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Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to religious - fictional, Brazil: Nova Roma

religious - fictional, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
religious - fictional Brazil: Nova Roma 1984 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 11: "Magma ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Jan 1984); pg. 3. Cult of Fire:
Selene: "Fortunately, however... my condition is easily rectified... albeit with the sacrifice of my loyal disciples. "; a commoner/disciple: "Priestess, no! "; other follower: "We served you well! "; other: "In mercy's name--spare us! "; [They are driven into the lava pit.] Selene: "With each death--each exquisite moment of agony--my youth and vigour are restored. " [Other refs., not in DB, to Selene as the 'Black Priestess' in this story. Some people in Nova Roma have worshipped the powerful mutant Selene. See also pg. 7, 10-11, 16.]
religious - fictional Briar Patch 2275 Dillard, J. M. Star Trek: Insurrection. New York: Pocket Books (1998). Based on the movie; story by Rick Berman & Michael Piller; screenplay by Michael Piller.; pg. 236. Son'a:
"The loss was crushing--in terms of both numbers and emotional effects upon the two disgraced Son'a leaders. Consensus of the loyal Ba'ku doomed the Son'a to exile . . . not from the village, but from the planet itself; word had leaked out long ago that the Son'a were in the process of constructing a spaceship in the desert, a ship large enough to carry all eighty of them. "
religious - fictional California 1971 Dick, Philip K. Valis. New York: Bantam (1981); pg. 161. Friends of God/Rhipidon Society:
"'We are the Rhipidon Society,' Fat said.

Eric Lampton said, 'We are the Friends of God.'

Amazed, Kevin reacted violently...

'You know the name, then,' Eric said.

'Gottesfreunde,' Kevin said. 'You go back to the fourteenth century!'

'The Friends of God formed originally in Basel. Finally we entered Germany and the Netherlands. You know of Meister Eckehart, then.' " [Much more about this group, not in DB, e.g. pg. 187-188, 191, 197.]

religious - fictional California 1996 Bear, Greg. The Forge of God. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 271. Forge of Godders:
"Compunews... Nov. 29...

... Death Valley proper... imitation extinct volcano... People have come here from around the world... They seem to have come to worship, or to just sit quietly under the warm desert sun and stare. What does it mean to them, to us?...

Among their numbers are approx. 10,000 Forge of Godders, with their various prophets and religious guides. The American branch of this cult has arisen in just three weeks, sown in the fertile religious ground of the American South & West by the President's blunt, uncompromising words. I have spoken with these people, and they share the President's convictions. Most are fundamentalist Christians, seeing this as the Apocalypse predicted in the Bible. But many come from other faiths, other religious around the world. They say they will stay here until the end. As one cultist told me, 'This is the center. This is where it's at. Forget Australia. The End of the World begins right here, in Death Valley.' "

religious - fictional California 1996 Bear, Greg. The Forge of God. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 271-272. Forge of Godders:
"Compunews Network, November 29, 1996, Frederick Hart reporting:

Here in the winder desert, only a few miles from Death Valley proper... around the government-declared National Security Site. In the middle of the site, rising against the clouds of stars like a great black hump, is the so-called Bogey, the imitation extinct volcano that has burrowed into the national imagination as the Kemp objects have burrowed into the Earth's core, and into our nightmares. People have come here from around the world, kept back a mile from the site... They seem to have come to worship, or to just sit quietly under the warm desert sun and stare. What does it mean to them, to us? Should they wish to storm the site, will the Army be able to keep them back?

Among their numbers are approximately ten thousand Forge of Godders, with their various prophets and religious guides. "

religious - fictional California 1996 Bear, Greg. The Forge of God. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 276. Forge of Godders:
"He hadn't given much thought to assassination attempts before, but he could be a likely target for Forge of Godders or anybody tipped over the edge by the news of the last few weeks. "
religious - fictional California 1996 Bear, Greg. The Forge of God. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 306. Forge of Godders:
"The Sunday New York Times lay spread across a desk below three blank television monitors. On the front page, three headlines of almost equal size vied for attention:

PRESIDENTIAL CRONY ASSASSINATED
Reverend Ormandy Shot by Lone Gunman in New Orleans

CROCKERMAN VETOES ALIEN DEFENSE ACT

FORGE OF GODDERS GATHER TO 'PROTECT' ALIEN CRAFT
Gathering of England-Based Cultists in California
"
religious - fictional California 1997 Bear, Greg. The Forge of God. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 321. Forge of Godders:
"It was Sunday; most of the Forge of Godders had moved to Furnace Creek the night before for a huge rally planned this morning by the Reverend Edwina Ashberry. "
religious - fictional California 2005 Gibson, William. Virtual Light. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 272. Fallonites:
"'Watch television?'

She was awake now.

'Well,' Rydell said, 'Fallonites believe God's sort of just there. On television, I mean.'

'God's on television?'

'Yeah. Kind of like in the background or something. Sublett's mother, she's in the church herself, but Sublett's kind of lapsed.'

'So they watch tv and pray, or what?'

'Well, I think it's more like kind of a meditation, you know? What they mostly watch is all these old movies, and they figure if they watch enough of them, long enough, the spirit will sort of enter into them.' " ['Fallon' is probably named after Jerry Falwell.]

religious - fictional California 2005 Gibson, William. Virtual Light. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 271-272. Fallonites:
"'You know they're waying I'm an apostate here?' Sublett hadn't sounded happy about that.

'A what?'

'An apostate. 'Cause I showed my mom this Cronenberg film. Berry? Videodrome? And they said it was from the Devil.'

'I thought all those movies were supposed to have God in 'em.'

'There's movies that are clearly of the Devil, Berry. Or anyway that's what Reverend Fallon says. Says all of Cronenberg's are.'

