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34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

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Quaker, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Quaker United Kingdom: England 1773 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 13-14. "Abraham Darby III... The young ironmaster... Awakening [from a bad dream], heart pounding, he was grateful to find himself in bed. He thanked the Almighty... He pulled on his boots, donned his coat and flat Quaker hat... " [Quakers are central to the plot of this novel and referred to throughout. Many refs., not all in DB.]
Quaker United Kingdom: England 1773 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 23-24. "'And I am certain that John Wilkinson is especially keen on seeing it made of iron.'

Pritchard chuckled. 'Surely a gentleman of your lineage might share Mr. Wilkinson's attraction to iron.'

'I owe my livelihood to it, but not my soul.'

Richard raised an eyebrow to the tone of this pronouncement. Abraham was surprised to hear his own rancor. The truth was, he found it difficult to meet that of God in John Wilkinson. 'My interest in iron turns to pots and engine cylinders,' he added, keeping his voice evenly deep, 'not cannon.'

'Spoken as a Quaker, I am sure, sir. But bridges, sir! What of bridges, Mr. Darby?' "

Quaker United Kingdom: England 1774 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 157. "...helping Abiah write a horrible little pamphlet entitled An Exhortation in Christian Love, to all who frequent horse-racing, cock-fighting, throwing at cocks, gaming, plays, dancing, musical entertainments, or any other Vain Diversion.'

This was the part of Quakerism that Maggie couldn't stand: the Puritanical assumption that not only was bull baiting bad but anything fun was bad. It was that, probably, that kept her from joining the Quakers. "

Quaker United Kingdom: England 1774 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 165. "'Thou wilt find the time, if thou art Convince.' Abiah spoke metaphorically of the harvest: how the spiritual ground first had to plowed [sic], the seed of Truth sown, and the tender plants weeded before the harvest of souls could take place. she herself was a birthright Quaker rather than one brought into Truth by Convincement, and yet she had had to discover her own Light within. As a girl, she wanted desperately to speak in Meeting, but her tongue was stopped--and remained so for years. Not until she was thirty-two was she finally 'seized upon with the power to declare the Truth.' "
Quaker United Kingdom: England 1774 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 170. Pg. 170: "She put aside the book she was reading, which he could see now was Robinson Crusoe, and red from Mother's small leather edition of George Fox's journal:

I saw that there was an ocean of darkness and death, but an infinite ocean of light which flowed over the ocean of darkness. In that, also, I saw the infinite love of God. . . . ";

Pg. 181: "...Maggie... Over dinner, she announced that she had become a Quaker. As she said it, she realized that this was partly what had brought her here. " [Many other refs. throughout book.]

Quaker United Kingdom: England 1776 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 368. "When they were gathered that day for silent prayer at the Old Furnace, Abraham felt moved to speak. He evoked George Fox's injunction to friends to keep atop of that which will cumber the mind, and dwell in love and peace one with another. After delivering himself of this message, listening to the thump of the bellows, he was at first pleased but later gnawed by doubts as to whether he had been moved by the Spirit or by calculation. "
Quaker United Kingdom: England 1776 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 369. "At Meeting, she spoke of love and charity. And the greatest of these is Charity. Words he took as a gentle rebuke to the annoyance smoldering in his own bosom. "
Quaker United Kingdom: England 1776 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 397. "Becky clapped her hands with delight. 'Oh Abey, I feel like royalty.'

It was such an un-Quakerly thought that they both laughed. " [The word 'un-Quakerly' is used many times in the novel.]

