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34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

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Quaker, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Quaker New World 2276 Gloss, Molly. The Dazzle of Day. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 92. "...if the Meeting ran long. In the last year, Meetings for Business had naturally been drawn out with all these matters to do with the New World, but since the Ruby was ahead of them even the weekly Meetings for Worship had been lengthening--people were anxious or ebullient by turns, they wanted to speak of the eventful times. "
Quaker New World 2276 Gloss, Molly. The Dazzle of Day. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 93. "There were six apartments in this domaro and twenty-four adults, but only twelve or fourteen who regularly came together on the First Day of the week: Meeting for Worship. What were they thinking, those other people, the ones who stayed away? Kristina wondered. Did they think there was an explanation for the soul, for its feelings of truth and beauty and goodness, for its moral imperatives and its intimations of wider scope--did they think there was an explanation for this that did not involve God?

She pulled her knees up to her chest and rested her forehead there, eyes closed, to allow the silence to take form. There seemed always a little while at the beginning of a Meeting when the silence was trivial--people would cough and squirm, it was clear in their faces that they were thinking about commonplace things. Only after the first restless quiet was there real silence--the silence of God, as distinct from the silence of people, Kristina thought. "

Quaker New World 2276 Gloss, Molly. The Dazzle of Day. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 94. "God is love comprised Kristina's whole system of ethics, and there was not much allowance in it for a husband who gave himself up to despair... "
Quaker New World 2276 Gloss, Molly. The Dazzle of Day. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 94. "'Today something has come to my mind of a very serious nature.' It was old Arno Masano, who was often given to inward voices; he stood to speak rather more often than other people and liked to cite ancient Quaker documents without attribution. He spoke with his eyes fixed on the hunched shoulders all around him on the floor. 'I have had a revelation that I believe makes our obedience to God a very simple thing. It is this--that the voice of God comes through our judgment, and not through our impressions... When people go by impressions, rather than judgment... they turn from the true voice of God, and follow the false voice of self. When they are led by God--that is, by careful judgment--they make very few mistakes.'

...it had occurred to her, God might find it necessary to repeat some things more than once... distinguishing between judgment and impression. If it was so easy, we always would make correct choices, she thought irritably. "

Quaker New World 2276 Gloss, Molly. The Dazzle of Day. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 99. "No one to keep silence. The Meeting was finished...

'It was a gathered meeting, eh?' Arno said happily.

It had been a while since a First Day Meeting had been Gathered Into the Light--not since the Ruby had gone ahead of them, Kristina realized suddenly. She and Arno believed with the old Quakers, when words are truly spoken In The Light, they didn't break the silence but continued it, the silence and the words all of one texture, one piece, so when the words ceased you had a sense of the silence continuing uninterrupted, seamless; and it was in such silence that God's voice could be heard. She nodded. 'I guess it was.' She had felt it herself, when Hilda Fugate had spoken, though afterward no one had seemed to know what her words meant. "

Quaker New World 2276 Gloss, Molly. The Dazzle of Day. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 100. "'Well, it may be I spoke In The Light, myself,' Arno said. He nodded and smiled modestly. 'God does speak in me, from time to time.' " [Entire culture is Quaker, but see particularly Quaker terms on some other pages, such as 114, 126, 130, 137-146, 212, 216, 223.]
Quaker New World 2276 Gloss, Molly. The Dazzle of Day. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 92-93. "It was up to members of the Ministry and counsel Committee to sense the end of a First Day Meeting and bring it to a timely close, and increasingly they had trouble apprehending the moment, erring always on the side of inaction. This was all right--Kristina liked their inefficient spiritualness. This domaro had had counselors in the past who were without sufficient silence, people who would interrupt thoughtful quietism. Luisa Jamaguci, who was clerk when the domaro held a Meeting For Business, and Iteja Peron, who was clerk of the Pacema Monthly Meeting, were both of them better at bringing an overlong Meeting to an end, but neither would sit at a Meeting For Worship--Kristina considered it a weakness in those two, that they never had written a Minute having to do with the Holy Spirit. "
Quaker New World 2278 Gloss, Molly. The Dazzle of Day. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 141. "...send only its clerk and maybe one other person to Monthly Meeting. Twenty people. That's always a good size for coming to agreement.'

