: Pocket Books (1998). Based on the movie; story by Rick Berman & Michael Piller; screenplay by Michael Piller.; pg. 56. "Between that, and the polite babble of voices Terran, Bajoran, Bolian, and Trill, he did not hear Geordi's final words... " [Many refs. to fictional cultures and groups in novel, including Klingon, Betazoid, Son'a, Ba'ku, Evora, Bolian, Borg, Dominion, Ellora, Tarlac.]
religious - fictional galaxy 2375 Galanter, Dave & Greg Brodeur. Maximum Warp: Book One: Dead Zone (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (2001) Vulcan:
[Spock, a Vulcan, is a major character in the novel. Other fictional cultures/races featured prominently in the novel are Romulans and Klingons. Some refs. to Troi, a Betazoid.]
religious - fictional galaxy 2375 Galanter, Dave & Greg Brodeur. Maximum Warp: Book Two: Forever Dark (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (2001) [Major fictional cultures/races in novel are Vulcan (Spock is a major character), Betazoid (Troi), Romulan, and Klingon.]
religious - fictional galaxy 2375 Golden, Christie. Ghost Dance (Star Trek: Voyager/Dark Matters #2). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 3. "The sweet, thick smoke from the burning leaves of the Sacred Plant wafted upward, wrapping the Culil in its gray embrace. Culil Matroci struggled not to cough, instead telling himself that the smoke was holy, it purified him, and it was only his weak, fleshly lungs attempting to resist the presence of the Divine.

If only he had the courage, as the Culil before him had, to lock himself into a closed room and let the holy smoke from the Sacred Plant fill up those fleshly lungs until he was entirely one with the spirit world. But Matroci was young, and sometimes the delights of the flesh were sweeter to him than the smoke of the Sacred Plant.

Sacrilege! his training screamed at him, and inwardly Matroci quailed at his lapse... Was that not the first of the ninety-nine Chants? 'Never think you are alone. The works of the Crafters...' " [Many other refs. throughout novel, not in DB.]

religious - fictional galaxy 2375 Golden, Christie. Shadow of Heaven (Star Trek: Voyager/Dark Matters #3). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 8. "She went about her duties of morning prayer, placing a few leaves of the Sacred Plant in the small bowl of embers and taking care to fully open the windows. She was not interested in dying the way Matroci had died.

Her thoughts were not in the prayers she had uttered since childhood, but on the fair-haired Stranger. " [Many other refs. throughout novel, not in DB.]

religious - fictional galaxy 2375 Mack, David. "The Star Trek: New Frontier Minipedia " in Excalibur: Restoration (ST: New Frontier). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 374. Hermat:
"Hermats
An hermaphroditic species, i.e., one that possesses fully functional gender organs of both male and female sexes. Not psychologically inclined toward long-term relationships or monogamy, they prefer to mate with several partners during their fertile years.

In addition, the Hermats possess razor-sharp canine teeth, and they have developed a unique set of pronouns to accommodate their dual-sex status.

Hermats, as a race, tend to keep to themselves. Their tendency toward segregation from the rest of the Federation is well known. While Hermats are not necessarily xenophobic, they have some difficulty relating effectively to members of other species. They are renowned for their versatility and ingenuity.

The Hermat Directorate does not officially recognize half-breeds as Hermat citizens, deserving of protection under Hermat law, despite a previous notable exception to the policy [made for]... Lebroq, a Hemat Elder. " [Many other refs., not in DB.]

religious - fictional galaxy 2375 Mack, David. "The Star Trek: New Frontier Minipedia " in Excalibur: Restoration (ST: New Frontier). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 376. Thallonian:
"Intempho
A trickster god in ancient Thallonian mythology, always pictured wearing a distinctive medallion. Hated the other gods, and strove to do away with them, but could not strike directly. Stole fire from the gods and gave it to the Thallonian people, who used it to create great works. According to legend, when the gods demanded that the Thallonians give back the secret of fire, the Thallonians set fire to the gods' Great Temple, ushering in the world's age of reason. Si Cwan read of this tale in an ancient book that was part of his sister Kalinda's library. " [Many other Thallonian refs. throughout novel and 'New Frontier' series, not in DB.]
religious - fictional galaxy 2375 Mack, David. "The Star Trek: New Frontier Minipedia " in Excalibur: Restoration (ST: New Frontier). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 358. Xantism:
"Alpha Carinae Central Hall of Worship
The primary temple of Xantism on Alpha Carinae, and residence of that world's High Priest of Xant.

Alphans
Humanoid species indigenous to Alpha Carinae. Large, muscled, relatively savage of mein. They converted to Xantism in the 24th century for a brief time. They soon rebelled against and killed the High Priest of Alpha Carinae, releasing a virulent pathogen that exterminated their species and every plant and animal life-form on the planet. " [Many other refs., not in DB.]

religious - fictional galaxy 2375 Mack, David. "The Star Trek: New Frontier Minipedia " in Excalibur: Restoration (ST: New Frontier). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 375. Xantism:
Pg. 375: "High Priests of Xant
Missionaries of the Redeemers. One High Priest is sent to each world selected to be converted to Xantism. Violence against High Priests is discouraged by the presence of a lethal pathogen stored within their bodies, which is released in the event of their unnatural death. Killing a High Priest of Xant effectively unleashes a planetary death sentence, as the residents of Alpha Carinae unfortunately discovered. ";

Pg. 406: "Xant
Deity of the Redeemers of Tulaan XV, who refer to Him as 'He Who Had Gone On' and 'He Who Would Return.' Redeemer mythology holds that Xant passed through the Beyond Gate, into another plane of existence, and that He will return through the Beyond Gate at the time of the Second Coming of Xant.