'He in Paradise, too?'

'Lord, no,' Sublett had said, 'he's in these tunnels out on the Channel Islands, between England and France. Can't leave there, either, because he needs the shelter.'

'From what?'

'Taxes. You know who dug those samme tunnels, Berry?'

'Who?'

'Hitler did, with slave labor.'...

Now here came another sign, this one not nearly as professional as the first one, just black spraypaint letters on a couple boards.

R.U. READY FOR ETERNITY?
HE LIVES! WILL YOU?
WATCH TELEVISION!
"
religious - fictional California 2027 Butler, Octavia. Parable of the Talents. New York: Seven Stories Press (1998); pg. 27. Earthseed:
"The original 13 settlers of Acorn, and thus the original 13 members of Earthseed, were my mother, of course, and Harry Balter and Zahra Moss... There was Travis, Natividad, and Dominic Douglas, a young family who became my mother's first highway converts. She met them as both groups walked through Santa Barbara, California... "
religious - fictional California 2032 Butler, Octavia. Parable of the Talents. New York: Seven Stories Press (1998); pg. 20-21. Earthseed:
Pg. 15: "SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2032

Today is Arrival Day, the fifth anniversary of our establishing a community called Acorn here in the mountains of Humboldt County "; Pg. 20-21: "I awoke here at Acorn... There were, yesterday at this time, 22 people living at Dovetree--the old man, his wife, and his two youngest daughters; his five married sons, their wives and their kids. All of these people are gone except for the two youngest wives and the three little children they were able to grab as they ran. Two of the kids are hurt, and one of the women has had a heart attack... The attack [by Christian fundamentalists] shouldn't have happened. Things have been quieting down over the past few years. "; Pg. 24: "And we are Earthseed. We're 'that cult,' 'those strange people in the hills'... We are now 59 people--64 with the Dovetree women and children if they stay. " [Many other refs. to the fictional group Earthseed, most not in DB.]

religious - fictional California 2032 Butler, Octavia. Parable of the Talents. New York: Seven Stories Press (1998); pg. 52. Earthseed:
"We're 67 people now with the Noyer children. We're growing too fast.

And yet in another way, we're only creeping along. We're not only Acorn, we're Earthseed, and we're still only a tiny hill community squeezed into too few cabins, and sharing an almost nineteenth-century existence. "

religious - fictional California 2032 Butler, Octavia. Parable of the Talents. New York: Seven Stories Press (1998); pg. 47-48. Earthseed:
"'God is Change,' she says, and means it. Some of the faces of her god are biological evolution, chaos theory, relativity theory... of course, the second law of thermodynamics. 'God is Change, and, in the end, God prevails.'

Yet Earthseed is not a fatalistic belief system. God can be directed, focused, speeded, slowed, shaped. All things change, but all things need not change in all ways. God is inexorable, yet malleable. Odd. Hardly religious at all. Even the Earthseed Destiny seems to have little to do with religion.

'We are Earthseed,' Olamina says. 'We are the children of God, as all fractions of the universe are the children of God. but more immediately we are the children of our particular Earth.' And within those words lies the origin of the Destiny. The portion of humanity that is conscious, that knows it is Earthseed, and that accepts its Destiny is simply trying to save the womb, the Earth, to be born as all young beings must do eventually. "

religious - fictional California 2050 Dick, Philip K. The Simulacra. New York: Random House (2002; c. 1964); pg. 24. Sons of Job:
"Days of Barbarism--that was the sweet-talk for the Nazi Period of the middle part of the previous century, now gone nearly a century but still vividly, if distortedly, recalled. So der Alte had taken to the airwaves to denounce the Sons of Job, the latest nut organization of a quasi-religious nature flapping about in the streets, proclaiming a purification of national ethnic life, etc. or whatever it was they proclaimed. In other words, stiff legislation to bar persons from public life who were odd--those born specially, due to the years of radiation fallout from bomb testing, in particular from the vicious People's China blasts. " [More, pg. 25, 47, 69, 85-86, etc.]
religious - fictional California 2051 Niven, Larry & Steven Barnes. Dream Park. New York: Ace (1981); pg. 11. Church of Him:
Pg. 11: "Birds of a feather, Alex guessed. Probably met in Dream Park; might even have been married in one of the Dream Park wedding chapels. Those could be interesting ceremonies; the wedding guests might include anyone from Glenda the Good Witch to Bluebird to Gandalf to a Motie Mediator. Angels were popular. "; Pg. 21: "'This is the Los Angeles of 2051 A.D.' " ['Motie Mediator' is apparently a reference to the 'Moties' in Niven's 1974 book The Mode in God's Eye.]
religious - fictional California 2103 Silverberg, Robert. Tom O'Bedlam. New York: Donald I. Fine, Inc. (1985); pg. 142. Tumbonde:
"And it took forever to get things started up again when the order went out to head for the road. Probably the builk of those who were here were people who had been part of the caravan since San Diego, Jaspin figured--tumbonde wasn't widely known outside the southern half of San Diego County, where the big refugee populations were--but as the vast procession had rolled along, a good many other people had joined in, perhaps a great many others. There might be fifty thousand people by now. A hundred thousand, even. Truly the Mongol horde on the march. "
religious - fictional California 2103 Silverberg, Robert. Tom O'Bedlam. New York: Donald I. Fine, Inc. (1985); pg. 28. Tumbonde:
"They wore tumbonde costumes: silver jackets, tight black leggings with red piping, wide black sombreros, crescent-moon pendants dangling on their chests. They appeared to be wearing masks, too, but they weren't; those were simply their faces, aloof, impassive. None of them seemed the least bit interestd in the pale gringo in the battered old car. But Jaspin knew the routine. He leaned out and said, 'Chungira-He-Will-Come, he will come.'