'Everybody's entitled to a voice,' Anejlisa Revfiem said irritably. 'You can't tell people to keep home from a Monthly Meeting. They want to know what's being said, even when they don't speak.'

'Well, nothing will get decided, then,' Edmo said grimly. 'How can we get to an agreement, with so many people having a say in it?... Must be eighty people, eh? ninety? a hundred people! A meeting will break down when we get these crowds, you know, that's something we can count on.'

A rule by majority or by representation always had been anathema to the old Quakers, but it was mostly the size of the gathering that had kept Humberto from speaking, and he thought other people were daunted too... "

Quaker New World 2278 Gloss, Molly. The Dazzle of Day. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 216. "'...But nothing in life is certain, eh? Nothing but the circling round of things.' And he brought up an old Quaker tenet, a belief in the progressive revelation of God's will through the ages. In order to discover new truths, they must look, each time around, for ways to widen the circle. 'New paths around old habits,' someone else said, and Sven nodded.

Between long silences, other people spoke: 'This New World is how God made it. What are we thinking? that God's work needs remaking?' 'We ought to be listening to this New World instead of asking it so many questions.' 'We ought to be asking whether there's a place for us there, and what it is.' 'If we want to live there, it ought to be on the old terms, eh? as the old Quakers lived, joining our hands to the world God made.' "

Quaker Newmanhome 2100 Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 106. "At least, he thought, with what remained of his identification as a Christian who hadn't been to a service since the landing, the Catholics and all the Protestants, even the Quakers and Unitarians, had all raised no objection to a common grave for their dead.

Not then, anyway. "

Quaker Pennsylvania 1665 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 104-105. "After a while Danny said, 'Did William Penn know the Indians were there when he went to Pennsylvania?'

'Sure. Is your history that bad. Columbus was 1492, Penn's charter was 1665.'

'Well--what did he think would happen? After he was dead, I mean--say in a hundred years or so?'

'He didn't think,' said George. 'Nobody every seems to look that far ahead. He started something he couldn't see to the end of. Oh, his conscience was clear enough; the Delawares thought very well of him--of Quakers generally, matter of fact. But... it didn't occur to Penn where Friends had led, others were bound to follow. And get out of hand. It probably didn't occur to many Indians, at least for a while.'

'Are you thinking he compromised the pace testimony by coming to America at all? William Penn?... Nothing's ever that simple... The English would certainly have come to Pennsylvania around the time Penn did. Charles would have just given [it] to somebody else to play with...' "

Quaker Pennsylvania 1756 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 104. "'...Friends ran the legislature for years on a principle of equality and nonviolence that kept everybody happy. But as time went by, more and more non-Quakers kept pushing across the mountains and homesteading the western part of the territory. They'd just squat there--put up cabins and clear a parcel of land, and when the Indians objected they'd howl to the colonial government for protection.'

'I'd say it was the Indians that needed protecting.'

'Um-hm. By that time, though, Quakers were a minority in the legislature and the colony, and there were other pressures on them too. To make a long story short, Friends still in office were crunched between the peace testimony and the obligation of any government to protect its citizens from being massacred. They couldn't resolve the contradiction. In 1756 they gave up their authority and stepped down. Quakers have never been much good at politics, politics and pacifism mix like oil and water,' said George. "

Quaker Pennsylvania 1756 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 103-104. "'How much do you remember about William Penn?' he asked his passenger.

'He founded Pennsylvania,' said Danny. 'Why?'

'How did it all turn out?'

'How did all what turn out?'

'Pennsylvania. All that.'

'What do you mean? It's still there, isn't it? Oh, you mean the Quakers in Pennsylvania.' George smiled without taking his eyes from the passing terrain. 'Um, I don't remember that much about it--something about William Penn's sons cheating the Indians and the Quakers having to get out of the government, but I forget why. Pennsylvania,' he said a bit plaintively. 'Seems like it's a long way from here.'

