Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

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religious - fictional, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
religious - fictional Aquasilva 2001 Audley, Anselm. Heresy. New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 4. Ranthas:
"'Master, we have found iron! The priest of Ranthas who offered to help our mining operations has discovered a huge seam of the red ore!'

I almost refused to believe him at first. Iron? Had we been sitting on top of one of the most valuable commodities of all for these last few ailing months...'

...'Take me to the priest,' I said to Maal... " [Many refs. to the fictional religion that worships Ranthas, throughout novel. The title itself indicates the importance of religious themes in the novel.]

religious - fictional Aquasilva 2001 Audley, Anselm. Heresy. New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 14. Ranthas:
"'Hasn't one of the acolytes from the temple been called to train in the Holy City?'

'I believe so. A promising young man who's been to New Hyperian and Equatoria. We'll send two guards with them. I'll arrange it with the High Priest.'

...'Atek is right, you've seen too little of the world. What you've seen of the priesthood is all that is good about it. We are too small a city to warrant anything more than a temple with four priests and ten acolytes. But in the capital and the other great cities, and in the priesthood's lands around the Holy City on Equatoria, there are thousands of warrior priests.. They're zealots--priests who can fight better than most other men, who believe in the cleansing power of fire and the sword. The Prime sends them out against those who don't believe in Ranthas. Cities and whole peoples have been destroyed by them. They're called the Sacri, the Sacred Ones.' " [Extensive refs. throughout novel.]

religious - fictional Aquasilva 2001 Audley, Anselm. Heresy. New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 15. Ranthas:
"'Cathan, fire is but one of the six elements. Each of the others has its own deity, its own magic, its own power. Some are potentially far more powerful, and far kinder, than the Fire-God. Don't we live on the surface of an endless ocean that makes up most of Aquasilva? That ocean is the domain of Thetis, Goddess of Water. The Void, the heavens beyond the storms, surpassing even the oceans in size, is the home of Shadow, and its spirit Ragnar. Then there is Earth, and its ruler Hyperias, after whom New Hyperian was originally named. Althana, Goddess of the Winds, and Phaetan, God of Light, are the other two. All of these have a history of worship as old as fire itself, and once they were freely tolerated. The Thetian Empire was founded on the worship of Thetis.' "
religious - fictional Archaria III 2364 Betancourt, John Gregory. Infection (Star Trek: TNG / Double Helix: Book 1 of 6). New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 211. Purity League:
"'Get off the planet, mixer!'

'Damn arrogant bastard,' Darling snarled under his breath. Thinks he's better than us!'

Riker held his tongue, but couldn't stop the thought: He is better than all of you. Cordial as Darling seemed, the underpinnings of his Purity League beliefs left no doubt about his true nature: xenophobe, human-supremacist, and violent terrorist. I must not forget that, Riker told himself. He thinks I'm one of them. That's the only reason he's behaving so well toward me. " [Other refs. throughout novel to the Purity League, the primary fictional religious group in novel. It is based on the racial purity believers found in the Christian Identity movement and Fundamentalist Christians such as found at Bob Jones University, in the fundamentalist wing of the Southern Baptist Convention, etc.]

religious - fictional Archaria III 2364 Betancourt, John Gregory. Infection (Star Trek: TNG / Double Helix: Book 1 of 6). New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 13. Purity League:
Pg. 13: "Picard... cleared his throat. 'Archaria III is in many ways a throwback to human civilization two or three hundred years ago. It was settled by religious zealots early in the twenty-second century, and although they have largely come into the Federation's fold, old prejudices and resentments still bubble to the surface from time to time... A radical political group called the Purity League claims the plague is an act of God against 'blasphemous unnatural unions.' ' ";

Pg. 14: "Deanna Troi asked, 'How many people of mixed blood are on the planet?'

'Nobody is quite sure. Estimates range from between 150,000 and 200,000 people...' " [Other refs. throughout novel, not in DB.]

religious - fictional Aruza -99936 B.C.E. Wolverton, Dave. "Payback: The Tale of Dengar " in Star Wars: Tales of the Bounty Hunters (Kevin J. Anderson, ed.) New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 78. Aruzans:
"It was a peaceful world. According to records, the people of Aruza had not had a murder on their planet in over a hundred of their years. They had forgotten how, grown soft. Through technology, they had created neural jacks that allowed them to both send and receive thoughts and emotions to one another, becoming technological empaths, sharing something of a limited group consciousness. "
religious - fictional Aruza -99936 B.C.E. Wolverton, Dave. "Payback: The Tale of Dengar " in Star Wars: Tales of the Bounty Hunters (Kevin J. Anderson, ed.) New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 87. Aruzans:
"The dancing girl, Manaroo, was indeed lovely. In the console lights of the speeder, he could see her well. She wore a silky outfit over her light blue skin, and luminous tattoos of moons and stars glowed on her wrists and ankles. Her eyes shone in the darkness. "
religious - fictional Aruza -99936 B.C.E. Wolverton, Dave. "Payback: The Tale of Dengar " in Star Wars: Tales of the Bounty Hunters (Kevin J. Anderson, ed.) New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 107. Aruzans:
"'You were very good. In fact, I've never seen anyone as good,' Dengar said. 'How did you learn to dance like that?'

