Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

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religious - fictional, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
religious - fictional galaxy 1982 Adams, Douglas. Life, the Universe and Everything. New York: Harmony Books (1982); pg. 83. Pg. 83: "'Nothing is lost forever,' said Slartibartfast, his face flickering readily in the light of the candle that the robot waiter was trying to take away, 'except for the Cathedral of Chalesm.'

'The what?' said Arthur with a start.

'The Cathedral of Chalesm,' repeated Slartibartfast. 'It was during the course of my researches at the Campaign for Real Time that I . . .'

'The what?' said Arthur again. ";

Pg. 90: "...news broke that not only had the great Cathedral of Chalesm been pulled down in order to build a new ion refinery, but that the construction of the refinery had taken so long, and had had to extend so far back into the past in order to allow ion production to start on time, that the Cathedral of Chalesm had now never been built in the first place. Picture postcards of the cathedral suddenly became immensely valuable. "

religious - fictional galaxy 1982 Adams, Douglas. Life, the Universe and Everything. New York: Harmony Books (1982); pg. 98. "...because the lights came up and revealed what it was he had walked into.

It was a Cathedral of Hate.

It was the product of a mind that was not merely twisted, but actually sprained.

It was huge. It was horrific.

It had a statue in it.

We will come to the statue in a moment.

The vast, incomprehensively vast chamber looked as if it had been carved out of the inside of a mountain, and the reason for this was that that was precisely what it had been carved out of. It seemed to Arthur to spin sickeningly round his head as he stood and gaped it.

It was black.

Where it wasn't black you inclined to wish that it was, because the colors with which some of the unspeakable details were picked out ranged horribly across the whole spectrum of eye-defying colors, from Ultra Violent to Infra Dead, taking in Liver Purple, Loathsome Lilac, Matter Yellow, Burnt Hombre and Gan Green on the way. " [More, including refs. to Francis Bacon.]

religious - fictional galaxy 1982 Adams, Douglas. Life, the Universe and Everything. New York: Harmony Books (1982); pg. 178. "The planet was Dalforsas, the ship was this one. It appeared as a brilliant new star moving silently across the heavens.

Primitive Tribesmen who were sitting huddled on the cold Hillsides looked up... pointed... & swore that they had seen a sign, a sign from their Gods that meant that they must now... go and slay the evil Princes of the Plains.

In the high turrets of their palaces, the Princes of the Plains looked up and saw the shining star, and received it unmistakably as a sign from their Gods that they must go and attack the accursed Tribesmen of the Cold Hillsides.

And between them, the Dwellers in the Forest looked up into the sky and saw the sign of the new star, & saw it with fear and apprehension, for though they had never seen anything like it before they, too, knew precisely what it foreshadowed, and they bowed their heads in despair... that the Princes... & the Tribesmen... were about to beat the hell out of each other again. " [More, pg. 179-180.]

religious - fictional galaxy 1985 Hubbard, L. Ron. Mission Earth Vol. 1: The Invaders Plan. Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (1985); pg. 165. Voltarian:
"But the priest of Voltar say, 'Never get too fond of happiness or the Gods will take it away.' " [The Voltarians are the primary fictional alien race central to the novel. Other refs. to them throughout the book, but few explicit refs. to their religion.]
religious - fictional galaxy 1990 Bonanno, Margaret Wander. The Others. New York: St. Martin's Press (1990); pg. 369. [This novel has no apparent connection to Earth; it seems to take place on an entirely different planet. There is no way to connect it to our chronology.] "The People employ one unified calendar, which was established under the Plalan Ascendancy, a sun-worshiping, slave-trading society which endured for approximately eight hundred years before falling into decline. Droghen-Gerim's arrival on the Other Archipelago occurs in the year 1563 P.A. (Plalan Ascendancy). " [Many refs. throughout novel to fictional religions and cultures, only a few examples in DB.]
religious - fictional galaxy 1990 Bonanno, Margaret Wander. The Others. New York: St. Martin's Press (1990); pg. 188. Pg. 188: "'...I gave you Heged's 'Evolution of Weaponry in Tawa and Kelibesh,' WiseMari's 'Religions of Zanti.' Your own teacher Rau's monograph...' "; Pg. 210: "Yet finding us neither in need of their trade goods, nor desirous of exporting raw materials, nor eager to embrace any of their several missionary religions, what disposition might they make of us?

How much did Monitors elsewhere in the World know of the two nations' progress, and with what haste would they hie themselves back to the Archipelago with what they knew? "

religious - fictional galaxy 1990 Bonanno, Margaret Wander. The Others. New York: St. Martin's Press (1990); pg. 298. "'But where are your wastealmshouses? Your gaols, your churches?' Droghen asked again and again. To each inquiry Jeijinn gave the same reply: 'We have none.'

'Impossible!' "

religious - fictional galaxy 1991 Foster, Alan Dean. A Call to Arms. New York: Ballantine (1991); pg. 27. Pg. 26: "'All are free to act as they wish,' said One-who-Decides, 'within the Purpose. Daily life differs on all worlds, among all races. Neither we nor anyone else interferes with another race's culture or art or traditions. Within that context we all strive towards greater common goal, one which renders all friends. Not masters and slaves, as you describe it.' "; Pg. 27: "'...We regret the loss of any individual intelligence in a universe of millions of worlds inhabited by perhaps thousands of intelligences. The death of even one diminishes the Purpose.'

'You really are a strange bunch,' Prinac commented, scratching his long upper lip. 'If you were not fanatics you might even be likable.'