'Penn bought land from the Delawares even though he had a charter from the king of England; he recognized the Indians' land claims as legitimate...' "

Quaker Pennsylvania 1850 Erdrich, Louise. The Antelope Wife. New York: HarperCollins (1998); pg. 3. "Private Scranton Teodorus Roy was the youngest son of a Quaker father and a reclusive poet mother who established a small Pennsylvania community based on intelligent conversation. " [More about this character, not in DB, but no other refs. to Quakers by name.]
Quaker Pennsylvania 1966 Rucker, Rudy. The Secret of Life. New York: Bluejay International (1985); pg. 90, 228. "'They'd have a Quaker service.' "; Pg. 228: "Right before the talk, with everyone still sitting down, they always had a minute of silence, a legacy of Swarthmore's Quaker beginnings. "
Quaker Pennsylvania 2000 Woodson, Jacqueline. "The Other Half of Me " in Tomorrowland: 10 Stories About the Future (Michael Cart, ed.) New York: Scholastic Press (1999); pg. 148. "There were my mother's parents in New Hope, Pennsylvania, and second grade in a tiny brown schoolhouse that was founded by Quakers. "
Quaker Pennsylvania: Philadelphia 2010 Moffett, Judith. Time, Like an Ever-Rolling Stream. New York: St. Martin's Press (1992); pg. 25. "'I was kind of a late bloomer compared to you, I guess. I went to a good school, a Quaker school in Philadelphia, through the sixth grade...' "
Quaker Pennterra 1987 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 1. [Epigraph, Part One.]

". . . whenever Friends came together and sat down in stillness and quietness they came to find the benefit, advantage and glory thereof in a wonderful and remarkable manner, for they became all as one body . . . yea in silence and ceasing of all words they were inwardly refreshed, comforted, quickened and strengthened through the communion and communication of spirit and life of God . . . as from upon all, and from all upon one.

--George Keith, 17th-century Quaker


Each individual will be acutely aware of his 'oneness' with life itself. . . . The goal of the meeting, that destiny to which it is being called, is unity.

--George H. Gorman
The Amazing Fact of Quaker Worship "

Quaker Pennterra 1987 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987), dedication (page before page I). Dedication:

"For Ted,
My Quaker-in-Residence "

Quaker Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 9. "An unknowing observer--had there been one such within millions of miles or light-years of that spot--would have seen what appeared to be three barefoot but particularly clean, attractive peasants dressed in short, loose, light-colored tunics tied at the waist with rope. Standing, they held one another toward a common center--eyes closed, heads lowered, faces graced with similar expressions of calm. Of the two men, both Caucasians, one was tall and lean, with beautiful gray-white hair; the other, thirtyish, was of middling height and build, his hair and short thick beard two violent shades of red; the third person was a young Asian woman, small and very pretty. They stood like that for nearly a quarter of an hour.

They looked and labored like peasants. But they were Quakers, starfarers, uniting in impromptu meeting for worship; and they and their fellow settlers, 312 souls in all, were the only human beings in all the world.

For one more day. "

Quaker Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 3. "...George Quinlan... fretting about his forthcoming meeting with the officers of the Down Plus Six, the colony ship whose arrival would soon be the second most eventful occurrence in the six-year history of the settlement the Quakers had named Swarthmore. " [The entire novel is about this colony on the planet Pennterra, populated entirely by Quakers, and what happens when a non-Quaker colony arrives. There are references to Quakers throughout the novel, on nearly every page in fact, explicitly by name, as well as to particular institutions, traditions, and beliefs. Only some of these refs. are in DB.]
Quaker Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 4. "No carnivores but Quakers had been brought to Pennterra... "
Quaker Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 18. "Three months after landfall, with construction in full swing, the hrossa had appeared one day out of the mountains northeast of the settlement. They had easily put across to the thunderstruck Quakers, who before this had observed not one hint of their existence, a demand that the building cease--that all activity cease, until a medium of communicating between the two peoples could be worked out.

The humans had rallied enough to put themselves at the disposal of the commanding, fantastical creatures whose emotional sendings invaded them as naturally as the brook's racket invaded their ears; and in mere weeks, in no time at all, the hrossa had acquired the means to tell the Quakers what they most needed to know... "

