Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to religious - fictional, Flatland

religious - fictional, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
religious - fictional Flatland 1999 Abbot, Edwin A. Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions. New York: Dover Publications (1952; c. 1884); pg. 79. Flatland:
"'Listen: no stranger must witness what you have witnessed. Send your Wife back at once, before she enters the apartment. The Gospel of the Three Dimensions must not be thus frustrated. Not thus must the fruits of one thousand years be thrown away...' " [Many other refs., not all in DB.]
religious - fictional Flatland 1999 Abbot, Edwin A. Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions. New York: Dover Publications (1952; c. 1884); pg. 86. Flatland:
"Awestruck at the sight of the mysteries of the earth, thus unveiled before my unworthy eye, I said to my Companion, 'Behold, I am become as a God. For the wise me in our country say that to see all things, or as they express it, omnividence, is the attribute of God alone.' There was something of scorn in the voice of my Teacher as he made answer: 'Is it so indeed? Then the very pickpockets and cut-throats of my country are to be worshipped by your wise men as being Gods: for there is not one of them that does not see as much as you see now. But trust me, your wise men are wrong.'

I. Then is omnividence the attribute of others beside Gods?

Sphere. I do not know. But, if a pick-pocket or a cut-throat of our country can see everything that is in your country, surely that is no reason why the pick-pocket... should be accepted by you as a God. This omnividence... does it make us more just...? Not in the least. Then how does it make you more divine? "

religious - fictional Florida 1986 Anthony, Piers. Shade of the Tree. New York: Tor (1986); pg. 20. "Josh had spent a fair amount of private time n the past month laboring over this riddle. The Pinsons were a religious family, most of whose members were associated with a kind of farm commune system that had endured for generations. Few broke free of it--seldom more than one person in a given generation. Elijah had spun off as a young man, thirty years before, and gone into the mundane world of free enterprise and self-interest. Thus he was the pariah, used within the family as a bad example. He was rumored to have done quite well for himself. That was added to the tally against him, since it was presumed that an honest man could not succeed in business. Yet there had never been tangible proof of Elijah's (ill-gotten?) wealth... "
religious - fictional Florida 1986 Anthony, Piers. Shade of the Tree. New York: Tor (1986); pg. 20-21. "Josh, in contrast to his uncle, had been lured out of the family system by a woman. Wilhelmina had been unacceptable to the family commune. She smoked cigarettes, she drank beer, she played cards, she wore lipstick, and she dressed in brightly feminine outfits: the very picture of the wanton woman. Since she could not be admitted to the family, Josh had departed the commune and joined her world in wider New York City. He had had considerable adjusting to do, but had survived it with her guidance... Now that world of Mina's had destroyed her, and Josh was retreating to his own sort of commune. He had been too much infected with mundane values to return to his family, and had not wanted his children to become captive to the commune. Yet he had not wished to remain in the situation that had spawned the death of his wife. "
religious - fictional Florida 1986 Anthony, Piers. Shade of the Tree. New York: Tor (1986); pg. 21. "'He was a funny man,' Foster said. 'From a funny family, way I heard it. Communists--'

'Commune,' Josh interjected. 'There is a distinction.'

'Oh, sure. Anyway, he was my kind of man. You wouldn't believe the doohinkeys he's built into his house.'

'Doohinkeys?'

'He was a solar freak, don't you know! And a wood freak. Wouldn't waste anything at all. Said there was all that sunlight coming down, had to use it, and the whole dang house is made of wood. And he was a doomsday freak to boot.'

'Doomsday?' Josh could only follow the man's lead, at the moment. What was wrong with a house made of wood?

'He's got food and money and other stuff stashed away all over the place. He said the economic system was going to break down...' "

religious - fictional Florida 1986 Anthony, Piers. Shade of the Tree. New York: Tor (1986); pg. 22. "'Because virtually all commercial food is chemicalized for flavor and storage. our family opposes the use of drugs and additives in all forms. Elijah was a renegade, but it seems he retained some of the fundamentals.'

Foster's eyes widened as he assimilated this gossip. 'You mean you're like him? Won't take aspirin, even?'

'True,' Josh agreed. He had been through this before. " [Other refs., not in DB.]

religious - fictional France 2030 McAuley, Paul J. Fairyland. New York: Avon Books (1997; c 1995); pg. 196. "'What does the Children's Crusade want?'

'They all know the same thing, but you only know what it is if you are one of them.' Ray shudders delicately at the thought.

Alex says, 'It's her. It's her religion.'

Katrina passes a hand over the strip of fur that grows on the crest of her skull. She says, 'Children. They like to take children...' " [The Children's Crusade is the main fictional religious/activist group in the novel. Many refs. throughout novel, not in DB. They are advocates for the rights and freedom of 'fairies', biogenetically engineered human-like lifeforms.]

religious - fictional Furies planet 2372 ab Hugh, Dafydd. The Final Fury (Star Trek: Voyager/Invasion! #4). New York: Pocket Books (1996); pg. 27. Furies:
[Home base planet of the Furies.] Pg. 27: "'Well, you're going to have a lot of company,' said Ensign Kim. 'I've just completed a full scan of the planet. There are twenty-seven billion dominant life-forms on the planet--of hundreds of different species.'

'Twenty-seven billion?'

'Yes, sir. Billion, with a b.' ";

Pg. 28: "Janeway raised her eyebrows. 'Twenty-seven billion. Either these people live like ants, or they've got one hell of a tourist season.' ";

Pg. 38: "'You are about to embark upon a spiritual journey,' prophesied Navdaq; 'thousands of years of devotion, preparation, and countless sacrifices, culminating in the final crusade against the most diabolical beings in the galaxy. And the righteous shall win; and you shall join us, an armored fist from behind the back...' " [The Furies are the primary fictional culture of this novel. Many refs. to their culture and religious beliefs, not in DB.]

