Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

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Boer, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Boer Mali 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 285. "'You really think we look alike?'

'Sure,' Laura said.

'But I'm a Boer, an Afrikaaner. And you have that hybrid American look.' "

Boer South Africa 1900 Leiber, Fritz. Our Lady of Darkness. New York: Berkley Publishing Corp. (1977); pg. 98. "In 1900... In South Africa the Boers were firing at the British Krupp's field guns... "
Boer South Africa 2015 Leiber, Fritz. The Wanderer. New York: Walker & Co. (1964); pg. 195. "In South Africa it became the standard of revolt for a bloody and successful uprising against the Boers. "
Boer South Africa 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 291. "The Boers were used to camps. The British had invented them during the Boer War, and in fact the very term 'concentration camp' was invented by the British as a term for the place where they concentrated kidnapped Boer civilians. Katje's father had actually kept up his banking job in the city while rival black factions were busy 'necklacing' one another... "
Boer South Africa 2025 Harrison, Harry. "Brave New World " in Stainless Steel Visions. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 140. Pg. 140-141: "'...I am by birth a Boer, and I grew up on one of the white reservations in South Africa after the revolution. Until we emigrated here, when I was eleven, I spoke only Afrikaans. So I have an emotional tie to the people--the ethnic group, you would call it--in which I was born. It was a small group, and it is very rare to meet a Boer in this country. So I look at lists of names, an old habit, to see if I recognize any Boers among them. I have met a few people that way in my lifetime. For some talk about the old days behind barbed wire. That is what I meant.'

'How does that apply to these lists?'

'There are no Boers among them.' " [Main character is apparently a Boer.]

Boer United Kingdom 1984 Adams, Douglas. So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish. New York: Harmony Books (1984); pg. 69. "A summer's day in Islington, full of the mournful wail of antique-restoring machinery... Boer War helmets... "
Boer world 1900 Farmer, Philip Jose (written as Harry Manders). "The Problem of the Sore Bridge--Among Others " in Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Space. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) USA: Bluejay Books (1984); pg. 35-36. "After Raffles' death in the Boer War... "; "The Boer bullet that pierced my thigh in 1900 lamed me for the rest of my life... "
Boer world 1972 DuBois, Brendan. Resurrection Day. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1999); pg. 138. "'...I know I "ve tried to put on a brave face, telling you about my stout grandmama and how she stayed with her husband during the Boer War...' "
Bogomil galaxy 2200 Aldiss, Brian. "Steppenpferd " in Supertoys Last All Summer Long. New York: St. Martin's Griffin (2001; c. 2000); pg. 148. "Sankal gave a shrug. He looked over one shoulder. 'The Devil can get to you, because he owns all -- every things in the world he made.'

'You will make yourself ill believing that. Such beliefs were once held by Cathars and Bogomils. They perished. What I am trying to tell you is that it is easy to mistake the danger we are in -- the more than mortal danger -- for the work of the Devil. There is no Devil. There is merely a desertion of God...' "

Bogomil United Kingdom 1995 Aldiss, Brian. "Dark Society " in Supertoys Last All Summer Long. New York: St. Martin's Griffin (2001; c. 1995); pg. 179. "'. . . King Harold is here, removing the arrow from his eye; Sophocles, recovered from his hemlock; whose armies freed of their wounds; the Bogomils, back again; Robespierre undecapitated...' "
Brahman California 1971 Dick, Philip K. Valis. New York: Bantam (1981); pg. 161. Pg. 161, 173
Brahman California 1975 Dick, Philip K. "Man, Android and Machine " in The Dark-Haired Girl. Willimantic, CT: Mark V. Ziesing (1988; c. 1975); pg. 213. "In Brahmanism, we would say that a great cycle has ended and that Brahman stirs and wakes again, or that it falls asleep from being awake; in any case the universe which we experience which is an extension in space... "
Brahman California 1975 Dick, Philip K. The Transmigration of Timothy Archer. New York: Timescape Books (1982); pg. 81. "'...Pure Consciousness of Yahweh, the God of the Hebrew people.'