Xantism
The religion of the redeemers, who worship the 'great god Xant.' "

religious - fictional galaxy 2375 Perry, S. D. Avatar, Book One (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 205. Jem'Hadar:
"...he'd been unable to stop fighting, or to curb his hatred for anyone who was not Jem'Hadar, Vorta, or Founder.

In that order, too. The Vorta keep them, the Founders are their apathetic gods, and everyone else deserves death. The Jem'Hadar grew from genetic envelope to maturity in a matter of days. Born to a martial code of blood lust, the vast majority die in battle before the age of ten. " [More.]

religious - fictional galaxy 2375 Robinson, Andrew J. A Stitch in Time (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (2000) "Cardassian,":
[The main character of the novel is Garak, a Cardassian, so naturally there is extensive material about Cardassian philosophy and culture. Other cultures include Bajoran, Ferengi, Klingon, Trill, Hebitians.]
religious - fictional galaxy 2375 Robinson, Andrew J. A Stitch in Time (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 161. Hebitian:
"'What is it?' I asked.

'It's a recitation mask. Hebitian poets wore it at festivals that celebrated Oralius.'

'Was he . . . their leader?' I asked.

'In a spiritual sense.'

My confusion must have been apparent, because Father nodded his understanding. 'I know this is difficult. Oralius was not a corporeal being, Elim, he didn't live as we do. He was a presence, a spiritual entity that guided people toward the higher ideals they were encouraged to live by.' Father was working hard to describe something for which I had absolutely no reference point.

'How did this 'encourage' them?' I asked.

'At the festival, the poet would put the mask on before he'd recite. In this way, he was no longer Elim or Tolan or any of 'us.' He was a conduit . . . a connector who with the help of his poetry brought the higher power of Oralius down to those of us who were there . . . who wanted this. . .' " [More, not in DB.]

religious - fictional galaxy 2375 Robinson, Andrew J. A Stitch in Time (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 367. "'Does my question amuse you, Garak?' Parn asked... He didn't even try to disguise his impatience with me. The ideology, the patchwork of old ideas and mythology was in place; the boundaries that determined what was sacred and received 'truth' and what was heresy were set: all that remained was for him to arrange the power structure and assign each person his or her role in it... "
religious - fictional galaxy 2375 Shatner, William; Judith Reeves-Stevens & Garfield Reeves-Stevens. Spectre (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1999; c. 1998) [The main fictional cultures/races in novel are Vulcans and Klingons. Many others are present, including Cardassian, Ferengi, Betazoid, Romulan. But little is said about religious or philosophical matters.]
religious - fictional galaxy 2375 Sheard, Kim. "Touched " in Star Trek: Strange New Worlds II (Dean Wesley Smith, ed.) New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 267. Pathon:
Pg. 296: "During the seventeenth cycle in the age of Marth'o, aliens first reached my planet... I was on my way home from the Grain Festiva... I would soon be reaching the Age of choosing and would need to select either an occupation or a mate... "; Pg. 297: "It walked upright on two legs as we Pathons do, but it had only two arms and two eyes. ";

Pg. 302: "Meanwhile, Chakotay spoke with me about my people and our culture.

'There are about five hundred thousand of us on our planet,' I explained.

'How are they counted?' he asked.

'At birth, we are each issued an ID tab.' I lifted my center arm to show him where it was attached to the skin underneath. 'It is taken off the body at death, and the numbers are adjusted.' " [Story has extensive references to the religion and culture of the Pathon. Other refs. not in DB.]

religious - fictional galaxy 2375 Weddle, David and Jeffrey Lang. Abyss (Star Trek: DS9/Section 31 #3). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 161. Jem'Hadar:
"'At first, I wasn't sure I understood why the Founders had decided to create a species with a biochemical dependence. It seemed counterintuitive, especially since the Jem'Hadar were genetically programmed to think of them as akin to gods. But then, I began to see the sense of it. In addition to nourishing them, the ketracel-white also relieves them of any unnecessary concepts of guilt or innocence. In their view, there is only order or disorder. It is a very . . . liberating perspective.' " [More, not in DB.]
religious - fictional galaxy 2376 Carey, Diane. "Exodus " in What Lay Beyond (Star Trek: Challenger). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 56. "Living, The":
"The planet couldn't support a population. The Living were more devolving than evolving. Families had fewer children, even though they produced as many as they could. Women dutifully produced babies their entire adult lives, by several men, to keep genetics from singularizing. They had developed an Eskimo-like manner of cooperative tribal structure, to be sure children were cared for if their adult relatives didn't survive the hunts, and to make sure nonhunting families were fed. There was food sharing and a strict hierarchy of distribution, the top of which involved the families of people who had been 'chosen' in the hunt. Perfect, to the dreamer's eye.