Quaker Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 21. "'Here's where ol' Fussbudget McWhirter put his oar in,' said Billy, the broad dialect of his childhood asserting itself in unconscious reaction to the formality of his public speech. 'I tell you what, I can speak to that of God in the rest of 'em just as nice as you please, but that fella's a right smart challenge for Friends as out of practice as we are at talkin' to people that aren't even tryin' to talk to us, you know?' "
Quaker Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 22. "...Billy spoke again. 'I don't believe you folks know very much about the Quakers,' he said pleasantly. 'No reason you should; their time in the limelight was a long while back. But you can take my word for it that their record for leaving very much nicer, more comfortable situations than this one, voluntarily, to go at God's behest into very much less comfortable ones, is pretty hard to fault. "
Quaker Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 22. "I'm not a birthright Quaker, I can say this without immodesty. When God wanted the early Friends to go to prison, or free their slaves and impoverish their families, or found schools for orphans, or hospitals for the insane, he let them know about it. And later on, when God wanted 111 Quaker scientists to go live in a lab for nineteen months and not come out without the ground-based defense that would guarantee the Peace, he let them know about that, too. I don't doubt for a minute that if he wants us to go home, way will open. When and if that happens, those of us that are clear about going will go, and we won't pussyfoot around about it when we do. But he brought us here, and at least for the time being he seems to be keeping us here.' "
Quaker Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 27. "By this means had McWhirter [a non-Quaker] initiated the predictable next phase of the debate: the attempt to justify doing away with the hrossa by establishing that they were dangerous to humans and therefore evil. Though the Quakers had never entered the justification phase, they had expected that the Sixers would. It certainly hadn't taken them long. Moreover, since the Sixers had yet to meet the hrossa, it was a line of thought bound to strike them as plausible. It had been rather clever of the Quakers--whose invariable aim in meeting was consensus rather than domination through argument, whose persuasive strategy was to identify with the adversary, and who live din intimacy of a sort with the hrossa for six years--to anticipate and prepare for this turn of events. "
Quaker Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 31. "A truly religious person, in trouble, in a place of so much natural beauty, must feel the moment as an invitation to prayer; but George was not a praying Quaker and had not believed since adolescence in a personal God. Meeting was all he knew of prayer--something that was like prayer--and meeting required people. Still, the force of the moment was such that, all but unconsciously, he relaxed the barriers and dropped into the receptive listening attitude appropriate to meeting for worship. The thought in his mind was a simple one: I'll need help; it's too much for me.

What happened then was strange. He seemed to become aware of the river as a shallow denseness spread out before him, before and behind as well, one surface passing over rocks and fallen tendrils, the other mixing with air and briefly catching the moonlight... Beyond anything in his experience, it thrilled him to perceive this infinite complexity of sensuous life--terrified him also... "

Quaker Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 36. [A non-Quaker 'Sixer' colonist is speaking.] "'Religious nuts don't have to be under anybody's control to do what these people did--remember Billy Purvis's little history lecture his evening? Hey, fanatics don't operate like other people! I mean look at the record--one time they take over politically and impose Peace, which nobody else on Earth could ever do; another time they leave trillions of dollars' worth of irreplaceable machinery out to rust in the rain, which nobody in their right mind would do. Just two sides of the same coin if you ask me. Sometimes the rest of us benefit, sometimes not. But there's no reason I can see to think these abos are dangerous to us, based on what the Quakers say or do--they're susceptible, we aren't.'...

'You could be right,' said McWhirter... 'but I feel in my bones that there's a lot more behind the Quakers'--well, you'd have to call it dereliction of duty, wouldn't you?--than they've told us yet...' "

Quaker Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 38. "'No, wait a minute,' said Nathan Levy. 'Can anybody tell me why the Quakers are trying to impose their restrictions on us? I thought they were supposed to be so tolerant of religious differences and all.'

'If the objections were purely religious I don't suppose there'd be any trouble,' said Maria, 'but it seems these are ethical objections. Quakers have always been great ones for minding other people's moral business.' She hesitated. 'I suppose I may take it that none of you accepts their position?' "

Quaker Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 41. "I have actually arrived, she told herself, at the planet we call Epsilon Eridani II, which the Quakers named Pennterra for reasons of their own. "
Quaker Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 53. "In honor of the visitors, both wore rawhide sandals and brand-new belted tunics cut from bolts of cotton brought from Earth--the Quakes having found their 'plain' uniforms, put on for the first formal meeting, inappropriate for continued use. 'The damn things make us look like a bunch of Yanks and Rebs at a powwow,' Billy Purvis had complained; and besides, Quakers were anti-uniform by tradition. "
Quaker Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 62. "'You keep calling it the Delaware,' Maggie remarked... the implicit question signaled a turn toward the business before them, and the Quakers, recognizing this, squeezed hands beneath the table...

