Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to religious - fictional, Commonwealth

religious - fictional, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
religious - fictional Commonwealth 1001983 Wolfe, Gene. The Citadel of the Autarch. New York: Timescape (1983); pg. 60. Pelerines:
"There came a moment when no one spoke, that lengthened and lengthened, interrupted only by the murmerings of the well--the Pelerines and their male slaves--who came to ask the condition of the patient or that. One of the scarlet-clad priestesses came and sat by my cot, and my mind was so slow, so nearly sleeping, that it was some time before I realized that she must have carried a stool with her. "
religious - fictional Commonwealth 1001983 Wolfe, Gene. The Citadel of the Autarch. New York: Timescape (1983); pg. 96. Pelerines:
"'...He told me that he was a slave of the Pelerines and it was about the same as being in an order, but better. A man could have a drink or two and nobody'd object so long as he was sober when he came to do his work. He could lie with girls too, and there were good chances for that because the girls thought they were holy men, more or less, and they traveled all around.

'I asked if he thought they'd take me, and I said I couldn't believe the life was as good as he made it out to be. He said he was sure they would, and although he couldn't prove what he'd said about the girls right then and there, he'd prove what he'd said about drinking by splitting a bottle of red with me...' "

religious - fictional Commonwealth 1001983 Wolfe, Gene. The Citadel of the Autarch. New York: Timescape (1983); pg. 97. Pelerines:
"'We went to a tavern by the market and sat down, and he was as good as his word. He told me the life [of a male slave of the Pelerines] was a lot like a sailor's, because the best part of being a sailor was seeing various places, and they did that It was like being a soldier too, because they carried weapons when the order journeyed in wild parts. Besides all that, they paid you to sign. In an order, the order gets an offering from every man who takes their vow. If he decides to leave later, he gets some of it back, depending on how long he's been in. For us slaves, as he explained to me, all that went the other way. A slave got paid when he signed. If he left later he'd have to buy his way out, but if he stayed he could keep all the money.

'...While I was thinking about the religious orders, I'd got to be more religious myself... I signed the paper--naturally Goslin, the slave who'd brought me in, got a reward for it--and I took the money to my mother.' "

religious - fictional Commonwealth 1001983 Wolfe, Gene. The Citadel of the Autarch. New York: Timescape (1983); pg. 98. Pelerines:
"'You said you thought the Pelerines would be kind mistresses, and I suppose you're right. I've had a lot of kindness from some of them, and I've never been whipped here--nothing worse than a few slaps. But you ought to know how they do it. Slaves that don't behave themselves get sold, that's all. Maybe you don't follow me.'

'I don't think I do.'

'A lot of men sell themselves to the order, thinking like I did that it'll be an easy life and an adventure. So it is, mostly, and it's a good feeling to help cure the sick and the wounded. But those who don't suit the Pelerines are sold off, and they get a lot more for them than they paid them. Do you see how it is now? This way, they don't have to beat anybody. About the worse punishment you get is scrubbing out the jakes. Only if you don't please them, you can find yourself getting driven down into a mine...' "

religious - fictional Commonwealth 1001983 Wolfe, Gene. The Citadel of the Autarch. New York: Timescape (1983); pg. 110. Pelerines:
"Of the liturgy of the Pelerines, I will say nothing. Such things cannot always be well described, and even when they can, it is less than proper to do so. The guild called the Seekers for Truth and Penitence, to which I at one time belonged, has its own ceremonies, one of which I have described in some detail in another place. Certainly those ceremonies are peculiar to it, and perhaps those of the Pelerines were peculiar to them as well, though they may once have been universal. "
religious - fictional Commonwealth 1001983 Wolfe, Gene. The Citadel of the Autarch. New York: Timescape (1983); pg. 111. Pelerines:
"Speaking in so far as I can as an unprejudiced observer, I would say that they were more beautiful than ours but less theatrical, and thus in the long run perhaps less moving. The costumes of the participants were ancient, I am sure, an striking. The chants possessed a queer attraction I have not encountered in other music. Our ceremonies were intended chiefly to impress the role of the guild upon the minds of our younger members. Possibly those of the Pelerines had a similar function. if not, then they were designed to engage the particular attention of the All-Seeing, and whether they did so I cannot say. In the event, the order received no special protection.

When the ceremony was over and the scarlet-clad priestesses filed out, I bowed my head & feigned to be deep in prayer. Very readily, I found, the pretense became the thing itself. I remained conscious of my kneeling body, but only as a peripheral burden. My mind was among the starry wastes, far from Urth... "

religious - fictional Darkover 3700 Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Heirs of Hammerfell. New York: DAW Books (1989); pg. 133. Darkovan:
Pg. 133: "...people arrived dripping wet and great fires had to be lighted for them to dry a little before they could enjoy the lavishly-provided supper, and the dancing which was the best known feature of all Darkovan social customs. "; Pg. 146: "'I am not superstitious,' said Floria. 'I think we should go on with the handfasting--I do not think the royal lady would grudge us that. Even if this should be her last act of kindness--'

'All Gods forbid,' said Erminie and Edric speaking almost together. "; Pg. 196: "'Only before I saw him; surely you must know that gossip and hearsay could make a monster of Saint Valentine of the Snows himself,' Alastair said... " [References to Darkovan culture and religion throughout novel, not in DB.]