Quaker United Kingdom: England 1776 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 419. "Sarah said something in Meeting that helped. She talked about forgiveness, the difficulty she had finding forgiveness in her heart. She quoted James Naylor, one of the founding Quakers: There is a spirit which I feel that delights to do no evil, nor to revenge any wrong, but delights to endure all things, in hope to enjoy its own in the end. Maggie could not find that forgiveness in herself just yet, but entertaining the possibility of it could help. "
Quaker United Kingdom: England 1778 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 426. "They had to be careful not to give off too much light. But they had surprising freedom as long as they confined their public show of affection to the hand-holding that was common among women. Sarah had got past the initial resistance she felt to their pleasures in bed. Lovemaking undertaking 'in simplicity,' as she put it, was surely the gift of a loving Maker. This was no small departure from prevailing Quaker orthodoxy, which railed against the flesh, or at least took a dour view of the body. But Sarah soon noticed the similarities between moments of sexual ecstasy and the raptures of those who surrendered to the Holy Spirit. Sometimes, transported by Maggie's ministrations, she cried out to Jesus. As Maggie saw it, they were practicing a new, more humanistic Quakerism. "
Quaker United Kingdom: England 1778 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 428. "'Thou must obey the Spirit,' she told Maggie. 'Ye are both called.' She wrote dozens of letters describing A Divine Visitation, likening Maggie's utterances to the Book of Revelation and the opening of the Seventh Seal. Sometimes, after writing furiously on her lap desk, she stopped and gazed at Maggie with a look of awe. "
Quaker United Kingdom: England 1778 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 426-427. "Seeing worship more and more as a vehicle for human love, Maggie began to lose some of her inhibitions at Meeting. She became more open to the occasional irrational supplication to Divine love, more open to the quavering voices and upturned eyes. She began to feel transported into the bosom of something she was willing to call God. Most of all she felt it in the shared silence. She learned to tune out distractions and open herself to the silence that went beyond language.

Finally it happened that she was sitting in Meeting and words came into her head. It was a declaration. I have a vision. She saw her whole world laid out in the future: the despoiled land, the poisoned water, the nomadic hordes. I have a vision. Her heart was pounding. A world destroyed by greed. Air poured through her lungs. Then she was standing, without having made any choice to stand, and her voice was issuing from her throat in a kind of wail... "

Quaker United Kingdom: England 1779 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 433. "She stood at the edge of such a vision. She was not a George Fox or a Mahatma Gandhi or a Martin Luther King. She was an ordinary person... "
Quaker United Kingdom: England 1905 Gibson, William & Bruce Sterling. The Difference Engine. New York: Bantam (1991); pg. 70. "The South-Eastern Railway Company's London Bridge Terminus was a vast drafty hall of iron and soot-blown glass. Quakers moved among the avenues of benches, offering pamphlets to the seated travelers. Red-coatd Irish soldiers, red-eyed rom the night's gin, glowered at the close-shaved missionaries as they passed. "
Quaker United Kingdom: England 1905 Gibson, William & Bruce Sterling. The Difference Engine. New York: Bantam (1991); pg. 150. "A group of Quakers, men and women, stood on the pavement outsid the Palace. They were droning another of their intolerable sermonizing ditties, something about a 'railway to Heaven,' by the sound off it. The song did not seem to have much to do with Evolution, or blasphemy, or fossils; but perhaps the sheer monotony of their bootless protests had exhausted even the Quakers. He hurried past them, ignoring their proffered pamphlets. It was hot, uncommon hot, beastly hot... "
Quaker United Kingdom: England 1905 Gibson, William & Bruce Sterling. The Difference Engine. New York: Bantam (1991); pg. 175. "Fraser opened a leather-bound notebook and produced a reservoir-pen from within his plain, Quakerish jacket. "
Quaker United Kingdom: England 1905 Gibson, William & Bruce Sterling. The Difference Engine. New York: Bantam (1991); pg. 290. "'What's his name?'

'Ned.'

'And him?'

'Brian,' Tom said. 'I think . . .'

'And what, pray, is the name of that grim-looking cove below, looking so awfully much like a copper?'

Tom hesitated.

'Don't you know?'

'He never gave us any proper name,' Mallory brike in. 'We just call him the Reverend.'

...Fraser rose within the noose.' 'So, 'Reverend,' ' said the Marquess, 'what, pray might be your denomination?'

Fraser shook the rope loose and stepped out. 'What do you think, gov'nor? I'm a bleedin' Quaker!'

There was evil laughter. Fraser, pretending a loutish pleasure at the others' fun, shook his gingham-masked head. 'No,' he rasped, 'no Quaker I, for I'm a Panty-sucker!'