religious - fictional galaxy -100000 B.C.E. Windham, Ryder. Star Wars: Episode I: The Phantom Menace: Scrapbook. New York: Random House (1999); pg. 16. Sith:
"Legends of the Sith go back thousands of years. A cult of renegade Jedi who gave in to the dark side of the Force, the Sith embraced the concept that power denied was power wasted. The cult was built in opposition to the Jedi. While the Jedi order was created to serve, the Sith only believed in domination. Many of the original Sith destroyed each other and themselves with their own evil. The few surviving Sith were hunted down and killed by the Jedi. After the killings, only one Sith remained. To prevent future infighting between rival Sith apprentices, the Sith Master decided to take only a single apprentice. Thus, there were never more than two Sith Lords at one time. For a millennium, the Sith maintained their order in secrecy, passing down their evil heritage. As they gained knowledge of the dark side of the Force, their powers increased with each generation. Nearly forgotten by the Republic, the Sith waited for the day they would find a weakness in the Jedi. "
religious - fictional galaxy -99943 B.C.E. Stackpole, Michael A. Dark Tide I: Onslaught (Star Wars). New York: Ballantine (2000); pg. 108. Yuuzhan Vong:
[1] "A quick examination of the ExGal facility proved the efficiency of the Yuuzhan Vong warning at the door. Luke found no signs of life in there, but there was a lot of evidence of the sheer virulence with which the Yuuzhan Vong hated technology. Machinery had been smashed into bits, and enough dark fluid formed footprints or was sprayed over the walls to suggest that the Yuuzhan Vong had been heedless of personal injuries during their orgy of destruction. " [The Yuuzhan Vong are the primary antagonist culture/religion in the novel. Extensive refs. throughout novel, not in DB, including refs. to their religious beliefs and practices.]
religious - fictional galaxy -99943 B.C.E. Stackpole, Michael A. Dark Tide I: Onslaught (Star Wars). New York: Ballantine (2000); pg. 108. Yuuzhan Vong:
[2] "That realization, which crystallized itself in his mind as he bent to trace a bloody footprint with a finger, sent a shiver down his spine. His inability to detect the Yuuzhan Vong through the Force had disturbed him, but he'd counted on their invisibility to be the only odd thing about them. Their apparent fanaticism, as evidenced by the willingness to hurt themselves while pursuing their beliefs, took them well outside the ranges for normal behavior as he knew it. Luke did know of species that valued stoicism in the face of pain, but the Yuuzhan Vong seemed to go beyond even that. "
religious - fictional galaxy -99943 B.C.E. Stackpole, Michael A. Dark Tide I: Onslaught (Star Wars). New York: Ballantine (2000); pg. 109. Yuuzhan Vong:
"'Find anything useful?'

His nephew held up a headless doll. 'This is one of those toys that has circuitry inside it to make it respond to phrases and things. It's harmless, but they smashed it just as bad as any of the computers.'...

'The Yuuzhan Vong clearly didn't see the toy as harmless.' Luke shook his head. 'From their point of view, it might be more of an abomination than any of the other equipment here.'

Jacen's brows arrowed together for a second, then his expression eased and he nodded. 'If they think of machines as evil, then this would be something designed to corrupt the very young. Instead, now it's just a broken toy meant for a child who will never enjoy it.' "

religious - fictional galaxy -99940 B.C.E. Anderson, Kevin J. "Therefore I Am: The Tale of IG-88 " in Star Wars: Tales of the Bounty Hunters (Kevin J. Anderson, ed.) New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 42. Sith:
"When the Dark Lord of the Sith had arrived unexpectedly on Mechis III, IG-88 had been greatly shaken. As he watched Vader and analyzed him with various unobtrusive probes, IG-88 saw that Vader was not merely a trivial organic life form... " [Vader's status as a 'Sith' lord is mentioned explicitly only here. Elsewhere in the story Vader has a semi-prominent role pg. 36-41; 46-49; 71. Emperor Palpatine, the other Sith, also appears, pg. 69-71.]
religious - fictional galaxy -99936 B.C.E. Tyers, Kathy. "The Prize Pelt: The Tale of Bossk " in Star Wars: Tales of the Bounty Hunters (Kevin J. Anderson, ed.) New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 147. Trandoshan:
"The lizard-like Trandoshan bounty hunter paused in his research to visualize bringing in Chewbacca's pelt. The thought made him flick his tongue with pleasure. Like a trophy fighter in top condition, Bossk was massive enough to challenge a wookie, but he would win this game by guile . . . or trickery, if need be. "; Pg. 148: "He had hunted Wookiees for over sixty Standard years. When a blaster or grenade finally killed Bossk, his death would shower hundreds of jagannath points onto the bloodthirsty, eternal Scorekeeper that he worshipped. Serene behind the pale, lidless eyes, the Scorekeeper existed beyond time ad space, numbering every deed of each Trandoshan Hunter. She could zero his life tally if he were shamed or captured. She could double it if he brought home a prize pelt. Ambushing Chewbacca was Bossk's sacred obligation. " [Many refs. to Trandoshan culture and religion throughout story, most not in DB.]
religious - fictional galaxy -99936 B.C.E. Wolverton, Dave. "Payback: The Tale of Dengar " in Star Wars: Tales of the Bounty Hunters (Kevin J. Anderson, ed.) New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 109. Sith:
"Dengar sat alone and wondered. With Solo captured, would Vader come after him? Dengar doubted it. The Dark Lord of the Sith had his own political agenda, men to command, an Empire to run. Dengar was almost beneath his notice. But Dengar didn't want to cross paths with him again. "
religious - fictional galaxy -99934 B.C.E. Tyers, Kathy. The Truce at Bakura (Star Wars). New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 87. Bakuran:
"'The Alliance has sent one of its ablest military leaders, Commander Skywalker of the Jedi Order.'

Jedi? Caught with her defenses down, Gaeri reached for a pendant on her necklace, the half-black, half-white enameled ring of the Cosmic Balance. According to her religion, Jedi had upset the universe by their very existence. For every height, there had to be a depth. She believed that every time an individual learned to wield so much power, that diminished a hapless counterpart somewhere in the galaxy. The power-greedy Jedi had puffed up their abilities without regard for the unknown others they destroyed. Their disappearance had become a morality tale, and the deaths of both her parents left her profoundly religious. At least in the Balance she'd found comfort. " [Many other refs. to her [Bakuran] religion, not in DB.]

religious - fictional galaxy -99934 B.C.E. Tyers, Kathy. The Truce at Bakura (Star Wars). New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 170. Bakuran:
"'Your feelings are strong for me. Strongly ambivalent.'

'It's not that I'm afraid of you, Commander--'

'Luke,' he insisted.

'I have a religious objection to what you are. What you've become. You weren't born a Jedi. And you'd better turn that back off for a few seconds, or we'll both be in trouble.' Then he caught it: through the Force, a swirl of intense attraction that had not come from him. Five years ago, he might have seized her hand and sworn away everything--the Fleet, the Alliance, and the Force.