religious - fictional Darkover 3900 Bradley, Marion Zimmer & Mercedes Lackey. Rediscovery. New York: DAW Books (1993); pg. 40. Darkovan:
Pg. 40: "'Are you now a fortune0teller in the marketplace, then? Or perhaps you'd care to take on the gray robe of a priestess of Avarra, and go about proclaiming doom! Old Martina, who was my mother's maid, was given to prophesying now and again, and she could prophesy snow at midwinter as well as anyone else.' "; Pg. 202: "'Maybe you hadn't heard,' Ysaye continued. 'It seems that we're all invited to the naming ceremony for the baby, at their Midwinter Festival--that's very nearly our Christmas Day.' " [Other refs. to Darkovan religious culture not in DB.]
religious - fictional Darkover 4000 Bradley, Marion Zimmer. Stormqueen! in The Ages of Chaos. New York: Daw Books (2002; c. 1978); pg. 40. Darkovan:
[1] "The chapel was dark, a single small light glowing in the shrine where the statue of the Holy Bearer of Burdens stood, above the last resting-place of the saint. Allart, moving quietly, eyes closed as the rule demanded, turned into his assigned place on the benches; as one, the brotherhood knelt. Allart, eyes still closed by rule, heard the shuffle of feet, an occasional stumble of some novice who must still rely on the outer instead of the inner sight to move his clumsy body about the monastery. The students, unsworn, with minimal teaching, stumbled in the darkness, ignorant of why the monks neither allowed nor required light. Whispering, pushing one another, they stumbled and sometimes fell, but eventually they were all in their assigned places. Again there was no discernible sound, but the monks rose with a single disciplined movement, following again some invisible signal from Father Master...' "
religious - fictional Darkover 4000 Bradley, Marion Zimmer. Stormqueen! in The Ages of Chaos. New York: Daw Books (2002; c. 1978); pg. 41. Darkovan:
[2] "...and their voices rose in the morning hymn:

'One Power created
Heaven and Earth
Mountains and valleys
Darkness and light;
Male and female
Human and nonhuman.
This Power cannot be seen
Cannot be heard
Cannot be measured
By anything except the mind
Which partakes of this Power;
I name it Divine. . . .'

This was the moment of every day when Allart's inward questions, searchings, and dismay wholly vanished. Hearing the voices of his brothers singing, old and young, treble with childhood or rusty with age, loosing his own voice in the great affirmation, he lost all sense of himself as a separate, searching, questing entity. He rested, floating, in the knowledge that he was a part of something greater than himself, a part of the great Power which maintained the motion of moons, stars, suns, and the unknown. " [More. Many other refs., not in DB.]

religious - fictional Darkover 4025 Bradley, Marion Zimmer. Traitor's Sun. New York: DAW Books (1999); pg. 411. Darkovan:
"At last she said, 'The Darkovan mythology is fairly simple--two gods, two goddesses and no theology to speak of. They are more like forces of nature, invoked ceremonially on occasion, and otherwise not given much attention. There are other deities, lesser ones, as well. But I think that the general attitude of the people is that if the gods do not actively interfere in their lives, then they should just leave well enough alone.' "
religious - fictional Darkover 4025 Bradley, Marion Zimmer. Traitor's Sun. New York: DAW Books (1999); pg. 43. "'He is Nevarsin,' he said... and if he was Nevarsin, then likely he intended to become a cristoforo monk. Although the sons of the Domains had been educated by the cristoforos for generations, it was rare these days for them to join the odd community in the far north, in the City of Snows as it as sometimes called. " [Other refs., not in DB.]
religious - fictional Darkover 4050 Bradley, Marion Zimmer & Deborah J. Ross. The Fall of Neskaya. New York: DAW Books (2001); pg. 41. Pg. 41: "He heard a voice, so low and resonant that he could catch only a phrase or two, 'Holy St. Christopher . . . Bearer of Burdens . . . Protector of children . . . Into Thy care . . .'

He looked down at his hands and saw, as if the images were painted on layers of gauze, his hands, whole and unharmed, and his other hands, his dream hands. Bits of heat-blackened flesh clung to splintered bones. Pain shrilled along his nerves. And still the fire burned, eating through the muscles of his chest, his ribs, his heart. . . .

Evanda and Avarra, Aldones the Son of Light, even you, Zandru of the Forge--help me! Help me! ";

Pg. 142: "'Walk? Would you deny Padrik the traditional rites as well? It is the custom in Acosta to ride--'

'It is our custom to walk to the burial site, out of respect for the dead. However, if the distance is too far for you to manage on your own, a litter can be arranged.' " [Other refs., not in DB.]

religious - fictional Darwath 1996 Hambly, Barbara. Mother of Winter. New York: Ballantine (1996); pg. 10. Church of the Straight God:
Pg. 10: "Maia of Thran, Bishop of Renweth, erstwhile Bishop of Penambra and owner of the palace they sought, had told her tales of analogous holy hermits who'd had similar problems. "; Pg. 14: "On a fallen keystone the circled cross of the Straight Faith was incised. "; Pg. 24: "...with the Church of the Straight God... "; Pg. 173: "Weaver and two or three others in the Keep operated out of the long Church medical tradition, a combination of anatomical study, herbalism, and dream interpretation, which Ingold had learned... Weaver, though devoutly religious, was willing and happy to teach them. " [Other refs., not in DB.]
religious - fictional Darwath 1998 Hambly, Barbara. Icefalcon's Quest. New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 17. Church of the Straight God:
Pg. 17: "'Alketch bandits' religious scruples might not have stretched to keeping her around... You know what the Church in the South does to wizards...' "; Pg. 257: "'...who through spells forbidden by both other wizards and the Church influenced not only the choice, but the date, of the succession of the Prince-Bishop of the Alketch should that mage find himself abroad in the world without a protector?' " [Other refs., not in DB.]
religious - fictional Dathomir -99927 B.C.E. Wolverton, Dave. The Courtship of Princess Leia. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 112. Alderaanian:
"Hand had seen Leia like this only very few times--always when her life was in danger. He had often thought that with his relaxed attitude, perhaps he enjoyed his life more than she enjoyed hers. But when he saw her fierceness rise to the surface, he realized that she loved life more passionately, more deeply than he could. Perhaps it was her Alderaanian heritage surfacing, her culture's legendary respect for any life, something Leia was forced to lay aside in her fight against the Empire. But always it surfaced, and Han kept finding that Leia was like that: she hid her feelings deeply, so deeply that Han suspected even she didn't know what she felt. "
religious - fictional Dathomir -99927 B.C.E. Wolverton, Dave. The Courtship of Princess Leia. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 182. Singing Mountain clan:
"Old Tannath said, 'Moments ago you quoted the Book of Law, saying that we should not concede to evil. But when have we of the Singing Mountain clan ever stopped conceding to evil? Gethzerion is powerful because we of the clans have not challenged her for far too long. When she began following her dark ways, we could have put an end to her easily.'

