Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Protestant - WASP, New Hampshire

Protestant - WASP, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Protestant - WASP New Jersey 1986 Hubbard, L. Ron. Mission Earth Vol. 6: Death Quest. Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (1986); pg. 179. "'While hiding out,' he said, 'I was a paragon of virtue. I realized crime did not pay. And when I was approached by an officer of the WASP Purity League on the plane, I instantly signed the pledge.' " [Also pg. 182, 184-186, 202.]
Protestant - WASP New York 2038 Jones, Gwyneth. White Queen. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 24. "...a feature of New York life... The truth was Johnny didn't give a sh-- for the Revolution. Hisps and Blacks duking it out with the Wasps [White Anglo-Saxon Protestants] and Jews and nothing in it for Johnny. "
Protestant - WASP New York: New York City 2000 Silverberg, Robert. The Stochastic Man. New York: Harper & Row (1975); pg. 28. "'He's a Jew,' said Mardikian with a little dry laugh. 'Lombroso is an old Jewish name, he tells me. We have a terrific team--Lombroso, Ephrikian, Missakian, Mardikian, and Nichols. You're our token WASP.' " ['White Anglo-Saxon Protestant.']
Protestant - WASP USA 1972 Bova, Ben. "Zero Gee " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 538. "'On the other hand,' he added, 'we WASPS ought to stick together. Not many of us left.'

That brought a faint smile. 'I'm not a WASP. My real name's Szymanski . . . I changed it when I started modeling.'

'Oh. Another complication.' "

Protestant - WASP USA 2000 Mann, William J. "Say Goodbye to Middletown " in Circa 2000: Gay Fiction at the Millennium (Robert Drake & Terry Wolverton, eds). Los Angeles, CA: Alyson Pub. (2000); pg. 250. "...rich WASP factory owners... "
Protestant - WASP Washington, D.C. 1974 Benford, Gregory. Timescape. New York: Simon & Schuster (1980); pg. 396. "To him Washington had ever since been the entranceway to a vast republic where crops sprouted under a WASP sun. "
Protestant - WASP Wyoming 1972 Ellison, Harlan, ed. Again, Dangerous Visions. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 187. [Introduction to "The 10:00 Report Is Brought To You By... " by Edward Bryant] "For a WASP from Wyoming, that's enormous forward-striding. " [Ellison refers to Edward Bryant]
psychohistory/Seldonists* galaxy 5115 Asimov, Isaac. Robots and Empire. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1985); pg. 303. "'...Then, when you called my attention to the application of the Zeroth Law to psychohistory, I could feel the positronomotive force mount higher and yet it was not quite high enough to supersede the First Law or even the strong Second Law.'

'Still,' murmured Daneel, 'you struck down Madam Vasilia, friend Giskard.'

'When she ordered the robots to dismantle you, friend Daneel, and showed a clear emotion of pleasure at the prospect, your need, added to what the concept of the Zeroth Law had already done, superseded the Second Law and rivaled the First Law. it was the combination of the Zeroth Law, psychohistory, my loyalty to Lady Gladia, and your need that dictated my action.' " [More.]

psychohistory/Seldonists* galaxy 22995 Benford, Gregory. Foundation's Fear. New York: HarperCollins (1997); pg. 2. "'It may distract him [Hari Seldon] from his work, from psychohistory.'

Olivaw shook his head slowly. 'I doubt that. He is a certain special kind of human--driven...' " [Many other refs. throughout novel, not in DB.]

psychohistory/Seldonists* galaxy 22995 Benford, Gregory. Foundation's Fear. New York: HarperCollins (1997); pg. 6. "HARI SELDON -- . . . though it is the best existing authority on the details of Seldon's life, the biography by Gaal Dornick cannot be trusted regarding the early rise to power. As a young man, Dornick met Seldon only two years before the great mathist's death. By then, rumor and even legend had already begun to grow about Seldon, particularly regarding his shadowy period of large-scale authority within the fading Imperium.

How Seldon became the only mathist in all Galactic history to ascend to political power remains one of the most intractable puzzles for Seldon scholars. He gave no sign of ambitions beyond the building of a science of 'history'--all the while envisioning not the mere fathoming of the past, but in fact the prediction of the future. (As Seldon himself remarked to Dornick, he early on desired 'the prevention of certain kinds of futures.')

...ENCYCLOPEDIA GALACTICA "

psychohistory/Seldonists* galaxy 23000 Asimov, Isaac. Prelude to Foundation. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 4. "'...He said that this Hari Seldon had attended a convention of mathematicians held here in Trantor... and he said that he had proved that one could foretell the future mathematically.'