'Maguali-ga, Maguali-ga,' replied some of the tumbonde men.

'Senhor Papamecer teaches. Senhora Aglaibahi is our mother. Rei Ceupassear rules.'

'Maguali-ga, Maguali-ga.'

He was doing all right so far. 'Chungira-He-Will-Come, he will come,' Jaspin said a second time.

'The parking is two kilometer,' said one of the tumbonde men indifferently. 'Then you walk five hundred meter. Better you run: is already starting, the procession.'

'Maguali-ga, Maguali-ga,' Jaspin said, as the barrier winked out. "

religious - fictional California 2103 Silverberg, Robert. Tom O'Bedlam. New York: Donald I. Fine, Inc. (1985); pg. 28. Tumbonde:
"In a few minutes he caught sight of the congregation, milling chaotically on a high knoll just off the road. There were thousands of them, some dressed in full tumbonde gear but most, like him, in ordinary street clothes. They were carrying banners, placards, little images of the great ones. From unseen loudspeakers came a deep, unhurried, relentless drumming. The ground shook. They probably had it wired, Jaspin thought. Electrostatic nodes all over the place, and synchronized pulsation chips. Tumbonde might be primitive and elemental but it didn't seem to scorn technology. " [Tumbonde (Tumbond? is the main fictional religious group in the book, and is referred to frequently throughout. Most refs. not in DB. See also, for example, pg. 29-34, 63-64, 94-102, 107-111, 118-119, 140-147, 165-171, 180-181, 194-201, 222, 230, etc.]
religious - fictional California 2103 Silverberg, Robert. Tom O'Bedlam. New York: Donald I. Fine, Inc. (1985); pg. 30. Tumbonde:
"There were very few Anglos in the crows. Tumbonde had emerged out of the Latino-African refugee community that had come crowding into San Diego after the Dust War, and most of these people were dark-skinned or outright black. The cult was an international stew, a mix of Brazilian and guinean stuff with an underlay of something Haitian, and of course it had taken on a Mexican tinge too; you couldn't have any kind of apocalyptic cult operating this close to the border without very quickly having it acquie a subtle Aztec coloration. But it was more ecstatic in nature than the usual Mexican variety--less death, more transfiguration. "
religious - fictional California 2103 Silverberg, Robert. Tom O'Bedlam. New York: Donald I. Fine, Inc. (1985); pg. 180. Tumbonde:
"'You know about tumbonde?' Kresh asked.

'I'm not sure that I do,' she said.

'I'm not surprised. It's been a purely local San Diego thing. But it isn't going to be much longer.'

'Tumbonde,' Elszabet said.

'It's a hybrid Brazilian-African spiritist cult, with some Caribbean and Mexican overtones. A former San Diego taxi driver who calls himself Senhor Papamacer runs it, and there are thousands of followers. They hold ritual ceremonies, apparently pretty wild stuff, in the hills east of San Diego. The essential thing of it is apocalyptic: our present civilization is near its end and we are about to be led to the next phase of our development by deities who will break through to our world from remote galaxies.' "

religious - fictional California 2103 Silverberg, Robert. Tom O'Bedlam. New York: Donald I. Fine, Inc. (1985); pg. 28-29. Tumbonde:
"He found a place at the edge of the croud. Far ahead, halfway up the hillside, he saw the colossal papier-mache statues of the divinities being carried on poled by sweating brawny men. Jaspin recognized each one: that was Prete Noire the Negus, that one was the thunder-serpent Narbail, that was O Minotauro the bull, that was Rei Ceupessear. And those, the biggest of all, were the true great ones, Chungira-He-Will-Come and Maguali-ga, the gods from deepest space. Jaspin shivered in the heat. Crazy as this stuff was, it had undeniable power. "
religious - fictional California: Berkeley 1975 Dick, Philip K. The Transmigration of Timothy Archer. New York: Timescape Books (1982); pg. 165. "Greater East Bay Co-Sexual Communal Free Love Exchange-Partners Enterprise, Unlimited":
"'You and your Berkeley friends. The Greater East Bay Co-Sexual Communal Free Love Exchange-Partners Enterprise, Unlimited. What is it about Berkeley, Angel? Why do you stay there?' "
religious - fictional California: Los Angeles 1999 Koman, Victor. Jehovah Contract. New York: Franklin Watts (1984); pg. 129. St. Judas Church of Holy Tribulation and Tax Evasion:
"I fingered the card, turned it over. On the printed side--in small, dignified letters--was engraved

ST. JUDAS CHURCH
OF HOLY TRIBULATION
AND TAX EVASION

'TO FIND LOVE,
ONE MUST FIRST KILL GOD.'
PHONE: 666-HWHY

" [Many other references to this fictional church, not in DB. This is the main fictional religious group in the book.]
religious - fictional California: Los Angeles 1999 Koman, Victor. Jehovah Contract. New York: Franklin Watts (1984); pg. 136. St. Judas Church of Holy Tribulation and Tax Evasion:
"In the middle of the east side of the block sate a squashed sort of biulding jammed between two other equally squashed buildings. A sign in the window hung at a careless angle.

CHECKS CASHED HERE
RUBBER STAMPS MADE TO ORDER
24 HOURS LEGAL FORMS
MAPS TO THE STARS'S HOMES

A three-by-five card--borrowed from time--was stuck to the window beneath the larger sign. The cellophane tape was likewise brown, curling away from the card and cracking in places. The card had two words and an arrow pointing at an upward angle.

CHURCH UPSTAIRS

I headed upstairs... The landing had been swept, at least, and the closed door had a small, engraved plastic sign.