'Fanaticism and dedication are terms whose parameters could be argued endlessly. We believe we are dedicated. We already like you; for your forthrightness, your honesty, and your bravery.' " [Many refs., not in DB.]

religious - fictional galaxy 1992 Adams, Douglas. Mostly Harmless. New York: Ballantine (2000; c. 1992); pg. 2. Church of the Second Coming of the Great Prophet Zarquon:
[Zarquon invoked.] "This didn't, of course, deter their crews from wanting to fight the battles anyway. They were trained, they were ready, they'd had a couple of thousand years' sleep, they'd come a long way to do a tough job and, by Zarquon, they were going to do it. "
religious - fictional galaxy 1992 Adams, Douglas. Mostly Harmless. New York: Ballantine (2000; c. 1992); pg. 97. Church of the Second Coming of the Great Prophet Zarquon:
Pg. 97: "These were the Guide offices he was hanging outside, for Zark's sake, in danger of his life... "; Pg. 162: "'An RW6, for Zark's sake... I said please, for Zark's sake, don't take my ship...' " ['Zark' is apparently short for 'Zarquon,' and is invoked here as a profanity.]
religious - fictional galaxy 1993 Sawyer, Robert J. Fossil Hunter. New York: Ace Books (1993); pg. 1. "Five thousand kilodays ago, God laid the eight eggs of creation. When they hatched, the world was born.

From the first egg came all the water. God let it run in a vast circular path and it became the Great River.

From the second egg came Land itself, and God set Land floating down the River.

From the third egg came the air, and God allowed it to flow everywhere that was not the River and not the Land.

From the fourth egg came the sun, source of light and heat.

From the fifth egg came the stars, planets, and moons, and God raised them high above. " [More about this creation account. Extensive refs. throughout novel to the religious beliefs of the dinosaur-like intelligent species which is featured. Their beliefs include an active belief in God. Actual planet and time unknown: the planet seems unrelated to contemporary Earth.]

religious - fictional galaxy 1995 Benford, Gregory. "High Abyss " in New Legends. Greg Bear (ed.) New York: Tor (1995); pg. 110. [Actual time and place uncertain.] "Lambda felt a strange emotion as it watched this: the slow, stately progress of the World, while armies crawled across its promontories and plains like a spreading stain. A disease of understanding.

'O Prophet!' Lambda turned on four legs and watched its sub-commander approach. A full guard marched behind, a prisoner staggering in their blunt care.

'Well rendered,' Lambda said. 'No Dox will throw itself forward against our lines again.'

'All homage to you!' the co-commander shouted.

'You say too much.' Lambda answered the formal salute with the proper piety.

'Your strategy worked gloriously!'

'No, your strategy.'

'Prophet, you pointed out that seizing these heights would force the Doxes to attack Crossly.'

'It was an obvious point.'

'You orchestrated our columns with masterly grace.' " [Other refs. to this fictional culture, not in DB. No refs. by name to any actual Earth religions.]

religious - fictional galaxy 1995 Benford, Gregory. "High Abyss " in New Legends. Greg Bear (ed.) New York: Tor (1995); pg. 110-111. "These two basic facts, of RightMotion and Crosswise, had given Lambda the great clue. And, of course, had led to taunts, jeers, followed by persecutions in even the hushed hallways of the Collegium. Then long periods of study and experiment, of intense concentration on matters that unhinged most minds, and outraged others. After that, expulsion from the Collegium, scuffles, and even beatings at public speeches. Followed by long, aching time when Lambda could live and work only in secret, gathering adherents. To further the ideas that now grew apace within, Lambda had to adopt the mantle of the Prophet. Muster followers, form armies, learn the sly arts.

All for the vision. Their Kind had long lived in a benighted miasma, hugging to the warmth and sparkling wealth of the Mother, thinking nought of the mind's stretch, the intellect's reach-- " [Many other refs. not in DB. Story is primarily religious in theme.]

religious - fictional galaxy 1995 Le Guin, Ursula K. "Coming of Age in Karhide " in New Legends. Greg Bear (ed.) New York: Tor (1995); pg. 90. [Actual time and place uncertain.] "Time is different here. I learned in school how the Orgota, the Ekumen, and most other people count years... When the Defenders of the Faith kicked them out of Orgoreyn, when King Emran got into the Border War and lost Erhenrang, even when their Mobiles were outlawed and forced into hiding at Estre in Kerm, the Ekumen did nothing much but wait. They had waited for two hundred years, as patient as Handdara. They did one thing: they took our young king offworld to foil a plot, and then brought the same king back sixty years later to end her wombchild's disastrous reign. Argaven XVII is the only king who has ever ruled four years before her heir and forty years later. " [Many refs. throughout story to the fictional religion and culture portrayed. No refs. by name to any actual Earth religions.]
religious - fictional galaxy 1995 Lyris, Sonia Orin. "When Strangers Meet " in New Legends. Greg Bear (ed.) New York: Tor (1995); pg. 150. [Time and place uncertain.] "It was a good day, this tenth day before the festival of the cooling time...

'The silks have come again, Great One,' the green Second said.

The One had felt herself grow euphoric and relaxed lately, and though it happened every year, she found herself surprised at how complete the change was, so complete that those who came day after day to consult with her about festival plans did not irritate her even though they were, by now, quite familiar.

'The silks,' her Second said again, quite softly. Barely a breeze to remind the One that her attentions were asked.

'Yes, of course,' said the One. 'They want--what they always want.'

'Yes, Great One.'

'Then I will see them. Him. Is it a him?'

'Yes, Great One, their leaders are usually male.' The Second's tone was a mild echo of the One's own amusement. " [Other refs. to this fictional culture and religion throughout story. Story has no refs. by name to any actual Earth religions.]

religious - fictional galaxy 1997 Sawyer, Robert J. Illegal Alien. New York: Ace Books (1997); pg. 90. Tosoks:
Pg. 57: "'Are you or any of your colleagues qualified to serve as an attorney?'

'No,' said Kelkad. 'We do not have a system of laws comparable to yours. Oh, there are intercessors who will entreat God on one's behalf, and mediators for civil disputes. But we have nothing like your 'criminal-justice' system--indeed, I am not even sure I fully understand that term.' "; Pg. 90: "'On my world, there is no such thing as crime; allowing a crime to occur would imply that God had ceased to be vigilant over the affairs of her children. Besides, we do not prize material things the way they are prized here, so there is no theft of objects. And everybody has enough to eat, so there is no theft of food, or the means to acquire food... It is not my place to say, but it seems that your legal system is designed backward. The root causes of human crime appear to my no-doubt-ignorant eyes to be poverty and [drug addiction]. But instead of treating those...' "

religious - fictional galaxy 1997 Sawyer, Robert J. Illegal Alien. New York: Ace Books (1997); pg. 98. Tosoks:
[1] "'What about the terms 'good' and 'bad'?'