Demerzel permitted himself a small smile. 'Either the Minister of Science, a man of little acumen, is mistaken or the mathematician is. Surely, the matter of foretelling the future is a children's dream of magic.'

'Is it, Demerzel? People believe in such things.'

'People believe in many things, Sire.'

'But they believe in such things. Therefore, it doesn't matter whether the forecast of the future is true or not...' "

psychohistory/Seldonists* galaxy 23000 Asimov, Isaac. Prelude to Foundation. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 6. "To anyone in later times who knew of Hari Seldon only as a legendary demigod, it would seem almost sacrilegious for him not to have white hair, not to have an old lined face, a quiet smile radiating wisdom, not to be seated in a wheelchair. Even then, in advanced old age, his eyes had been cheerful, however. There was that.

And his eyes were particularly cheerful now, for his paper had been given at the Decennial Convention. It had even aroused some interest in a distant sort of way... " [Many refs. to psychohistory and Seldonism throughout novel, most not in DB. This novel depicts Seldon when young, before he had fully introduced psychohistory, and before later generations venerated him in often quasi-religious ways.]

psychohistory/Seldonists* galaxy 23000 Asimov, Isaac. Prelude to Foundation. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 49. "What good was such a history? Surely, psychohistory would have to take into account the actions and reactions and interactions of each world--each and every world. How could one study the history of twenty-five million worlds and consider all their possible interactions? It would surely be an impossible task and this was just one more reinforcement of the general conclusion that psychohistory was of theoretical interest but could never be put to any practical use. "
psychohistory/Seldonists* galaxy 23000 Asimov, Isaac. Prelude to Foundation. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 55. "Seldon's eyes blinked rapidly. 'Millions of worlds. Billions of cultures. Quadrillions of people. Decillions of interrelationships. --And you want me to reduce it to order.'

'No, I want you to try. For the sake of those millions of worlds, billions of cultures, and quadrillions of people. Not for the Emperor. Not for Demerzel. For humanity.'

'I will fail,' said Seldon.

'Then we will be no worse off. Will you try?'

And against his will and not knowing why, Seldon heard himself say, 'I will try.' And the course of his life was set. "

psychohistory/Seldonists* galaxy 23000 Asimov, Isaac. Prelude to Foundation. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 73. "Seldon said, 'Of course, when I saw I should have studied history, I don't mean that I should have made it a life work. I mean I should have studied enough to help me in my mathematics. My field of specialization is the mathematical analysis of social structure.'

'Sounds horrible.'

'In a way, it is. It's very complicated and without it my knowing a great deal more about how societies evolved it's hopeless. My picture is too static, you see.'

'I can't see because I know nothing about it. Chetter told me you were developing something called psychohistory and that it was important. Have I got it right? Psychohistory?'

'That's right. I should have called it 'psychosociology,' but it seemed to me that was too ugly a word. Or perhaps I knew instinctively that a knowledge of history was necessary and then didn't pay sufficient attention to my thoughts.'

'Psychohistory does sound better, but I don't know what it is.'

'I scarcely do myself.' "

psychohistory/Seldonists* galaxy 23000 Asimov, Isaac. Prelude to Foundation. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 174. "Dors smiled at him. 'There's a bit of your psychohistory, Hari. Rule number 47,854: The downtrodden are more religious than the satisfied.'

Seldon shook his head. 'Don't joke about psychohistory, Dors. You know I'm not looking for tiny rules but for vast generalizations and for means of manipulation. I don't want comparative religiosity as the result of a hundred specific rules. I want something from which I can say, after manipulation through some system of mathematicized logic, say, 'Aaho, this group of people will tend to be more religious than that group, provided that the following criteria are met, and that, therefore, when humanity meets with these stimuli, it will react with these responses.'

'How horrible,' said Dors. 'You are picturing human beings as simple mechanical devices. Press this button and you will get that twitch.'

'No, because there will be many buttons pushing simultaneously to varying degrees...' "

psychohistory/Seldonists* galaxy 23000 Bear, Greg. Foundation and Chaos. New York: HarperCollins (1998); pg. 1. [Year estimated.] "The centuries recede, and the legend of Hari Seldon grows: the brilliant man, wise man, sad man who charted the course of the human future in the old Empire. But revisionist views prosper, and cannot always be easily dismissed. To understand Seldon, we are sometimes tempted to refer to apocrypha, myths, even fairy tales from those distant times. We are frustrated by the contradictions of incomplete documents and what amount to hagiographies.