'It's easy,' Manaroo said. 'On Aruza, we use our cybernetic links to share our feelings. We're tech-empaths. When I dance, I know what pleases my watchers. So I practice those moves they love best.' "

religious - fictional Aruza -99936 B.C.E. Wolverton, Dave. "Payback: The Tale of Dengar " in Star Wars: Tales of the Bounty Hunters (Kevin J. Anderson, ed.) New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 108. Aruzans:
"'...I feel we are all strangers, encased in our shells... On my world, when two people love each other, they share more than their bodies. They do more than take pleasure with each other. They bond with the Attanni, sharing their thoughts and emotions completely, sharing their memories and their knowledge. All of the subterfuges between them are stripped away, and they became one person. On Aruza I was bonded to three good friends, but now...' "
religious - fictional Aruza -99936 B.C.E. Wolverton, Dave. "Payback: The Tale of Dengar " in Star Wars: Tales of the Bounty Hunters (Kevin J. Anderson, ed.) New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 113. Aruzans:
"Over the next few days, Dengar spent a great deal of time with Manaroo, just talking. She told him of her life on Aruza, being raised on a farm by a mother who made clay diningware and a father who worked as a petty bureaucrat. On their farm, Manaroo had learned how to coax flowers from the near-sentient dola trees, and the thick juice that these flowers exuded made a potent antibiotic syrup, often prescribed by Aruza's physicians.

At the age of three, Manaroo had begun dancing, and by nine she was winning interstellar competitions. Dengar had imagined her to be some local girl, little traveled, with no real living experience. But she told him tales of rafting through dark storms upon the water world of Bengat, of living through a pirate raid on a starliner. "

religious - fictional Aruza -99936 B.C.E. Wolverton, Dave. "Payback: The Tale of Dengar " in Star Wars: Tales of the Bounty Hunters (Kevin J. Anderson, ed.) New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 113. Aruzans:
"And sometimes she talked about the experiences of her friends, those with whom she'd shared the Attanni, as if such experiences were her own. The list of people that she considered to be friends and family was enormous, and the pain she'd suffered in sharing those lives was equally enormous, for each of her friends had also shared their memories with others through the Attanni, so that all of them were but motes in some vast net. "
religious - fictional Aruza -99936 B.C.E. Wolverton, Dave. "Payback: The Tale of Dengar " in Star Wars: Tales of the Bounty Hunters (Kevin J. Anderson, ed.) New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 73-74. Aruzans:
"...on Aruza... The Aruzans were small people, with faintly blue skin as lustrous as pearls, with rounded heads and hair of such a dark, dark blue it was almost black.

The Aruzans were also a soft people, unwilling to do violence. And once they entered Kritkeen's estate, they'd fall on their knees and begin begging some favor, seeking mercy... Little did Kritkeen know that tonight, once his guests had left, he would be paid a visit by one final caller. The impoverished citizens of Aruza, as peaceful as they were, had paid Dengar the pittance of a thousand credits to end Kritkeen's tyranny. " [Many other refs. to Aruzans in story, not all in DB. Manaroo, one of the two main characters in the story, is Aruzan.]

religious - fictional Australia 1996 Bear, Greg. The Forge of God. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 118. Church of New Australia:
"AAP/UK Net, October 8, 1996; Woomera, Local Church of New Australia:

The Reverend Brian Caldecott has proclaimed the Australian extraterrestrials to be 'patent frauds.' Caldecott, long known for his fiery harangues against all forms of government, and for leading his disciples in a return to 'the Garden of Eden,' which he claims was once located near Alice Springs, came to Woomera in a caravan of thirty white Mercedes-Benzes to hold a tent rally this evening. 'These 'aliens' are the Country Party's attempt to mislead the citizens of the world, and to make the Australian Government, under Prime Minister Stanley Miller, the center of world government, which I of course deplore.' Caldecott's crusade suffered a public relations setback last year when it was discovered he was married to three women. The Church of New Australia promptly declared bigamy to be a religious principle, stirring a legal stew as yet unsettled. " [Also pg. 159.]