'A food item that has an agreeable taste is said to be good; one that has putrefied is said to be bad.'

'And what about the concepts of moral and immoral?'

'These apparently have to do with human religion.'

'They have no bearing on Tosok religion?'

'Tosoks believe in predetermination--we do the will of God.'

'You believe in a single God?'

'We believe in a single being that was foremother to our race.'

'And this God--she is good?'

'Well, she has not begun to putrefy.'

'You perform no actions that are not the will of your God?'

The God.'

'Pardon?' said Penney.

'It is not acceptable to speak of God possessively.'

'Sorry. You perform no actions that are not the will of the God?'

'By definition, such a thing would be impossible.' "

religious - fictional galaxy 1997 Sawyer, Robert J. Illegal Alien. New York: Ace Books (1997); pg. 98. Tosoks:
[2] "'Is there a devil in your religion?'

Hask's translator beeped. 'A--devil? The word is unfamiliar.'

'In many Earth religions,' said Frank, once again leaning against the wall, 'there is a supremely good being, called God, and an adversary, who attempts to thwart God's will. This adversary is called the devil.'

'God is omnipotent,' said Hask, looking briefly at Frank, then turning back to Penney. 'Nothing can thwart her.'

'Then there is no continuum of behavior?' asked the psychiatrist.

'I have encountered this concept repeatedly in human thought,' said Hask. 'The idea that everything moves from one extreme on the left to another on the right, or that there are two equal 'sides' to every issue--using the word 'sides' in a way a Tosok never would... This is an alien way of thinking to me; I rather suspect it has something to do with the left-right symmetry of your bodies...' " [More about Tosok religion and culture, not in DB.]

religious - fictional galaxy 1997 Sawyer, Robert J. Illegal Alien. New York: Ace Books (1997); pg. 99. Tosoks:
[3] "'...But we Tosoks have a front hand that is much stronger than our back hand; we have no concept--to use one of your words that does not translate fully--of what you call 'evenhandedness.' One perspective is always superior to the other; the front always takes precedence over the back. The aspect with the preponderance of power or weight is the side of God, and it always wins.'

Frank smiled. Clete would have loved that kind of biology-based answer.

'Let me ask you some hypothetical questions,' said Penney. 'Is it all right to steal?'

'If I do it, God certainly must have observed it, and since she did not stop me, it must be acceptable.'

'Is it all right to kill?'

'Obviously, God could prevent one from doing so if she wished; that she does not clearly means the killer must have been acting as her instrument.' "

religious - fictional galaxy 1997 Sawyer, Robert J. Illegal Alien. New York: Ace Books (1997); pg. 99. Tosoks:
[4] "Penney's eyebrows went up. 'Are there any acceptable actions?'

'Define unacceptable.'

'Unacceptable acts that cannot be countenanced. Acts that are not reasonable.'

'No.'

'If you killed someone because he was trying to kill you, would that be acceptable?'

'If it happened, it is acceptable.'

'If you killed someone because he was trying to steal from you, would that be acceptable?'

'If it happened, it is acceptable.'

'If you killed someone because the joke they told was one you had already heard, would that be acceptable?'

'If it happened, it is acceptable.'

'In our culture,' said Penney, 'we define insanity as the inability to distinguish moral acts from immoral acts.'

'There is no such thing as an immoral act.'

'So, by the definition of the human race, are you insane?'

Hask considered this for a moment. 'Unquestionably,' he said at last. "

religious - fictional galaxy 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 129. Forhilnors:
"Did God see all the conceivable actions for all conscious lifeforms--six billion humans, eight billion Forhilnors (as Hollus had told me at one point), fifty-seven million Wreeds... " [Pg. 26: The Forhilnors live on the third planet in the Beta Hydri system.]
religious - fictional galaxy 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 129. Wreeds:
"Did God see all the conceivable actions for all conscious lifeforms--six billion humans, eight billion Forhilnors (as Hollus had told me at one point), fifty-seven million Wreeds... " [Pg. 26: The Wreeds are the native species of the second planet of Delta Pavonis, the fourth-brightest star in the constellation of Pavo.]
religious - fictional galaxy 2001 Aldiss, Brian. "Apogee Again " in Supertoys Last All Summer Long. New York: St. Martin's Griffin (2001); pg. 37. Pg. 36-37: "...there was a time when I lived in a different world... One different thing was the way the female sex behaved. But then... the women had wings and could fly... There was... a saying among men: 'If the Hallon had meant us to fly, she would not have given us testicles'.

The men who lived on the ground had no beliefs. Even the idea of there being a Hallon had come from the women. They lived by the day, which meant they found it hard to imagine anything that was not in front of their eyes. But the women had a faith, and a rather ridiculous one, full of bizarre imaginings.

The women clutched their genitals as they recited: 'I believe that our brief life is no tall. I believe that after our lives are over, the darkness will live. I believe that dragons will fly and will eat us all, every bit of us, including those useful parts of which we have told.' " [Refs. to this alien race and religion throughout story.]

religious - fictional galaxy 2029 Quick, William T. Planet of the Apes. New York: HarperCollins (2001); pg. 90. "Attar, the gorilla commander, had a beatific expression on his face as he closed his eyes and began to pray.

'We give thanks to you, Semos, for the fruit of this land. Bless us, Holy Father, who created all apes in His image. Hasten the day when you will return, and bring peace to your children. Amen,' he declaimed in deep, sonorous, reverential tones.

When he finished, Attar sat in silence, without opening his eyes. He seemed to be waiting for something. General Thade cast an inclusive gaze around the table, and was quickly rewarded with an emphatic chorus of 'Amen!' from the rest of the guests.

Attar looked up and saw Krull staring at him. He seemed to wince, and looked away from the old ape's eyes.