This we know without reference to the revisionists: that Seldon was brilliant, Seldon was key. But Seldon was neither saint nor divinely inspired prophet, and of course, he did not act alone. The most pervasive myths involve . . .

--Encyclopedia Galactica, 117th Edition, 1054 F.E. " [Many refs. throughout novel to Seldonism and Psychohistory. Other refs. not in DB.]

psychohistory/Seldonists* galaxy 23000 Bear, Greg. Foundation and Chaos. New York: HarperCollins (1998); pg. 2. [Year estimated.] "He had spent so much of his life enclosed, insulated from the chill as well as the freshness, the newness, much as the numbers and equations of psychohistory insulated him from the harsh reality of individual fires... In a real sense, the patient was already dead. Trantor, the political center of the galaxy, had died decades, perhaps centuries before, and was only now obviously falling to rot... this awful vision had made him perversely famous, and his theories known throughout Trantor, and in many parts of the Galaxy. He was called 'Raven' Seldon, harbinger of nightmare doom. The rot would last five more centuries, a simple and rapid deflation of the time-scales of Hari's broadest equations . . . Social skin collapsing, then melting away over the steel bones of Trantor's Sectors and municipalities. "
psychohistory/Seldonists* galaxy 23000 Bear, Greg. Foundation and Chaos. New York: HarperCollins (1998); pg. 2. "How many human tales would fill that collapse! An empire, unlike a corpse, continues to feel pain after death. On the scale of the most minute and least reliable equations, sparkling within the displays of his powerful Prime Radiant, Hari could almost imagine a million billion faces blurred together in an immense calculus to fill the area beneath the Empire's declining curve. Acceleration of decay marked by the loci of every human story, almost as the points on a plane . . . Beyond understanding, without psychohistory.

It was his hope to foster a rebirth of something better and more durable than the Empire, and he was close to success . . . according to the equations. "

psychohistory/Seldonists* galaxy 23008 Asimov, Isaac. Forward the Foundation. New York: Doubleday (1993); pg. 11. Pg. 8: "'...As long as you're a friend of Demerzel, your position here at the University is secure and you can continue to work on psychohistorical research.' "; Pg. 11: "But Seldon... Forty! He was not younger any longer... He had been on Trantor for eight years and the time had passed quickly. Another eight years and he would be nearly fifty... And he had not even made a decent beginning in psychohistory! Yugo Amaryl spoke brightly of laws and worked out his equations by making daring assumptions based on intuition. but how could one possibly test those assumptions? Psychohistory was not yet an experimental science. The complete study of psychohistory would require experiments that would involve worlds of people, centuries of time--and a total lack of ethical responsibility. " [Many other refs. throughout novel, not in DB.]
psychohistory/Seldonists* galaxy 23030 Asimov, Isaac. Forward the Foundation. New York: Doubleday (1993); pg. 238. "'It is hard to believe, but Seldon has become something of a cult figure here on Trantor--and in certain places in the Outer Worlds. Now psychohistory--if it can be used to predict the future or if even people merely think it can be so used.--can be a powerful tool with which to uphold the regime. I'm sure you have already seen this, General. one need merely predict our regime will endure and bring forth peace and prosperity for the Empire. People, believing this, will help make it a self-fulfilling prophecy. On the other hand, if Seldon wishes the reverse, he can predict civil war and ruin. People will believe that, too, and that would destabilize the regime.'

'In that case, Colonel, we simply make sure that the predictions of psychohistory are what we want them to be.' "

psychohistory/Seldonists* galaxy 23030 Asimov, Isaac. Forward the Foundation. New York: Doubleday (1993); pg. 240. "It seems to me, General, and I'm sure that it seems so to you, that Hari Seldon is the focus of a personality cult. He has so identified himself with psychohistory that if we were to get rid of him in too open a manner, we would entirely destroy the credibility of the science. It would be useless to us.