religious - fictional Australia 1996 Bear, Greg. The Forge of God. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 159. Church of New Australia:
"'A lot like Ayers Rock, only smaller... It's less convincing than the cinder cone in Death Valley. Frankly, I wouldn't have been surprised to find it at Disney World.' "
religious - fictional Australia 2025 Egan, Greg. "Cocoon " in Isaac Asimov's Detectives (Gardner Dozois and Sheila Williams, eds.) New York: Ace Books (1998; c. 1994); pg. 56. God's Image:
[The cocoon: a technology that allows women to avoid a full-term pregnancy. One benefit is HIV-positive and drug-using women don't pass on their affliction through childbirth or pregnancy. The character thinks of two fictional religious/terrorist groups, but realizes that neither of them would try to destroy this technology.] "She said darkly. 'We're tampering with certain . . . natural processes. You can draw your own conclusions, can't you?'

There was no sense to that at all. God's Image would probably want to force all pregnant women with HIV infections, or drug habits, to use the cocoon; they wouldn't try to bomb the technology out of existence. Gaia's Soldiers were more concerned with genetically engineered crops and bacteria than trivial modifications to insignificant species like humans--and they wouldn't have used radioisotopes if the fate of the planet depended on it. "

religious - fictional Australia 2050 Egan, Greg. Permutation City. New York: HarperPrism (1995); pg. 20. Church of the God Who Makes No Difference:
"'I also know that you're a highly intelligent, discerning woman, with no interest whatsoever in the muddled, irrational superstitions of the past, the fairy tales that comforted humanity in its infancy... No truly intelligent person, though, ever dismisses an idea without taking the trouble to evaluate it--skeptically, but fairly--and here at the Church of the God Who Makes No Difference--'

Maria pointed two fingers at the interactive, and it died. She wondered if it was her mother who'd set the Church onto her, but that was unlikely. They must have targeted their new member's family automatically; if consulted, Francesca would have told them that they'd be wasting their time. "

religious - fictional Australia 2050 Egan, Greg. Permutation City. New York: HarperPrism (1995); pg. 55. Church of the God Who Makes No Difference:
"She said, 'I got some junk mail today that looked just like you.'

'How flattering, I think. What was it selling?'

'The Church of the God Who Makes No Difference.'

He laughed. 'Every time I hear that, I think: they've got to change the name. A God which makes no difference doesn't rate the definite article or the pronoun 'who.'' " [Other refs. to this church, not all in DB. See also pg. 85-86, 185, 206.]

religious - fictional Australia 2050 Egan, Greg. Permutation City. New York: HarperPrism (1995); pg. 86. Church of the God Who Makes No Difference:
"'Don't knock tautology. Better base a religion on tautology than fantasy.'

'But it's worse than tautology. It's . . . redefining words arbitrarily, it's like something out of Lewis Carroll. Or George Orwell. 'God is the reason for everything . . . whatever that reason is.' So what any sane person would simply call the law of physics you've decided to rename G-O-D . . . solely because the word carries all kinds of historical resonances--all kinds of misleading connotations. You claim to have nothing to do the old religions--so why keep using their terminology?'

Francesca said. 'We [Church of the God Who Makes No Difference] don't deny the history of the world. We make a break from the past in a lot of ways--but we also acknowledge our origins. God is a concept people have been using for millennia. The fact that we've refined the idea beyond primitive superstitions and wish-fulfillment doesn't mean we're not part of the same tradition.' "

religious - fictional Australia 2050 Egan, Greg. Permutation City. New York: HarperPrism (1995); pg. 86. Church of the God Who Makes No Difference:
"'But you [Church of the God Who Makes No Difference] haven't refined the idea [of God], you've made it meaningless! And rightly so--but you don't seem to realize it. You've stripped away all the obvious stupidities--all the anthropomorphism, the miracles, the answered prayers--but you don't seem to have notice that once you've done that, there's absolutely nothing left that needs to be called religion. Physics is not theology. Ethics is not theology. Why pretend that they are?'

'Francesca said, 'But don't you see? We talk about God for the simple reason that we still want to. There's a deeply ingrained human compulsion to keep using the word, that concept--to keep honing it, rather than discarding it--despite the fact that it no longer means what it did five thousand years ago.' "

religious - fictional Australia 2050 Egan, Greg. Permutation City. New York: HarperPrism (1995); pg. 87. Church of the God Who Makes No Difference:
"Francesca laughed. '...The religious impulse isn't some kind of . . . alien mind virus. It's not--in its purest form, stripped of all content--the product of brain-washing. It's part of who I am.'