'Brahman is that,' I said.

'I beg your pardon? 'Brahman'?'

'In India. Brahmanism possesses absolute, pure consciousness. Pure consciousness, pure being, pure bliss. As I recall.' "

Brahman India -445 B.C.E. Vidal, Gore. Creation. New York: Random House (1981); pg. 28. "The Magians are the hereditary priests of the Medusa and the Persians, just as the Brahmans are the hereditary priests of India. "
Brahman India -445 B.C.E. Vidal, Gore. Creation. New York: Random House (1981); pg. 140. "First, the priests, whom they call Brahmans--creatures very like our own Magians... "
Brahman India -445 B.C.E. Vidal, Gore. Creation. New York: Random House (1981); pg. 165. "'What is an Aryan without his cow?' the Brahmans ask. They do not, of course, expect an answer. "
Brahman India 1000 C.E. Anthony, Piers & Alfred Tella. The Willing Spirit. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 134. Pg. 134: "'...You must go to the rana and tell him that the Brahmin boy escaped across the border after trying to steal his pet bird...' "; Pg. 160: "'Ah, it seems we have a special visitor tonight, Sharmila, a young Brahmin no less,' declared the guru. 'Welcome to this humble house, young man. We are pleased to have you...' "; Pg. 166: "Too, as a student and a Brahmin, he was respectful of the revered status of the master-teacher, and it was in the Brahminical tradition that he should obligingly render service to others. And the experience would do him no harm. " [Many other refs., not in DB.]
Brahman India 1835 Sterling, S. M. Island in the Sea of Time. New York: Penguin (1998); pg. 526. "'Well, there's always the Sir Charles Napier method of cultural reconciliation,' she said. At his raised eyebrows she went on: 'He was a British governor in India, back... in the 1830s. A delegation of Brahmins came to him and complained that he was oppressing them by forbidding suttee, widow-burning, that it was part of their religion.'

'What did he tell them?' Cofflin asked, curious.

'Roughly... 'It is your custom to burn widows. We also have a custom. When men burn a woman alive, we take those men, tie a rope around their necks, and hang them. Build your funeral pyre; beside it my carpenters will build a gallows. You may follow your national custom. And then we will follow ours.' ' "

Brahman India 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 44. [Chapter 12] "A procession of Brahmins is coming this way. We must prevent their seeing us, if possible. "

The guide unloosed the elephant and led him into a thicket, at the same time asking the travellers not to stir. He held himself ready to bestride the animal at a moment's notice, should flight become necessary; but he evidently thought that the procession of the faithful would pass without perceiving them amid the thick foliage, in which they were wholly concealed.

The discordant tones of the voices and instruments drew nearer, and now droning songs mingled with the sound of the tambourines and cymbals. The head of the procession soon appeared beneath the trees, a hundred paces away; and the strange figures who performed the religious ceremony were easily distinguished through the branches. First came the priests, with mitres on their heads, and clothed in long lace robes. "