The laughter stopped short.

'Panty-sucker,' Fraser insisted, 'one o' them yellow-back Yankee ranters--'

...'A Pantisocrat, do you mean? That is to say, a lay preacher of the Susquehanna Phalanstery?' "

Quaker United Kingdom: England 1944 Holdstock, Robert. Mythago Wood. London: Victor Gollancz Ltd. (1984); pg. 113. "...and words in her Brythonic language that she briefly translated as, 'Good. Easting.' She had discovered a box of Quaker Oats, and had made a thick porridge with water and honey... She picked up the box and stared at the dark-robed Quaker who featured on the front, and laughed. 'Meivoroth!' she said, pointing to the thick broth, and nodded vigorously. 'Good.' "
Quaker United Kingdom: London 1990 Byatt, A.S. Possession. New York: Random House (1991; c. 1990); pg. 186. "We went to hear another lecture of the recent Spiritual Manifestations, given by a most respectable Quaker--who began with a predisposition to believe in the life of the Spirit--but with no vulgar desire to be shocked or startled. Himself an Englishman, he characterised the English in a manner not wholly alien to the style of the poet Ash. " [More pg. 188-189, 424.]
Quaker USA 1773 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 111. "Once, while she was clearing the table, some Philadelphia Quakers on their way to Shrewsbury asked her views on the recent Boston Tea Party. She responded tactfully, knowing it was a matter of some controversy--knowing, too, that American Quakers were being criticized for refusing to take up arms in the revolutionary cause. The challenge, she said, was to explore 'nonviolent alternatives' (they liked this phrase), and she observed that at least the demonstration in Boston Harbor involved violence against property, not against people... There was some talk then about John Woolman, the famous American Quaker who had died last year, who had refused to wear clothing dyed with indigo or to otherwise support slavery. His white hat and coat made him stand out amidst the Quaker gray. No, she had not met him. "
Quaker USA 1855 Anderson, Poul. The Boat of a Million Years. New York: Tor (1989); pg. 200. "The dark man spat. 'How many like that you got around here? They're all runaways, and you damn well know it, Quaker' "; pg. 203: "'Lying is against the principles of the Society of Friends. Now kindly let me get on with my work.' "; See also pg. 206. [Book has other references to Quakers, not in DB.]
Quaker USA 1938 Delacorte, Peter. Time On My Hands. New York: Scribner (1997); pg. 213. [a movie] "Flynn entered his office. Shot of a clock. Here was Lorna again, reminding Flynn that she's a Quaker, a woman of peace, telling him he's no longer marshal and the proper thing is to leave town with her, as planned. "
Quaker USA 1982 Bishop, Michael. The Secret Ascension; or, Philip K. Dick is Dead, Alas. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 137. "'But it's my understanding... that you'd be in a monastery--monkeyhouses, I affectionally called them when I was a Quaker...' "
Quaker USA 1995 Scholz, Carter. "Radiance " in New Legends. Greg Bear (ed.) New York: Tor (1995); pg. 237. "Oh, I know how people get caught up in their work. I have a friend there, not in Radiance, in another section. He's a Quaker, he calls it 'being in the world.' I can respect that, at least he's thought about it. How did you get into it? "
Quaker USA 1997 Gloss, Molly. The Dazzle of Day. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 5. "Acknowledgments

...All epigraphs in this book are from the writings of the sometime-Quaker Walt Whitman, his lifework, Leaves of Grass. " [We've made note of this here, but the epigraphs themselves have not been included in the DB, as many more explicitly Quaker references are in the book and have been included in DB.]

Quaker USA 1998 Atwood, Margaret. The Handmaid's Tale. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin (1986); pg. 83. "The ring has been smuggling precious national resources over the border into Canada.

'Five members of the heretical sect of Quakers have been arrested,' he says, smiling blandly, 'and more arrests are anticipated.'