Maria put her face in her hands. 'Is it? When you talk like this, it doesn't sound like you.'

Francesca said, 'Don't you ever want to give thanks to God when things are going well for you? Don't you ever want to ask God for strength when you need it?'

'No.'

'Well, I do. Even though I know God makes no difference. And if God is the reason for everything, then God includes the urge to use the word God. So whenever I get some strength, or comfort, or meaning, from that urge, then God is the source of that strength, that comfort, that meaning.

'And if God--while making no difference--helps me to accept what's going to happen to me, why should that make you sad?' "

religious - fictional Bajor 2376 George III, David R. Twilight (Star Trek: DS9; "Mission: Gamma " #1 of 4). New York: Pocket Books (2002); pg. 175. Pah-wraith cult:
"There had always been issues regarding who would be the next kai, or what actions the Vedek Assembly should take in various situations, but overall the Bajoran religion had remained united. There was the Pah-wraith cult, of course, but that had never threatened overall religious accord. A true schism within the faith could, Kasidy suspected, bring tremendous turmoil to Bajor. "
religious - fictional Benin 1999 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 68. Holaini:
"Beninia... Est. pop. (1999) 870,000. Port Mey (127,000)... 85% Shinka, 10% Holaini, 3% Inoko, 2% Kpala... "
religious - fictional Benin 1999 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 68. Inoko:
"Beninia... Est. pop. (1999) 870,000. Port Mey (127,000)... 85% Shinka, 10% Holaini, 3% Inoko, 2% Kpala... "
religious - fictional Benin 1999 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 68. Shinka:
"Beninia... Est. pop. (1999) 870,000. Port Mey (127,000)... 85% Shinka, 10% Holaini, 3% Inoko, 2% Kpala... "
religious - fictional Benin 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 10. Holaini:
"...in Beninia Shinka speaks to Holaini, Inoko to Kpala, in the same tongue as Yoruba speaks to Ashanti... "
religious - fictional Benin 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 270. Holaini:
"...during the heydey of internal African slave-trading, when Arab pressure from the north drove the Holaini--a sub-branch of the Berbers, of Muslim faith and Hamitic race--past Timbuktu towards the Bight of Benin. There they came across an enclave of Shinka, hemmed in on one side by Mandingo and on the other by Yoruba.

These neighbours were accustomed to leaving the Shinka strictly alone, claiming that they were powerful magicians and could steal the heart out of a valiant fighting man. The Holaini scoffed; as good Muslims they discounted the idea of witchcraft, and certainly the unaggressive, welcoming Shinka--whom even the idea of slavery did not seem to arouse to anger--offered no obvious threat. " [Character in 2010 reflects on earlier Benin history.]