ST. JUDAS CHURCH
OF HOLY TRIBULATION
AND TAX EVASION
I listened at the door. Voices beyond spoke casually... I could hear every word...

'If God is dead... what have people been getting at Communion?'

'A Guest Host.' "

religious - fictional California: Los Angeles 1999 Koman, Victor. Jehovah Contract. New York: Franklin Watts (1984); pg. 136. St. Judas Church of Holy Tribulation and Tax Evasion:
"'Can we get back to work?'

'Okay. How's this one--'Bored with the Lord? Feast with the Beast!' '

'Catchy,' the deeper voice replied, 'but we need something that'll really inflame them. I want you to escape within three inches of your life... How abou this--you could explain that all good Christians should actively support the Beast and the Antichrist because the Kingdom of God won't return until we've had a thousand years of tribulation. After all, it's in the Bible, it's God's prophecy. And any good Christian can see the necessity of allowing God's prophecy to proceed. Hence, the most blessed Christians are the ones who put the Antichrist on the throne of the world.'

There was a long pause. 'Nah... too subtle.' "

religious - fictional California: Los Angeles 1999 Koman, Victor. Jehovah Contract. New York: Franklin Watts (1984); pg. 151. St. Judas Church of Holy Tribulation and Tax Evasion:
"'...His name's Thomas Russell, and he's from a gang of degenerates called the St. Judas Church of Holy Tribulation and Tax Evasion...

'St. Judas,' he hollerred. 'I can understand the tax evasion part--that's as Amerian as unregistered handguns. But blasphemy?' He grinned. 'Well, fellow righteously idignant [sic], how many bodyguards do I want for this creep?'

'Eight!' someone from the audience shouted.

'Come on,' Lenny hollered. 'You can do better than that!'

'Five!' a dozen or so shot back.

The host bounded around the stage like a teenager in heat. 'C'mon, c'mon. He's a threat to our American values. He's trying to undermine our faith, our morals, and our philosophical underpinnings!' "

religious - fictional California: Los Angeles 1999 Koman, Victor. Jehovah Contract. New York: Franklin Watts (1984); pg. 134-135. St. Judas Church of Holy Tribulation and Tax Evasion:
"Pulling the business card out of my wallet, I set it next to the telephone and punched out the combination of numbers and letters. If the HWHY was some sort of mnemonic, I had no idea what it was for.

A female voice as pert and crisp as sunrise over the mountains said, 'Forty-nine forty-nine. May I help you?'

'Is this the church?' I asked with a small degree of surprise. A church with an answering service?'

'Church, sir?'

She must get darned few calls for them. 'Uh . . . the St. Judas Church.'

'Oh,' she said with a pleasant tone. 'One moment.' The phone went silent.

I waited... a man's voice crackled onto the line. He had that sharp-edged bite that one would expect from a tough businessman, not from someone connected with a church. At least not with a nonevangelical church.

'Who is this?' he demanded, as polite as a gunshot.

'A fellow believer,' I said in a simpery voice...

'Cut the crap--I'm a busy man..' "

religious - fictional California: Los Angeles 2005 Gibson, William. Virtual Light. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 23. Fallonites:
"Sublett had seen her too, but it only kicked him into some kind of motormouthed ecstasy of religious dread, every horror-movie he'd ever seen tumbling over into Reverend Fallon's rants about witches, devil-worshippers, and the living power of Satan. He'd gone through his week's supply of gum, talking nonstop, until Rydell had finally told him to shut... up. "
religious - fictional California: Los Angeles 2038 Goonan, Kathleen Ann. Crescent City Rhapsody. New York: Tor (2001; c. 2000); pg. 352. Church of the Transformation:
"'It'll be good, won't it. I've been going to the Church of the Transformation. They say that it's like St. Anselm said. You remember St. Anselm?... He said that God is that which cannot be conceived of by human thought. Or whatever. Something like that, you know. It's something that you couldn't possibly imagine, no matter how hard you try. 'Cause everything you imagine is not . . . grand enough, because you're human, just one human, and what's in there is so very man humans, how many now?' Her words mingled with a faint 'Over the Rainbow.' " [More.]
religious - fictional California: Los Angeles 2038 Goonan, Kathleen Ann. Crescent City Rhapsody. New York: Tor (2001; c. 2000); pg. 350. PEGS:
"...Polly Newface's famous 'Dome or Doom' speech:

'We--the newly formed Gaian, Extropian, and Psychic Coalition--the PEGS--are willing to move boldly into the new era to complete and instantaneous communication. There will be no death in the Dome. We shall only grow in wisdom and in luminosity. The dome will be self-sustaining, solar-powered, made of light, so that it will not deplete the Earth's bounty any longer. Those of you who are Gaians will have the opportunity to resolve the dilemma of having to sustain your bodies by killing and, what is worse, by being forced to use technologies which are proving deadly to our Mother Earth. You can simply leave your body behind, but not by dying. By living more fully. For those of you who wish to become pure information--that time has now--' " [Much more.]

religious - fictional California: Los Angeles 2047 Bear, Greg. Queen of Angels. New York: Warner Books (1994; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 6. therapied:
Pg. 6: "...Mary put on her uniform carefully... Her rank carried no weapons in daytoday. She was not expected to engage in regular combat. Physical violence in the USA had declined markedly in the past fifteen years. The therapied did not seek violence. "; Pg. 7: "'Did you make it?' Marky asked, certain Theodora had gotten the grade.

'Passed over,' Ferrero said. 'Three times now, last chance. Recommended for further therapy.'...

'I'm sorry to spill this now, but you have an edge over me and I refuse to compete, Mary.'

'What edge?'