Ari stared down at the table, deep in thought. She'd been trumped with religion, and could not continue the argument without appearing to be sacrilegious. " [Other refs. to the apes' religion, not in DB.]

religious - fictional galaxy 2030 Hogan, James P. Entoverse. New York: Ballantine (1991); pg. 5. Jevlenese:
"Nieru, the god of darkness, was descending in the west after his nightly domination of the sky, his cloak wrapped about him in a glowing purple spiral. Overhead, Cassona, the goddess who created weather, had become the dawn star. The lesser stars of her daughters, the Cassoneids, which oscillated about her--Peria, Isthucis, and Dometer, the spirits of wind, rain, and cloud--were very close, almost in alignment, which meant that it was early summer. Compared to the splendor that the night sky had once been, the stars were few and feeble.

Cassona had once been capricious and vindictive, liable to cleave mountains with a lightning bolt or send storms to devastate an entire countryside on a whim. Today, however, she was placid. The morning was clear, and the first light revealed that the peaks at the far end of the valley outside Orenash had receded unusually far during the night... During the night, Gralth, the gods' baker, who kneaded the world... " [Refs. throughout novel.]

religious - fictional galaxy 2030 Hogan, James P. Entoverse. New York: Ballantine (1991); pg. 6. Jevlenese:
"But these days, everyone was confused and afraid. The old ways were ceasing to work, and the old wisdom had no answers. Priests prayed, seers beseeched, and people redoubled their sacrifices. But the force-currents waned, and life-power ebbed. No signs came; the oracles remained mute. And as the gods died, their stars were going out.

Some thought that a great war had been waged in the sky, that new gods had defeated the old, and different laws were coming into being to rule the world. Mystics spoke of having seen a higher realm that they called Hyperia, beyond the everyday plane of existence, where perpetual serenity reigned and impossible happenings were commonplace.

Perhaps, a few of the more hopeful reasoned, the breaking down of the old laws portended a transition of their world into a phase that would be governed by the new kinds of laws glimpsed in the world beyond. They experimented in unheard-of ways to prepare themselves... "

religious - fictional galaxy 2030 Hogan, James P. Entoverse. New York: Ballantine (1991); pg. 8. Jevlenese:
"'The priests know!' Keyalo retorted. 'The gods were putting us to a test. And we shall all be judged by the failures of those who deny them, such as you.'

'Appeasing the gods, angering the gods . . .' Dalgren shook his head. 'I'm beginning to suspect that it's all in the mind. The world runs according to its own rules, and what we think they influence is all our imagination. When was anyone ever--'

Without a warning, Keyalo stepped forward and shot out an arm in the manner of a Master casting a firebolt, pointing at the mechanism on the slab. The tip of his finger swelled and glowed faintly for an instant--most people could achieve that--and then returned to normal without discharging. Keyalo stared at it in anger and surprised disappointment.

Perhaps he had thought that a concentrated moment of belief and will would induce a god to favor him.

Keyalo... hung around the disciples and the Masters, and sometimes attended the ceremonies... "

religious - fictional galaxy 2030 Hogan, James P. Entoverse. New York: Ballantine (1991); pg. 34. Jevlenese:
[1] "Having no concept of any alternative, they established the same system--or lack of one, in the opinion of many Terrans--on Jevlen in the period following the destruction of Minerva. So instead of producing the authoritarian institutions that were the inevitable outcome of the ferocious power struggles and ideological collisions characteristic of social evolution on Earth, Jevlenese society developed as a kind of patronized anarchy, secure in the guarantee of unlimited goods and products indefinitely, and the total absence of threats. Hence, survival had never played any great role as a shaper of individual or collective behavior; therefore, the rationality that human survival ultimately depends on had received little incentive to bloom. "
religious - fictional galaxy 2030 Hogan, James P. Entoverse. New York: Ballantine (1991); pg. 34. Jevlenese:
[2] "Over the years, many popular political and quasireligious cults had come to flourish on Jevlen. They appealed by catering to the needs of individuals to discover some purpose and to affirm their identity in a risk-free, unstructured society, and to the fascination of the uncritical for peculiar beliefs. One of the largest and most militant of them called itself the Axis of Light. It symbol was a green crescent. The leader, whose real name was Eubeleus, had been well connected with the previous regime responsible for the short-lived Federation and went by the public title of Deliverer.

The Deliverer's followers numbered millions. Their faith was a conviction that the key to opening up latent, mystical human powers lay in the supercomputer, JEVEX. Their indignation at the Ganymeans' shutting down of JEVEX, therefore, stemmed not merely from material deprivations or fears of a political tactic to encourage dependency, but from what they saw as a persecution of their beliefs. "

religious - fictional galaxy 2030 Hogan, James P. Entoverse. New York: Ballantine (1991); pg. 34. Jevlenese:
[3] "One of the most commonly used methods of interfacing to Thurien networking systems--JEVEX and VISAR--was by direct coupling into the user's neural centers, bypassing the normal sensory apparatus. The central dogma that the Deliverer taught was that the close-coupled interaction between the inner processes of the human psyche and the more remote levels of supercomputing complexity could unlike the mind to new dimensions of reality. Thus stimulated, the believer would be enabled to conquer the ultimate reaches of time and space. He would come to know his full self in all the dimensions of its existence, and gain access to the powers encompassed by them.

All heady stuff. The followers were suitably impressed. For his part, it was clear that the Deliverer, Eubeleus, held JEVEX in extraordinary awe and reverence, with an unswerving belief in its abilities that bordered on fanatical. "

religious - fictional galaxy 2030 Hogan, James P. Entoverse. New York: Ballantine (1991); pg. 108. Jevlenese:
"Ayultha, the leader of the Jevlenese cult that called itself the Spiral of Awakening and used the device of a purple spiral as its emblem, had come to Shiban. It was the same Ayultha who had led the demonstration in the city of Barusi on the southern continent, which had let to Garuth's calling Hunt.