'Hush,' Augwynne said. 'That was long ago, the mistake cannot be unmade. We were right to hope that she would turn from her ways.'

'She violated all of our laws,' old Tannath said. 'Those who commit evil are supposed to go into the wilderness alone to seek cleansing, but she sought to unite the forsaken ones and create the clan of Nightsisters. We could have killed them all when there were less than a dozen...' " [Other refs. to the Singing Mountain clan and Nightsisters throughout most of the novel. These are the novel's central fictional groups. Their history and culture is described in detail.]

religious - fictional Deep Space 9 2369 David, Peter. The Siege (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1993); pg. 40. Edemians:
Pg. 40: "'...They're as fervent about that as the holiest of men about their own respective gods. No offense intended.'

'None taken... Indeed, we may be performing K'olkr's will, despite our original intention of passing through the Gamma Quadrant...' ";

Pg. 51-52: "'K'olkr is . . . all... K'olkr loves us. K'olkr protects us. He . . . He guides us... By trusting ourselves to the fate decreed by K'olkr, we have that much more security in ourselves.'

'Trusting yourselves to the fate K'olkr decrees?' said Bashir. 'So you believe purely in predestination? Or do you accept the notion of free will?'

Rasa looked somewhat surprised at this. It was as if he hadn't been certain until just this moment that Bashir was actually paying attention to what he was saying. Automatically he said, 'Free will when it comes to dealing in mortal affairs. But trusting in the wisdom of K'olkr when it comes to those matters that are the affairs of gods.' " [Many other refs., not in DB.]

religious - fictional Deep Space 9 2370 Schofield, Sandy. The Big Game (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1993) [Book cover] "When Quark holds a poker tournament on Deep Space Nine someone from almost every sentient race--Klingons, Cardassians, Romulans, Vulcans, Ferengi--shows up for what is sure to be the highest-stakes game of all... " [Many different races/cultures featured in this novel, but little is said about their religions.]
religious - fictional Deep Space 9 2371 Sheckley, Robert. The Laertian Gamble (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1995); pg. 52. Laertian:
"'Gambling, sir,' the Gamemaster told him, 'is one of the highly sanctioned activities on Laertes, where it is considered tantamount to a religious duty. Those who gamble for the highest stakes are thought to be touched by the Supreme Gambler which is our name and description of the Deity that rules us all. Although we normally leave the matter of gambling to individual conscience, sometimes a matter comes up which effects us all as a people.' " [Many other refs., not in DB. The Laertians, as the title of the novel indicates, are the main fictional culture/race in the novel.]
religious - fictional Deep Space 9 2374 Carey, Diane. Call to Arms . . . (Star Trek: DS9 / The Dominion War: Book 2 of 4). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 22. Vorta:
[Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: The Dominion War: Book Two: Call to Arms . . .: Novelization by Diane Carey based on original telescripts written by Ira Steven Behr, Robert Hewitt Wolfe, Hans Beimler, Bradley Thompson, David Weddle, Ronald D. Moore, and Rene Echevarria.] "But Weyoun saved her from having to speak as he drifted forward to Odo, spread his hands, and gazed in obsequious adoration at the shapeshifter. 'Founder . . . we are honored by your decision to remain with us.'

Odo blistered and stiffened. 'I'm not here as a Founder,' his gravelly voice returned. 'I'm the station's security chief.'

Kira bit back a grin. She knew what that meant to Odo, and also how much of a lesser thing it must seem to Weyoun.

'Whatever you say,' Weyoun allowed. 'Nevertheless, having a . . . a god . . . walk among us is most gratifying.' " [The Vorta worship the Founders as gods. Other refs., not in DB.]

religious - fictional Deep Space 9 2375 David, Peter. Triangle: Imzadi II (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 4. Trill:
"All her things were there. Scents and makeup, souvenirs, irreplaceable knickknacks representing a life that had spanned decades. For Jadzia Dax was a gestalt being, a combination of a humanoid host and a worm-like symbiont called a Trill. When a Trill began a new life, contact with the old was strictly forbidden. Worf was suddenly--just like that--part of Jadzia Dax's past. He had no idea what was going to happen. Whether the Trill would return in another body, whether the new incarnation of Dax would still love him, whether he would love her . . .

. . . her?

. . . him? That would be all he needed. "

religious - fictional Deep Space 9 2375 Perry, S. D. Avatar, Book Two (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 55. Andorian:
"'What's your culture like?'...

'The Andorian culture is complex,' Shar said, after a few beats... 'Andorians have a genetic predisposition toward violent behavior, but socially, within our own communities, we're extremely structured.. I would say we are a serious people, and adaptable. Compared to many other species, Andorians excel under difficult circumstances; like the human fight-or-flight response to danger, our biochemical reaction is to either fight or to increase our sensory input levels, which lends greater power to our analytical and reasoning skills.' " [More, not in DB.]

religious - fictional Deep Space 9 2400 Reeves-Stevens, Judith & Garfield. The War of the Prophets (Star Trek: DS9 / Millennium Book 2 of 3). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 96. Vorta:
[1] "'Captain Sisko, you must believe me. I begged Damar to accept the inevitable. I implored the Founder to accept that it was time she and her kind accepted their fate to be partners in a new cause, not the leaders of a dying one. Yet--'

Sisko regarded him with disbelief. 'Are you saying you turned against the Founders?!'

'But . . . they were your gods,' Kira said.

Weyoun shook his head. 'The only reason the Vorta believed the Founders to be gods was because that was programmed into the basic structure of our brains. Our belief in the Founders was achieved through the same genetic engineering that raised us from the forests of our homeworld.' "

religious - fictional Deep Space 9 2400 Reeves-Stevens, Judith & Garfield. The War of the Prophets (Star Trek: DS9 / Millennium Book 2 of 3). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 97. Vorta:
[2] "'But you've always known about your programming,' Sisko said.