'You're a transform. You're exotic and protected. The pd doesn't dare tell you to go back for therapy or you cry on the temp and the feds investigate. They can't touch you.' " [Many other refs. to therapy, and the therapied segment of the population, other refs., not in DB.]

religious - fictional California: Los Angeles 2047 Bear, Greg. Queen of Angels. New York: Warner Books (1994; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 66. therapied:
"'Like Emmanuel Goldsmith.'

'Goldsmith was untherapied,' Carol said. 'A privileged natural. More power to the argument that only therapied are truly human.' "

religious - fictional California: Orange County 2065 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Pacific Edge. New York: Tor (1990); pg. 312. World Peace Church:
"Hank conducted a brief ceremony. He was dressed in his Unitarian minister's shirt... when he spoke it was in the same Hank voice, nothing inflated or ministerial about it. But he was a minister, in the Unitarian Church (also in the Universal Life Church, and in the World Peace Church, and in the Ba'hais [sic]), and as he talked about Tom... "
religious - fictional California: San Diego 1999 Cerasini, Marc. Godzilla 2000. New York: Random House (1997); pg. 218. Prophetess of Doom:
Pg. 219: "The self-styled 'Prophetess of Doom'--and former editor of a Marilyn Manson magazine--predicted that a fourth creature, also numerologically a six, was yet to come, forming the 'Number of the Beast,' 666. This final monster, called 'King Ghidorah,' would come from the depths of space, the prophetess announced, and would end all life on Earth.

Her followers moved into their spiritual leader's recently purchased San Diego mansion to await the end. An MTV film crew joined them, and soon weekly sessions were aired on the music channel in which the Prophetess--in full Goth regalia--spoke at length about 'King Ghidorah.' ";

Pg. 288: "The monster, called King Ghidora, after the monster predicted by the 'Prophetess of Doom,' was now circling over Europe... " [More, pg. 262.]

religious - fictional California: San Francisco 1991 Blaylock, James P. The Paper Grail. New York: Ace Books (1991); pg. 16. Church of the Profiting Christian:
"There was a breezeway at the corner of the courtyard, opening onto another small, winding alley that ran steeply uphill. At the top she crossed a small parking lot and went in through the side door of a white concrete building with red letters on the side proclaiming itself to be the 'Whole Life Mission.' below that, in italic lettering, was the legend 'The Church of the Profiting Christian.'

Inside the church the air was heavy, still, and musty. The building was bigger than it appeared to be from the street... A sign on the door read, 'Reverend White, Ministry Office.' There was nothing but silence inside. Reverend White, apparently, was somewhere on the second floor. " [Many other refs., not in DB.]

religious - fictional California: San Francisco 2021 Dick, Philip K. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?. New York: Ballantine (1996; c. 1968); pg. 11. Mercerism:
"'But,' Rick interrupted, 'for you to have two horses and me none, that violates the whole basic theological and moral structure of Mercerism.'

'You have your sheep; hell, you can follow the Ascent in your individual life, and when you grasp the two handles of empathy, you approach honorably. Now if you didn't have that old sheep, there, I'd see some logic in your position. Sure, if I had two animals and you didn't have any, I'd be helping deprive you of true fusion with Mercer. But every family in this building--let's see; around fifty: one to every three apts, as I compute it--every one of us has an animal of some sort...' " [Many other refs. to 'Mercerism', not in DB. This is the novel's main fictional religion.]

religious - fictional California: San Francisco 2357 David, Peter. Worf's First Adventure (Star Trek: TNG: Starfleet Academy). New York: Pocket Books (1993); pg. 10. Vulcan:
"'I . . . did not mean to embarrass you.'

'Embarrass?' She stared at him as if he'd just spoken a word in some bizarre foreign tongue. 'I do not 'embarrass.' It is understandable that you know nothing of the IDIC. But do you know nothing of Vulcans at all?'

'I know o Vulcans,' said Worf stiffly. 'You are said to prize logic above all else. To be very disciplined and totally without emotion.'

'Not precisely,' she said. 'If we were truly without emotion, no discipline would be required. We control our emotions so that they do not interfere with other pursuits. Logic is of paramount importance. It is all we need.' " [Many other Vulcan refs., not in DB. A major character is a Vulcan cadet.]

religious - fictional California: San Francisco 2357 David, Peter. Worf's First Adventure (Star Trek: TNG: Starfleet Academy). New York: Pocket Books (1993); pg. 11. Vulcan:
"''What is IDIC?'

'A Vulcan term,' she said. 'A philosophy of spiritual oneness. The actual Vulcan word is pronounced more along the lines of 'Eee-deek.' Humans have transliterated it into I-D-I-C, claiming that it stands for 'Infinite Diversity in Infinite Combination.' A convenient mnemonic memory device . . . simplistic but fairly accurate.' "

religious - fictional California: San Francisco 2369 Wright, Susan. The Best and the Brightest (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 16. Trill:
[Book jacket:] "Meet a new generation of cadets: a newly joined Trill just beginning the first of many lives... " [A Trill is one of novel's main characters. Many refs., not in DB.]; Pg. 16: "Not that she expected to have much fun around T'Rees since he was a Vulcan... but she had expected more from Nev Reoh, a former Bajoran Vedek, and Moll Enor, a newly joined Trill. The exotic possibilities in such roommates were endless, but Moll Enor had hardly spoken four words since the semester had begun... "; Pg. 23: "And Moll made it a point to notice everything. As the first host for the Enor symbiont, it was her duty to provide a solid foundation of experiences, as well as a wide-ranging understanding of the numerous alien races that inhabited the Alpha Quadrant. "
religious - fictional Canada 2020 Heinlein, Robert A. Friday. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston (1982); pg. 103. Angels of the Lord:
[A fundamentalist/Evangelical Christian is preaching.] "'Men who lie with men, women who lie with women, any who lie with beats--all shall die by stones. As shall women taken in adultery.