Brahman India 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 44. [Chapter 12] "They were surrounded by men, women, and children, who sang a kind of lugubrious psalm, interrupted at regular intervals by the tambourines and cymbals; while behind them was drawn a car with large wheels, the spokes of which represented serpents entwined with each other. Upon the car, which was drawn by four richly caparisoned zebus, stood a hideous statue with four arms, the body coloured a dull red, with haggard eyes, dishevelled hair, protruding tongue, and lips tinted with betel. It stood upright upon the figure of a prostrate and headless giant. " [Many other refs., not in DB.]
Brahman India 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 44. [Chapter 12] "A group of old fakirs were capering and making a wild ado round the statue; these were striped with ochre, and covered with cuts whence their blood issued drop by drop--stupid fanatics, who, in the great Indian ceremonies, still throw themselves under the wheels of Juggernaut. Some Brahmins, clad in all the sumptuousness of Oriental apparel, and leading a woman who faltered at every step, followed. This woman was young, and as fair as a European. Her head and neck, shoulders, ears, arms, hands, and toes were loaded down with jewels and gems with bracelets, earrings, and rings; while a tunic bordered with gold, and covered with a light muslin robe, betrayed the outline of her form. "
Brahman India 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 55. [Chapter 14] At half-past twelve the train stopped at Benares. The Brahmin legends assert that this city is built on the site of the ancient Casi, which, like Mahomet's tomb, was once suspended between heaven and earth; though the Benares of to-day, which the Orientalists call the Athens of India, stands quite unpoetically on the solid earth, Passepartout caught glimpses of its brick houses and clay huts, giving an aspect of desolation to the place, as the train entered it.
Brahman India 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 55. [Chapter 14] Through the windows of their carriage the travellers had glimpses of the diversified landscape of Behar, with its mountains clothed in verdure, its fields of barley, wheat, and corn, its jungles peopled with green alligators, its neat villages, and its still thickly-leaved forests. Elephants were bathing in the waters of the sacred river, and groups of Indians, despite the advanced season and chilly air, were performing solemnly their pious ablutions. These were fervent Brahmins, the bitterest foes of Buddhism, their deities being Vishnu, the solar god, Shiva, the divine impersonation of natural forces, and Brahma, the supreme ruler of priests and legislators. What would these divinities think of India, anglicised as it is to-day, with steamers whistling and scudding along the Ganges, frightening the gulls which float upon its surface, the turtles swarming along its banks, and the faithful dwelling upon its borders?
Brahman India 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 59. [Chapter 15] A door was swung open by order of the judge, and three Indian priests entered.

"That's it, " muttered Passepartout; "these are the rogues who were going to burn our young lady. "

The priests took their places in front of the judge, and the clerk proceeded to read in a loud voice a complaint of sacrilege against Phileas Fogg and his servant, who were accused of having violated a place held consecrated by the Brahmin religion.

"You hear the charge? " asked the judge.

"Yes, sir, " replied Mr. Fogg, consulting his watch, "and I admit it. "

"You admit it? "

"I admit it, and I wish to hear these priests admit, in their turn, what they were going to do at the pagoda of Pillaji. "

The priests looked at each other; they did not seem to understand what was said.

"Yes, " cried Passepartout, warmly; "at the pagoda of Pillaji, where they were on the point of burning their victim. "

The judge stared with astonishment, and the priests were stupefied.

Brahman India 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 60. [Chapter 15] "Inasmuch, " resumed the judge, "as the English law protects equally and sternly the religions of the Indian people, and as the man Passepartout has admitted that he violated the sacred pagoda of Malabar Hill, at Bombay, on the 20th of October, I condemn the said Passepartout to imprisonment for fifteen days and a fine of three hundred pounds. "

"Three hundred pounds! " cried Passepartout, startled at the largeness of the sum.

"Silence! " shouted the constable.

"And inasmuch, " continued the judge, "as it is not proved that the act was not done by the connivance of the master with the servant, and as the master in any case must be held responsible for the acts of his paid servant, I condemn Phileas Fogg to a week's imprisonment and a fine of one hundred and fifty pounds. "