...They wanted to go. They planned to go. Unless they were 'chosen' in the hunt of a free dancer or 'Anointed'--killed by accident or illness--they worked toward the goal of eventually leaving this tin pot. "

religious - fictional galaxy 2376 Carey, Diane. "Exodus " in What Lay Beyond (Star Trek: Challenger). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 57. "Living, The":
"A year... sounded long, but wasn't. The Living had been waiting years on this side for Riutta and Luntee to send a summons, then instead received a cutoff. They supposed the Anointed had met with tragedy in space. After hundreds of generations, nothing had come of this. They had accepted two new Elders, along with the one left behind, and they had begun again. More than half of these people would die in a stepped-up schedule of hunts, to provide enough energy for the other half to keep existing on this brittle ferrous ball. " [More]
religious - fictional galaxy 2376 David, Peter. Cold Wars (ST: New Frontier / Gateways: Book 6 of 7). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 218. Aerons:
"'Yes! Had you not taken it upon yourself to separate us from the Markanians, to deprive us of our beloved Sinqay and the Holy Site, none of this would have happened. We [the Aerons, led by the Zarns] are the stronger race; we would have eliminated them in time. and then, as promised, the Holy Site would have been ours.' There were grunts of agreement from behind him. 'But we will not be deterred in our quest. We will triumph over the--'

'Oh. Right. The Holy Site,' said Calhoun, almost as if being reminded of an afterthought. 'I'm planning to destroy it.'

There was dead silence in the Counselar chamber. Burkitt's mouth moved with no sound emerging for some moments before he finally managed to get out, 'What?' in a hoarse whisper.

'I won't have any trouble finding it; Si Cwan can bring me right to it...'

'But . . . but the Prime Directive--!'

'Applies only to civilized worlds. Sinqay, so far as we know, is devoid of life...' " [Other refs., not in DB.]

religious - fictional galaxy 2376 DeCandido, Keith R. A. Demons of Air and Darkness (Star Trek: DS9 / Gateways: Book 4 of 7). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 15. Andorian:
Pg. 15: "'Excellent,' Shar said, letting out a breath. Then he muttered some kind of supplication to the Andorian deity. ";

Pg. 70: "'Well, I'm not a Bajoran, and I wasn't raised in that religious tradition, so no, but it's an interesting hypothesis.'

'So there's no way I'm going to convince you that you need to live a profitable life so you can go to the Divine Treasury when you die?' [Ferengi afterlife]

Shar said in all seriousness. 'Probably not, no. The Andorian afterlife is a bit more--complicated than that, I'm afraid.' " [Shar, an Andorian, is one of the main characters in the novel, as is his mother. He is pictured on the novel. Many refs. to Andorian culture and religion, not in DB. Other fictional races/cultures/religions in novel include Ferengi, Trill, Jem'Hadar, Bajoran, Malon, Hirogen, Europa Novan, Cardassian, Orion, Iconian, and others.]

religious - fictional galaxy 2376 DeCandido, Keith R. A. Demons of Air and Darkness (Star Trek: DS9 / Gateways: Book 4 of 7). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 161. Andorian:
"Ezri thought a moment, then decided to go for broke. 'I take it there are three people on Andor waiting for you to come home to take part in the shelthreth?'Shar whirled around, his antennae raised. In a quiet, stunned voice, he asked, 'You know about that?'

'I've been around for three centuries, Shar--I've known a few Andorians in my time.'

Nodding, Shar said, 'Yes, of course you have.'

'And I know how important the shelthreth is.'

Shar's face hardened. 'Not you as well, Ezri. I know that I have a duty to Andor. And whether anyone back home understands this or not, I'm fulfilling it in my own way. But now Zhavey [his mother] is...' " [As mentioned elsewhere in the novel, Andorian marriages involve more than two people.]

religious - fictional galaxy 2376 Martin, Michael A. & Andy Mangels. Cathedral (Star Trek: DS9; "Mission: Gamma " #3 of 4). New York: Pocket Books (2002); pg. 182. Jem'Hadar:
"Taran'atar mulled that over momentarily. 'No, I do not. Believing that the Founders are gods requires no faith on the part of a Jem'Hadar.'

'Why's that?'

'Because the Founders are gods.' " [Other refs., not in DB.]

religious - fictional galaxy 2377 David, Peter. Being Human (ST: New Frontier). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 47. Deltan:
"'No. No, the Deltans take an Oath of Celibacy, not chastity. For all their legendary sexual techniques, Deltans are still a fairly conservative race. They only engage in such congress with those who are to be lifemates. The problem is that if they become involved with a non-Deltan, then sex with his partner becomes the only thing that the non-Deltan can live for. It consumes the non-Deltan's life. So they take their Oath of Celibacy, promising not to enter in the bond of lifemating with any non-Deltan Starfleet personnel. And since they won't become sexually involved with a nonlifemate, chastity is simply an extension of that. But the oath doesn't apply to other Deltans . . .' "
religious - fictional galaxy 2400 Cherryh, C. J. Brothers of Earth. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1976); pg. 92. "'Intaem-Inta. That is the great temple. It is the beginning of Cadmisan.'

The gong moaned forth again through the fog-stilled air, measured, four times more. Then it was done, the last echoes dying.

'It is the fourth of Nermotai,' said Mim, 'the first of the Sufak holy days. The temple will sound the Inta every morning and every evening for the next seven days, and the Sufaki will make prayers and invoke the Intain, the spirits of their gods.'

'What is done there?' Kurt asked.