But those five years had molded his destiny. Perhaps he could change her mind.

He caught himself. What right did he have to chip at her beliefs? She drew on the Force like anyone else, though she couldn't accept it. "

religious - fictional galaxy -99934 B.C.E. Tyers, Kathy. The Truce at Bakura (Star Wars). New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 171. Bakuran:
"'Do most Bakurans share your beliefs?' he asked.

Relieved that he'd brought up the subject, she answered, 'Many are stricter. My sister is an ascetic. She lives with almost nothing in order to free up more for everyone else. I'm less . . . devoted. We're a minority, but the weight of the universe could balance on one rightly placed atom.'

'I can feel through the Force that you're a woman of depth. Of deep feelings.'

...'Once I settle with them [Ssi-ruuk], I'll come back--to talk with you, Gaeriel--if there's any hope that you'd reconsider about me. About Jedi. You were only partially right when you said I wasn't born a Jedi. The Force is strong in my family.' "

religious - fictional galaxy -99934 B.C.E. Tyers, Kathy. The Truce at Bakura (Star Wars). New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 1. Ewoks:
"Luke Skywalker hustled across one cruiser's landing bay, red-eyed but still suffused with victory after the Ewoks' celebration. " [Other alien species/cultures include Calamarians, Bakurans, Wookies, etc. The primary antagonist species is, according to book jacket, "the Ssi-ruuk, cold-blooded reptilian invaders who, once allied with the now dead Emperor, are approaching imperial space with only one goal: total domination. "
religious - fictional galaxy -99931 B.C.E. Hambly, Barbara. Planet of Twilight (Star Wars). New York: Bantam (1997) Therans:
[Book jacket] "It all begins on a barren backwater world called Renat Chorios--once a dreaded prison colony, now home to the Therans, a fanatic religious cult. To this exiled world has come the ruthless warlord Seti Draconis, who seeks to exploit the vast crystalline deserts that cover the planet's desolate surface. " [Some other refs. to this fictional religious culture.]
religious - fictional galaxy -99927 B.C.E. Wolverton, Dave. The Courtship of Princess Leia. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 3. Alderaanian:
Pg. 3: "Leia was smiling, euphoric... 'Oh, Han,' she said in a breath, her voice mellifluous. 'I'm so glad you're here.' She wore the pure white uniform of an Alderaanian ambassador, and her hair was down... In her hair she wore the combs he [Han] had given her, made from silver and opal mined on Alderaan before Grand Moff Tarkin blasted the planet to cinders with the first Death Star. "; Pg. 5: "'General Solo!' Threepio responded, a note of relief in his voice. 'Princess Leia asked that I find you and escort you to the Alderaanian ambassador's balcony...'

...Hans recognized some of them: Carlist Rieekan, the Alderaanian general who had commanded Hoth base; Threkin Horm, president of the powerful Alderaanian Council, an immensely fat man who rested in a repulsor chair... " [Leia, an Alderaanian, is one of novel's main characters, and the novel's title character, of course. Many refs. to Alderaan and things Alderaanian, not in DB.]

religious - fictional galaxy -99927 B.C.E. Wolverton, Dave. The Courtship of Princess Leia. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 1. Hapan:
Pg. 1: "General Han Solo stood at the command console viewport of the Mon Calamari Star Cruiser Mon Remonda.... Hand longed to get off the humid Calamarian ship... The white starfield on the screen resolved as the hyperdrive engines cut, and Chewbacca roared in alarm... dozens of enormous, saucer-shaped starships that Han recognized immediately as Hapan Battle Dragons... "; Pg. 2: "Han could make out the startled faces of three Hapan officer, the silver name tags sewn into their collars. Han had never seen a Hapan. Their star sector was renowned for its wealth, and the Hapans guarded their borders jealously. He'd known that they were human--for humans had scattered like weeds across the galaxy--but he was surprised to discover that without exception, all three of the female officers were astonishingly beautiful--like fragile, living ornaments. " [Hapans are the novel's main fictional culture. Other fictional races/cultures incl. Wookies, Calamarians, etc.]
religious - fictional galaxy -99927 B.C.E. Wolverton, Dave. The Courtship of Princess Leia. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 105. Hapan:
"Now, Isolder was waiting for his mother to revel in her victory, make some seemingly inconsequential but pointed remark designed to show the superiority of the female intellect over that of a male. The women of Hapes had an old saying: Never let a man become so deluded as to believe that he is the intellectual equal of a woman. It only leads him to evil. "
religious - fictional galaxy -99927 B.C.E. Wolverton, Dave. The Courtship of Princess Leia. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 3. Hapan:
"The first time Han had seen a Hapan warship, he had been smuggling guns with a small convoy fleet under the command of Captain Rula. Since the Hapans hadn't yet fallen to the Empire the smugglers had been using an outpost in neutral territory near the borders of the Hapan star cluster, hoping that their proximity to the Hapans would keep the Empire off their back. But one day they came out of hyperspace and found a Hapan Battle Dragon hovering in their path. Even though they were in neutral territory, even though they made no aggressive moves, only three of the twenty smuggler ships managed to survive the Hapan attack. "
religious - fictional galaxy -99927 B.C.E. Wolverton, Dave. The Courtship of Princess Leia. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 7. Hapan:
"'If my sensors monitored her correctly, the delegate reported the words of the great queen mother: 'Worthy Leia, I offer gifts from the sixty-three worlds of Hapes. Take joy in them.' '

'Gifts?' Han said. 'That sounds pretty straightforward to me.'

'Indeed it is. The Hapans never ask a favor without offering a gift of equal value first,' Threepio said condescendingly. 'No, what troubles me is the use of the word shakal, 'worthy.' The queen mother would never apply that word to Leia, for the Hapans use it only when speaking to equals.'

'Well,' Han hazarded a guess, 'they are both royalty.'