The SoA had been founded over two hundred years previously by a woman called Sykha, a hitherto unheard-of office clerk who had undergone an abrupt personality change. The sect's basic creed was an involved doctrine of reincarnation, which held that the individual developed through a series of 'phases' of existence on successively higher planes, each one representing a step farther along a transition that progressed away from the purely material and mechanistic, and toward the spiritual and willful...' " [More.]

religious - fictional galaxy 2100 Drake, David. The Tank Lords. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 374. Church of the Lord's Universe:
[8] "Thus, when Man did reach the stars, the ships were crewed in large measure by Universalists. Those who had prayed for, worked for, and even sworn by the Way of the Stars, Via Stellarum, were certain to be among the first treading it. On Earth, the Church of the Lord's Universe had been a vocal minority; in the colonies spreading like a bacterial culture through the galaxy, Universalists were frequently in the majority. "
religious - fictional galaxy 2100 Drake, David. The Tank Lords. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 374. Church of the Lord's Universe:
[9] "There were changes. Inevitably, fragmentation followed success as centuries and the high cost of interstellar communication made each congregation a separate entity. But the basic thrust of the Church, present peace and safety for Mankind, remained even when reality diluted it to lip service or less. Mercenaries were recruited mostly from rural cultures which were used to privation--and steeped in religion as well. Occasionally a trooper might feel uneasy as he swore, 'Via!' for the Way had been a way of peace.

But mercs swore by blood and the martyrs as well; and few had better knowledge of either blood or innocent victims than the gunmen of the mercenary companies. "

religious - fictional galaxy 2100 Pohl, Frederik. Gateway. New York: St. Martin's Press (1977); pg. 11. Heechee:
"
The Heechee Hut
Direct from the Lost Tunnels of Venus!
Rare Religious Objects
Priceless Gems Once Worn by the Secret Race
Astounding Scientific Discoveries
EVERY ITEM GUARANTEED AUTHENTIC!
Special Discount for
Scientific Parties and Students
THESE FANTASTIC OBJECTS
ARE OLDER THAN HUMANITY!
" [Many other references to the Heechee in this book; other refs. not in DB.]
religious - fictional galaxy 2100 Pohl, Frederik. Gateway. New York: St. Martin's Press (1977); pg. 226. "CLASSIFIEDS

...YOUR DEBTS are paid when you achieve Oneness. He/She is Heechee and He/She Forgives. Church of the Marvelously Maintained Motorcycle. 88-344. "

religious - fictional galaxy 2150 Pohl, Frederik. "Hatching the Phoenix " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 216. Heechee:
[Year estimated] Pg.216: "Hypatia had already turned on the Heechee screen, but it showed nothing other than the pebbly gray blue that the Heechee use. "; Pg. 223: "'Oh, right, that Rebecca,' I said, not very honestly. By then I'd paid the fare to the Core for--what?--at least two or three hundred Rebeccas or Carloses or Janes who volunteered to be Citizen Ambassadors to the Heechee in the Core because they had lives that were in shambles. "; Pg. 237: "'As I did, Ms. Moynlin,' said Starminder, with the Heechee equivalent of a smile. " [This is a story set in the same fictional universe as the other Heechee stories and novels by Pohl, including Gateway. Many refs. to the Heechee, other refs. not in DB.]
religious - fictional galaxy 2150 Resnick, Mike. A Miracle of Rare Design. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 22-23. [Year is estimated. Description of the native religion of the race called 'Fireflies' on the planet Terrans call 'Medina':] "Lennox's hands were bound behind his back, and he was marched toward the immense pyramid he had come so far to see. it was some sixty feet tall, and its smooth golden sides were totally devoid of any markings or carvings. It amazed him that a race as primitive as the Fireflies could have constructed it. He toyed with the possibility that some other starfaring race had created and then abandoned it, and that over the eons its origin had been forgotten as it became the holiest of the Fireflies' many religious monuments.

'This is what you came for, is it not...?' asked the golden-robed Firefly, gesturing toward the pyramid.

'I came to study the entire ceremony,' replied Lennox truthfully.

'Why?'

'I was told that it is both beautiful and awsome.'

'We have no desire to see your religious ceremonies,' said the Firefly. "

religious - fictional galaxy 2200 Anthony, Patricia. Conscience of the Beagle. New York: Ace Books (1995; co. 1993); pg. 18. Tennysonian Christian:
"'Marvin--The Chosen of God, that is--we grew up together. Used to make spitballs in elementary school before he got called to the ministry. Old Marvin, the spitball king. He hates when I tell that story, just hates it. But still, he made me Minister of Science, didn't he? It's because I know where all the spitballs are buried.' " [The novel features a fictional religious group, Tennysonian Christians, on the colony planet Tennyson, that has a leader known as the 'Chosen of God.' It is a Christian group. Many refs. throughout novel, some under 'Christianity' and some under 'religious - fictional.']
religious - fictional galaxy 2200 Ford, John M. Growing Up Weightless. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 140. "The Diskers didn't believe the galaxy was indifferent. They held that the Avakian Disk was God. Or a god, since by Avakian-God theory every object of galactic mass had its own Disk, and there might even be a metaDisk for the universe as a whole. Disker theology was not settled yet. Indeed, there were Diskers of the Heisenberg school, who held that not only was the nature of God unknowable, any attempt to perceive the nature of God inevitably changed that nature. The Localists held (or also held, because nothing prevented one from being a Localist and a Heisenbergian at once) that what was true for the Milky Way's rotating Deity might not apply to the Andromedan, or M31's, or the Lesser Magellanic Cloud's. Local Groupists said that members of a galactic cluster must be doctrinally similar, but there was still room for variation in the observable universe. "
religious - fictional galaxy 2200 Ford, John M. Growing Up Weightless. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 140. "A fraction thought that if there was a vast black hole at the center of this (or that, or any) galaxy, swallowing down mass and light, it must therefore be the Adversary of God. And was not Lucifer a morning star fallen from the brightness? Collapsed past the radius of grace, here defined as 2MG over c squared--was that not the Pit, from whose event horizon all hope abandon? " [More, not in DB.]
religious - fictional galaxy 2200 Moon, Elizabeth. Remnant Population. Riverdale, NY: Baen Books (1996); pg. 210-211. [Year is estimated.] "Aboard the Mias Vir, en route to former Sims colony #3245.12... Ori Lavin, normally a calm, pragmatic Pelorist, almost a caricature of that sect, had reacted to Bilong as if to a shot of rejuvenating hormones, and sleeked his moustache every time she undulated by. "
religious - fictional galaxy 2250 Dick, Philip K. A Maze of Death. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1970); pg. 205. "What did we make up? he asked himself blearily. The entire theology, he realized. They had fed into the ship's computer all the data they had in their possession concerning advanced religions. Into T.E.N.C.H. 889B had gone elaborate information dealing with Judaism, Christianity, Mohammedanism, Zoroastrianism, Tibetan Buddhism . . . a complex mass, out of which T.E.N.C.H. 889B was to distill a composite religion, a synthesis of every factor involved. "
religious - fictional galaxy 2260 Friedman, Michael Jan. Republic (Star Trek / My Brother's Keeper 1 of 3). New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 218. Heiren:
Pg. 207: "'We made it,' said the plebe...