'It is the old religion which was here before the Families. I am not really sure what is done, and I do not care to know. I have heard that they even invoke the names of god-kings in Phan's own temple, but we do not go there, ever. There were old gods in Chteftikan, old and evil gods from the First Days, and once a year the Sufaki call their names and pay them honor, to appease their anger at losing this land to Phan. These are beings we Indras do not name.' " [More.]

religious - fictional galaxy 2400 Cherryh, C. J. Brothers of Earth. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1976); pg. 114. Pg. 110: "'Our Ancestors,' he prayed, 'receive this soul, not born of our kindred; spirits of our Ancestors, receive her, Mim h'Elas. Take her gently among you, one with us, as birth-sharing, loving, beloved. Peace was upon her heart, this child of Elas, daughter of Minas, of Indras, of the far-shining city.'

'Spirits of Elas,' prayed Kta, holding his hands also toward the fire, 'our Ancestors, wake and behold us. Guardians of Elas, see us, this wrong done against us. Swift to vengeance, our Ancestors, wake and behold us.' ";

Pg. 114: "'You do not need to give me hospitality,' said Kurt, for the sharing of bread and fire created a religious bond forever unless otherwise agreed from the beginning. 'But I do ask you for food and drink. It is the second day since I have eaten.' ";

Pg. 181: "He wept, unashamed. 'Priest,' he said, not knowing how to address the man with honor, 'please help us.' " [Many other refs. to the fictional religions of this novel, not in DB.]

religious - fictional galaxy 2400 Ing, Dean. Cathouse. New York: Baen (1990); pg. ]. Kzinti:
Pg. 206: "Uh-huh; they have priests instead of senators. But this smells like the old American system before direct elections. 'Your priest is not bound to vote as you say?' A derisive snort was his answer, and he persisted. 'Do you vote your priests in?' ";

Pg. 220: "Scarface checked the magazine of his sidearm. 'One priest has paid. There is no reason why I cannot extract full payment from the others now,' he said.

'Yes, there is,' Locklear replied... 'Before you can get 'em all, they'll send devout fools to be killed while they escape. You said so yourself. Scarface, I don't want innocent kzin blood on my hands! But after my old promise to Boots, I saw what that maniac was doing and--let's just say my honor was at stake... If you'll help me get the wiring rigged for these stasis units, we can hide them in the right spot and take the entire bloody priesthood in one pile.' " [Other refs., not in DB to kzinti priesthood. Refs. to kzin race/culture throughout novel.]

religious - fictional galaxy 2400 McCaffrey, Anne. "Duty Calls " in L. Ron Hubbard Presents The Best of Writers of the Future (Algis Budrys, ed.) Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (2000; c. 1994); pg. 353-378. Khalians/Hrrubans:
[Main fictional alien species in story are the Khalians and the Hrrubans. Story is apparently about warfare between these species. Little or no religion attributed to these species or described.]
religious - fictional galaxy 2500 Anthony, Piers & Jo Anne Taeusch. The Secret of Spring. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 51. "Curious, Herb accepted it and flipped open the cover. He gasped in disbelief. It was a seed catalog! The Patrol might be tolerant of most of these establishments, for sex played a large role in many of the new imported offworlder religions, but this was incredible. Child pollinography was an instant cancellation of license and closedown. Herb handed it back, disgusted. "
religious - fictional galaxy 2500 Bujold, Lois McMaster. Barrayar. New York: Baen (1991); pg. 77. Barrayaran:
"Maybe a raucous street party--they drove around several--wasn't such a bad idea. The celebrators reminded Cordelia of primitive Earth men banging pots and firing guns to drive off the dragon that was eating the eclipsing moon. This strange autumn sadness could consume an unwary soul. Gregor's birthday was well-timed. "
religious - fictional galaxy 2500 Bujold, Lois McMaster. Barrayar. New York: Baen (1991); pg. 90. Barrayaran:
Pg. 90: "'...I'm surprised you don't import less lethal mood-altering drugs.'

Kareen's smile sharpened. 'But drunken brawls are traditional... In fact, such things are coming in, at least in the shuttleport cities. As usual, we seem to be adding to rather than replacing our customs.' "; Pg. 108: "'I don't approve of Barrayaran notions of therapy. Particularly when colored by political expediency.'

'I've come to realize that, milady...

'How did they work it? Burn out selected neurons? Chemical erasure?'

'No . . . they used drugs, but nothing was destroyed. The doctors called it suppression-therapy. We just called it hell. Every day we went to hell, till we didn't want to go there any more.' "

religious - fictional galaxy 2500 Bujold, Lois McMaster. Barrayar. New York: Baen (1991); pg. 177. Barrayaran:
"Ah, yes, the barbaric Barrayaran custom of introducing their women to sex with the pain of unanesthesized defloration. Though considering how much pain their reproductive methods later entailed, perhaps it constituted fair warning. "
religious - fictional galaxy 2500 Bujold, Lois McMaster. Barrayar. New York: Baen (1991); pg. 189. Barrayaran:
"Barrayaran ceremonies for the dead approached ancestor-worship, as if remembrance could keep the souls alive. "
religious - fictional galaxy 2500 Bujold, Lois McMaster. Barrayar. New York: Baen (1991); pg. 293. Barrayaran:
"Good God. Did Barrayaran men actually pay for the privilege of committing that bit of sexual torture upon uninitiated women? "
religious - fictional galaxy 2500 Bujold, Lois McMaster. Barrayar. New York: Baen (1991); pg. 315. Barrayaran:
"I guess I understand now why Drou was so worried about being pregnant. "

"Do you? " said Cordelia.