'True,' Threepio said, 'but the Hapans practically worship their queen mother. Indeed, one of their names for her is Ereneda, 'she who has no equal.' So you see, it would not be logical for the queen mother to refer to Leia as her equal.' "

religious - fictional galaxy -99927 B.C.E. Wolverton, Dave. The Courtship of Princess Leia. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 7. Hapan:
[Hapan] "A second trio of women, far taller than the others, descended from the diplomatic shuttle wearing leathers in colors of tawny ocher and cinnamon. They danced lightly to the sounds of the flutes and drums, and between them floated a platform that bore a small, gnarled tree and ruddy brown fruits. Twin lights floated above it, beaming steadily like the suns of some desert world. The crowd murmured quietly until the ambassador explained, 'Selabah, terrefel n lasarla.' ('From Selab, a tree of wisdom, bearing fruits.') The crowd suddenly shouted in delight, and Han stood dumbfounded. He had thought the wisdom trees of Selab to be only a legend. It was said that the fruit of the wisdom trees could greatly boost the intelligence of those who had passed into old age. "
religious - fictional galaxy -99927 B.C.E. Wolverton, Dave. The Courtship of Princess Leia. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 8. Hapan:
[Hapan] "Their every world, each planet in the Hapes system, is offering its greatest treasures, Han realized. What could they hope to gain? What could they want in return?

He watched over the next hour. The music of the drums and flutes and the high, clear calls of the women singing 'Hapes, Hapes, Hapes,' over and over again seemed to pound through his veins, through his temples. Twelve of the poorer worlds each gave Leia Star Destroyers captured from the Empire, while others brought things that held more esoteric value. From Arabanth came an old woman who spoke only a few words on the importance of embracing life while accepting death, offering a 'thought puzzle' that her people held to be of great value. Ut sent a woman who sang so beautiful that the sound seemed to carry Han away to her world on a warm breeze. "

religious - fictional galaxy -4990 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. Elven Star. New York: Bantam (1990); pg. 99. "'Tytans? The followers of San? That's only myth.'

'Don't speak sacrilege, Paithan. If you believe in the Mother you must believe in San and his followers, who rule the Dark.'

'Yeah, Umbar, we all know how religious you are! If you walked into one of the Mother's temples it's probably fall down on top of you! You're a sensible man. You don't believe in goblins and ghoulies.'

...Peytin, Matriarch of Heaven. The elves believe that Peytin created a world for her mortal children. She appointed her eldest twin sons, Orn and Obi, to rule over it. Their younger brother, san, become [sic] jealous and, gathering together the greedy, warlike humans, waged war against his brothers. This war sundered the ancient world. San was banished below. The humans were cast out of the ancient world and sent to this one. Peytin created a race known as elf and sent them to restore the world's purity. " [Other refs. not in DB.]

religious - fictional galaxy -4970 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. The Seventh Gate. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 282. "The only building to suffer extensive damage in the storm was the Cathedral of the Albedo, the repository for the souls of the dead.

The Kenkari elves had formed the Cathedral of crystal, stone, and magic. Its crystal-paned dome protected an exotic garden of rare and beautiful plants, some purportedly dating back to pre-Sundering times--plants brought from a world whose very existence was now mostly forgotten. Inside this garden, the souls of elves of royal blood fluttered among the leaves and the fragrant roses.

Each elf, before he or she died, bequeathed the soul to the Kenkari, leaving it in the care of keeper elves, who were known as geir or weesham. The geir brought the soul, imprisoned in an ornate box, to the Cathedral, where the Kenkari let i loose among the other souls held in the garden. It was believed, among the elves, that these souls of the dead granted the gift of strength and wisdom gained in life to the living. "

religious - fictional galaxy -4970 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. The Seventh Gate. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 282. "The ancient custom had been started by the holy elf-woman Krenka-Anris, the souls of her grown dead sons having returned to save their mother from a dragon.

The Kenkari elves lived in the Cathedral, tending to the souls, accepting and releasing new souls into the garden. At least, that was what had been done in the past. When it became clear to the Kenkari that the elven emperor Agah'ran was having young elves murdered in order to obtain their souls to aid his corrupt rule, the Kenkari closed the Cathedral, forbade the acceptance of any more souls.

Agah'ran was overthrown by his son, Prince Rees'ahn, and the human rulers Stephen and Anne of Volkaran. The emperor fled and disappeared. The elves and humans formed an alliance... In the Cathedral, the Keepers of the Soul, the Book, and the door all gathered together before the alter of Krenka-Anris to pray... " [More.]

religious - fictional galaxy 1367 C.E. Banks, Iain M. Consider Phlebas. New York: St. Martin's Press (1987); pg. 87. "Culture, the":
"There were in excess of eighteen trillion people in the Culture, just about every one of them well nourished, extensively educated and mentally alert, and only thirty or forty of them had this unusual ability to forecast and assess on a par with a well-informed Mind (of which there were already many hundreds of thousand). It was not impossible that this was pure luck; toss eighteen trillion coins in the air for a long while and a few of them are going to keep landing the same side up for a long, long time. "
religious - fictional galaxy 1367 C.E. Banks, Iain M. Consider Phlebas. New York: St. Martin's Press (1987); pg. 29. Idirans and The Culture:
"'...I don't care how self-righteous the Culture feels, or how many people the Idirans kill. They're on the side of life--boring, old-fashioned, biological life; smelly, fallible and short-sighted, God knows, but real life. You're ruled by your machines. You're an evolutionary dead end. The trouble is that you take your mind off it and you try to drag everybody else down there with you. The worst thing that could happen to the galaxy would be if the Culture wins this war.' "
religious - fictional galaxy 1367 C.E. Banks, Iain M. Consider Phlebas. New York: St. Martin's Press (1987); pg. 34. Idirans and The Culture:
"He recalled that the Idirans said some sort of prayer to their God before going into warp. Once when he had been with Xoralundra on a ship which was warping, the Querl had insisted that the Changer repeat the prayer, too. Horza had protested that it meant nothing to him; not only did the Idiran God clash with his own personal convictions, the prayer was in a dead Idiran language he didn't understand. He had been told rather coldly that it was the gesture that mattered. For what the Idirans regarded as essentially an animal (their word for humanoids as best translated as 'biotomaton'), only the behaviour of devotion was required; his heart and mind were of no consequence. When Horza had asked, what about his immortal soul? Xoralundra had laughed. It was the first and only time Horza had experienced such a thing from the old warrior. Whoever heard of a mortal body having an immortal soul? "
religious - fictional galaxy 1367 C.E. Banks, Iain M. Consider Phlebas. New York: St. Martin's Press (1987); pg. 158. Idirans and The Culture:
"In them, and the Word that was their inheritance from the divine, the Spell within their genetic inheritance, a new message was abroad: Grow up. Behave. Prepare.