'We named it the day after we landed, a sentimental gesture to our own history, like calling the settlement Swarthmore and the planet Pennterra...' "

Quaker Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 64. "'...Their name for the planet sounded to one Friend, who's an amateur anthropologist and up on Amerindians, like the Sioux Indian name for the great Spirit: Tanka Wakan. They liked that when we explained it, so now that's what we and they both call the planet when we talk about it together. It's quite a good term, in fact--sometimes when we say 'Tanka Wakan' they seem to mean what we might mean by God, which isn't unrelated to the Sioux meaning either, I gather.' She suddenly looked rather sad. 'We ought to stop saying Pennterra altogether, I guess, but somehow we never do.' " [This is one of the rare instances in this book where the term 'Friend' is used instead of 'Quaker.' "
Quaker Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 91. "'...We go in and sit down. Nobody talks. Sometimes people hold hands, or close their eyes, or bow their heads--however they're comfortable is OK, whatever helps them center down. 'Centering down'--that's the term we sue, it goes way back--physically it works like a lot of other forms of meditation that produce alpha waves and slow down the rates of pulse and breathing... We're all used to doing it, of course--individually we move pretty smoothly through the stages of getting censured by our different methods, I won't go into those now. But when a lot of us have achieved that sort of relaxed-but-alert condition as individuals, something else happens; the separate people merge--or unite, that's the jargon word--into a whole, and then we say the meeting is 'gathered.' ' "
Quaker Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 91. "Having lived in an isolated community of Friends for so long, it wasn't obvious to Katy what an outsider would find strange. The Quakers themselves were familiar with the experience of the gathered meeting, knew certainly when the quality of the silence changed, knew the change--wrought in, and also by, each person--to be a corporate power greater than the sum of its personal parts. But how account for all this to someone who had never been to meeting before? Katy had never tried. It was easier to describe it without explaining.

'Question,' said Byron. 'Is every meeting 'gathered'?'

'On Earth, no, not always. Here--it's different here. We need each other so much, we've had to work so hard . . . I can't remember offhand the last time we didn't have a a gathered meeting. I guess we sort of take it for granted now. It's like good cooking or good sex, if you get it all the time you forget there's nay other kind.' "

Quaker Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 92. "'So everybody just sits there for an hour or so?' he was asking, and she tried to put some kindliness into her reply; being a sincere Quaker, she also honestly tried to feel more warmly toward Byron.

'Oh no, if somebody feels an impulse to speak, they do! Speaking in meeting is supposed to be strictly spontaneous, and usually it is, here in Swarthmore anyway.' She gave him the friendliest smile she could manage and got a weak one in return. 'The early Friends six hundred years ago, who had grown up imbued with Christian tradition, used to say they were guided or led of the Lord to speak, or pray aloud or whatever--sing, sometimes!--and they knew what they meant! Nowadays you couldn't get most of us to say what 'the Lord' is, though everybody's familiar with the history of the Society's thoughts on the subject. But... nobody'll speak tonight anyway because the hrossa will be uniting with us and w hear much better in the silence...' "

Quaker Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 92. "'Don't Quaker's believe in God? I thought they did.'

'Oh sure. But at various times we've defined God as love, the source of everything that is, the ground of being, the first over the life principle, humanity's best nature, entropy's creative antithesis, and on and on. You don't have to 'believe in God' in any traditional sense to be a good Quaker; we're very tolerant about stuff like that, doctrinaire stuff. What's important to us here is the reality of what happens in meeting. Something does really happen, not just between each of us and God, whatever God is, but between all of us together and God. There've been theories that it's to do with telepathy, or the collective unconscious or group dynamics, but really we don't any of us know how it works or what it means, just that it keeps us going and we'd be sunk without it.' "

Quaker Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 93. "'Could whatever it is be happening just among all of you, leaving God out of it?'