'Not yet, we haven't,' Kirk responded. 'We've still got a long way before we reach the temple.' He turned to the telepath. 'By the way, which one are we headed for?'

'The Eastern Temple,' the Heiren told him. 'The closer one, as luck would have it.'

'The Eastern Temple it is, then, said the lieutenant. 'Just stick with me and keep your eyes open.' ";

Pg. 208: "'They told us which telepath would come from the Eastern Temple,' he told the Heiren, 'but, frankly, I don't recall what they said.' ";

Pg. 226: "Their voices echoed in the Eastern Temple's primary chamber, a huge room with lofty, vaulted ceilings full of small, flying creatures that resembled hummingbirds. Great events in Heiren history were depicted in glorious murals that covered the entirety of each wall. " [Other refs., not in DB.]

religious - fictional galaxy 2266 Anderson, Poul. "Appendix A: Design for Two Worlds " in Murasaki (Robert Silverberg, ed.) New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 254. Chujoans:
"Only one society of the sapient Chujoans appear to remain, numbering perhaps a million individuals though it is impossible for humans to conduct a census. "; Pg. 255: "Male and female look almost identical except during mating. Yet no signs of homosexual behavior have been noticed... Chujoans seem to mate for life and stay pretty monogamous. The sexes seem to be equal socially, with perhaps a slight female dominance; however, they do have various rites (or celebrations) that they carry out separately. "
religious - fictional galaxy 2266 Anderson, Poul. "Appendix A: Design for Two Worlds " in Murasaki (Robert Silverberg, ed.) New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 287. Chujoans:
"As Poul has told us, there are about 1 million Chujoans. One human investigator... believes that there are exactly 1,048,576 Chupchups at all times, divided into 1,024 tribes of 1,024 individuals each. (And subdivided within the tribes to 32 families of 32 members each.) It appear these numbers are immutable. It is not clear how the numbers are maintained: either new children are conceived when there is a death in the tribe, or when a new baby is born another member of the tribe dies, by suicide or ritual murder.

The Chupchup society is a confusing mixture of authoritarian centralism and individualism: the main purpose of any Chujoan's life seems to be for him to perfect his own understanding of himself, his world, and the universe.

As far as anyone ha yet been able to determine, Chupchups do not seem to have a religion in any Earthly sense. They do not appear to believe in a God or a hereafter. Best guess: What they believe in is rightness. "

religious - fictional galaxy 2266 Bear, Greg. "A Plague of Conscience " (chapter) in Murasaki (Robert Silverberg, ed.) New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 157. God the Physicist Church:
"'Who is the fanatic, then?' Eiji Yoshimura asked. 'And who is the aggressor?' The director of Hokkaido Station rose from his squat stone desk...

'I understand sir. Philby's fears are well-founded. Already Carnot has spread his religious beliefs to nine Genji associations, Already nine temples to their version of Jesus, and to Kammer, have been built, and villages established. Carnot will soon have a broad enough base of support to endanger our own mission...' "; Pg. 158: "'Besides, traditional Christians would hardly recognize the beliefs of the God the Physicist Church, as preached by Carnot.' "

religious - fictional galaxy 2266 Bear, Greg. "A Plague of Conscience " (chapter) in Murasaki (Robert Silverberg, ed.) New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 141, 144. God the Physicist Church:
"He was, after all, rational--unlike the members of the God the Physicist Church, the Quantists. "; Pg. 144: "The Quantistts had come here to find something transcendental, their ragged poor ship surviving the voyage just barely, their faith strengthening in the great Betweens... "; Pg. 145: "'An avatar of the ancient spirituality of Chujo... Cognate to Jesus. Jesus can be found in the universal ground state, where all our redemptions lie. God the Physicist shows us the way through physics. Just what the Ihrdizu need--visitors from the sky able to take messages to Heaven.' "
religious - fictional galaxy 2266 Kress, Nancy. "Birthing Pool " (chapter) in Murasaki (Robert Silverberg, ed.) New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 229. God the Physicist Church:
"Three Quantists had declared the Chujoan return to be a 'Return,' capital R, and had set about building more Carnot temples. Two of the time artists had moved into a Carnot temple to hold what they called a 'court of time'... "
religious - fictional galaxy 2268 Vardeman, Robert E. Mutiny on the Enterprise (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1983); pg. 78. "'I hereby refuse to every again report to duty on the phasers. Those are weapons of war. I want only peace for everyone in the universe.'

'Ensign Ross, would you consider this an adequate response in the face of Romulan aggression?'

'If we won't fight, they won't,' she shot back.

'Anita,' hissed her companion. 'Quiet.'

'No, Deke, it's time that we stood up for our beliefs. Neither of us will take part in any activity that imperils another life form. The death and destruction have to stop somewhere. It might as well be with us. We have it in our power now to do something. And we will!'

'Is she speaking for you, Ensign Kesselmann? You're assigned to the biosupport division, aren't you?'

'Life is precious, sir. Y-yes, she is speaking for me. And a lot of others in the crew...

'Of course life is precious. That's why our mission to Ammdon is to prevent war... Have you considered that you did not hold this belief until after you spoke with the alien Lorelei?' " [More.]

religious - fictional galaxy 2268 Vardeman, Robert E. The Klingon Gambit (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1981) Klingon:
[As the title indicates, Klingons are the major antagonist race/culture in the novel. However, Klingon culture isn't dealt with extensively.] Book jacket: "The Klingons are hungry for war . . . their target: the Enterprise!