'True. And our belief, engineered or not, did sustain the Vorta--sustained me--through the most difficult times. But then. . .' Weyoun withdrew his arms from his robes and spread them wide, as if to embrace Sisko and the others. '. . . The day came when those difficult times ended . . . and I met the true Gods of all creation--the Prophets.' His transformed face shone with bliss.

Sisko stared at the triumphant Vorta. 'You . . . met the Bajoran Prophets?'

Weyoun nodded, his beatific smile never wavering.

'Through an Orb experience?' Kira asked doubtfully. 'Or--'

'Face to face,' the Vorta said in a humble voice. 'In the True Celestial Temple. I traveled through it. A desperate expedition to see if it led to the Gamma Quadrant.' " [Many more refs. Weyoun is a major character in novel, and is pictured on the cover.]

religious - fictional Diaspar 1000000000 Clarke, Arthur C. The City and the Stars. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1956); pg. 25. "There are some forms or architecture that can never change because they have reached perfection. The Tomb of Yarlan Zey might have been designed by the temple builders of the first civilizations man had ever known, though they would have found it impossible to imagine of what material it was made... The creator of the great park--the builder, some said, of Diaspar itself--sat with slightly downcast eyes, as if examining the plans spread across his knees... Some had dismissed it as no more than an idle whim of the artist's, but to others it seemed that Yarlan Zey was smiling at some secret jest. " [More.]
religious - fictional Diaspar 1000000000 Clarke, Arthur C. The City and the Stars. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1956); pg. 57. "Long ago it had been discovered that without some crime or disorder, Utopia soon became unbearably dull. Crime, however, from the nature of things, could not be guaranteed to remain at the optimum level which the social equations demanded. If it was licensed and regulated, it ceased to be crime.

The office of Jester was the solution-at first sight naive, yet actually profoundly subtle--which the city's designers had evolved. In all the history of Diaspar there were less than two hundred persons whose mental inheritance fitted them for this peculiar role. They had certain privileges that protected them from the consequences of their actions, though there had been Jesters who had overstepped the mark and paid the only penalty that Diaspar could impose--that of being banished into the future before their current incarnation had ended. "

religious - fictional Diaspar 1000000000 Clarke, Arthur C. The City and the Stars. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1956); pg. 58. "'Tell me, Jeserac,' asked Khedron abruptly, 'does Alvin know that he is not the first Unique?'

Jeserac looked startled, then a little defiant.

'I might have guessed,' he said ruefully, 'that you would know that. How many Uniques have there been in the whole history of Diaspar? As many as ten?'

'Fourteen,' answered Khedron without hesitation. 'Not counting Alvin.' "

religious - fictional Diaspar 1000000000 Clarke, Arthur C. The City and the Stars. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1956); pg. 67. "The Hall was one of the largest buildings in the city, and was almost entirely given over to the machines that were the real administrators of Diaspar. Not far from its summit was the chamber where the Council met on those infrequent occasions when it had any business to discuss.

The wide entrance swallowed them up, and Khedron strode forward into the golden gloom. Alvin had never entered Council Hall before; there was no rule against it--there were few rules against anything in Diaspar--but like everyone else he had a certain half-religious awe of the place. IN a world that had no gods, Council Hall was the nearest thing to a temple. " [More.]

religious - fictional Discworld 1992 Pratchett, Terry. Small Gods. New York: HarperCollins (1994; c. 1992); pg. 2. Omnianism:
Pg. 2: "Omnianism "; Pg. 5: "Church of the Great God Om " [Extensive refs. throughout novel to this fictional church, and to the philosophy of Omnianism. This is the novel's main fictional religion.]
religious - fictional Earthsea 1990 LeGuin, Ursula K. Tehanu: The Last Book of Earthsea. New York: Atheneum (1990); pg. 11. Earthsea religion:
[A portion of the creation myth of this community is recited:] "'So this is the story she sang to him, to Ogion.

'When Segoy raised the islands of the world from the sea in the beginning of time, the dragons were the first born of the land and the wind blowing over the land. So the Song of the Creation tells. But her song told also that then, in the beginning, dragon and human were all one. They were all one people, one race, winged, and speaking the True Language.

'They were beautiful, and strong, and wise, and free.

'But in time nothing can be without becoming. So among the dragon-people some became more and more in love with flight and wildness, and would have less and less to do with the works of making, or with study and learning, or with houses and cities. They wanted only to fly farther and farther, hunting and eating their kill, ignorant and uncaring, seeking more freedom and more...' "

religious - fictional Earthsea 1990 LeGuin, Ursula K. Tehanu: The Last Book of Earthsea. New York: Atheneum (1990); pg. 62. Earthsea religion:
"As a girl, a priestess, she had been a vessel: the power of the dark places had run through her, used her, left her empty, untouched. As a young woman she had been taught a powerful knowledge by a powerful man and had laid it aside, turned away from it, not touched it. As a woman she had chosen and had the powers of a woman, in their time, and the time was past; her wiving and mothering was done. " [There are many references to the religion of this book's culture, which does not appear to be explicitly named. There are no explicit references by name to any actual Earth religions. Witches are mentioned in the book, only the fantasy type, not Wiccans.]
religious - fictional Earthsea 1990 LeGuin, Ursula K. Tehanu: The Last Book of Earthsea. New York: Atheneum (1990); pg. 11. Earthsea religion:
[A portion of the creation myth of this community is recited:] "'...the Song of the Creation... Others of the dragon-people came to care little for flight, but gathered up treasure, wealth, things made, things learned. They built houses, strongholds to keep their treasures in, so they could pass all they gained to their children, ever seeking more increase and more. And they came to fear the wild ones, who might come flying and destroy all their dear hoard, burn it up in a blast of flame out of mere carelessness and ferocity.