'Papists and Saracens and infidels and Jews and all who bow down to idolatrous images--the Angels of the Lord say unto you: Repent for the hour is at hand! Repent or feel the swift swords of the Lord's chosen instruments.

'Pornographers and harlots and women of immodest demeanor, repent!--or suffer the terrible wrath of the Lord!

'Sinners of every sort, remain on this channel to receive instruction in how you may yet find the Light.

'By order of the Grand General of the Angels of the Lord.'

The tape ended and there was another break. "

religious - fictional Canada 2020 Heinlein, Robert A. Friday. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston (1982); pg. 103. Angels of the Lord:
[Characters refer to 'Angels of the Lord', a violent fundamentalist/Evangelical Christian group.] "Ian said, 'Janet, do you remember the first time we saw Angels of the Lord?'

I said, 'There really are Angels of the Lord? Not just another nightmare on the screen?'

'Um. It's hard to connect the Angels Ian and I saw with this business. Last March, early April, I had driven to the port to pick up Ian. The Concourse was loaded with Hare Krishna freaks, saffron robes and shaved heads... A load of Scientologists was coming out the gates, heading for some do of theirs... Just as the two groups merged, here came the Angels of the Lord, homemade signs and tambourines and clubs.

'Marj, it was the gaudiest brawl I have ever seen. No trouble telling the three sides apart... The Elronners were clean and neat and short-haired; the Angels looked like unmade beds. They carried the 'stink of piety,' too; I got downwind of them once, then moved quickly.' "

religious - fictional Canada 2020 Heinlein, Robert A. Friday. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston (1982); pg. 104. Angels of the Lord:
"'The Scientologists, of course, have had to fight for their rights many times; they fought with discipline, defended themselves, and disengaged rapidly--got out, taking their wounded with them. The Hairy Krishners fought like squawking chickens and left their wounded behind. But the Angels of the Lord fought as if they were crazy--and I think they are. They moved straight in, swinging clubs and fists, and didn't stop until they were down and unable to get up. It took about as many Mounties to subdue them as there were Angels . . . when the usual ratio is one Mounty, one riot.

'It appears that the Angels knew that the Hubbardites were arriving at that time and had come there to jump them; the Hare Krishna crowd showed up by accident--they were at the port simply because it is a good place to shake down cubes for money. but, having found the Hairies and being unable to pin down the Scientologists, the Angels settled for beating up the Krishna freaks.' "

religious - fictional Canada 2020 Heinlein, Robert A. Friday. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston (1982); pg. 104. Angels of the Lord:
"'I saw it from the other side of the barrier. Those Angels fought berserk. I think they may have been hopped up. But I would never have believed that such a mob of rags and dirt could be a threat to the whole planet--hell, I can't believe it now. I think they re trying to grab credit, like those psychotics that confess to any spectacular crime.'

'But I would not want to have to face them,' Janet added.

'Right! I would as lief face a pack of wild dogs. But I can't imagine wild dogs toppling a government. Much less a world.' "

religious - fictional Chatoob 2353 Barnes-Svarney, Patricia. Quarantine (Star Trek: Voyager: Starfleet Academy). New York: Pocket Books (1997); pg. 57. Ober:
"'We are called the Chatoob, but our people are--'

'Divided into the Chats and the Obers...'

'Yes, the Obers represent almost half the population. We are the original culture of this planet,' she said... "

religious - fictional Colorado 1999 Kessel, John. Good News from Outer Space. New York: Tor (1990; c. 1989); pg. 48. Good Faith Church:
[faux newspaper article] "PLAY-FOR-PAY GIRL SAYS JESUS MADE HER DO IT

Denver--Mar 19----CLN--A woman charged with solicitation has told police that she took up prostitution as a result o a conversation she had with an angel of the Lord... Ms. Benzell... said she had attended the Good Faith Church for the past seven years... " [More, pg. 48-49.]

religious - fictional Colorado 2010 Willis, Connie. "Samaritan " in Fire Watch. New York: Bluejay (1984; story copyright 1979); pg. 219. United Ecumenical Church:
"She looked stubborn. 'Why? He only wants to be baptized. The Ecumenical Church baptizes people, doesn't it? We baptized fourteen people last Sunday. All he wants is to be baptized.' " [The 'Ecumenical Church' apparently refers to a near-future combined name for liberal Protestant churches, including Presbyterian and Congregational. This entire story deals with two ministers in this church, and the desire of one to have an orangutan baptized. Other refs., not all in DB.]
religious - fictional Colorado 2010 Willis, Connie. "Samaritan " in Fire Watch. New York: Bluejay (1984; story copyright 1979); pg. 219-220. United Ecumenical Church:
"Reverend Hoyt sat at his desk for some time. Then he walked down the endless hall from his office to the sanctuary. He stood at the side door and looked into the vast sunlit chamber. The church was one of the first great Ecumenical cathedrals, built before the Rapture. It was nearly four stories high, vaulted with great open pine beams from the Colorado mountains. The famous Lazetti window reached the full four stories and was made of stained glass set in strips of steel.

The first floor, behind the pulpit and the choir loft, was in shadow, dark browns and greens rising to a few slender palm trees. Above that was the sunset. Powerful orange, rich rose, deep mauve dimmed to delicate peach and cream and lavender far above the heads of the congregation. At about the third-floor level the windows changed imperceptibly from pastel-tinted to clear window glass. In the evenings the Denver sunsets, rising above the smog, blended with the clouds of the windows. "

religious - fictional Colorado 2010 Willis, Connie. "Samaritan " in Fire Watch. New York: Bluejay (1984; story copyright 1979); pg. 224. United Ecumenical Church:
"'I don't suppose there's anything in church law?'