Horza didn't believe in the Idiran's religion any more than Balveda had, and indeed he could see in its over-deliberate, too-planned ideals exactly the sort of life-constricting forces he so despised in the Culture's initially benign ethos. But the Idirans relied on themselves, not on their machines, and so they were still part of life. To him, that made all the difference. "

religious - fictional galaxy 1367 C.E. Banks, Iain M. Consider Phlebas. New York: St. Martin's Press (1987); pg. 159. Idirans and The Culture:
"Horza knew the Idirans would never subdue all the less-developed civilisations in the galaxy; their dreamed-of day of judgement would never come. But the very certainty of that ultimate defeat made the Idirans safe, made them normal, made them part of the general life of the galaxy; just one more species, which would grow and expand and then, finding the plateau phase all non-suicidal species eventually arrived at, settle down. In ten thousand years the Idirans would be just another civilisation, getting on with their own lives. The current era of conquests might be fondly remembered, but it would be irrelevant by then, explained away by some creative theology. They had been quiet and introspective before; so they would be again.

In the end, they were rational. They listened to common sense before their own emotions. "

religious - fictional galaxy 1367 C.E. Banks, Iain M. Consider Phlebas. New York: St. Martin's Press (1987); pg. 159. Idirans and The Culture:
"The only thing they [Idirans] believed without proof was that there was a purpose to life, that there was something which was translated in most languages as 'God', and that that God wanted a better existence for His creations. At the moment they pursued this goal themselves, believed themselves to be the arms and hands and fingers of God. But when the time came they would be able to assimilate the realisation that they'd got it wrong, that it was not up to them to bring about the final order. They would themselves become calm; they would find their own place. The galaxy and its many and varied civilisations would assimilate them.

The Culture [communists and atheists who use artificial intelligence to lead them] was different. Horza could see no end to its policy of continual and escalating interference. It could easily grow for ever, because it was not governed by natural limitations. Like a rogue cell, a cancer with no 'off' switch... " [More.]

religious - fictional galaxy 1367 C.E. Banks, Iain M. Consider Phlebas. New York: St. Martin's Press (1987); pg. 334. Idirans and The Culture:
"And worse still, worst of all, not just producing, but embracing and giving ourselves over totally to the ultimate anathema: the Minds, the sentient machines; the very image and essence of life itself, desecrated. Idolatry incarnate.

No wonder that they despise us. Poor sick mutations that we are, petty and obscene, servants of the machine-devils that we worship. Not even sure of our own identity: just who is Culture? Where exactly does it begin and end? Who is and who isn't? The Idirans know exactly who they are: purebred, the one race, or nothing. Do we? Contact is Contact, the core, but after that? The level of genofixing varies; despite the ideal, not everybody can mate successfully with everybody else. The Minds? No real standards; individuals, too, and not fully predictable -- precocious, independent. Living on a Culture-made Orbital, or in a Rock... "

religious - fictional galaxy 1367 C.E. Banks, Iain M. Consider Phlebas. New York: St. Martin's Press (1987); pg. 82. "From radio transmissions they had picked up from the planet they worked out what had happened to the place, what had caused the monks and priests in the temple to be so well armed. Two nation states on the world of Marjoin were at war, and the temple was near the frontier between the two countries, constantly ready for attack. One of the states was vaguely socialist; the other was religiously inspired, the priests of the Temple of Light representing one sect of that militant faith. The war was partly caused by the greater, galactic conflict taking place around it, as well as being a tiny and approximate image of it. It was that reflection, Horza realised, which had killed the members of the Company, as much as any bounced laserflash. "
religious - fictional galaxy 1873 David, Peter. Martyr (ST: New Frontier). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 4. Zondarian:
"He wondered how many bodies burning there were people he knew. People he had blessed, or at whose birth he had officiated, or weddings he had performed. For that matter, how many of them had come to him for guidance, had sought out the wisdom of the prophet Ontear? Ontear, the prophet who had seen a great and glorious destiny for Zondar. Ontear, who knew all that was to come. Ontear, who could not help but feel that he was single-handedly responsible for the chaos that had erupted all around him.

He had long felt that he was in direct communion with the gods. But today of all days, he believed that the gods were going to communicate with him directly, and with a vengeance. Today, Ontear felt, was going to be his judgment day.

He heart scrambling below him, heard grunts and arguments and words of indecision. He was being approached by acolytes. They were not exactly being subtle about their advent... "

religious - fictional galaxy 1873 David, Peter. Martyr (ST: New Frontier). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 4. Zondarian:
Pg. 4: "This was not of tremendous consequences to Ontear, because truthfully there was very little any acolytes could say that would come as a surprise to him. This was an inevitable state of affairs, after all, when one is a prophet.

There were three of them [acolytes], approaching Ontear with bedraggled and exhausted mien. It was not the easiest of climbs, for Ontear's cave was set upon the upper ridge of a small mountain... "; Pg. 5: "The trio continued to approach, and Ontear recognized the closest of them as Suti-Lon-sondon, one of his oldest and most dedicated students. He remembered the first time that Suti had come to him, scared and confused, daunted by the task that had been put to him: to approach the prophet and learn at his feet. That had seemed an eternity ago. "

religious - fictional galaxy 1873 David, Peter. Martyr (ST: New Frontier). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 5. Zondarian:
"It had not been difficult to convince Suti of his veracity as a prophet. Indeed, it was no more difficult than it had been to prove it to anyone else. Unlike other prophets, false prophets, who had contended themselves to with speaking in broad and unspecific predictions (the more precious of them choosing to quote their vagueness in rhyme, as if that added some aura of respectability), Ontear had been amazingly specific in his prognostications. He had predicted the great earthquake of Kartoof. He had predicted the rise in power of Quinzar the Wicked and Krusea the Black, and the defeat of Krusea's son, Otton the Unready.

Oh, there were the skeptics who believed that Ontear's predictions were so specific that they became self-fulfilling prophecies. For instance, his prediction that a conqueror named Muton would be born in the eastern territories and dominate half the region had resulted in no fewer than 2000 eastern territory newborns... last year being [named] 'Muton.' "

religious - fictional galaxy 1873 David, Peter. Martyr (ST: New Frontier). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 6. Zondarian:
"But the debates over Ontear meant nothing to Suti, for he believed in the man and his powers. There was a serenity about Ontear, a confidence that seemed to lift him above all that surrounded him... Suti gestured for the others who had accompanied him to hang back, desiring to address Ontear on his own first. Slowly he drew near to the prophet, and Ontear acknowledged his approach with a slight nod of his head. Suti began to speak, but Ontear put out a raised hand and Suti promptly lapsed into a respectful silence.