'The wild ones feared nothing. They learned nothing. Because they were ignorant and fearless, they could not save themselves when the flightless ones trapped them as animals and killed them. But other wild ones would come flying and set the beautiful houses afire, and destroy them, and kill. Those that were strongest, wild or wise, were those who killed each other first...' "

religious - fictional Ecotopia 1980 Callenbach, Ernest. Ecotopia. New York: Tor (1977; c. 1975); pg. 4. Ecotopians:
[Full title: Ecotopia: The Notebooks and Reports of William Weston] "On board TWA flight 38, New York to Reno, May 3. As I begin this assignment, my jet heads west to Reno--last American city before the forbidding Sierra Nevada mountains that guard the closed boarders of Ecotopia... Ecotopia's secession in 1980... Nonetheless, many Americans still remember the terrible shortages of fruit, lettuce, wine, cotton, paper, lumber, and other western products which followed the breakaway of what had been Washington, Oregon, and Northern California. " [The entire novel, of course, is about Ecotopia, it's culture, beliefs, politics, etc.]
religious - fictional Ecotopia 2001 Callenbach, Ernest. Ecotopia. New York: Tor (1977; c. 1975); pg. 37. Ecotopians:
"Ecotopians a little vague about time, I notice--few wear watches, and they pay more attention to things like sunrise and sunset or the tides than to actual hour time. They will accede to the demands of industrial civilization to some extent, but grudgingly. 'You'd never catch an Indian wearing a watch.' Many Ecotopians sentimental about Indians, and there's some sense in which they envy the Indians their lost natural place in the American wilderness. Indeed this is probably a major Ecotopian myth; keep hearing references to what Indians would or wouldn't do in a given situation. Some Ecotopian articles--clothing and baskets and personal ornamentation--perhaps directly Indian in inspiration. But what matters most is the aspiration to live in balance with nature, 'walk lightly on the land,' treat the earth as a mother. No surprise that to such a morality most industrial processes, work schedules, and products are suspect! Who would use an earth-mover on his own mother? "
religious - fictional Ecotopia 2001 Callenbach, Ernest. Ecotopia. New York: Tor (1977; c. 1975); pg. 83. Ecotopians:
"Americans are familiar with rumors of sexual depravity in Ecotopia, but I must report that the sexual practices of these families seem about as stable as ours. Generally there are more or less permanent heterosexual couples involved--though both male and female homosexual couples also exist, and I gather that same-sex relationships pose less of a problem psychologically than they do with us. Monogamy is not an officially proclaimed value, but the couples are generally monogamous (except for four holidays each year, at the solstices and equinoxes, when sexual promiscuity is widespread. "
religious - fictional Egypt 1986 Gerstner-Miller, Gail. "Down by the Nile " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 160. "Church of Jesus Christ, Joker":
"Father Squid, the kindly pastor of the Church of Jesus Christ, Joker, made Hiram look almost svelte. He was as tall as a normal man and twice as broad. His face was round and gray... He always reminded her of one of Lovecraft's fictional Deep Ones, but he was actually much nicer.

...Peregrine responded witha smile and then greeted Hiram and the priest [Father Squid]... " [Many other refs. to Father Squid in this story, but not specifically to his church.]

religious - fictional Fauldro 3039 Anderson, Kevin J. & Rebecca Moesta. Titan A.E.: Akima's Story. New York: Ace (2000); pg. 115. Hodrian:
"As Ishaq had predicted, most of the vaults were entirely featureless and unmarked, but one of the rusty rooftops below them bore a symbol of a sword through ring of barbed wire, or perhaps it was thorns.

'Anybody know what that means?' Akima asked.

'I think it's the mark of some religious order,' Stith said. 'That triangle design over there'--she pointed to a rundown-looking chamber--'means it's another Hodrian storage box. You'll see plenty of them.' "

religious - fictional Fauldro 3039 Anderson, Kevin J. & Rebecca Moesta. Titan A.E.: Akima's Story. New York: Ace (2000); pg. 143. Hodrian:
"'Memory spheres, like I said.' Stith picked up one and scrutinized it. 'The Hodrians believe that each person exists only so long as his name is remembered. So they keep track of every member of their race who has ever lived, one name sealed inside each one of these spheres.'

Under the dim, pinkish-yellow light of glowpanels that illuminated the nighttime warehouse districts, she could read the carefully written name. 'Reminat Janush. I have no idea who he was, but here he's still remembered.' Stith flicked the ball with her long finger, and it sailed in a perfect arc to plunk into the open hole on the roof of the Hodrian storage container.

'Because the Hodrians are an old race, they've filled their own planet with those memory spheres, piling them in wells and canyons and landfills until now they've had to rent storage containers all over Fauldro just to hold the names of their people.' "

religious - fictional Fauldro 3039 Anderson, Kevin J. & Rebecca Moesta. Titan A.E.: Akima's Story. New York: Ace (2000); pg. 148. Hodrian:
"Within moments, the flood of name balls spread, branching out and knocking over even the pheromone-dizzied aliens.

Far behind, Jaxor stood atop one of the smaller storage containers and yowled in anger. But the strewn Hodrian memory spheres continued to bounce and roll, breaking the mob into a tangle of arms and legs and other limbs...

Stith shook with laughter. 'Those Hodrians may be long dead, but they've finally done something memorable.' "

religious - fictional Fauldro 3039 Anderson, Kevin J. & Rebecca Moesta. Titan A.E.: Akima's Story. New York: Ace (2000); pg. 108. Mantrin:
"'Yes, that's correct. Female Mantrin, female Human, male Human...' "
religious - fictional Federation 2271 Roddenberry, Gene. Star Trek: The Motion Picture (excerpt from novelization) in Star Trek: Adventures in Time and Space (Mary P. Taylor, ed.) New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 5. Federation:
"Some critics have characterized us of Starfleet as 'primitives,' and with some justification. In some ways we do resemble our forebears of a couple of centuries ago more than most people today. We are not part of those increasingly large numbers of humans who seem willing to submerge their own identities into the groups to which they belong. I am prepared to accept the possibility that these so-called new humans represent a more highly evolved breed, capable of finding rewards in group consciousness that we more primitive individuals will never know. For the present, however, this new breed of human makes a poor space traveler, and Starfleet must depend on us 'primitives for deep-space exploration.