'George Fox, the founder of the Society of Friends, used to say there was 'that of God' in everyone. If you look at it that way, god can't be left out.' "

Quaker Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 103. "The theoretically leaderless Quaker community which derived its strength from a corporate love and trust reconfirmed at every meeting, in fact looked chiefly to him to steer it safely through the present mess... "
Quaker Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 174. "So here's the preliminary list we drew up, of stories whose theme is parent-child discord/grief/injury:

1. Oedipus the King
2. Abraham and Issac [sic] (God and Jesus)
3. Noah and His Sons
4. David and Absalom
5. The Prodigal Son
6. King Lear
7. Hansel and Gretel
8. William Penn and His Father

Judged as narratives, with a beginning, middle, and end, 3 and 4 don't work to well. Oedipus is about parricide and incest, both irrelevant here. All in all, we think 2, 5, 6, and 7 the most promising, with 8 as a modest legendary alternate of special meaning to Friends. "

Quaker Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 174. "...too bad Friends have always been so overwhelmingly Anglo-Saxon, apart from our smattering of Jewish converts. "
Quaker Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 178. "Even KliUrrh, who's more used to us barbarians than most, was perturbed by the story [of Abraham and Isaac, from the Old Testament], though he understood that it represented not Quakers but the tradition of the larger culture that produced us and that we've separated ourselves from. "
Quaker Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 263. "'And also,' said Joel, 'I'm interested in Quakers, sort of. If you feel like explaining to me why the Quakers ditched the mission, I'll tell you--are you interested in what being Jewish is like, for example?'

Danny laughed. 'I already know a whole lot about being Jewish--we've got tons of Jews in Swarthmore! Every year we celebrate Christmas and Hanukkah. Quakers don't have to be Christians anymore! You could be a Quaker, easy as I could be a Sixer.' "

Quaker Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 265. Pg. 265: "Danny was surprised and said so. 'Course, his parents are back there. And he is a Friend...' "; Pg. 266: "And you could see Katy again, he would have added, had not his weeks away from chronic Friendly bluntness taught him something about the uses and purposes of tact. "; Pg. 266: "It was only that just now he was hooked on the pleasures of feeling like part of a family--a nuclear family, with parents and siblings--after a lifetime of being squeezed between George on the one hand and, on the other, the whole tight-knit community of Friends. "
Quaker Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 14-16. Pg. 14: "...the little valley the Quakers called Delaware... "; Pg. 16 [New colony has just arrived, after the Quakers have been only humans on the planet for six years]: "'Most of them are struggling to be courteous and reserve judgment, but they're not Quakers, Danny, and at this point what we've done here makes sense to them only as a piece of pure Quaker foolishness.' He made a rueful face at George. 'It's been such a long time since I sat through a meeting with non-Quakers, I'd kind of forgot what it's like. Mm-mmm. This isn't going to be easy.'

...Danny had never sat through a meeting with non-Quakers; before today he had never laid eyes on a non-Quaker in his whole life, that he could remember (though in fact, in infancy, he had). "

Quaker Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 8-9. Pg. 8: "'...Anyway, Andrew will just say, very patiently, 'Well, we're here, which ought to be impossible, so we have to assume we're meant to survive here; if we're meant to, we will; if not, we won't, and it's as much as I can do to concentrate on every day as it comes along--the rest is up to Providence.' Now, I'm as clear about all that as--well, as you are yourself, George, but Andrew feels it the way you do. He's honestly content to work and wait upon the Lord. Me, I' have to keep yanking myself up short. I wish I knew how you chaps do it...' "; Pg. 9: "'Just for the record, though, Andrew's perfectly right. Why should we be here, if not to mend our fences somehow, and act as a buffer between the Sixers and the hrossa? And survive? The Mormons had it worse, didn't they? And lived to populate a desert and a dozen space colonies? What would George Fox and Margaret Fell think of all this fussing and bitching, hmm? Not much!' "
Quaker Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987), book jacket. Book jacket: "Pennterra is a beautiful and fertile planet and humanity's last hope survival. But Pennterra is already inhabited.

After warning other colony ships to stay away, the small advance colony of Quakers has adapted to life on Pennterra. Heeding the empathic warnings of the native hrossa, they have settled in a single valley, sharply limited their population, and continued to use no heavy machinery in their building and farming.

But surviving under these conditions has left the Quakers little time to learn more about their native neighbors.

Now, a radio transmission from space makes it the Quakers' first priority: a colony ship of refugees from an impoverished and starving Earth, launched before the Quakers' message of warning arrived, is headed for Pennterra. "

Quaker Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987), book jacket. Book jacket, continued: "The new colonists, called 'Sixers,' arrive eager to conquer their new home and refuse to believe the strange warning that the planet will destroy them if they do not accept the strictures for living on Pennterra. The new colonists demand proof that the threat is real--proof the Quakers don't have.