religious - fictional Benin 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 270. Holaini:
"With the full intention of ranching the Shinka, cattle-fashion, as a constant source of slaves, the Holaini installed themselves as the new masters of the area. But as though by magic neighbouring tribes had described, the venture crumbled. After twenty years, no more slave-caravans were formed. The Holaini gradually became absorbed into the base population, leading a quiet rural existence, until by the twentieth century only their dialect and such physical traces as the 'northern nose' and breadth of forehead remained to testify to their independent identity. " [Character in 2010 reflects on earlier Benin history.]; [Other refs. to Holaini in book, but not in DB.]
religious - fictional Benin 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 315. Holaini:
"'...'the meek shall inherit the earth.' The Shinka are the only living proof I know of that promise. Sounds crazy? You wait and you'll see. They digested the Holaini, who wanted to ship the whole tribe off to the east as slaves...' "
religious - fictional Benin 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 357. Holaini:
"'...and like I said the day you arrived they [Shinka] swallowed up the Holaini and the Inoko and Kpala immigrants...' "
religious - fictional Benin 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 479. Holaini:
"'...The Holaini dialect constitutes a pidgin [of Shinka] in that it hybridises a vocabulary mostly of local origin with grammar originating elsewhere... Over the whole of the north of the country [Benin] where Holaini influence is mosts pervasive the majority of the people irrespective of origin understand Holaini words and can follow simple Holaini sentences but the predominant domestic usage must be classified as contaminated Shinka.' "
religious - fictional Benin 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 481. Holaini:
"'The structure of the family is typically patrilineal among Holaini...' "
religious - fictional Benin 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 481. Holaini:
"'Full study of the differences between Shinka and Holaini usage, as well as of Inoko and Kpala influence, must await . . .' "
religious - fictional Benin 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 10. Inoko:
"...in Beninia Shinka speaks to Holaini, Inoko to Kpala, in the same tongue as Yoruba speaks to Ashanti... "
religious - fictional Benin 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 272. Inoko:
Pg. 272: "In former British and French colonies adjacent to Beninia, a commonplace feature of late twentieth-century Africa broke out--tribal quarrels flared up into rioting... Large movements of Inoko and Kpala took place. Since Beninia was handy, and since it wasn't in turmoil, both tribes' refugees headed for there... The Shinka were even poorer than the Inoko and Kpala... "; Pg. 315: "'...The Shinka... digested the Inoko and Kpala when they fled here from neighbouring countries...' "
religious - fictional Benin 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 357. Inoko:
"'...and like I said the day you arrived they [Shinka] swallowed up the Holaini and the Inoko and Kpala immigrants...' "
religious - fictional Benin 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 423. Inoko:
"'...the Beninians haven't had a murder in fifteen years... Thousands of Inoko and Kpala poured over the border as refugees only a generation ago and there's never been any tribal disorder between them and the people who were already there...' "
religious - fictional Benin 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 479. Inoko:
"'Additionally there are enclaves of Inoko and Kpala each of which retains its parent language (now with heavy Shinka contamination) but is effectively bi-lingual or, in the case of children educated at schools where in class they have to speak English, tri-lingual.' "
religious - fictional Benin 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 481. Inoko:
"'Full study of the differences between Shinka and Holaini usage, as well as of Inoko and Kpala influence, must await . . .' "
religious - fictional Benin 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 10. Shinka:
"...in Beninia Shinka speaks to Holaini, Inoko to Kpala, in the same tongue as Yoruba speaks to Ashanti... "
religious - fictional Benin 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 270. Shinka:
"...during the heydey of internal African slave-trading, when Arab pressure from the north drove the Holaini... past Timbuktu towards the Bight of Benin. There they came across an enclave of Shinka, hemmed in on one side by Mandingo and on the other by Yoruba.

These neighbours were accustomed to leaving the Shinka strictly alone, claiming that they were powerful magicians and could steal the heart out of a valiant fighting man. The Holaini scoffed... they discounted the idea of witchcraft, and certainly the unaggressive, welcoming Shinka--whom even the idea of slavery did not seem to arouse to anger--offered no obvious threat.

With the full intention of ranching the Shinka, cattle-fashion, as a constant source of slaves, the Holaini installed themselves as the new masters of the area. But as though by magic... the venture crumbled... The Holaini gradually became absorbed into the base population... " [Character in 2010 reflects on earlier Benin history.]

religious - fictional Benin 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 271. Shinka:
"Superstition--perhaps--accounted for the subsequent unwillingness of the dealers who supplied the European slave-ship captains to tangle with the Shinka. They excused themselves on the specious ground that Shinkas made bad slaves, or that they were sickly, or that they were under the special protection of Shaitan. One or two European-led raids apart, they remained largely umnolested until the age of colonial exploitation... " [Other refs. to Shinka in book, but not in DB.]
religious - fictional Benin 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 272. Shinka:
"Large movements of Inoko and Kpala took place. Since Beninia was handy, and since it wasn't in turmoil, both tribes' refugees headed for there... The Shinka were even poorer than the Inoko and Kpala, and might have been expected to resent the extra burden the refugees placed on the country's strained resources. But they had demonstrated no hostility. On the contrary, a generation of foreigners had been raised in Beninia who seemed perfectly contented... "
religious - fictional Benin 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 315. Shinka:
"'Depends.'

'On what?'

'On how many Shinkas the Dahomalians and the RUNGs left alive when they'd carved up the country.'

...'...I don't have to explain the context of the bit about 'the meek shall inherit the earth.' The Shinka are the only living proof I know of that promise. Sounds crazy? You wait and you'll see. They digested the Holaini, who wanted to ship the whole tribe off to the east as slaves. They digested the British so well they were almost the last British colony to be forced into independence. They digested the Inoko and Kpala when they fled here from neighbouring countries. Give them a chance and I swear they'd digest the Dahomalians and the RUNGs too...' "

religious - fictional Benin 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 357. Shinka:
"'...You know what the Mandingo used to say about the Shinka in the old days?'

...'They were magicians who could steal the heart out of a warrior.'