It seems an almost absurd claim that we 'primitives' make better space travelers than the highly evolved, superbly intelligent and adaptable new humans. The reason for this paradox is best explained in a Vulcan study of Starfleet's early years... "

religious - fictional Flatland 1999 Abbot, Edwin A. Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions. New York: Dover Publications (1952; c. 1884); pg. 35. Flatland:
"Finding the higher Orders wavering and undecided, the leaders of the Revolution advanced still further in their requirements, and at last demanded that all classes alike, the Priests and the Women not excepted, should do homage to Colour by submitting to be painted. When it was objected that Priests and Women had no sides, they retorted that Nature and Expediency concurred in dictating that the front half of every human being (that is to say, the half containing his eye and mouth) should be distinguishable from his hinder half. They therefore brought before a general and extraordinary Assembly of all the States of Flatland a Bill proposing that in every Woman the half containing the eye and mouth should be coloured red, and the other half green. The Priests were to be painted the same way, red being applied to that cemicircle in which the eye and mouth formed the middle point; while the other or hinder semicircle was to be coloured green. "
religious - fictional Flatland 1999 Abbot, Edwin A. Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions. New York: Dover Publications (1952; c. 1884); pg. 35. Flatland:
"There was no little cunning in this proposal, which indeed emanated not from any Isosceles--for no being so degraded would have any angularity enough to appreciate, much less to devise, such a model of state-craft--but from an Irregular Circle who, instead of being destroyed in his childhood, was reserved by a foolish indulgence to bring desolation no his country and destruction on myriads of his followers.

On the one hand the proposition was calculated to bring the Women in all classes over to the side of the Chromatic Innovation. For by assigning to the Women the same two colours as were assigned to the Priests, the Revolutionists thereby ensured that, in certain positions, every Woman would appear like a Priest, and be treated with corresponding respect and deference--a prospect that could not fail to attract the Female Sex in a mass. " [Other refs. throughout novel to the fictional realm of Flatland.]

religious - fictional Flatland 1999 Abbot, Edwin A. Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions. New York: Dover Publications (1952; c. 1884); pg. 42. Flatland:
[1] "11.--Concerning our Priests

It is high time that I should pass from these brief and discursive notes about things in Flatland to the central event of this book, my initiation into the mysteries of Space. That is my object; all that has gone before is merely preface.

For this reason I must omit many matters of which the explanation would not, I flatter myself, be without interest for my Readers: as for example, our method of propelling and stopping ourselves, although destitute of feet... "

religious - fictional Flatland 1999 Abbot, Edwin A. Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions. New York: Dover Publications (1952; c. 1884); pg. 43. Flatland:
[2] "...the means by which we give fixity to structures of wood, stone, or brick, although of course we have no hands, nor can we lay foundations as you can, nor avail ourselves of the lateral pressure of the earth; the manner in which the rain originates in the intervals between our various zones, so that the northern regions do not intercept the moisture falling on the southern; the nature of our hills and mines, our trees and vegetables, our seasons and harvests; our Alphabet and method of writing, adapted to our linear tablets; these and a hundred other details of our physical existence I must pass over, nor do I mention them now except to indicate to my readers that their omission proceeds not from forgetfulness on the part of the author, but from his regard for the time of the Reader. "
religious - fictional Flatland 1999 Abbot, Edwin A. Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions. New York: Dover Publications (1952; c. 1884); pg. 43. Flatland:
[3] "Yet before I proceed to my legitimate subject some few final remarks will no doubt be expected by my Readers upon these pillars and mainstays of the Constitution of Flatland, the controllers of our conduct and shapers of our destiny, the objects of universal homage and almost of adoration: need I say that I mean our Circles or Priests?

When I call them Priests, let me not be understood as meaning no more than the term denotes with you. With us, our Priests are Administrators of all Business, Art, and Science; Directors of Trade, Commerce, Generalship, Architecture, Engineering, Education, Statesmanship, Legislature, Morality, Theology; doing nothing themselves, they are the Causes of everything worth doing, that is done by others. "

religious - fictional Flatland 1999 Abbot, Edwin A. Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions. New York: Dover Publications (1952; c. 1884); pg. 44. Flatland:
[4] "Although popularly everyone called a Circle is deemed a Circle, yet among the better educated Classes it is known that no Circle is really a Circle, but only a Polygon with a very large number of very small sides. As the number of the sides increases, a Polygon approximates to a Circle; and, when the number is very great indeed, say for example three or four hundred, it is extremely difficult for the most delicate touch to feel any polygonal angles. Let me say rather it would be difficult: for, as I have shown above, Recognition by Feeling is unknown among the highest society, and to feel a Circle would be considered a most audacious insult. "
religious - fictional Flatland 1999 Abbot, Edwin A. Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions. New York: Dover Publications (1952; c. 1884); pg. 44. Flatland:
[5] "This habit of abstention from Feeling in the best society enables a Circle the more easily to sustain the veil of mystery in which, from his earliest years, he is wont to enwrap the exact nature of his Perimeter or Circumference. Three feet being the average Perimeter it follows that, in a Polygon of three hundred sides each side will be no more than the hundredth part of a foot in length, or little more than the tenth part of an inch; and in a Polygon of six or seven hundred sides the sides are little larger than the diameter of a Spaceland pin-head. It is always assumed, by courtesy, that the Chief Circle for the time being has ten thousand sides. "
religious - fictional Flatland 1999 Abbot, Edwin A. Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions. New York: Dover Publications (1952; c. 1884); pg. 44. Flatland:
[6] "The ascent of the posterity of the Circles in the social scale is not restricted, as it is among the lower Regular classes, by the Law of Nature which limits the increase of sides to one in each generation. If it were so, the number of sides in the Circle would be a mere question of pedigree and arithmetic, and the four hundred and ninety-seventh descendant of an Equilateral Triangle would necessarily be a polygon With five hundred sides. But this is not the case. Nature's Law prescribes two antagonistic decrees affecting Circular propagation; first, that as the race climbs higher in the scale of development, so development shall proceed at an accelerated pace; second, that in the same proportion, the race shall become less fertile. Consequently in the home of a Polygon of four or five hundred sides it is rare to find a son; more than one is never seen. On the other hand the son of a five-hundred-sided Polygon has been known to possess 550, or even 600 sides. "
religious - fictional Flatland 1999 Abbot, Edwin A. Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions. New York: Dover Publications (1952; c. 1884); pg. 45. Flatland:
[7] "Art also steps in to help the process of higher Evolution. Our physicians have discovered that the small and tender sides of an infant Polygon of the higher class can be fractured, and his whole frame re-set, with such exactness that a Polygon of two or three hundred sides sometimes--by no means always, for the process is attended with serious risk--but sometimes overleaps two or three hundred generations, and as it were double at a stroke, the number of his progenitors and the nobility of his descent.