'Can you smell it, Suti?' asked Ontear after a short time. 'There is a storm coming. A storm of great significance. I have foreseen it.' " [Extensive other refs. throughout novel. Zondarian religion, revolving around the prophet Ontear, is one of the two main fictional religions in the novel.]

religious - fictional galaxy 1873 David, Peter. Martyr (ST: New Frontier). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 12. Zondarian:
"'...I know everything and nothing! Everything and nothing!' He voice [sic] went to a higher and higher pitch, bubbling just short of total hysteria. 'You want predictions? You want to know what to expect from the future? Look to the stars, Suti! All of you, look to the stars, for from there will come the Messiah! The bird of flame will signal his coming! He will bear a scar, and he will be a great leader! he will come from air and return to air! And he will be slain by the appointed one! Read the writings, Suti! Read of the appointed one and keep that knowledge secret, within the acolytes, for the appointed one must not know the destiny that awaits until the time of slaying! For in the slaying, the Messiah's death will unite our planet! And if he does not die in the appointed way, then the final war will destroy all! All! All!' " [More. These prophecies are fulfilled 500 years later when Captain Calhoun ('the Messiah') and the crew of Excalibur arrive.]
religious - fictional galaxy 1930 Damon Knight. "To Serve Man " in Galaxy: Thirty Years of Innovative Science Fiction (Frederik Pohl, ed.) Chicago, IL: Playboy Press (1980; first pub. Galaxy, Nov. 1950); pg. 30. "No, really, " he said. "They told us what they wanted to do--'to bring to you peace and plenty which we ourselves enjoy.' But they didn't say why. "

"Why do missionaries-- "

"Missionaries be damned! " he said angrily. "Missionaries have a religious motive. If these creatures have a religion, they haven't once mentioned it. What's more, they didn't send a missionary group; they sent a diplomatic delegation--a group representing the will and policy of their whole people. Now just what have the Kanamit, as a people or a nation, got to gain from our welfare? "

I said, "Cultural-- "

"Cultural cabbage soup! No, it's something less obvious than that... " [The aliens came to use humans as a food source. The title of this classic SF story refers to 'serving man' as a food dish.]

religious - fictional galaxy 1943 Lewis, C.S. Out of the Silent Planet. New York: Simon & Schuster (1996; c. 1943); pg. 68. hrossa:
"Did people in Thulcandra not know that Maleldil the Young had made and still ruled the world? Even a child knew that. Where did Maleldil live, Ransom asked.

'With the old One.'

And who was the Old One? Ransom did not understand the answer. He tried again.

'Where was the Old One?'

'He is not that sort,' said Hnohra, 'that he has to live anywhere,' and proceeded to a good deal which Ransom did not follow. But he followed enough to feel once more a certain irritation. Ever since he had discovered the rationality of the hrossa he had been haunted by a... scruple as to whether it might not be his duty to undertake their religious instruction; now, as a result of his tentative efforts, he found himself being treated as if he were the savage and being given a first sketch of civilized religion--a sort of hrossian equivalent of the shorter catechism. It became plain that Maleldil was a spirit without body, parts or passions. " [Much more.]

religious - fictional galaxy 1966 Adams, Douglas. "Young Zaphod Plays it Safe " in The More Than Complete Hitchhiker's Guide. Avenel, New Jersey: Wings Books (1989; 1st ed. 1986); pg. 620. Church of the Second Coming of the Great Prophet Zarquon:
Pg. 620: "'...but he was crazy. Obsessed! Do you ever get like that about lobster? Because I don't... I infinitely prefer scallops, and said so. Oh Zarquon, I said so!' "; Pg. 621: "'Oh Zarquon, oh heavens,' he mumbled pathetically to himself. 'I've been found. I've been rescued.' " [This character invokes 'Zarquon,' the founder of Church of the Second Coming of the Great Prophet Zarquon, which was introduced in The Restaurant at the End of the Universe.]
religious - fictional galaxy 1975 Jones, Raymond F. Renegades of Time. Don Mills, Ontario: Laser Books/Harlequin (1975); pg. 24. Algorans:
"'I suppose I don't really have a world that is my home,' she finally said... 'Few of my people do. Not many of us are even born on the world our race comes from. I don't know where I was born--and I'm glad I don't. That way there's never a looking back to some beginning place. There's only a looking ahead. I like it that way.'

'Your parents must know what world you were born on.'

The girl laughed as if he had said something ridiculous. 'Bill explained how your relationships are on Earth. They are nothing like that among my people. Marriage relationships can be as temporary or as permanent as people care to make them. My parents made it quite temporary.' " [The Algorans are the primary fictional culture in the novel, and one of the main characters, Tamarina, is Algoran. Much of the novel involves the main character's learning about Algorans, and a major change in Algoran culture. Most refs. not in DB. Central antagonist culture is the barbarian 'Bakori' culture.]

religious - fictional galaxy 1975 Jones, Raymond F. Renegades of Time. Don Mills, Ontario: Laser Books/Harlequin (1975); pg. 57. Algorans:
"The Algoran punched a series of buttons on a small panel in front of him. He read of some lighted characters that appeared in his own language. 'Tamarina is a Lost One,' he said. 'She is not available. We will, however, continue to honor the passes she has issued to you.'

The Algoran's words froze Joe's belly. Bill's face paled. 'What do you mean, Lost One?' he demanded. 'What has happened to her?'