In the quest to learn more about the culture of the hrossa and the ecology of Pennterra, the Quaker boy Danny becomes torn between the mystical bond he feels for the hrossa and his attraction to the high-tech way of life the Sixers offer in their separate settlement. Unknowingly, Danny becomes the fulcrum on which the future of all the colonists will be weighed.

Catastrophe or peace--Tanka Wakan, the omnipotent master spirit of Pennterra, will decide. "

Quaker United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 157. "'The pigeon,' said Archimedes, 'is a kind of Quaker. She dresses in grey. A dutiful child, a constant lover, and a wise parent, she knows, like all philosophers, that the hand of every man is against her. She has learned throughout the centuries to specialize in escape. No pigeon has ever committed an act of aggression nor turned upon her persecutors: but no bird, likewise, is so skillful in eluding them. She has learned to drop out of a tree on the opposite side to man, and to fly low so that there is a hedge between them. No other bird can estimate a range so well... the pigeons coo to one another with true love, nourish their cunningly hidden children with true solicitude, and flee from the aggressor with true philosophy--a race of peace lovers continually caravaning away from the destructive Indian in covered wagons. They are loving individualists surviving against the forces of massacre only by wisdom in escape.' "
Quaker United Kingdom: England 1750 Jonas, Gerald. "The Shaker Revival " in The Ruins of Earth: An Anthology of Stories of the Immediate Future. (Thomas M. Disch, ed.) New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons (1971); pg. 280. "ENCLOSED: Fact sheet on Old Shakers
*Foundress--Mother Ann Lee, b. Feb. 29, 1736, Manchester, England
*Antecedents--Early Puritan 'seekers' (Quakers), French 'Prophets' (Camisards). "
Quaker United Kingdom: England 1773 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 15. "Abraham thought of his mother, who often gave testimony that Judgment Day was at hand, calling up the images of the pale horse and pale rider: And out of his mouth goeth a sharp sword, that with it he should smite the nations, and rule them with a rod of iron.

Wonder swelled in his breast. Was he prepared to meet the Maker? "

Quaker United Kingdom: England 1773 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 17. "Abraham dismounted so his Quaker hat would not be so conspicuous. "
Quaker United Kingdom: England 1773 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 19. "It was not just ironmaking that Richard had taught him; it was the Quaker belief in meeting that of God in every man, a hatred of war, love of simplicity and good works. "
Quaker United Kingdom: England 1773 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 21. "Abraham did not always understand his mother's testimonies; nor did he approve entirely of her ministry, whose leadings had prompted her to journey to distant Quaker meetings even as Father lay dying. But the [Methodist] vicar's elaborate conceits recalled the Pharisees of old.

...At their approach, Pritchard saluted them in his raspy voice, with the customary doffing of hat and elaborate salutations that Quakers avoided--avoided not only for their falsity but also for their putting the creaturely self forward--his blonde wig at odds with his wrinkled face. Richard and Abraham responded with simple handshakes and plain speech. "

Quaker United Kingdom: England 1773 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 23. "'And may I presume--' The architect interrupted himself, sneezing into his ruffled sleeve, and beckoned them closer, addressing them in an insidious whisper. 'May I flatter myself to suppose, gentlemen, that you would like it to be--if I may speak frankly--a Quaker bridge? That is, a bridge that Quakers might find to their liking?'

...It was a silly question, a ridiculous question. Everyone knew it should be a Quaker bridge! It was his grandmother's discovery early in the century that had turned the whole gorge into a magnet for furnaces! And his father's labors twenty years ago that had made Coalbrookdale what it was today. "

Quaker United Kingdom: England 1773 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 34. "Wilkinson had little use for this new Darby, so we behind the ears that he fairly glistened--or for Quakers in general, with their drab clothes and sanctimonious pronouncements. They ignored good manners, refusing to doff their hats and addressing everyone with their familiar thees and thous without regard to social rank. stiff-necked lot, prideful in their own ways. They foreswore oaths and weapons of war and refused to pay tithes like other men. And blubbed together as thick as thieves, they did, so that after eleven years at the Severn Gorge, Wilkinson remained an outsider. "
Quaker United Kingdom: England 1773 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 65. "On Easter First Day--what Mrs. Hannigan called Easter Sunday, for she was not Quaker--when they all combed the Wrekin to watch the sunrise... "
Quaker United Kingdom: England 1773 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 83. "When they got closer, Maggie read the large type aloud

A
SERIOUS WARNING
TO THE
INHABITANTS OF MADELEY

'Repent!' cried Abiah Darby, a thin woman approaching sixty, her face made narrower by the brim of her Quaker bonnet. She had sharp features: a thin aquiline nose, prominent eyelids...