Brahman India 1940 Gormley, Adrienne. "Children of Tears " in Alternate Tyrants (Mike Resnick, ed.) New York: Tor (1997); pg. 2. "Father... and my mother worked with Ritesh's parents in planning the wedding. I remember their long hours consulting with the Brahmin priest, then the astrologer, and finally setting the most propitious date and time for the wedding. "
Brahman India 1984 Cox, Greg. The Eugenics Wars: The Rise and Fall of Khan Noonien Singh: Volume One (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 263. "The crowd surrounding Noon took up the cry, 'Blood for blood!' Women grabbed their children and hurried for safety while their menfolk surged toward the outnumbered teenager. Brahmans and beggars, old men and grinning youths, joining the gang threatening Noon... "
Brahman India 1999 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 207. "She had been born to a Brahman but unprosperous family with matriarchal proclivities in the southern state of Tamil Nadu. Matriarchal households were still common all over South India. She matriculated at Banares Hindu University. At medical school in England she had met and fallen deeply in love with Surindar Ghosh, a fellow medical student. But Surindar was a harijan, an untouchable, of a caste so loathed that the mere sight of them was held by orthodox Brahmans to be polluting. Surindar's ancestor shad been forced to live a nocturnal existence, like bats and owls. " [More about these characters, not in DB.]
Brahman India: Bombay 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 34. "Passepartout, however, thinking no harm, went in like a simple tourist, and was soon lost in admiration of the splendid Brahmin ornamentation which everywhere met his eyes, when of a sudden he found himself sprawling on the sacred flagging. He looked up to behold three enraged priests, who forthwith fell upon him; tore off his shoes, and began to beat him with loud, savage exclamations. The agile Frenchman was soon upon his feet again, and lost no time in knocking down two of his long-gowned adversaries with his fists and a vigorous application of his toes; then, rushing out of the pagoda as fast as his legs could carry him, he soon escaped the third priest by mingling with the crowd in the streets. "
Brahman India: Calcutta 1969 Simmons, Dan. Song of Kali. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1985); pg. 39. Pg. 39: "'..My father had lived a long and useful life. Every man in his village, Brahman to Harijan, wished to attend his cremation...' "; Pg. 105: "...My Brahman was a kindly-looking man. A banker, perhaps... "; Pg. 106: "Never had I seen a Brahman hold high a pink circle of flesh and then bow to insert it in the gaping mouth of a corpse... The first Brahman raised his forehead from the jagrata's foot and turned to us. He walked slowly along our semicircle as if inspecting the bodies we had brought as offerings. He paused for a lengthy moment in front of me. I could not raise my eyes to meet his. I was convinced that the drowned corpse would not be found worthy... " [More]
Brahman Massachusetts: Boston 1973 Sagan, Carl. Cosmic Connection: An Extraterrestrial Perspective. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2000; c. 1973); pg. 129. "A Boston Brahmin, the brother of the president of Harvard University... "
Brahman New York: New York City 1987 Cadigan, Pat. "Addicted to Love " in Wild Cards V: Down and Dirty (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 321. "Tomoyuki's cultured, Boston Brahmin tones held no hostility or impatience. "
Brahman Roman Empire 620 C.E. Douglas, L. Warren. The Veil of Years. New York: Baen (2001); pg. 103. "But dryades were philosophers and scholars, judges and astronomers. Their traditions descended from the same tribes who, beyond the River Indus, had become the Brahmin caste. The Greeks of their day respected them, as would Roman scholars to come. "
Brahman USA 1984 Chandler, Neal. "Benediction " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1984); pg. 165. "In particular the militant and military-looking Marvin Chisolm led the counterattack. Marvin was the ward liberal, an unabashed Democrat rendered respectable by his brahman Utah roots and successful consulting business. He wore his expensive, Ivy League education openly with his mustache, his penny loafers, and his herringbone jackets. "
Brahman USA 1986 Anderson, Jack. Control. New York: Kensington Publishing Corp. (1988); pg. 46. "His eyes were mobile and piercing, amused, then sober, then amused again. Characteristically, he pursed his thin lips as if the world did not quite meet his Brahmin standards. "
Brahman world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 55. "...Madame Blavatsky... and her various spirit guides, the Great White Brotherhood of Masters. It was these higher beings--Serapis and Tuitit Behy, the Tibetan prince Master Morya, and the Kashmiri Brahmin Koot Hoomi (who had been Pythagoras in an earlier incarnation)--who dictated her books to her, or simply 'precipitated' the completed manuscripts on her desk while she slept... "
Brahman world 1999 Banks, Iain. The Business. New York: Simon & Schuster (1999); pg. 268. "'Physics. That's our Brahmin faith.'

'You think so?'