Choral studied the screen once more. 'She was misaligned through interference and went to a planet of... She was diverted by the Bakori. There has been no further contact. She has been designated a Lost One.' "

religious - fictional galaxy 1975 Jones, Raymond F. Renegades of Time. Don Mills, Ontario: Laser Books/Harlequin (1975); pg. 59. Algorans:
Pg. 59: "Joe was astonished by the statements of choral, the Algoran, concerning the attitude of the Algorans toward one another. It was another facet of the people Tamarina had partially described in telling him of her parents. There were no ties, no concerns that bound Algorans to one another. It was a world of individuality gone mad. 'How can you figure these people out?' Joe said. 'Not even trying to bail somebody out when he falls in the soup.' "; Pg. 65: "Susselein led them to elevators that took them down through the solid rock of the escarpment to levels far below the desert. They came out on a balcony overlooking a floor on which endless bays of unrecognizable equipment stretched for hundreds of feet into the distance. Scores of operators sat at monitoring stations checking communications with tens of thousands of Algorans and checking their transfers between the galaxies. "
religious - fictional galaxy 1975 Jones, Raymond F. Renegades of Time. Don Mills, Ontario: Laser Books/Harlequin (1975); pg. 60. Algorans:
"'This world--it's a ruin. I thought it would be some kind of paradise.'

'It took me a while to get used to it. It's a ruin because nobody lives here except a few die-hards out in desert villages, a kind of priestly class dedicated to serving the machinery that enables the rest of them to live where they will.

'Nobody cares about Algor. Why should they? After they discovered time-space travel they could live where they pleased. Let other races develop worlds. Algorans can have the pick of the universe. Whatever luxury they want they can find already in existence--somewhere. A few of them do contribute to the worlds on which they live, but those are very much in the minority. The rest are parasites.' "

religious - fictional galaxy 1975 Jones, Raymond F. Renegades of Time. Don Mills, Ontario: Laser Books/Harlequin (1975); pg. 66. Algorans:
"'...I wanted to show you this to help you understand the scope of our work. Our people here are dedicated to maintaining this service for Algorans throughout the universe. I wanted you to know what we are not just a few old men here on an abandoned world with little boxes of gadgets.' "
religious - fictional galaxy 1975 Jones, Raymond F. Renegades of Time. Don Mills, Ontario: Laser Books/Harlequin (1975); pg. 124-125. Algorans:
"'Earth is our home,' he said... 'I wonder if there is any one of you who can understand what that means. You have abandoned your own home and made playthings of the worlds and homes of other races. You abandon each other when you become Lost Ones. You have concern for nothing. You create nothing. You steal what you want from other worlds and other races. The Bakori are barbarians who destroy openly and coldly. But the Algorans are parasites who infest and destroy slowly and carelessly. I doubt there is any choice as to which is the more deadly in the end.'...

Susselein... spoke finally. 'We can forgive you lack of understanding of our culture, but your turbulence may be a factor, after all, that we cannot accommodate.'

The Director of Social Relationships, Rafeno... could not endure the tension longer. 'What you don't understand is that there is no end of worlds. Worlds are infinite. Worlds are cheap.' "

religious - fictional galaxy 1975 Jones, Raymond F. Renegades of Time. Don Mills, Ontario: Laser Books/Harlequin (1975); pg. 57-58. Algorans:
"'Aren't you going to try to get her back?'

... Choral said, 'In travelling to alien worlds, and coping with alien peoples and custom there is an inevitable element of danger. Scores of our people are in trouble of some kind constantly. The risk is accepted by the individual each time he begins a journey. His only lifeline is the beacon he carries. If he gets in trouble and is able to establish a beacon signal we send a rescue channel as was done in your case... Beyond that we cannot go. We cannot send out search parties or rescue teams for everyone who is in trouble or lost. We all know that when we go out. The risk is accepted.' "

religious - fictional galaxy 1975 Jones, Raymond F. Renegades of Time. Don Mills, Ontario: Laser Books/Harlequin (1975); pg. 66-67. Algorans:
"For five centuries they had lived as total individuals, without regard for one another. It must have come gradually. They must have started as a people who lived in families and worked together and cared for one another. But could they ever again understand the possibility of cooperative, group action? Could they understand the meaning of a family, a city, a nation? Yet the technicians remained. There must be something that held them together. Without them, the whole system would break down.

Joe asked the question, 'What keeps the technicians here? How do you recruit new ones?'

'We have surrounded the post with what you would call mystique,' replied Susselein. 'We select intelligent, loyal apprentices from out in the field. One in a hundred is finally qualified. It's the one thing that unifies our scattered people--the honor and exalted station of being called to serve at Base Terminal. So far, we have survived on that mystique. If it ever dies, Algor will die.' "

religious - fictional galaxy 1979 Asprin, Robert L. The Bug Wars. New York: St. Martin's Press (1979) Tzen:
[This novel appears to take place entirely in a part of the galaxy completely removed from Earth, amid alien with no apparent contact with Earth.] Book jacket: "This is the story of a war. Evolving in a hostile environment, the Tzen have fought and clawed their way to dominance in their own world. Now they and their planet lie in the path of a relentless, swarming foe. Hopelessly outnumbered, the Tzen face their greatest test. To survive they must attack, relying on their skills and tactics in a war where defeat means certain extinction.

This is the story of a society. The warrior culture of the Tzen is rich in tradition and proud of its history of victories unblemished by defeat. The succeed in this new war, however, they must adapt to a new level of technology. More important, they must abandon old feuds between individuals and castes if they are to present a united front to the foe.]

religious - fictional galaxy 1979 Asprin, Robert L. The Bug Wars. New York: St. Martin's Press (1979); pg. 1. Tzen:
"I have my weapons, I am alive, I am Tzen, I am duty-bound. I am Rahm.

Having recalled I am Tzen, it did not surprise me that I thought of my duty before even thinking of my name. It is part of the character of the Tzen to always think of the species and the Empire before thinking of themselves, particularly the Warrior caste, of which I was one. It has occasionally been suggested, privately of course, that some of the other castes, particularly the Scientists, think of the individual before they think of the species, but I do not believe this. A Tzen is a Tzen. " [Other refs. to the Tzen throughout novel, only a few examples in DB.]

religious - fictional galaxy 1979 Asprin, Robert L. The Bug Wars. New York: St. Martin's Press (1979) Tzen:
[The main character of the novel, by the way, is Rahm.] Book jacket: "This is the story of an individual. Rahm, a Commander in the Warrior's Caste, must stretch his old-order abilities and knowledge to their limits and beyond as he executes the orders of the High Command. Trained for war to the exclusion of all else, he must fight to defend an Empire which becomes more alien to him with each victory than the foe he battles. "
religious - fictional galaxy 1979 Asprin, Robert L. The Bug Wars. New York: St. Martin's Press (1979); pg. 2. Tzen:
"We exchanged neither salutes nor nods of recognition as he passed, his tail rasping briefly on the walkway. His ten-foot bulk, large even for a Tzen, was easy to recognize in the semidarkness. He was Zur, my second-in-command for this mission. I respected him for his abilities, as he respected me for mine. I felt no desire to wish him luck or a need to give him last-minute instructions. He was a Tzen.