Maggie stooped to read the smaller printing: I am concerned in great love to your never dying Souls, to warn to you consider your Ways and be Wise, and to remember your latter End, that you must in a little Time be called upon to give an Account of your stewardship, of the Grace of God bestowed upon you. "

Quaker United Kingdom: England 1773 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 104. "The furnishings were surprisingly ornate, given the Quaker belief in simplicity. "; Pg. 105: "The walls were bare except for two framed prints: one, hanging by the first landing, portrayed William Penn 'treating with the Indians'... "; Pg. 106: "Abiah nodded and then shut her eyes, evidently praying. After a time, she looked up. 'Thou art replacing another maid, who professed herself a Quaker but who strayed from the path. I pray thou wilt find the Light, and keep thy precious soul in Jesus' grace.' "
Quaker United Kingdom: England 1773 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 107. "The Darbys took their meals in 'awful silence.' They had frequent guests. Coalbrookdale being a favorite stopping place for traveling Friends who made the circuit from London through Wales and the North Country or oversaw the businesses in which Quakers excelled--ironmaking, banking, chocolate, tea--commercial and spiritual concerns interwoven with friendships between families. It was a tight little world, the Quaker subculture, with its distinctive dress and speech, a minority even here in Coalbrookdale. "
Quaker United Kingdom: England 1773 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 112. "Her ability to read and write set her apart from the other servants, as did her interest in Quakerism. Abiah gave her tracts to read and loaned her a copy of George Fox's Journal. Fox had founded Quakerism in the last century, during Cromwell's time; his journal served as a basic text, along with the Bible. "
Quaker United Kingdom: England 1773 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 112. "She attended Meeting with the family. The meeting house was a plain square building that had separate entrances for women and men. Inside was dark wood paneling, and straight-backed benches facing each other in a square. Worshipers entered in silence and often remained silent the whole two hours, the women wearing bonnets with brims often so constricting that the visible portion of their faces was hardly bigger than an egg. The men's faces were shadowed by dark, flat-brimmed hats, which they removed only when they stood to testify.

It was all very staid. Later, Quakers would refer to this as the 'quietest' era. The ecstatic trembling and prayerful outpourings associated with the earlier Quakers were now rare. Quaker evangelism had ebbed. And, commensurate with their success in business, few Friends actually went to jail for their beliefs. "

Quaker United Kingdom: England 1773 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 113. "Quaker principles overlapped with those that guided Ecosophia. It was no accident, she realized. Quakers were among Ecosophia's original founders. Still, she was surprised to see how many of those principles were in place: Friends decided things by consensus; they were committed to nonviolence; they emphasized mindfulness and community.

And Maggie grew to like the shared silence of worship. Often an hour passed without anyone speaking, so that a simple utterance had special force. But apart from any spoken testimony, the silence itself seemed full. Trevor would have been right at home here. She supposed someday she would join the Society of Friends. But she was content for now to be simply an attender--waiting, as Abiah had made it clear she must wait, for Convincement.

'Every seed,' said Abiah, 'hath its time of ripening.' "

Quaker United Kingdom: England 1773 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 112-113. "And yet Maggie found herself drawn to the Society of Friends. They retained a radical social agenda: working to reform prisons and schools, protesting slavery and war. Local meetings were linked to a network strengthened by visits of traveling Friends and by exchanges of letters. The meetings gathered regionally four times a year. In the interim, individual meetings passed resolutions, or 'minutes,' on various issues, which were carried to the Quarterly regional meetings and which the Quarterly meetings often forwarded to the Yearly meeting held in London. So the network had a potential for rallying great support around a cause, at least within the Society of Friends. "


Quaker, continued

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