'Right. And the way they do it is by dodging passion. I don't know how they manage it, but there's the record. A thousand or more years in the same spot, not bothering anyone, and like I said the day you arrived they swallowed up the Holaini and the Inoko and Kpala immigrants...' "

religious - fictional Benin 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 358. Shinka:
"'...The first Christian missionary... He'd learned enough Shinka to start preaching, and started off with some of the parables and highlights of the gospel, and to his dismay the people he talked to said no, you've got that wrong, it wasn't anyone far away called Jesus but our own man Begi who did that. You know about Begi?'

'I don't think I do'...

'Any briefing on Beninia that leaves Begi out of account isn't worth having,' Gideon grunted. 'I guess you'd call him a folk-hero, a sort of Jack character, or maybe like this Anancy that you find in the West Indies. His name apparently means 'winter-born', and they say he always used to carry a blunt spear and a shield with a hole in it--to look through. And as you might expect the stories about him were more to the Shinka taste than those about Jesus. "

religious - fictional Benin 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 375. Shinka:
"Linguistic evaluation suggests the earliest form of the name 'Begi' is transliterable rather as 'Mpengi' and in consequence it is generally rendered 'winter-born'. The more close rendering would be 'child of dry season'. December and January in northern Beninia (where he was supposedly born) are both least humid months of every year.

It has been suggested the name was originally 'Kpegi' (i.e. 'foreigner') but this would not give rise to the 'Mpengi' form mentioned above. In any case Shinka superstition has it that a child conceived in the breaking of the maximum summer rains (hence born in midwinter) is likely to be livelier than average. Attempts to show that Begi was in fact a solar myth originating in latitutdes where seasons are marked enough to foster concepts of death and rebirth of the sun are tantalising, but fruitless in the absense of any other than oral evidence, thought it is highly possible that prehistoric cross-cultural interaction provided... "

religious - fictional Benin 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 375. Shinka:
[Shinka myths and traditional stories are recorded in detail on pages 375 to 380: "Begi and his Greedy Sister "; Begi and the Foreign Merchant "; "Begi and the Sea-Monster "; "Begi and the Wicked Sorcerer "; "Begi and the Steamship " (a very late acretal to the mythos) and "Begi and the Ghost ", a portion of which is recorded here in DB:

"Once the people were much troubled by a tlele-ki (ancestral spirit) which terrified the women going to fetch water and made the children have bad dreams.

Begi's father the chief called together the kotlanga (council of adults), and Ethlezi (lit. 'sorcerer, medicine-man') told him, 'It is the spirit of your father, Begi's grandfather.'

The chief was very upset. He asked Begi, 'What can grandfather want with us?'

Begi said, 'Ther is only one way to find out what a ghost wants. We will go and ask him. Or if you won't, I will go by myself.' " [More.]

religious - fictional Benin 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 479. Shinka:
"'Linguistically Shinka in the pure traditional form exhibited only be extremely old men and women when recitingsongs, catches and folk-tales learned as children is a typical member of the sub-family which dominates this area. A number of anomalies have been noted in addition to the ones originally cited, especially significant being the cognate relationship between the words for 'warrior' and 'fool', and the homonymic identity of the words for 'wound' and 'disease'.

'However, 'pure' Shinka has been displaced almost completely. Heavey contamination exists in all urban centres with English, though there is no self-sufficient vocabulary forming a pidgin. The Holaini dialect...Over the whole of the north of the country [Benin] where Holaini influence is mosts pervasive the majority of the people irrespective of origin understand Holaini words and can follow simple Holaini sentences but the predominant domestic usage must be classified as contaminated Shinka.' "

religious - fictional Benin 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 481. Shinka:
"'The structure of the family is typically patrilineal among Holaini and tends toward the matrilocal among the southern Shinka, especially in the cities where maximal movement of male labourers is found. However, both sexes enjoy equal rights before the law and folklore indicates that women of forceful personality were accepted into male councils before the advent of the European. The elaborate familial terms of aboriginal Shinka are giving way to a simplified pattern probably related to the English and much influenced by missionary teaching...' "
religious - fictional Benin 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 481. Shinka:
"'Full study of the differences between Shinka and Holaini usage, as well as of Inoko and Kpala influence, must await . . .' "
religious - fictional Benin 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 498. Shinka:
"'One: Shinkas don't think killing each other is a good idea, under any circumstances.

'Two: everybody else, practically, does. They say they don't and then they lose their tempers and smash a few heads.