He, like the rest of my flight team, had performed efficiently in practice, and I had no reason to expect they would perform otherwise in actual combat. If he or any of the others seemed lax or panicky in battle, and if that shortcoming endangered me or the mission, I would kill them. "

religious - fictional galaxy 1979 Asprin, Robert L. The Bug Wars. New York: St. Martin's Press (1979); pg. 14. Tzen:
"'Ahk here, Rahm. Should we accept so readily that we're dead? There is always a chance of a missed transmission from the transport. I would suggest we use whatever power remains to sweep for another transport. If we cannot find one, then we can decide a course of action.'

'May I remind the team,' came Ssah's voice, 'that dead or not, Rahm is still in command. As commander, it is his duty, difficult though it may be, to decide our course of action, not waste our time in idle debate.'

'Mahz confirms Ssah's contention!'

I was about to reply to this implication of my shirking of duty, when Zur's quiet voice interrupted. "

religious - fictional galaxy 1979 Asprin, Robert L. The Bug Wars. New York: St. Martin's Press (1979); pg. 54. Tzen:
"'There is a balance of work here, Commander, which at times I think you overlook. Knowledge is a powerful weapon, but only if it is used. Had the Coalition of Insects utilized the knowledge of the First Ones as we have, it is doubtful we would be here today. The Tzen are effective not because we have knowledge, but because we use it. The Scientists seek and organize the knowledge, the Technicians render it usable, and the Warriors apply it. On a smaller scale, my information would be of little value if you as the Commander were unwilling to benefit from it. As I pointed out when we first met, I feel there are many officers who would be reluctant to take advantage of my assistance.'

'I must disagree with you, Zur. I do not feel am that unusual as an officer. In all phases of our training we rely heavily on the Scientists and Technicians. Why should it be any different in the field?' "

religious - fictional galaxy 1980 Adams, Douglas. The Restaurant at the End of the Universe. New York: Harmony Books (1980); pg. 107. Church of the Second Coming of the Great Prophet Zarquon:
[At Milliways, the titular 'Restaurant at the End of the Galaxy'] "'And finally,' said Max, quieting the audience down and putting on his solemn face, 'finally I believe we have with us here tonight, a party of believers, very devout believers, from the Church of the Second Coming of the Great Prophet Zarquon.'

There were about twenty of them, sitting right out on the edge of the floor, ascetically dressed, sipping mineral water nervously and staying apart from the festivities. They blinked resentfully as the spotlight was turned on them.

'There they are,' said Max, 'sitting there, patiently. He said he'd come again, and he's kept you waiting a long time, so let's hope he's hurrying fellas, because he's only got eight minutes left!'

The party of Zarquon's followers sat rigid, refusing to be buffeted by the waves of uncharitable laughter which swept over them.

Max restrained the audience. "

religious - fictional galaxy 1980 Adams, Douglas. The Restaurant at the End of the Universe. New York: Harmony Books (1980); pg. 108. Church of the Second Coming of the Great Prophet Zarquon:
"No, but seriously folk, seriously though, no offense meant. No, I know we shouldn't make fun of deeply held beliefs, so I think a big hand please for the Great Prophet Zarquon . . .'

The audience clapped respectfully.

'. . . wherever he's gone to!'

He blew a kiss to the stony-faced party and returned to the center of the stage. "

religious - fictional galaxy 1980 Adams, Douglas. The Restaurant at the End of the Universe. New York: Harmony Books (1980); pg. 125. Church of the Second Coming of the Great Prophet Zarquon:
"Suddenly a wisp of smoke was swirling and shimmering on the stage next to him. The trumpet was joined by more trumpets. Over five hundred times Max had done this show, and nothing like this had ever happened before. He drew back in alarm from the swirling smoke, and as he did so, a figure slowly materialized inside, the figure of an ancient man, robed and wreathed in light. In his eyes were stars and on his brow a golden crown.

'What's this? whispered Max, wild-eyed. 'What's happening?'

At the back of the Restaurant the stony-faced party from the Church of the Second Coming of the Great Prophet Zarquon leaped ecstatically to their feet chanting and crying. "

religious - fictional galaxy 1980 Adams, Douglas. The Restaurant at the End of the Universe. New York: Harmony Books (1980); pg. 125. Church of the Second Coming of the Great Prophet Zarquon:
"Max blinked in amazement. He threw up his arms to the audience.

'A big hand please, ladies and gentlemen,' he hollered, 'for the Great Prophet Zarquon! He has come! Zarquon has come again!'

Thunderous applause broke out as Max strode across the stage and handed his microphone to the Prophet.

Zarquon coughed. He peered round at the assembled gathering. The stars in his eyes twinkled uneasily. He handled the microphone with confusion.

'Er . . .' he said, 'hello. Er, look, I'm sorry I'm a bit late. I've had the most ghastly time, all sorts of things cropping up at the last minute.'

He seemed nervous of the expectant awed hush. He cleared his throat.

'Er, how are we for time?'

he said. 'Have I just got a min--'

And so the Universe ended. "

religious - fictional galaxy 1980 Adams, Douglas. The Restaurant at the End of the Universe. New York: Harmony Books (1980); pg. 190. Pralite monks:
"They wrapped themselves in animal skins and furs which Ford Prefect acquired by a technique he once learned from a couple of ex-Pralite monks running a mind-surfing resort in the Hills of Hunian.

The Galaxy is littered with ex-Pralite monks, all on the make, because the mental control techniques the Order have evolved as a form of devotional discipline are, frankly, sensational--and extraordinary numbers of monks leave the Order just after they have finished their devotional training and just before they make their final vows to stay locked in small metal boxes for the rest of their lives.

Ford's technique seemed to consist mainly of standing still for a while and smiling. "



religious - fictional, continued

Search Adherents.com

Custom Search
comments powered by Disqus
Collection and organization of data © 23 April 2007 by Adherents.com.   Site created by custom apps written in C++.  
Research supported by East Haven University.
Books * Videos * Music * Posters

We are always striving to increase the accuracy and usefulness of our website. We are happy to hear from you. Please submit questions, suggestions, comments, corrections, etc. to: webmaster@adherents.com.