Many a promising child is sacrificed in this way. Scarcely one out of ten survives. Yet so strong is the parental ambition among those Polygons who are, as it were, on the fringe of the Circular class, that it is very rare to find the Nobleman of that position in society, who has neglected to place his first-born in the Circular Neo-Therapeutic Gymnasium before he has attained the age of a month. "

religious - fictional Flatland 1999 Abbot, Edwin A. Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions. New York: Dover Publications (1952; c. 1884); pg. 45. Flatland:
[8] "One year determines success or failure. At the end of that time the child has, in all probability, added one more to the tombstones that crowd the Neo-Therapeutic Cemetery; but on rare occasions a glad procession bears back the little one to his exultant parents, no longer a Polygon, but a Circle, at least by courtesy: and a single instance of so blessed a result induces multitudes of Polygonal parents to submit to similar domestic sacrifice, which have a dissimilar issue. "
religious - fictional Flatland 1999 Abbot, Edwin A. Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions. New York: Dover Publications (1952; c. 1884); pg. 45. Flatland:
[9] "Of the Doctrine of our Priests

As to the doctrine of the Circles it may briefly be summed up in a single maxim, "Attend to your Configuration." Whether political, ecclesiastical, or moral, all their teaching has for its object the improvement of individual and collective Configuration--with special reference of course to the Configuration of the Circles, to which all other objects are subordinated. "

religious - fictional Flatland 1999 Abbot, Edwin A. Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions. New York: Dover Publications (1952; c. 1884); pg. 46. Flatland:
[10] "It is the merit of the Circles that they have effectually suppressed those ancient heresies which led men to waste energy and sympathy in the vain belief that conduct depends upon will, effort, training, encouragement, praise, or anything else but Configuration. It was Pantocyclus--the illustrious Circle mentioned above, as the queller of the Colour Revolt--who first convinced mankind that Configuration makes the man; that if, for example, you are born an Isosceles with two uneven sides, you will assuredly go wrong unless you have them made even--for which purpose you must go to the Isosceles Hospital; similarly, if you are a Triangle, or Square, or even a Polygon, born with any Irregularity, you must be taken to one of the Regular Hospitals to have your disease cured; otherwise you will end your days in the State Prison or by the angle of the State Executioner. "
religious - fictional Flatland 1999 Abbot, Edwin A. Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions. New York: Dover Publications (1952; c. 1884); pg. 46. Flatland:
[11] "All faults or defects, from the slightest misconduct to the most flagitious crime, Pantocyclus attributed to some deviation from perfect Regularity in the bodily figure, caused perhaps (if not congenital) by some collision in a crowd; by neglect to take exercise, or by taking too much of it; or even by a sudden change of temperature, resulting in a shrinkage or expansion in some too susceptible part of the frame. Therefore, concluded that illustrious Philosopher, neither good conduct nor bad conduct is a fit subject, in any sober estimation, for either praise or blame. For why should you praise, for example, the integrity of a Square who faithfully defends the interests of his client, when you ought in reality rather to admire the exact precision of his right angles? Or again, why blame a lying, thievish Isosceles, when you ought rather to deplore the incurable inequality of his sides? "
religious - fictional Flatland 1999 Abbot, Edwin A. Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions. New York: Dover Publications (1952; c. 1884); pg. 46. Flatland:
[12] "Theoretically, this doctrine is unquestionable; but it has practical drawbacks. In dealing with an Isosceles, if a rascal pleads that he cannot help stealing because of his unevenness, you reply that for that very reason, because he cannot help being a nuisance to his neighbours, you, the Magistrate, cannot help sentencing him to be consumed--and there's an end of the matter. But in little domestic difficulties, when the penalty of consumption, or death, is out of the question, this theory of Configuration sometimes comes in awkwardly; and I must confess that occasionally when one of my own Hexagonal Grandsons pleads as an excuse for his disobedience that a sudden change of temperature has been too much for his Perimeter, and that I ought to lay the blame not on him but on his Configuration, which can only be strengthened by abundance of the choicest sweetmeats, I neither see my way logically to reject, nor practically to accept, his conclusions. "
religious - fictional Flatland 1999 Abbot, Edwin A. Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions. New York: Dover Publications (1952; c. 1884); pg. 47. Flatland:
[13] "For my own part, I find it best to assume that a good sound scolding or castigation has some latent and strengthening influence on my Grandson's Configuration; though I own that I have no grounds for thinking so. At all events I am not alone in my way of extricating myself from this dilemma; for I find that many of the highest Circles, sitting as Judges in law courts, use praise and blame towards Regular and Irregular Figures; and in their homes I know by experience that, when scolding their children, they speak about "right" and "wrong" as vehemently and passionately as if they believe that these names represented real existence, and that a human Figure is really capable of choosing between them. "
religious - fictional Flatland 1999 Abbot, Edwin A. Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions. New York: Dover Publications (1952; c. 1884); pg. 47. Flatland:
[14] "Constantly carrying out their policy of making Configuration the leading idea in every mind, the Circles reverse the nature of that Commandment which in Spaceland regulates the relations between parents and children. With you, children are taught to honour their parents; with us--next to the Circles, who are the chief object of universal homage--a man is taught to honour his Grandson, if he has one; or, if not, his Son. By "honour," however, is by no means mean "indulgence," but a reverent regard for their highest interests: and the Circles teach that the duty of fathers is to subordinate their own interests to those of posterity, thereby advancing the welfare of the whole State as well as that of their own immediate descendants.