'I think a lot of people live as though that's true, even if they don't think about it. To us, science is the religion that works...' "

Brahman world 2150 Zelazny, Roger. Lord of Light. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1967); pg. 82. [Talking to Buddha.] "'...But your words move me, and they are superior to the teachings of the Brahmins...' " [Other refs. not in DB.]
Branch Davidians Texas 1993 Wood, Crystal. Fool's Joust. Denton, Texas: Tattersall Publishing (1998) "You can't believe in what you don't understand.
--David Koresh, 1993 "
Branch Davidians Texas 1998 Wood, Crystal. Fool's Joust. Denton, Texas: Tattersall Publishing (1998); pg. 25. "'...If no such evidence exists, no warrants will be issued, no investigation will be authorized. He offered a reminder of what happened down around Waco a few years ago between the FBI and another 'character' with delusions of divinity...' "
Branch Davidians Texas 1998 Wood, Crystal. Fool's Joust. Denton, Texas: Tattersall Publishing (1998); pg. 219. "He had seen in photos the same kind of peculiar glint in the eyes of others who had aspired to godhood, such as David Koresh of the doomed Branch Davidians... "
Branch Davidians Texas: Waco 1998 Wood, Crystal. Cut Him Out in Little Stars. Denton, TX: Tattersall Publishing (revised and reprinted 1998; c. 1994); pg. 21. "The FBI had been watching Sweeney for a long time, Shackleford had explained, but had no safe way to get onto his property to serve the warrant they already had; the Branch Davidian episode near Waco had taught them a hard lesson about approaching those who were heavily armed and fortified. "
Branch Davidians USA 1965 Cart, Michael. "Starry, Starry Night " in Tomorrowland: 10 Stories About the Future (Michael Cart, ed.) New York: Scholastic Press (1999); pg. 194. [Author's Note] "Yeas later, when I had grown up and moved to California, I saw television evangelists for the first time and was even more intrigued by the mesmerizing power they exerted over their audience. What would have happened to me if I had encountered one of them when I was a lonely teenager? I wondered. Might I have ended as a true believer in a Jonestown or a Waco? It was such speculation that inspired the story 'Starry, Starry Night.' "
Branch Davidians USA 1995 Hand, Elizabeth. Waking the Moon. New York: HarperPrism (1995); pg. 247. "'...You don't think--none of you think, you're letting some rich crazy egotistical New Age bitch do it for you. Haven't you ever heard of cults, girls? Don't any of you know how to read a newspaper? The name Manson mean anything to you? David Koresh? Bhagwan Rajneesh? Jim Jones?' "
Branch Davidians USA 1997 Byrne, John. Wonder Woman: Gods and Goddesses. Rocklin, CA: Prima Publishing (1997); pg. 23. "'...and she hates you--well, hate may be too strong a word, but she sure doesn't like the fact that you represent another theology. I think if you were a member of some sort of cult, if you followed a David Koresh or Reverend Moon or any other extremist, she wouldn't feel so threatened by you. But your gods, though thought nicely dead and gone, are respected and recognized. And now you come along and now only worship Zeus and Athena and Hera and Apollo and all the rest, but have actually met them...' "
Branch Davidians USA 1999 Anderson, Jack. Millennium. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 167. "'There are people with charisma,' Brickell said, 'and if their motivation is powerful enough, people will obey. Hitler had the German economy working for him. Jim Jones and David Koresh had the fear of hell on their sides...' "
Branch Davidians USA 1999 Anderson, Jack. Millennium. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 215. "'You might have the power, young man, but you're very alone with it. It happens whenever one of our little 'trinkets' falls into the hands of your species. Jim Jones. David Koresh. But they can never handle it. And we always get our devices back.' "
Branch Davidians world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 152. Pg. 152: "...their backs are really against the wall, mass suicide may seem the best option, as it did to the faithful in Guyana and Waco. "; Pg. 161: "From the orderliness surrounding their communal suicide, and on the evidence of their videotapes, it would not seem that any of them was acting under coercion. The same can't be said for those who drank the Kool-Aid of Guyana or perished in the flames of Waco. "
Buddhism Afghanistan -209 B.C.E. Anderson, Poul. The Shield of Time. New York: Tor (1990); pg. 38. "209 B.C. At last the teaching of Gautama Buddha would ebb from his native India until there it was all but forgotten. Today it still flourished, and the tide of it flowed strongly outward. Thus far, converts in Bactria were scarce. The topes and stupas whose ruins Everard saw in twentieth-century Afghanistan would not be built for generations. However, Bactra city numbered sufficient believers to maintain a vihara, at which visiting coreligionists usualy called and sometimes stayed... "
Buddhism Afghanistan -209 B.C.E. Anderson, Poul. The Shield of Time. New York: Tor (1990); pg. 47. "'...who stopped by this house, paid his respects, and in the course of chitchat found out what's been going on--whether any other oddball strangers were in town, for instance?'