When Captain Kirk and his crew are ordered to Alnath II to challenge the deadliest Klingon starship Terror, they're ready for anything--or so they think. But the defenseless Vulcan crew of a Federation science ship has been wiped out. The remaining members of the Alnath II mission have discovered a fabulous ancient city--but their report doesn't make sense. The Klingon battle cruiser has the Enterprise in its sights, and is ready to destroy it.

But Captain Kirk can't seem to make decisions. Spock has started to thrown temper tantrums. And Chekov has disobeyed vital orders.

The crew of the Enterprise are losing their minds . . . one by one . . . all victims of THE KLINGON GAMBIT "

religious - fictional galaxy 2269 Dvorkin, David. The Trellisane Confrontation (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1984); pg. 15. Onctiliian:
"'The Onctiliian consists of four separate creatures, but they are physically bonded for life. The Onctiliians are unique in the known Galaxy for their, ah, tetrasexual method of reproduction. However, the bonding serves other purposes as well. In particular, it creates beings who have four distinct personalities residing in them but are still roughly four times as strong and as fast as a single Onctiliian. The four can pool their intelligence to a degree when necessary, and they will react with utmost speed and violence to any threat to their physical integrity. If one of them dies, they all die: once a bonding has been completed, there is no way back for them. Instead of making the group creature more cautious, more timid, as one might expect it to, the opposite seems to be the case. An Onctiliian group creature attacks any threat ferociously, but also very intelligently, hoping to disarm and destroy it before the Onctiliian itself comes to harm.' " [Many other refs.]
religious - fictional galaxy 2271 Roddenberry, Gene. Star Trek: The Motion Picture. New York: Pocket Books (1979); pg. 126. "His seventh sense had long ago assured him of this, just as it was doing again now, that this relationship of consciousness and universe was the only reality which actually existed. The Masters of Gol, of course, spent much of their lives seeking to unravel the puzzle of how a living consciousness could at every moment be both part and All.... To Vulcans, the sense of oneness with the All, i.e., the universe, the creative force, or what some humans might call God. Vulcans do not, however, see this as a belief, either religious or philosophical. They treat it as simple fact which they insist is no more unusual or difficult to understand than the ability to hear or see... "
religious - fictional galaxy 2293 Crispin, A. C. Sarek (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1994); pg. 19. Freelan:
"Cultural exchanges between Freelan and other worlds were virtually nonexistent, due to the Freelan taboo--religious or cultural, no one knew which--that prohibited Freelans from revealing their faces or bodies. When the natives had any contact with anyone not of their world, they shrouded themselves in concealing garments. Their muffling cloaks, hoods, and masks were made from material impregnated with selonite, which prevented them from being scanned by tricorders or medical sensors. " [Many other refs. to Freelan, and other fictional groups, not in DB, particularly to Vulcans and Klingons.]
religious - fictional galaxy 2300 Dickson, Gordon R. "Soldier, Ask Not " in The Hugo Winners: Volumes One and Two. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971; story copyright 1964); pg. 427. United Churches of Harmony and Association:
[Year estimated] "'Commandant,' I said, putting my credentials back in their case, 'two years ago your Elders of the United Churches of Harmony and Association found the planetary government of St. Marie in default of certain disputed balances of credit, so they sent an expedition in here to occupy and enforce payment. Of that expedition, how much in the way of men and equipment do you have left?' "
religious - fictional galaxy 2300 Dickson, Gordon R. "Soldier, Ask Not " in The Hugo Winners: Volumes One and Two. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971; story copyright 1964); pg. 450. United Churches of Harmony and Association:
"Be Informed, in God's Name--
--That since it does seem the Lord's Will that our Brothers on St. Marie made no success, it is ordered that henceforth no more replacements or personnel or supplies be sent them. For if our Captain does intend us the victory, surely we will conquer without further expenditure. And if it be His will that we conquer not, then surely it would be an impiety to throw away the substance of God's Churches in an attempt to frustrate that Will.

Be it further ordered that our Brothers on St. Marie be spared the knowledge that no further assistance is forthcoming, that they may bear witness to their faith in battle as ever, and God's Churches be undismayed.
Heed this Command, in the Name of the Lord:
By order of he who is called . . .
Bright
Eldest Among the Chosen "
religious - fictional galaxy 2300 Dickson, Gordon R. "Soldier, Ask Not " in The Hugo Winners: Volumes One and Two. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971; story copyright 1964); pg. 453. United Churches of Harmony and Association:
"I looked into his eyes. They were exhausted but calm. I glanced aside at the desk where the picture of the church, the older man and woman and the young girl stood still... 'Who're you trying to fool?' I said. 'Who? I see through you just like the people on all the other world's do! I know you know what a mumbo-jumbo your United Churches are. I know you know the way of life you sing of through your nose so much isn't what you claim it is. I know your Eldest Bright and his gang of narrow-minded men are just a gang of world-hungry tyrants that don't give a damn for religion or anything as long as they get what they want. I know you know it--and I'm going to make you admit it!' "
religious - fictional galaxy 2300 Dickson, Gordon R. "Soldier, Ask Not " in The Hugo Winners: Volumes One and Two. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971; story copyright 1964); pg. 455. United Churches of Harmony and Association:
"I stared at him, for it was sympathy I saw in his face. For me.

'It's your own blindness that deludes you,' he said. 'You see nothing and so believe no man can see. Our Lord is not just a name, but all things. That's why we have no ornament in our churches, scorning any painted screen between us and our God. Listen to me, Mr. Olyn. Those churches themselves are but tabernacles of the earth. Our Elders and Leaders, though they are Chosen and Anointed, are still but mortal men. To none of these things or people do we hearken in our faith, but to the very voice of God within us.' " [Many other refs., not in DB, to this fictional organization. The United Churches in this story utilizes many Christian terms and concepts--including Catholic, Protestant, and LDS--but does not appear to be explicitly Christian.]

religious - fictional galaxy 2300 Le Guin, Ursula K. The Dispossessed. New York: Avon Books (1975; first pub. 1974); pg. 114. Hainish:
"...But it was only the Hainish, quacking about peace and brotherhood...'...