"Lady Vorpatril's make mine look . . . pretty small. God, that looked painful. "

"Mm. But the pain only lasts a day.' She rubbed her scar. 'Or a few weeks. I don't think that's it. "

"What is, then? "

"It's . . . a transcendental act. Making life. I thought about that, when I was carrying Miles. 'By this act, I bring one death into the world.' One birth, one death, and all the pain and acts of will between. I didn't understand certain Oriental mystic symbols like the Death-mother, Kali, till I realized it wasn't mystic at all, just plain fact. A Barrayaran-style sexual 'accident' can start a chain of causality that doesn't stop till the end of time. Our children change us...' "

religious - fictional galaxy 2500 Bujold, Lois McMaster. Barrayar. New York: Baen (1991); pg. 358. Barrayaran:
Pg. 358: "'I feel dirty. I feel sick.'

'Yes. Most sane people do, coming in off a combat mission. It's a very familiar state of mind.' He paused. 'But if a Betan can become so Barrayaran, maybe it's not so impossible for Barrayarans to become a little more Betan. Change is possible.' "; Pg. 363: "Given the bewildering pitfalls of Barrayaran social custom, Cordelia was just as happy to leave it to the experienced elderly lady... "

religious - fictional galaxy 2500 Bujold, Lois McMaster. Barrayar. New York: Baen (1991); pg. 377. Barrayaran:
"'Do you Betans have any nursery tales about the witch's name-day gifts?'

'The good and bad fairies seem to all be out in force for this one, don't they?... I don't know if Piotr meant Bothari for a blessing or a curse?...'...

Welcome to Barrayar, son. Here you go: have a world of wealth and poverty, wrenching change and rooted history. "

religious - fictional galaxy 2500 Bujold, Lois McMaster. Barrayar. New York: Baen (1991); pg. 175-176. Barrayaran:
"'...I was on the verge of being old for the organic method, which seemed the only one available here on Barrayar; more to the point, he wanted to start soon. So a few weeks after we were married, I went and had my contraceptive removed. Made me feel very wicked. I couldn't have had it taken out without buying a license.'

'Really?' Drou listened with... fascination.

'Yes, it's a Betan legal requirement. You have to qualify for a parent's license first. I've had my implant since I was fourteen. I had a menstrual period once then, I remember. We turn them off till they're needed. I go my implant, and my hymen cut, and my ears pierced, and had my coming-out party. . . .'

'You didn't . . . start doing sex when you were fourteen, did you?' Droushnakovi's voice was hushed.

'I could have. But it takes two, y'know. I didn't find a real lover till later.' Cordelia was ashamed to admit how much later... "

religious - fictional galaxy 2500 Bujold, Lois McMaster. Barrayar. New York: Baen (1991); pg. 8-9. Barrayaran:
Pg. 8: "Cordelia sat back wanly, and watched the Barrayaran capital city of Vorbarr Sultana pass by through the thick canopy. She hadn't married the Regend of Barrayar, four months back. She'd married a simple retired soldier. "; Pg. 9: "Other Barrayarans, presumably, in the faction-fractured political landscape. A very Barrayaran phrase the old Count had used that ticked her humor now ran, disquieting, through her memory. With all this manure around, there's got to be a pony someplace. " [Other references to Barrayar and Barrayaran culture are throughout the book. This is the central fictional group in the book. This is a geographically-based culture, not a distinct religion.]
religious - fictional galaxy 2500 Dickson, Gordon R. Other. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 15. [Book jacket, including a quote from page 15.] "'Call me Bleys,' said the figure... 'I speak for no church, he said in that oddly memorable, compelling voice, 'for no political party or policy. If I am anything, I am only a philosopher. A philosopher in love with humanity; and concerned about its future . . .'

The voice wen on, filling the car, holding the five people captive with its sound and its words, in spite of their familiarity with the message and the one who spoke it. Only Joshua, glancing for a moment sideways at his father's face, saw that Henry's eyes had gone as hard as the blue-white stones of yard and field.

...But within his inner circle as Henry McClean, Soldier of God, and a True Faith-Holder, Henry fears for the soul of his nephew Bleys... " [Many refs. to fictional religions throughout novel, not in DB.]

religious - fictional galaxy 2500 Dickson, Gordon R. Other. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 11. "It was not until the small hours of the morning that Henry MacLean had finished the cleaning and reassembly of his power pistol... he would have done with a fresh reserve coil, in combat as a Soldier of God... 'God,' he prayed, 'he is like a son. Like Joshua--and like Will, who is in Thy arms now. I love him equally. Thou knowest why I must do this.' "
religious - fictional galaxy 2500 Dickson, Gordon R. Other. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 24. "It's been three hundred years now since terraforming allowed the first immigrants to go to the New Worlds. For a long time those who left Old Earth were too busy struggling to survive, to consider where they were headed in the long run. But they've had time now. The Fanatics, the True-Faith-Holders, the Dorsai and the Exotics believe they've already found their future and they're satisfied with it. But everyone else on our New Worlds is reaching out for something they can't describe... "
religious - fictional galaxy 2500 Dickson, Gordon R. Other. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 33. "'You must not condemn him,' Henry said to Bleys. 'He is Fanatic and probably will never be a True Faith-Holder. It is clear in him; and sad as true. But even as a Fanatic, he's closer to God--much closer--than either you or Dahno have ever been. In his twisted faith--within its limits--he may well be an honest man.' "
religious - fictional galaxy 2500 Drake, David. The Tank Lords. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 1. Church of the Lord's Universe:
"...the clerical collar which completed the other's costume. The smooth, black synthetic contrasted oddly with the coveralls and shirt of local weave... Uniform issue would come soon.