...'There's a dominant mutation among the Shnka. I can't see it, but my geneticists say it stands out a mile if you put a genotype from someone of pure Inoko blood alongside somebody's who's half Inoko and half Shinka. it makes the Shinka secrete, along with all their other bodily odours, a specific suppressant for the territorial-aggresion reaction! You just walk into a nice, crowded, insanitary hut full of Shinkas, armed to the teeth and dead set on getting level with you rival males, and take a deep breath. You'll be a happy, lazy, inoffensive slob inside the hour...' "

religious - fictional Benin 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 499. Shinka:
"'...it saved the Shinka from being made slaves in any great number. The Holaini, who settled down with the intention of sort of farming the Shinka as a slave-crop, lost their determination within a generation or so, partly because of interbreeding and partly because their aggression was being undermined by the company they were keeping. After that other slave-trading peoples avoided Shinka territory like the plague. They thought some powerful magic had been worked. Correctly!' "
religious - fictional Betazed 2371 David, Peter. Triangle: Imzadi II (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 147. Betazoid:
"'If you go through with this,' Lwaxana said flatly, 'then at your marriage, you will not be allowed to drink from the Sacred Chalice of Rixx.'

Deanna was floored... 'Mother!' she cried out as if stricken. 'The women of the Fifth House have drunk from the Sacred Chalice at their weddings for over six centuries! Six centuries of tradition, Mother! That's when the chalice is passed down to its new holder!' " [Many other Betazoid refs., including extensive passages in which Lwaxana attempts to teach Betazoid philosophy to Worf, and in which Worf and Troi discuss differences between their two cultures, throughout novel, not in DB. The two primary fictional cultures/religions in novel are Klingon and Betazoid.]

religious - fictional Borthan 4500 Silverberg, Robert. A Time of Changes. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971); pg. 23. Borthan:
"The scheme of bondings allows us a small escape from the constricting solitude in which we of Borthan are expected to live... it has long been forbidden by custom for us to open our souls to others. To talk excessively of oneself, so our forefathers believed, leads inevitably to self-indulgence, self-pity, and self-corruption; therefore we are trained to keep ourselves to ourselves, and, so that the prisoning bands of custom may be all the more steely, we are prohibited even from using such words as 'I' or 'me' in polite discourse. If we have problems we settle them in silence; if we have ambitions, we fulfill them without advertising our hopes; if we have desires, we pursue them in a selfless and impersonal way. To these harsh rules only two exceptions are made. We may speak our hearts freely to our drainers, who are religious functionaries and mere hirelings; and we may, within limits, open ourselves to our bond-kind. These are the rules of the Covenant. "
religious - fictional Borthan 4500 Silverberg, Robert. A Time of Changes. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971); pg. 87. Borthan:
"'To understand your habit of erecting walls about yourselves. To prise the ease with which you accept divine presence. One envies you for that. As one said, one was raised in no system of belief at all, and is unable to let himiself be overtaken by faith. One's head is always full of nasty skeptical questions. One is constitutionally unable to accept what one can't see or feel, and so one must always be alone, and one goes around the galaxy seeking for the gateway to belief, trying this, trying that, and one never finds--' Schweiz paused... 'So you see, your grace, you have something precious here, this ability to let yourselves become part of a larger power. One would wish to learn it from you. Of course, it's a matter of cultural conditioning. Borthan still knows the gods, and Earth has outlived them. Civilization is young on this planet. It takes thousands of years for the religious impulse to erode.' "
religious - fictional Borthan 4500 Silverberg, Robert. A Time of Changes. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971); pg. 89. Borthan:
"His high-pitched rapid speech still seemed to echo in the room. Asking. Asking. Asking. And then revealing. Are you a religious man? Do you believe in literal gods? If only I could find faith! How I envy you. But the flaws of your world. The denial of self. Would you be so free with a citizen of Manneran? Speak to me, your grace. Open to me. I have been alone here so long.

...and when we were warmed by drinking we discussed religion once more, and Schweiz's difficulties with faith, and my convictions that the gods were real. "

religious - fictional Borthan 4500 Silverberg, Robert. A Time of Changes. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971); pg. 89. Borthan:
"His high-pitched rapid speech still seemed to echo in the room. Asking. Asking. Asking. And then revealing. Are you a religious man? Do you believe in literal gods? If only I could find faith! How I envy you. But the flaws of your world. The denial of self. Would you be so free with a citizen of Manneran? Speak to me, your grace. Open to me. I have been alone here so long.

...and when we were warmed by drinking we discussed religion once more, and Schweiz's difficulties with faith, and my convictions that the gods were real. "

religious - fictional Borthan 4500 Silverberg, Robert. A Time of Changes. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971); pg. 94. Borthan:
"'Such drugs are forbidden...' I said.

'Of course, of course! For you they offer a means of sidestepping the processes of formal religion. Why waste your time at a drainer's if you can expand your soul with a pill? Your law is wise on this point. Your Covenant could not survive if you allowed these chemicals to be used here.'