Two of the Quakers appear onscreen, a man and a woman. They look terrified, but they're trying to preserve some dignity in front of the camera. The man has a large dark mark on his forehead; the woman's veil has been torn off, and her hair falls in strands over her face. Both of them are about fifty. "

Quaker USA 1998 Atwood, Margaret. The Handmaid's Tale. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin (1986); pg. 89. "...found his way to a nearby farmhouse, was allowed in, with suspicion at first, but then when they understood who he was, they were friendly, not the sort who would turn him in, perhaps they were Quakers, they will smuggle him inland, from house to house, the woman made him some hot coffee and gave him a set of her husband's clothes. "
Quaker USA 1998 Atwood, Margaret. The Handmaid's Tale. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin (1986); pg. 247. "'It was before the sectarian roundups began in earnest. As long as you said you were some sort of a Christian and you were married, for the first time that is, they [Christian Fundamentalist regime that gained control of the country] were still leaving you pretty much alone. They were concentrating first on the others. They got them more or less under control before the started in everybody else.

'I was underground it must have been eight or nine months. I was taken from one safe house to another, there were more of those then. They weren't all Quakers, some of them weren't even religious. They were just people who didn't like the way things were going.' "

Quaker USA 1998 Atwood, Margaret. The Handmaid's Tale. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin (1986); pg. 246. Pg. 245: "'I chose them because they were a married couple, and those were safer than anyone single and especially anyone gay. Also I remembered the designation beside their name. Q, it said, which meant Quaker. We had the religious denominations marked where there were any, for marches. That way you could tell who might turn out to what. It was no good calling on the C's to do abortion stuff, for instance; not that we'd done much that lately...' "; Pg. 246: "'The other house was Quakers too, and they were pay dirt, because they were a station on the Underground Femaleroad. After the first man left, they said they'd try to get me out of the country. I won't tell you how, because some of the stations may still be operating...' "
Quaker USA 2026 Moffett, Judith. Time, Like an Ever-Rolling Stream. New York: St. Martin's Press (1992); pg. 159. "The Fundamentalism puzzled him and made him nervous, once it was clear that Pam really believed some personal version of what Liam--raised without religious instruction, apart from that acquired by osmosis at his two Quaker schools--couldn't help viewing as a lot of primitive horsesh--. "
Quaker world 1800 Anthony, Piers. Vision of Tarot. New York: Berkley Books (1985; 1st ed. 1980); pg. 200. "...Protestant groups, and the latter into multiple splits. The Lutherans, the Calvinists, Episcopals, Presbyterians, Puritans, Baptists, Congregationalists, Quakers, Methodists... "
Quaker world 1982 Straub, Peter. Koko. New York: E. P. Dutton (1988); pg. 144. "...the wrapper from a Quaker Oats Granola Bar... "
Quaker world 1986 Slonczewski, Joan. A Door into Ocean. New York: Arbor House (1986), book jacket. "A Door into Ocean. Thousands of years in the future in a distant part of the galaxy, lies the planet Shora, entirely covered by a world-spanning ocean. The huge and complex ecosystem of Shora is inhabited by the Sharers, an all female race who reproduce by parthenogensis, without males. The Sharers are immensely sophisticated in the life sciences, but have eschewed all unnatural technology. Over millennia of isolation, they have developed a complex philosphical and ethical ssytem, idealistic, communal, and pacifist... So begins a war, protracted and graphic, in which one side cannot fight because the concept is inconceivable in their philosophy... " [The author, a Quaker, has based the central religious-cultural group of this novel partially on Quakerism. Note particularly the pacifism of the Sharers. Quakers are not mentioned by name.]
Quaker world 1990 Byatt, A.S. Possession. New York: Random House (1991; c. 1990); pg. 113. "...Priscilla Penn Cropper, nee Priscilla Penn... I should perhaps add that though she did not disclaim any kinship with the Pennsylvania Penns, the Quakers, my own researches do not indicate that there was any solid connection. "
Quaker world 1995 Jonas, Gerald. "The Shaker Revival " in The Ruins of Earth: An Anthology of Stories of the Immediate Future. (Thomas M. Disch, ed.) New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons (1971); pg. 289. "In my final year [of Law School] I became interested in the literature of religion--or, to be more precise, the literature of mysticism... Purely as an intellectual diversion I began to read St. John of the Cross, George Fox, the Vedas, Tao, Zen, the Kabbala, the Sufis. "
Quaker world 1996 Willis, Connie. Bellwether. New York: Bantam Spectra (1997; 1st ed. 1996); pg. 74. "Bigotry is one of the oldest and ugliest of trends, so persistent it only counts as a fad because the target keeps changing: Huguenots, Koreans, homosexuals, Muslims, Tutsis, Jews, Quakers, wolves, Serbs, Salem housewives. Nearly every group so long as its small and different, has had a turn, and the pattern never changes--disapproval, isolation, demonization, persecution. "
Quaker world 1997 Gloss, Molly. The Dazzle of Day. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 7. "Author's Note