'I looked. The Ecumenical Church is just a baby, Will. We barely have the organizational bylaws written down, let along all the odds and ends. And twenty years is not enough time to build a base of precedent. I'm sorry, Will. I even went back to pre-unification law, thinking we might be able to borrow something obscure. But no luck.

The liberal churches had flirted with the idea of unification for more than twenty-five years without getting more accomplished than a few statements of good will. Then the Charismatics had declared the Rapture, and the churches had dived for cover right into the arms of ecumenism. "

religious - fictional Colorado 2010 Willis, Connie. "Samaritan " in Fire Watch. New York: Bluejay (1984; story copyright 1979); pg. 225-226. United Ecumenical Church:
"Reverend Hoyt had a feeling the purpose of this was to get him to smile. He smiled. 'And what was it you Catholics nearly walked out over? Oh, yes, grape juice.'

'Will, the point is I cannot give you bishop's counsel on this [whether or not to baptize an orangutan]. It's your problem. You're the one who'll have to come to a fair and rational decision.'

'Fair and rational?' He picked up a handful of mail. 'With advice like this?'

'You asked for it, remember? Ranting from the pulpit about humility?'

'Listen to this: 'You can't baptize an ape. They don't have souls. One time I was in San Diego in the zoo there. We went to the ape house and right there, in front of the visitors and everything, were these two orangitangs... doing it.'...' "

religious - fictional Commonwealth 1001980 Wolfe, Gene. The Shadow of the Torturer. New York: Simon and Schuster (1980); pg. 16. Order of the Seekers for Truth and Penitence:
"'Severian. I am a torturer. Or rather, I am an apprentice of the torturers, Liege. Of the Order of the Seekers for Truth and Penitence.' I drew a deep breath. 'I am a Vodalarius. One of the thousands of Vodalarii of whose existence you are unaware.' It was a term I had scarcely heard. " [Many other refs. throughout novel to the fictional religious groups in this far-future Earth.]
religious - fictional Commonwealth 1001980 Wolfe, Gene. The Shadow of the Torturer. New York: Simon and Schuster (1980); pg. 19. Order of the Seekers for Truth and Penitence:
"I have never known my father or my mother. No more did my brother apprentices know theirs. From time to time, but most particularly when winter draws on, poor wretches come clamoring to the Corpse Door, hoping to be admitted to our ancient guild. Often they regale Brother Porter with accounts of the torments they will willingly inflict in payment for warmth and food; occasionally they fetch animals as samples of their work.

All are turned away. Traditions from our days of glory, antedating the present degenerate age, and the one before it, and the one before that, an age whose name is hardly remembered now by scholars, forbid recruitment from such as they. Even at the time I wrote of, when the guild had shrunk to two masters and less than a score of journeymen, those traditions were honored. "

religious - fictional Commonwealth 1001980 Wolfe, Gene. The Shadow of the Torturer. New York: Simon and Schuster (1980); pg. 20. Order of the Seekers for Truth and Penitence:
"Our necropolis is said to be the oldest in Nessus. That is certainly false, but the very existence of the error testifies to a real antiquity, though the autarchs were not buried there even when the Citadel was their stronghold... Since that time our numbers have been repaired solely from the children of those who fall into our hands. In our Matachin Tower, a certain bar of iron thrusts from a bulkhead at the height of a man's groin. Male children small enough to stand upright beneath it are nurtured as our own; and when a woman big with child is sent to us we open her and if the babe draws breath engage a wet-nurse if it be a boy. The females are rendered to the witches. So it has been since the days of Ymar, and those days are now by many hundreds of years forgotten. "
religious - fictional Commonwealth 1001980 Wolfe, Gene. The Shadow of the Torturer. New York: Simon and Schuster (1980); pg. 169. Pelerines:
"The tall woman gave no indication that she had heard any of them. She was already leaving us, seeming to glide across the straw. the women followed her, looking at one another, and the men lowered their gleaming blades and backed away.

Agia was struggling into her gown. I asked her what she knew of the Claw, and who these Pelerines were.

'Get me out of here, Severian, and I'll tell you. It isn't lucky to talk of them in their own place...' "

religious - fictional Commonwealth 1001980 Wolfe, Gene. The Shadow of the Torturer. New York: Simon and Schuster (1980); pg. 170. Pelerines:
"I asked again who the Pelerines were.

Agia looked sidelong at me. 'You must forgive me, but I don't find it easy to talk of professional virgins to a man who's just seen me naked. Though under other circumstances it might be different... I don't really know a great deal about them, but we have some of their habits in the shop, and I asked my brother about them once, and after that paid attention to whatever I heard. It's a popular costume for masques--all that red.

'Anyway, they are an order of conventionals, as no doubt you've already discerned. The red is for the descending light of the New Sun, and they descend on landowners, traveling around the country with their cathedral and seizing enough to set it up. Their order claims to possess the most valuable relic in existence, the Claw of the Conciliator, so the red may be for the Wounds of the Claw as well.' " [Many other refs., not in DB.]