At least, he hoped and prayed it would.

When the youth looked away after an embarrassed grin, the priest chuckled. 'Another damned old fool, hey, boy? There were a few in your family, weren't there . . . the ones who'd quote the Book of the Way saying not to kill--and here you go off for a hired murderer. Right?' He laughed again, seeing he had the younger man's attention. 'But that by itself wouldn't be so hard to take--you were leaving your family anyways, weren't you, nobody really believes they'll keep close to their people after five years, ten years of star hopping...' "

religious - fictional galaxy 2500 Drake, David. The Tank Lords. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 2. Church of the Lord's Universe:
Pg. 2: "'Haven't I seen a thousand of you?' the priest blazed back, his eyes like sparks glinting from the drill shaft as the sledge drove it deeper into the rock. 'You're young and strong and bright enough to pass Alois Hammer's tests--you be proud of that, boy, few enough are fit for Hammer's Slammers. There you were, a man grown who'd read all the cop about mercenaries, believed most of it . . . more'n ever you did the Book of the Way, anyhow. Sure, I know. So you got some off-planet factor to send your papers in for you...'

The priest caught Rob's blink of surprise. He chuckled again, a cruel, unpriestly sound, and said, 'He told you it was for friendship? One of these days you'll learn what friendship counts...' "

religious - fictional galaxy 2500 Drake, David. The Tank Lords. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 3. Church of the Lord's Universe:
"'...now... here's a stranger riding you too. I don't mean it like I sound . . . wasn't born to the work, I guess. There's priests--and maybe the better ones--who'd say that signing on with mercenaries means so long a spiral down that maybe your soul won't come out of it in another life or another hundred. But I don't see it like that.'

'Life's a forge, boy, and the purest metal comes from the hottest fire. When you've been under the hammer a few times, you'll find you've been beaten down to the real, no lies, no excuses. There'll be a time, then, when you go to look over the product . . . and if you don't like what you see, well, maybe there's time for change too.'

The priest turned his head to scan the half of the horizon not blocked by the bellied-down bulk of the starship... " [Other refs. to this priest, not in DB.]

religious - fictional galaxy 2500 Drake, David. The Tank Lords. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 319. Church of the Lord's Universe:
"When I was first gelded and sold to the Baron as his Lady's page, Wolfitz had helped me continue the studies I began when I was training for the Church. "
religious - fictional galaxy 2500 Drake, David. The Tank Lords. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 372. Church of the Lord's Universe:
[1] [Appendix] "The Church of the Lord's Universe

Perhaps the most surprising thing about the faith that men took to the stars--and vice versa--was that it appeared to differ so little from the liturgical protestantism of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries. Indeed, services of the Church of the Lord' Universe--almost always, except by Unitarians, corrupted to 'Universal Church'--so resembled those of a high-flying Anglican parish of 1920 that a visitor from the past would have been hard put to believe that he was watching a sect as extreme in its own way as the Society for Krishna Consciousness was in its. "

religious - fictional galaxy 2500 Gardner, James Alan. Expendable. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 27. Opters:
"'I'm an Opter.'

'I guessed.'

'I'm opting to die.'

'Yes.'

She looked at me with a sly smile. Her eyes kept losing focus. 'You don't understand this, do you?'

'I've read about Opters,' I said. 'Your religion claims that any attempt to prevent death is an affront to your god's will.'

'You don't understand.' She let her head flop back onto the plastic sheet I had put over the pillow. Her breath slid softly in and out, gradually slowing.

For a while, I watched her stare blindly at the ceiling. Those blind eyes gave her face an ecstatic radiance that annoyed me. Radiance always did.

'Can't you close your eyes?' I asked.

'Why?'

'I don't like the way you look.'

...'It doesn't hurt, you know.'

'Of course not. I gave you 20 cc's of picollin.'

...'It doesn't hurt because God is kind to those who come when She calls. It doesn't matter what you've done, if you say yes. She'll just sing you to sleep. La, la-lah, la, la-lah . . .' "