'But haven't the Hainish proved that we are--'

'All of alien origin, offspring of Hainish interstellar colonists, half a million years ago, or a million, or two or three million, yes, I know. Proved! By the Primal Number, Shevek, you sound like a first-year seminarian! How can you speak seriously of historical proof, over such a span of time? Those Hainish toss millennia about like handballs, but it's all juggling. Proof, indeed! The religion of my fathers informs me, with equal authority, that I'm a descendant of Pinra Od, whom God exiled from the Garden because he had the audacity to count his fingers and toes, add them up to twenty, and thus let Time loose upon the universe. I prefer that story to the aliens', if I must choose!' "

religious - fictional galaxy 2300 McAuley, Paul J. "Recording Angel " in New Legends. Greg Bear (ed.) New York: Tor (1995); pg. 130. "Mr Naryan explained, 'They have not lost their reason, but they have had it taken away. For some it will be returned in a year; it was taken away from them as a punishment. Others have renounced their own selves for the rest of their lives. It is a religious avocation. But saint or criminal, they were all once as fully aware as you or me.'

'I'm not like you,' she said. 'I'm not like any of the crazy kinds of people I have met.'

Mr Naryan beckoned to the owner of the tea house and ordered two more bowls. 'I understand you have come a long way.' Although he was terrified of her, he was certain that he could draw her out.

But Angel only laughed.

Mr Naryan said, 'I do not mean to insult you.'

'You dress like a . . . native. Is that a religious avocation?'

'It is my profession. I am the Archivist here.' "

religious - fictional galaxy 2300 McAuley, Paul J. "Recording Angel " in New Legends. Greg Bear (ed.) New York: Tor (1995); pg. 130. Pg. 130: "'I was told that the Preservers, who I suppose were my descendants, made the different races, but each race calls itself human, even the ones who don't look like they could have evolved from anything that ever looked remotely human.'

'The Shaped call themselves human because they have no other name for what they have become, innocent and fallen alike. After all, they had no name before they were raised up. The citizens of Sensch remain innocent. They are our . . . responsibility.' "; Pg. 131: "...and she kept stopping to ask Mr Naryan questions, most of which, despite his extensive readings of the Puranas, he was unable to answer. "; Pg. 145: "'They surely cannot disbelieve the Puranas,' Mr Naryan says. " [Many other refs. not in DB. Story has no refs. by name to any actual Earth religions.]

religious - fictional galaxy 2342 ab Hugh, Daffyd. Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: The Courageous (Book 2 of 3 in "Rebels " trilogy). New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 73. Cardassian:
"Sister Winn was the only cleric among the Bajoran mass of Gul Ragat's household; she had no idea whether she had a religious counterpart among the Cardassians . . . in fact, she wasn't even sure whether they even had a religion beyond worship of the state. If there were a Cardassian holy man or woman, he had not seen fit to knock elbows with the Bajorans. "
religious - fictional galaxy 2366 David, Peter. Q-in-Law (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1991); pg. 54. Betazoid:
"'You're still in phase, aren't you,' referring to a time during which older Betazoid women's sex drive is quadrupled, or more.'

'It's in remission,' said Lwaxana blithely. 'My abilities to read minds are as sharp as they ever were.'

'Yes, that's what I thought,' said Deanna ruefully. 'Mother, the Ab'brax was from a time when life spans were shorter, and when a woman's niche in society was to be married, have children, and tend house. So if you weren't married by a certain age, it was anticipated that you would never marry and the family would go into mourning... generally in order to raise such a fuss that people would be forced to realize that someone the family was eager to marry off was in the house. This would, in theory, attract someone who needed a good wife in the same way that he needed a good animal...' " [More about this Betazoid ritual. Lwaxana and Deanna, two Betazoids, are main characters. Many other Betazoid refs. not in DB.]

religious - fictional galaxy 2366 David, Peter. Q-in-Law (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1991); pg. 19. Tizarin:
Pg. 4: "The bottom of the shuttle sparked and squealed, and Kerin let out a brief shriek.

'Hold together, baby,' he prayed. ";

Pg. 19: "'A wedding among the Tizarin,' Picard informed them. 'Not an unusual occasion in and of itself, of course, but this is a cross-marriage between the houses of Nistral and Graziunas.'

'All right, I'll bite,' said Geordi. 'Someone want to tell me who all these people are? I've never heard of the Tizarin or these 'houses'...'

...'...The Tizarin,' Data continued... 'are a spacegoing race of merchants, somewhat similar to the earth people known as Gypsies. If there is a home planet for the Tizarin, it is unknown. They are spread throughout the galaxy, engaging in trading with most races in the Federation with the exception of the Ferengi.' " [Many other refs. to the Tizarin throughout novel. They are the main fictional culture/race in book.]

religious - fictional galaxy 2366 David, Peter. Q-in-Law (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1991); pg. 41. Tizarin:
Pg. 41: "'A week' he said softly, wistfully. 'An entire week. Gods. Now that we've committed to each other...' ";

Pg. 43: "'This man is a Tizarin?' said Nistral uncertainly. 'Of the house of Shinbum?'

'No, sir,' Data politely informed him. 'I am an android. Data. Of the Enterprise.'

'Remarkable resemblance. Especially the gold skin--a sure sign,' said Nistral.

'That was the choice of my creator,' said Data.

Graziunas nodded. 'So it was with us all.' "

religious - fictional galaxy 2366 David, Peter. Q-in-Law (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1991); pg. 193. Tizarin:
"Picard's finger automatically paged through to get an idea of the length of the ceremony. He sighed inwardly. About thirty pages. This is going to take a while.

As required, he stretched out his right arm in the gesture of a benediction. 'Good people! All who are assembled this day in the sight of the gods of the Tizarin--the only real and true pantheon of gods in the cosmos...' He paused and glanced at the fathers. Graziunas shrugged slightly. Nistral offered a game half-smile.

Stay in the spirit of it, Picard told himself. '. . . in the cosmos,' he continued, 'are brought here to witness the sanctification of this place,' and he gestured widely to encompass the entire holodeck scene. 'It must be duly sanctified and cleansed, so that the spirits of matrimony and childbirth can enter this place and bless the wedding.' " [More.]



religious - fictional, continued

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