Esperanto is an artificial, international language favored by many Peace churches for its facility at clearing the way.

There are no silent letters; every word is pronounced as it is spelled... " ['Peace churches' apparently refers to Quakers.]

Quaker world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 198. "Pulp fiction of the nineteenth century regularly casts blacks as subsidiary villains. A sample of such writing at its most disgraceful can be found in George Lippard's The Quaker City of 1844, the best-selling American novel before Uncle Tom's Cabin. "
Quaker world 2008 Barnes, John. Kaleidoscope Century. New York: Tor (1995); pg. 174. "...the cybertaoists were highly principled and at least as pacifistic as the old Quakers. (Who, of course, were all Ecucatholics now.) "
Quaker world 2075 Anthony, Piers. Faith of Tarot. New York: Berkley Books (10th printing 1986; 1st ed. 1980); pg. 75. "'...I can see that much of your [Waldensian] philosophy of religion has come down to my own time and has been incorporated into the faiths of my world... The Quakers honor the direct relation between man and God, calling it the 'Inner Light'...' "
Quaker world 2086 Heinlein, Robert A. Stranger in a Strange Land. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1961); pg. 135. "If people must go to church, why the devil couldn't they be dignified, like Catholics, Christian Scientists, or Quakers? "
Quaker world 2100 Gloss, Molly. The Dazzle of Day. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 9. "My family once considered themselves Tico, but the old Hispanic tradition of community has so long ago disappeared from this continent, subsumed in the monoculture of the West, that I consider my only culture to be Quaker. Still, the Friends who are joining us in this migration have Japanese names, English, Norwegian--these Friends are strangers to me. Moreover I don't speak Esperanto very well, and maybe I'm too old to learn it better, or maybe too tired. Esperanto is a language without much grace: in the rainy season, who would want to give up saying invierno, which lies sweetly on the tongue, in trade for the crabbed little sound of vintro? " [Many other refs. throughout novel to Quakers, the central cultural group of the book. Other refs. in DB, but most are not.]
Quaker world 2100 Gloss, Molly. The Dazzle of Day. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 10. "A decade of seeding and reseeding, trials of species-packing and of minimalism, emending and remodeling the nexus, and now there is a modest proliferation of these small forged moons, these hollow wheels with their interior, tubular landscapes... what has been proven by these toroids is only the absolute unmindful benightedness of the greater part of the human race. The very difficulties and economics of a closed circle of recycle and reuse have kept the stations, against all expectation, in the minds of the patient and whole-minded... The toroid takes its plain Quaker name, Dusty Miller, from the reflective sail's whitish aspect in the sun's transparent light... "
Quaker world 2100 Gloss, Molly. The Dazzle of Day. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 13. "And I wondered why I had been afraid. 'Now I am clear. I am fully clear,' the prophet George Fox was supposed to have said when he died. It might be, there is only so much that can be learned from his life; perhaps then one has to wait for what will be exhibited by death. "
Quaker world 2100 Gloss, Molly. The Dazzle of Day. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 15. "The way of Friends is to think quietly and to listen. We ask people, we consider how the answer is made by different people, we ask again, answer again, change our minds; we reach an understanding. The meeting evolves this way, not by shouting each other down, not by the weight of the majority, but by the capacity of individual human beings to comprehend one another. So there was a pondering silence and then someone stood and said,' What is impairment, I wonder. Is it arthritis? If one eye is blind but not the other, is that disabling?' People considered this. After a while someone else, a surgeon, said, 'There won't be the resources to treat serious health problems...'