The weak point in the system of the Circles--if a humble Square may venture to speak of anything Circular as containing any element of weakness--appears to me to be found in their relations with Women. "

religious - fictional Flatland 1999 Abbot, Edwin A. Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions. New York: Dover Publications (1952; c. 1884); pg. 48. Flatland:
[15] "As it is of the utmost importance for Society that Irregular births should be discouraged, it follows that no Woman who has any Irregularities in her ancestry is a fit partner for one who desires that his posterity should rise by regular degrees in the social scale.

Now the Irregularity of a Male is a matter of measurement; but as all Women are straight, and therefore visibly Regular so to speak, one has to device some other means of ascertaining what I may call their invisible Irregularity, that is to say their potential Irregularities as regards possible offspring. This is effected by carefully-kept pedigrees, which are preserved and supervised by the State; and without a certified pedigree no Woman is allowed to marry. "

religious - fictional Flatland 1999 Abbot, Edwin A. Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions. New York: Dover Publications (1952; c. 1884); pg. 48. Flatland:
[16] "...might have been supposed the Circle--proud of his ancestry and regardful for a posterity which might... issue hereafter in a Chief Circle--would be more careful than any other to choose a wife who had no blot on her escutcheon. But it is not so. The care in choosing a Regular wife appears to diminish as one rises in the social scale. Nothing would induce an aspiring Isosceles, who has hopes of generating an Equilateral Son, to take a wife who reckoned a single Irregularity among her Ancestors; a Square or Pentagon, who is confident that his family is steadily on the rise, does not inquire above the 500th generation; a Hexagon or Dodecagon is even more careless of the wife's pedigree; but a Circle has been known deliberately to take a wife who has had an Irregular Great-Grandfather, and all because of some slight superiority of lustre, or because of the charms of a low voice--which, with us, even more than with you, is thought 'an excellent thing in a Woman.' "
religious - fictional Flatland 1999 Abbot, Edwin A. Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions. New York: Dover Publications (1952; c. 1884); pg. 49. Flatland:
[17] "Such ill-judged marriages are, as might be expected, barren, if they do not result in positive Irregularity or in diminution of sides; but none of these evils have hitherto proved sufficiently deterrent. The loss of a few sides in a highly-developed Polygon is not easily noticed, and is sometimes compensated by a successful operation in the Neo-Therapeutic Gymnasium, as I have described above; and the Circles are too much disposed to acquiesce in infecundity as a law of the superior development. Yet, if this evil be not arrested, the gradual diminution of the Circular class may soon become more rapid, and the time may not be far distant when, the race being no longer able to produce a Chief Circle, the Constitution of Flatland must fall. "
religious - fictional Flatland 1999 Abbot, Edwin A. Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions. New York: Dover Publications (1952; c. 1884); pg. 49. Flatland:
[18] "One other word of warning suggest itself to me, though I cannot so easily mention a remedy; and this also refers to our relations with Women. About three hundred years ago, it was decreed by the Chief Circle that, since women are deficient in Reason but abundant in Emotion, they ought no longer to be treated as rational, nor receive any mental education. The consequence was that they were no longer taught to read, nor even to master Arithmetic enough to enable them to count the angles of their husband or children; and hence they sensibly declined during each generation in intellectual power. And this system of female non-education or quietism still prevails.

My fear is that, with the best intentions, this policy has been carried so far as to react injuriously on the Male Sex. "

religious - fictional Flatland 1999 Abbot, Edwin A. Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions. New York: Dover Publications (1952; c. 1884); pg. 49. Flatland:
[19] "For the consequence is that, as things now are, we Males have to lead a kind of bi-lingual, and I may almost say bimental, existence. With Women, we speak of 'love,' 'duty,' 'right,' 'wrong,' 'pity,' 'hope,' and other irrational and emotional conceptions, which have no existence, and the fiction of which has no object except to control feminine exuberances; but among ourselves, and in our books, we have an entirely different vocabulary and I may also say, idion. 'Love' them becomes 'the anticipation of benefits'; 'duty' becomes 'necessity' or 'fitness'; and other words are correspondingly transmuted. Moreover, among Women, we use language implying the utmost deference for their Sex; and they fully believe that the Chief Circle Himself is not more devoutly adored by us than they are: but behind their backs they are both regarded and spoken of--by all but the very young--as being little better than 'mindless organisms.' "
religious - fictional Flatland 1999 Abbot, Edwin A. Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions. New York: Dover Publications (1952; c. 1884); pg. 50. Flatland:
[20] "Our Theology also in the Women's chambers is entirely different from our Theology elsewhere.

Now my humble fear is that this double training, in language as well as in thought, imposes somewhat too heavy a burden upon the young, especially when, at the age of three years old, they are taken from the maternal care and taught to unlearn the old language--except for the purpose of repeating it in the presence of the Mothers and Nurses--and to learn the vocabulary and idiom of science. "

religious - fictional Flatland 1999 Abbot, Edwin A. Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions. New York: Dover Publications (1952; c. 1884); pg. 50. Flatland:
[21] "Already methinks I discern a weakness in the grasp of mathematical truth at the present time as compared with the more robust intellect of our ancestors three hundred years ago. I say nothing of the possible danger if a Woman should ever surreptitiously learn to read and convey to her Sex the result of her perusal of a single popular volume; nor of the possibility that the indiscretion or disobedience of some infant Male might reveal to a Mother the secrets of the logical dialect. On the simple ground of the enfeebling of the male intellect, I rest this humble appeal to the highest Authorities to reconsider the regulations of Female education. "


religious - fictional, continued

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