religious - fictional galaxy 2500 Leigh, Stephen. Dark Water's Embrace. New York: Avon (1998); pg. xii. Sa:
Pg. xii: "Sa: Miccail. A suffix indicating a Miccail midmale. Nearly all the rare midmales belonged to the Sa sect, a religious colony based on an island. "; Pg. xiii: "VeiSaTi: Miccail. One of the gods of the Miccail, the one most sacred to the sect of the Sa. " [Many refs., not in DB.]
religious - fictional galaxy 2500 Matthews, Susan R. Colony Fleet. New York: Eos/HarperCollins (2000); pg. 10. Jneers:
"More than three hundred and eighty years since the Colony Fleet had set out on its mission; that meant more than three hundred and sixty-five years of tradition, of Comparisons Testing year after year. Three hundred and sixty-five years of twenty-two-year-old Jneers testing themselves against their peers to see who was to claim the technical direction of the Colony Fleet by right of superior analytical ability. Three hundred and eighty yers since the hope ofa dying world had launched Colony Fleet, and then fallen silent; and now approaching Waystation One at last. " [Extensive refs., not in DB.]
religious - fictional galaxy 2500 Matthews, Susan R. Colony Fleet. New York: Eos/HarperCollins (2000) Jneers:
[Back cover] "Four hundred years have passed since the leaders of an ecologically threatened Earth launched a great fleet of asteroid ships toward the stars... Hillbrane Harkover belongs to the Jneers, the privileged third of the tripartite class system that evolved during the voyage. Now, with the first world landing mere months away, she finds herself betrayed by one of her own, expelled from her caste, and exiled to the dangerous fringes of the fleet. Abandoned here, where lowly Mechs toil in unsafe, unhealthy conditions, Hillbrane no longer has a place in the cruel hierarcy she has always taken for granted. But a four-century-old dream is suddenly in dire jeopardy, doomed by custom, suspicion, and class hatred. And someone on the outside may be the only one who can save the first colony--and the fleet--from catastrophe. " [The third group is Oway.]
religious - fictional galaxy 2500 Matthews, Susan R. Colony Fleet. New York: Eos/HarperCollins (2000); pg. 158. Mechs:
"She had to change their minds.

Yet how could she hope for a hearing? Peoples' convictions were fixed, and had been since the first day. Less than six months go she would have been confident that it was because the Jneers were right and the Mechs mistaken, and subterfuge if necessary was allowable in order to carry the Jneer point of view, because it was the correct point of view. Now she knew what the Mechs were saying, and she believed them, and she was desperate to communicate to her former peers that if they did not listen to what the Mechs had to say, a disaster was going to come down upon the First Colony and destroy it. " [Extensive other refs. to Mechs and Jneers, the two major fictional groups in novel.]

religious - fictional galaxy 2520 Bujold, Lois McMaster. The Vor Game. New York: Baen (1990); pg. 75. Barrayaran:
Pg. 75: "Miles silently cursed the anonymous clever boffin who'd invented fetaine as a terror weapon, not for his chemistry, but for his insight into the Barraryaran psyche. Fetaine could surely never have been used, could never be used. Any faction trying to do so must rise up against itself and tear apart in moral convulsions. "; Pg. 148: "Thank God the Barrayaran aristocracy still insisted on military training for its scions. " [The fictional Barraryarans and their culture are mentioned frequently in this book. Other refs. not in DB. This is geographically-based culture. Other fictional planetary cultures are mentioned as well.]
religious - fictional galaxy 2530 Bujold, Lois McMaster. Mirror Dance. Riverdale, NY: Baen (1994); pg. 145. Barrayaran:
[Actual year unknown.] "'I'm from Beta Colony, kiddo... Betan law is very sensible and clear on the topic of clones. It's only Barrayaran custom that finds itself at a loss. Barrayarans!' She pronounced it like a swear word. 'Barrayar lacks a long experience of dealing with all the logical variants on human reproduction. No legal precedents. And if it's not a tradition,' she put the same spin on the word as had Bothari-Jesek, 'they don't know how to cope.' " [Barrayarans are mentioned throughout the book, and appear to be one of the primary fictional cultural groups in the novel. Most references are not in DB. Some may be listed simply under 'galaxy' as location, with no named religious group.]
religious - fictional galaxy 2531 Bujold, Lois McMaster. A Civil Campaign. Riverdale, NY: Baen (1999); pg. 47. Barrayaran:
"Lady Alys glowered at her flimsy, and added, 'Fireworks.'

Miles blinked, then realized this wasn't a prediction of the probably result of the clash in social views between his Betan mother and his Barrayaran aunt, but rather, the last--thank God--item on today's agenda.

'Yes!' said Gregor, smiling eagerly. All the Barrayarans round the table, including Lady Alys, perked up at this. An inherent cultural passion for things that wen boom, perhaps. "

religious - fictional galaxy 2531 Bujold, Lois McMaster. A Civil Campaign. Riverdale, NY: Baen (1999); pg. 312-313. Barrayaran:
"Of course, his introduction to his own sexuality had included such ghastly trauma and tortures, it was only natural he be worried sick. She smiled reassuringly at him now. 'If that's Barrayar, I'll take Beta!'

...'...Now, Beta can control one's ovaries; Barrayar, especially during the Time of Isolation, was forced to try to control the entire woman attached to them. Throw in Barrayar's need to increase its population to survive, at least as pressing as Beta's to limit its to the same end, and your peculiar gender-biased inheritance laws, and, well, here we all are.' "