'Several, off and on. An establishment like this is a sort of verbal bulliten board, you know, and not ony for Buddhists.' "; "'I didn't listen to their talk with Zenodotus. He's a Greek convert, the most active mundanely of these monks...' "

Buddhism Alabama 1974 Disch, Thomas M. Camp Concentration. New York: Random House (1999; c. 1968); pg. 6. "I had thought of doing an inspiration book for fat people called Fifteen Famous Fatsos. Dr. Johnson, Alfred Hitchcock, Salinger, Thomas Aquinas, Melchior, Buddha, Norbert Wiener, etc. "
Buddhism Asia -190 B.C.E. Anthony, Piers. Vision of Tarot. New York: Berkley Books (1985; 1st ed. 1980); pg. 242. "'Well, it started with Asoka,' she said. 'The emperor Asoka of India was born in 273 B.C. He was the grandson of Chandra-gupta who unified India. But there was still some land to add. So Asoka conquered Kalinga. His army killed a hundred thousand men in battle. When he saw all that gore he was horrified at such massacre. He renounced that kind of conquest and declared that the only true conquest was to win men's hearts. By being kind and dutiful and pious, and letting all creatures be free to live as they pleased. So he converted to Buddhism... He was such a good Buddhist that a lot of other people joined too. Buddhism spread through India and Ceylon and [Indonesia]... Asoka respected all religions; he didn't make anybody turn Buddhist, and he didn't [persecute]... He was a vegetarian and he wouldn't touch alcohol. I think he was the best monarch ever!'

'History agrees,' Brother Paul said. 'Asoka was one of the finest.' "

Buddhism Asia - East 1968 Bishop, Michael. The Secret Ascension; or, Philip K. Dick is Dead, Alas. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 116. "...'68... Thomas Merton... [had] been touring the Far East discussing monasticism and meditation with the Dalai Lama and other Buddhists. "
Buddhism Asia - Southeast 1997 Watson, Ian. God's World. New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers (this ed. 1990; copyright 1979); pg. 28-29. "The year 1997... As the world spun on its course that Easter Day a whole series of manifestations came and went... And on, across South-East Asia and India, avatars Buddhist and Hindu appeared at holy places... The composite message of the avatars, given through the lips of quasi-Jesus, quasi-Buddha, quasi-Mohammed... " [Other refs. not in DB.]
Buddhism Australia 2050 Egan, Greg. Permutation City. New York: HarperPrism (1995); pg. 54. "He gestured with the headset. 'You should listen. Crooked Buddhist Lawyers on Crack. They're quite good.' "
Buddhism Brazil 2045 Wilson, Robert Charles. Memory Wire. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 49. "The threats were named Compassion, and Hate, and Desire, and Love. In Angel basic he had been taught to set these things aside as earnestly as a Buddhist monk sets aside the temptations of the flesh. But like the temptations of the flesh, they were difficult to suppress. "
Buddhism Brunei 2035 Sterling, Bruce. "Green Days in Brunei " in Future on Fire (Orson Scott Card, ed.) New York: Tor (1991; story copyright 1985); pg. 373. Pg. 373: "Brooke was walking toward them, and with him Dr. Moratuwa, newly outfitted in saffron-colored baggy shorts and T-shirt. They were the work clothes of a Buddhist technician. 'Oh, no,' Turner said. He dropped his wrench with a thud.