People went on this way for quite a while--not back and forth but circling around. "

Quaker world 2100 Gloss, Molly. The Dazzle of Day. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 24. "Elizabeth Martin and her husband had been among the First Seventy who settled the old estancia, and her handwritten diary is a family treasure. The First Seventy had been members of Ohio or Iowa Yearly Meetings, had emigrated after one of the first World Wars--escaping militarism, as they thought--thus Elizabeth's diary is in English... "
Quaker world 2100 Gloss, Molly. The Dazzle of Day. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 13-14. "Some people see a moral imperative in standing against government oppression of the Peace churches. Or they say this emigration extends a frontier mythos whose legacy is destruction and exploitation. I haven't any compunction that way. Quaker principles have been proffered to the world for many hundreds of years, and indifferently spurned or actively expunged everywhere. I am weary of trying to live a moral and religious life against the persistent oppression of an immoral, irreligious world. It has become a terrible, exhausting struggle. How much longer can we few go on sustaining a society based on joy and authenticity--defining success as an internal process in a world that defines it by power and wealth? What is the mythos that propels the Dusty Miller, if not Wholeness? "
Quaker world 2100 Gloss, Molly. The Dazzle of Day. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 15-16. "There was a Japanese woman sitting at that Meeting, a young woman who had come over from Honshu to talk to our Farms Committee about the growing of kenaf and cilantro. The woman stood up after a long, listening silence and said what everyone there already knew--one of the four cardinal principles of the Religious Society of Friends: 'Something of the inner light of God lives in every human being.' I remember the precise pitch and cadence of her voice, her precisely correct Spanish, and the way the air felt at that moment, charged and vivid. And afterward there was no further questioning about the disabled. "
Quaker world 2100 Gloss, Molly. The Dazzle of Day. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 9. "With the first of these toroids it was something like that, the one named Crommelin... a scrupulously beautiful, flauntingly private refuge put to circling the earth just above this poisoned sky, every grain of dirt disinfected, every person and object sterilized, unpleasant insects and reptiles shut out. In a year, less than a year, there was a collapse of the organic life, and the dead construct was abandoned. It was sects of the counterculture--Carsonites and bird-watchers and Rodale farmers, Quakers and Mennonites--who understood the microbial needs of a closed system, guessed the conceit that must have killed the life in there, and joined in bargaining for the Crommelin and attempting its renascence, as a kind of public proof of the connectedness of life. "
Quaker world 2100 Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 41. "Then his father went on the English Quaker, Arthur Eddington, the man who had figured out the connection between physics--stuff that people studied in laboratories on Earth--and the stars, the things that interested astronomers. You might even say, Pal Soricaine told his son, that Eddington invented the science of astrophysics. "
Quaker world 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 104. "'...Quakers have never been much good at politics, politics and pacifism mix like oil and water,' said George.

'What about the Peace?' Danny objected.

'Touche,' said George, and this time smiled directly at his bright child. 'But the circumstances were unique. For once people really wanted to be kept from fighting, nobody stood to gain more than they would lose from that war. But no country kept Friends in the highest offices for long, even so.' " [It is not clear exactly then 'the Peace', when Quakers briefly gained control of governments, took place.]