religious - fictional galaxy 2531 Bujold, Lois McMaster. A Civil Campaign. Riverdale, NY: Baen (1999); pg. 32. Betan:
"With a reluctant frown, she drew her Betan earrings from her ears, and tucked them into her boleropocket. Mama had hung around with Countess Cordelia enough; she might well be able to decode the Betan meaning. This was the style that said: Yes, I'm a consenting and contraceptive-protectd adult, but I am presently in an exclusive relationship, so please do not embarrass us both by asking. Which was rather a lot to encrypt in a few twists of metal, and the Betans had a dozen more styles for other nuances; she'd graduated through a couple of them. The contraceptive implant the earrings advertised could now just ride along in secret, no one's business but her own. " [Many other refs. to Betan culture, and the other cultures--Komarran, Barrayaran, Jacksonian, Cetagandan (e.g., pg. 44, 110, 403), Escobaran--, in book, but not in DB.]
religious - fictional galaxy 2531 Bujold, Lois McMaster. A Civil Campaign. Riverdale, NY: Baen (1999); pg. 32. Betan:
"Kareen considered briefly the comparison of Betan earrings with related social signals in other cultures: the wedding rings, certain styles of clothing... or veils or facial hair or tattoos. All such signals could be subverted, as with unfaithful spouses whose behavior belied their outward statement of monogamy, but really the Betans seemed very good about keeping congruent to theirs. Of course, they had so many choices. Wearing a false signal was highly disapproved, socially. It screws it up for the rest of us, a Betan had... explained to her. The whole idea is to eliminate the weird guessing-games. You had to admire their honesty. No wonder they did so well at the sciences. In all, Kareen decided, there was a lot about the sometimes appallingly sensible Betan-born Countess Cordelia Vorkosigan that she thought she might understand much better now. But Tante Cordelia wouldn't be back home to talk with till nearly the Emperor's wedding at Midsummer... "
religious - fictional galaxy 2531 Bujold, Lois McMaster. A Civil Campaign. Riverdale, NY: Baen (1999); pg. 47. Betan:
Pg. 29: "Damn that smile. It was Ivan's fault... "; Pg. 402: "'I just found out what Alexi Vormoncrief's new posting is.'

'I hope it's the ninth circle of hell!' she said vengefully. " [Reference to 'Hell' and 'Damn' provide linguistic evidence of a religious, probably Christian, background, at least historically.]

religious - fictional galaxy 2531 Bujold, Lois McMaster. A Civil Campaign. Riverdale, NY: Baen (1999); pg. 312. Betan:
"She'd been too shy to start with an actual man, so she'd hired a hermaphrodite Licensed Practial Sexuality Therapist whom Mark's counselor had recommended. The L.P.S.T. had explained to her kindly that hermaphrodites were extremely popular with young persons taking the introductory practical course for just that reason. It had all worked out really really well. Mark, anxiously hovering by his comconsole for her post-coital report, had been so pleased for her. Of course, his introduction to his own sexuality had included such ghastly trauma and tortures, it was only natural he be worried sick. She smiled reassuringly at him now. 'If that's Barrayar, I'll take Beta!' "
religious - fictional galaxy 2531 Bujold, Lois McMaster. A Civil Campaign. Riverdale, NY: Baen (1999); pg. 312-313. Betan:
"Tante Cordelia said thoughtfully, 'It's not entirely that simple. Both societies seek to solve the same fundamental problem--to assure that all children arriving will be cared for. Betans make the choice to do it directly, technologically, by mandating a biochemical padlock on everyone's gonads. Sexual behavior seems open at the price of absolute social control on its reproductive consequences. Has it never crossed your mind to winder how that is enforced. It should. Now, Beta can control one's ovaries; Barrayar, especially during the Time of Isolation, was forced to try to control the entire woman attached to them. Throw in Barrayar's need to increase its population to survive, at least as pressing as Beta's to limit its to the same end, and your peculiar gender-biased inheritance laws, and, well, here we all are.' "
religious - fictional galaxy 2531 Bujold, Lois McMaster. Komarr. Riverdale, NY: Baen (1998); pg. 29. Barrayaran:
"...she still had to make an effort not to think of it a Barrayaran-style District. Barrayaran District boundaries were more organic, higgly-piggly territories following rivers, mountain ranges, and ragged lines where Counts' armies had lost historic babbles. Komarran Sectors were neat geometric slices equitably dividing the globe. " [Many Barrayaran refs. throughout novel, not in DB. One of main cultures in novel.]
religious - fictional galaxy 2555 Barton, William. Acts of Conscience. New York: Warner Books (1997); pg. 263. Kali Meitner:
Pg. 263: "Silence. Then one of the other boys, sounding a little afraid, 'Oh, Kali, Scott!' " [Kali's name appears to be used here as a profanity. But the reference isn't to Kali the ancient Hindu goddess, but to a future important person named Kali Meitner.]; Pg. 303: "'That's what they say. But one person never matters, even if that person turns out to be Jesus, or Kali Meitner, or something.' "; Pg. 311: "Sudden, stark memory of myself, stripped naked, tied to the Wheel of Men's Repentance, in the dim shadows of the Hall of Kali Meitner's Grace, whispering the prayer they'd taught me, Kali Meitner, beloved of God, who suffered for our sins, lend me the grace to suffer as you suffered at the dirty hands of . . .

Over the chanted dollie prayers, I heard a girl's voice sob, 'Oh, Goddess, why? Now I'll never see the egg . . .' " [Other refs., not in DB.]

religious - fictional galaxy 2600 Zettel, Sarah. Reclamation. New York: Warner Books (1996) [Book jacket] "Heretic priest turned data pirate, Eric Born has run from his past for years. Then his steady clients--a self-proclaimed master race called the Vitae kidnap a mysterious pariah named Arla Stone from the Realm of the Nameless, the shattered, pre-technological planet Eric fled long ago. Priest and peasant plunge into a mystery mixing myth, genetics, artifacts, aliens, AIs, slavery, and Reclamation. Now Eric is on the run from his own masters, and even his telekinetic abilities and Arla's wits may not be enough to save them . . . " [As indicated by the book jacket, religious themes are prominent in the novel.]


religious - fictional, continued

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