Seria said, 'Now you see why I had to leave, don't you? My family locked him up. I had to break adat and help Brooke set him free. It was my obligation, my dharma!' "; Pg. 375: "Brooke raised his eyes to heaven. 'Lord Buddha, forgive my doubts. . . .' "

Buddhism Brunei 2035 Sterling, Bruce. "Green Days in Brunei " in Future on Fire (Orson Scott Card, ed.) New York: Tor (1991; story copyright 1985); pg. 360-361. "'Yes, those poor Moslem fellows,' said Moratuwa. 'Still here after so many years. You must talk to the sultan about an amnesty, Jimmy... The royals went too far in protecting their power. They tried to bottle up our Way, to control it with their royal adat. But they cannot lock out the world forever, and lock up those who want fresh air. They only imprison themselves. Ask your Seria.' He smiled. 'Buddha was a prince also, but he left his palace when the world called out.' "
Buddhism California 1918 Ebershoff, David. The Danish Girl. New York: Viking (2000); pg. 161. "By March of 1918 the winder rains had ended, and Pasadena was green, as green as the jade Buddha Akiko kept in her dormer room on the third floor "
Buddhism California 1971 Dick, Philip K. Valis. New York: Bantam (1981); pg. 30. "Nor, really, is group perception (as Spinoza supposed, the entire universe may be one theophany, but then, again, the universe may not exist at all, as the Buddhist idealists decided). "
Buddhism California 1971 Dick, Philip K. Valis. New York: Bantam (1981); pg. 32. Pg. 32: "The source-basis for Parsifal consisted of Celtic legends, and Wagner's research into Buddhism for his never-written opera about the Buddha to be called The Victors (Die Sieger). Where did Richard Wagner get the notion that time could turn into space?) "; Pg. 158: Siddhartha Society [Other Buddhist refs., pg. 77, 90, 110-112, 123, 144, 157, 169, 173, etc., including many references to Siddhartha.]
Buddhism California 1971 Dick, Philip K. Valis. New York: Bantam (1981); pg. 111. "The three-eyed people who Fat saw represented himself at an enlightened stage of his evolving development through his various lifetimes. In Buddhism it's called the 'super-human divine eye' (dibba-cakkhu), the power to see the passing away and rebirth of beings. Gautama the Buddha (Siddhartha) attained it during the middle watch (ten P.M. to two A.M.). In his first watch (six P.M. to ten P.M.) he gained the knowledge of all--repeat: all--his former existences (pubbenivasanussati-nana). I did not tell fat this, but technically he had become a Buddha. It did not seem to me like a good idea to let him know. After all, if you are a Buddha you should be able to figure it out for yourself.

It strikes me as an interesting paradox that a Buddha--an enlightened one--would be unable to figure out, even after four-and-a-half years, that he had become enlightened. Fat had become totally bogged down in his enormous exegesis... " [more]

Buddhism California 1971 Dick, Philip K. Valis. New York: Bantam (1981); pg. 112. "Being eclectic in terms of his theology, Fat listed a number of saviors: the Buddha, Zoroaster, Jesus and... Muhammad "
Buddhism California 1975 Dick, Philip K. The Transmigration of Timothy Archer. New York: Timescape Books (1982); pg. 221. Pg. 221, 224, 229, 234, 241: extended discussion of bodhisattva, mentioning Buddha by name, and Nirvana; Pg. 223: satori
Buddhism California 1993 Shiner, Lewis. Glimpses. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1993); pg. 247. "It used to be the Samarkand Hotel and there is still a brass Buddha on the door at street level. " [Also pg. 249.]


Buddhism, continued

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