Quaker world 2437 Bester, Alfred. The Stars My Destination. New York: Berkley Publishing (1975; c. 1956); pg. 154. "'Just repetitious, Yeo. All your romances star the same way. 'There's no need to manhandle that girl . . .' And then -- Dolly Quaker, Jean Webster, Gwynn Roget...' "
Quechua Ecuador 1986 Vonnegut, Kurt. Galapagos. New York: Delacorte Press (1985); pg. 50. "Zenji knew a little English and Russian. Hisako knew a little Chinese. Neither one knew any Spanish or Quechuan or German or Portuguese, the commonest languages in Ecuador. "
Quechua Guatemala 1986 Harper, Leanne C. "Blood Rights " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 86. "'It is necessary to work together for the greater good. The divisions between Quiche and Ladino are crated and encouraged by the repressive regime under which we labor...' " [More. Also pg. 90.]
Quechua Guatemala 1986 Harper, Leanne C. "Blood Rights " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 90. "The coming doom was that of the Ladinos and norteamericanos, not the Maya, who would inherit the Earth. No longer should the Quiche follow the lead of outsiders, socialist, communist, or democratic. "
Quechua Guatemala 2030 Jablokov, Alexander. Nimbus. New York: Avon Books (1993); pg. 123. "'...I do my research. I was perfect--born in a village in the mountains around Quetzaltenango, spoke Quechua and Spanish. The accent was real--English was only my third language. Speech-center processing has progressed since our days in the business. I wonder if Karin is still into it. And I got to wear that great mestizo skin. Which you greatly admired, as I recall.' "
Quechua Latin America 2010 Card, Orson Scott. "America " (published 1987) in The Norton Book of Science Fiction (Ursula K. Le Guin & Brian Atterbery, editors). New York: W. W. Norton & Co. (1993); pg. 681. "'...Tell it to the Indians. You can cross all these borders in a thousand different places, and you speak Portuguese and Spanish and Arawak and Carib, and you'll be able to tell your story in Quechua, too, no doubt, crossing back and forth between Brazil and Colombia and Bolivia and Peru and Venezuela...' "
Quechua Mexico 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 8. Pg. 8: "Machado might be the forebrain of his group, but in Teniente lived at the instincts of its Quechuan Indian soul. No amount of university training could have quenched that. "; Pg. 324: "'Shut your mouth, Huanca. The others may here.' Teniente's given Quechuan name, rarely employed, bore another special power. Another one of those ignorant Indio premonitions, Machado told himself. " [May be other refs., not in DB.]
Quechua Peru 2020 Abraham, Greg. "Gnota " in New Legends. Greg Bear (ed.) New York: Tor (1995); pg. 174. "He could go home to Arequipa tomorrow and wait for his heart. Live out his life somewhere in the Andean Confederation, where people spoke nimble Spanish or Quechua, where things were always getting a little better. "
Quechua world 1995 Foster, Alan Dean. The Dig. New York: Warner Books (1995); pg. 248. "It was as if she were performing simultaneous translation from the Russian with the odd word interspersed in Quechua. "
Querechos North America 1270 C.E. Shuler, Linda Lay. She Who Remembers. New York: Arbor House (1988); pg. 317. Pg. 317: "A party of Querechos had come for trading and had set up tipis near the pueblo at the base of the ridge. Two Elk observed them with a trace of unease. These were not the esteemed Querechos of the Plains, but a band from the south, given to thievery and ill temper. However, they were good traders, and trading was trading. Tolonqua, however, said these southern Querechos were untrustworthy and should not be welcomed. Some of the young braves agreed with him. ";

Pg. 325: "'Who are they?'

'Querechos. Related to Apaches.' " [Many other refs., not in DB.]

radio California 1995 Ing, Dean. "Vital Signs " in Firefight 2000. New York: Baen (1987; c. 1980); pg. 218. National Public Radio; NPR; KERS
radio galaxy 2561 Knight, Damon. "Forever " in One Side Laughing. New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; 1981); pg. 228. Amos 'n' Andy
radio Missouri: St. Louis 1998 Wood, Crystal. Cut Him Out in Little Stars. Denton, TX: Tattersall Publishing (revised and reprinted 1998; c. 1994); pg. 68. "...diametrically opposed radio hosts Howard Stern and Rush Limbaugh... " [More.]
radio USA 1932 Wilson, Robert Charles. A Hidden Place. New York: Bantam (1989; c. 1986); pg. 25. "'Amos & Andy' or Ed Wynn or, Sundays, Father coughlin's 'Golden Hour of the Little Flower.' "


radio, continued

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