...'One first must tell you that he has used these drugs himself and found them not entirely satisfactory. True, they open the infinite. True, they let one merge with the Godhead. But only for moments: a few hours at best. And at the end of it, one is as alone as before. It is the illusion of the soul's opening, not the opening itself...' "

religious - fictional Borthan 4500 Silverberg, Robert. A Time of Changes. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971); pg. 87-88. Borthan:
"'And,' I said, 'this planet was settled by men who had strong religious beliefs, who specifically came here to preserve them, and who took great pains to instill them in their descendants.'

'That too. Your Covenant. Yet that was--what, fifteen hundred, two thousand years ago? It could all have crumbled by now, but it hasn't. It's stronger than ever. Your devoutness, your humility, your denial of self--'

'Those who couldn't accept and transmit the ideals of the first settlers,' I pointed out, 'were not allowed to remain among them. That had its effect on the pattern of the culture, if you'll agree that such traits as rebelliousness and atheism can be bred out of a race. The consenters stayed; the rejecters went.' "

religious - fictional Borthan 4500 Silverberg, Robert. A Time of Changes. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971), book jacket. Borthan:
"A Time of Changes is a novel set in a distant future when the vast majority of human beings live on planets other than Earth. Each of these new worlds has developed its own form of society, but none so strange as that on the planet Borthan.

The people of Borthan are ruled by the Covenant. Established thousands of years ago by the original settlers, the Covenant teaches that the self is to be despised, and it forbids anyone to reveal his innermost thoughts or feelings to another. On Borthan, the filthiest obscenities imaginable are the words 'I' and 'me.'

A few men have dared to rebel against this repressive religion and then paid with their lives for the heinous crime of selfbaring. but no one has ever represented a more dangerous threat to the Covenant than Kinnall Darival, a prince of the country of Salla. " [This entire book is primarily about religion on Borthan. Only a few refs. are in DB.]

religious - fictional Brazil 1986 Leigh, Stephen. "The Tint of Hatred " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 129. "Church of Jesus Christ, Joker":
"...Rio... Through the narrow alleys between buildings she could glimpse the old landmark, Corcovado, the gigantic statue of Christ the redeemer atop a central peak of the city... Father Squid had celebrated mass there yesterday; tow hundred thousand people had prayed together under the deformed statue. " [Father Squid is the leader of the 'Church of Jesus Christ, Joker.' Other refs., not in DB.]
religious - fictional Brazil 2045 Wilson, Robert Charles. Memory Wire. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 47. Church of the Vale de Amenhecar:
"Down one alley near the hotel she saw a sign that intrigued her: CHURCH OF THE VALE DO AMENHECAR, it said, and in the dusty window beneath it there was the painted image of an upraised hand, a dreamstone radiating from the palm.

We are close now, she thought, and the pronoun came so naturally to her that she did not notice its strangeness: we. "

religious - fictional Brazil 2045 Wilson, Robert Charles. Memory Wire. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 49. Church of the Vale de Amenhecar:
"'Where do you want to go?'

'The church we passed. The dreamstone church.'

'It's a Valley church,' Byron said. 'Jungle cults. You want to sacrifice a chicken? Maybe we can arrange it.'

Keller remembered the Valley from the war. The Vale do Amenhecar was a Brazilian stone cult, one of the junk religions that had prospered since the discovery of the 'liths. It was a peasant's religion, wildly syncretic; they believed in sacred jaguars, the divinity of Christ, the imminent arrival of fleets of flying saucers.

'I want to see what it's like,' Teresa said. " [Other refs., not in DB.]

religious - fictional Brazil: Nova Roma 1983 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 10: "Betrayal ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Dec 1983); pg. 14. Cult of Fire:
guard: "Behold the sanctuary of the Cult of Fire, where--for the glory of our gods--you will be consigned to the eternal flame! " [This is Selene's cult, where she sacrifices people her people capture. She throws them into a lava/fire pit, and she consumes their life energy so that she can be perpetually youthful. Many refs to this, not in DB, pg. 14-15, 19-22.]
religious - fictional Brazil: Nova Roma 1983 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 9: "Arena ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Nov 1983); pg. 5. Cult of Fire:
"Suddenly, inexplicably, Dani's psi-power merges her mind with Amara's... finding the girls' most terrible nightmare... and projecting it for all to see. "; Pg. 6: Amara: "The Black Priestess--her pit of fire! I die... as have so many others. Nothing can save me, nothing! " [Other refs. to the Black Priestess/Selene, not in DB, e.g. pg. 22.]


religious - fictional, continued

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