religious - fictional Commonwealth 1001980 Wolfe, Gene. The Shadow of the Torturer. New York: Simon and Schuster (1980); pg. 36. Vodalus:
"Not one--not one--of the prisoners whose papers I had read had been an adherent of Vodalus. There were merchants who had tried to make profits on supplies needed by the army, camp followers who had spied for the Ascians, and a sprinkling of sordid civil criminals. Nothing else... I caught the name Vodalus in the air; but at that moment it seemed I was the only one who heard it, and suddenly I felt Vodalus had been only an eidolon created by my imagination from the fob, and only the man I had slain with his own ax real... Now I could no longer be sure my own mind was not lying to me; all my falsehoods were recoiling on me, and I who remembered everything could not be certain those memories were more than my own dreams. I recalled the moonlit face of Vodalus; but then, I had wanted to see it. I recalled his voice as he spoke to me, but I had desired to hear it, and the woman's voice too. "
religious - fictional Commonwealth 1001980 Wolfe, Gene. The Shadow of the Torturer. New York: Simon and Schuster (1980); pg. 62. Pg. 62: The Book of Gold; Pg. 63: The Book of the Wonders of Urth and Sky; Pg. 64: Blaithmaic's Lives of the Seventeen Megatherians
religious - fictional Commonwealth 1001981 Wolfe, Gene. The Claw of the Conciliator. New York: Timescape Books (1981); pg. 299. Pelerines:
"'...the society of the Commonwealth... The religious... appear to be members of various orders, but unlike them they seem subject to no uniting authority... The Pelerines, who play a larger part in the manuscripts than any other holy community, are clearly a sisterhood of priestesses, accompanied (as such a roving group would have to be in their place and time) by armed male servants. "
religious - fictional Commonwealth 1001981 Wolfe, Gene. The Claw of the Conciliator. New York: Timescape Books (1981); pg. 25-26. Pelerines:
"'...Then there's the cathedral. I suppose you've heard about that?'

'The cathedral?'

'I've heard tell it wasn't what cityfolk call a real one... but it's the only cathedral most of us around Saltus ever saw, and pretty too, with all the hanging lamps and the windows in the sides made of colored silk... it's shame what they did, if they did what's told against htem. Set fire to it, you know.'

'Are you talking about the Cathedral of the Pelerines?'

...'There, you said it yourself. You're making the same mistake they did. It wasn't the Cathedral of the Pelerines, it was the Cathedral of the Claw. Which is to say, it wasn't theirs to burn.' " [The fictional Pelerines appear to be the main religious group referred to in this novel, which, according to the book jacket, is "set a million years in the future, on an Earth transformed in mysterious and wondrous ways, and in a time when our present culture is no longer even a memory. "]

religious - fictional Commonwealth 1001982 Wolfe, Gene. The Sword of the Lictor. New York: Timescape Books (1981); pg. 61. necromancers:
"'You have heard tales of necromancers... who fish for the spirits of the dead. Do you know there are vivimancers among the dead, who call to them those who can make them live again? There is such a one in the stone town, and once or twice in each saros one of those he has called to him will sup with us... You will recall the silent man who slept beside his staff. You were his only child...' "
religious - fictional Commonwealth 1001982 Wolfe, Gene. The Sword of the Lictor. New York: Timescape Books (1981); pg. 62. Pelerines:
Pg. 62: "'Most importantly,' I went on, 'when the revenant vanished, one of the scarlet capes of the Pelerines, like the one you're wearing now, was left behind in the mud. I have it in my sabretache. Do the Pelerines dabble in necromancy?' "; Pg. 169: "'If you have walked far in The Way, you know you have less authority over me than the ignorant may believe.' (It is not difficult to ape the way such people talk, for it is itself an aping of the speech of ascetics, and such priestesses as the Pelerines.) 'You stole my son, who is also the son to The Beast Who Speaks, as you must know by this time if you have much questioned him...' "; Pg. 271: "I began the task of describing my meeting with Agia and the destruction of the altar of the Pelerines, but he cut me short. "
religious - fictional Commonwealth 1001983 Wolfe, Gene. The Citadel of the Autarch. New York: Timescape (1983); pg. 37. Pelerines:
"The bitter taste of medicine was in my mouth, the stretched canvas felt as hard as a floor beneath me, and scarlet-clad Pelerines with lamps moved to and fro, tending men and women who groaned in the dark. "
religious - fictional Commonwealth 1001983 Wolfe, Gene. The Citadel of the Autarch. New York: Timescape (1983); pg. 38. Pelerines:
"I do not believe I really slept again that night, though I may have dozed. When dawn came, the snow had melted. Two Pelerines took the sheets away, gave me a towel with which to dry myself, and brought dry bedding. I wanted to give the Claw to them--my possessions were in my bag under my cot--but the moment seemed inappropriate. I law down instead, and now that it was daylight, slept.

I woke again about noon. The lazaret was as quiet as it ever became; somewhere far off two men were talking and another cried out, but their voices only emphasized the stillness. I sat up and looked around, hoping to see the soldier. On my right lay a man whose close-cropped scalp made me think at first that he was one of the slaves of the Pelerines. I called to him, but then he turned his head to look at me, I saw I had been mistaken.

His eyes were emptier than any human eyes I had ever seen... "

religious - fictional Commonwealth 1001983 Wolfe, Gene. The Citadel of the Autarch. New York: Timescape (1983); pg. 45. Pelerines:
Pg. 45: "Any one of the scarlet-clad priestesses of the Pelerines moving between the cots might easily be she, with a poisoned stiletto beneath her gown. "; Pg. 46: "That morning the soldier came to see me. He wore a white gown the Pelerines had given him in place of his armor... "
religious - fictional Commonwealth 1001983 Wolfe, Gene. The Citadel of the Autarch. New York: Timescape (1983); pg. 48. Pelerines:
"'May I see the talisman?'

I took it out and held it in the palm of my hand. He took it from me, examined both sides carefully, and tested the point against the ball of his finger. 'It doesn't look magical,' he said.

'I'm not sure magical is the right term for it... Sometimes it glows with light--it's very faith now, and I doubt if you can see it'

'I can't. There doesn't seem to be any writing on it.'

'You mean spells or prayers. No I've never noticed any, and I've carried it a long way. I don't really know anything about it except that it acts at times; but I think it is probably the kind of thing spells and prayers are made with, and not the kind that is made with them.' "



religious - fictional, continued

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