'On the other hand, General, Seldon is growing old and it is not difficult to imagine him being replaced by another man: someone we could choose and who would be friendly to our great aims and hopes for the Empire. If Seldon could be removed in such a way that it is made to seem natural, then that is all we need.' "

psychohistory/Seldonists* galaxy 23200 Asimov, Isaac. Foundation. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1951); pg. 3. "HARI SELDON--. . . born in the 11,988th year of the Galactic Era; died 12,069. The dates are more commonly given in terms of the current Foundational Era as -79 to the year 1 F.E. Born to middle-class parents on Helicon, Arcuturs sector (where his father, in a legend of doubtful authenticity, was a tobacco grower in the hydroponic plants of the planet), he early showed amazing ability in mathematics. Anecdotes concerning his ability are innumerable, and some are contadictory. At the age of two, he is said to have . . . Undoubtedly his greatest contributions were in the field of psychohistory. Seldon found the field little more than a set of vague axioms; he left it a profound statistical science. . . . The best existing authority we have for the details of his life is the biography written by Gaal Dornick who, as a young man, met Seldon two years before the great mathematician's death...

- ENCYCLOPEDIA GALACTICA "

psychohistory/Seldonists* galaxy 23200 Asimov, Isaac. Foundation. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1951); pg. 14. "PSYCHOHISTORY-- . . . Gaal Dornick, using nonmathematical concepts, has defined psychohistory to be that branch of mathematics which deals with the reactions of human conglomerates to fixed social and economic stimuli. . . . Implict in all these definitions is the assumption that the human conglomerate being dealt with is sufficiently large for valid statistial treatment. The necessary size of such a conglomerate may be determined by Seldon's First Theorem which . . . A further necessary assumption is that the uman conglomerate be itself unaware of psychohistoric analysis in order that is reactions be truly random... The basis of all valid psychohistory lies in the development of the Seldon Functions which exhibit properties congruent to those of such social dn economic forces . . .

- ENCYLOPEDIA GALACTICA " [Many refs. to psychohistory/Seldonism throughout book, only a few in DB.]

psychohistory/Seldonists* galaxy 23200 Asimov, Isaac. Foundation. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1951); pg. 103. "'Well, I know that. But Verisof says--'

'Damnation to Verisof. It's nonsense.'

There was a short, rebellious silence, and then Lepold said, 'Everyone believes it just the same. I mean all this talk about the Prophet Hari Seldon and how he appointed the Foundation to carry on his commandments that there might some day be a return of the Earthly Paradise: and how anyone who disobeys his commandments will be destroyed for eternity. hey believe it. I've presided at festivals, and I'm sure they do.'

'Yes, they do; but we don't. And you may be thankful it's so, for according to this foolishness, you are king by divine right--and are semi-divine yourself. Very handy. It eliminates all possibilities of revolts and insures absolute obedience in everything. and that is why, Lepold, you must take an active part in ordering the war against the Foundation. I am only regent, and quite human. You are king, and more than half a god--to them.' "

psychohistory/Seldonists* galaxy 23200 Asimov, Isaac. Foundation. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1951); pg. 103. "'But I suppose I'm not really,' said the king, reflectively.

'No, not really,' came the ironic response. 'but you are to everyone but the people of the Foundation. Get that? To eeryone but those of the Foundation. Once they are removed there will be no one to deny you the godhead. Think of that!'

'And after that we will ourselves be able to operate th epower boxes of the temples and the ships that fly without men and the holy food that cures cancer and all the rest? Verisof said only those blessed with the Galactic Spirit could--' "

psychohistory/Seldonists* galaxy 23200 Asimov, Isaac. Foundation. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1951); pg. 121. "'...The power plants have shut down. All ships are grounded. If you don't like it, Wienis, you can order the priests back to their jobs. I don't wish to.'

'By Space, Hardin, I will. If it's to be a showdown, so be it. We'll see if your priests can withstand the army. Tonight, every temple on the planet will be put under army supervision.' "

psychohistory/Seldonists* galaxy 23200 Asimov, Isaac. Foundation. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1951); pg. 131. "'According to our calculations, you have now reached domination of the barbarian kingdoms immediatelysurrounding the Foundation. Just as in the first crisis you held them off by the use of the Balance of Power, so in the second, you gained mastery by use of the Spiritual Power as against the Temporal.

'However, I might warn you here against overconfidence. It is not my way to grant you any foreknowledge in these recordings, but it would be safe to indicate that what you have now achieved is merely a new balance--though one in which your position is considerably better. The Spiritual Power, while sufficient to ward off attacks of the Temporal is not sufficient to attack in turn. Because of the invariable growth of the counteracting force known as Regionalism, or Nationalism, the Spiritual Power cannot prevail. I am telling you nothing new, I'm sure.' "

psychohistory/Seldonists* galaxy 23200 Asimov, Isaac. Foundation. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1951); pg. 135. "Through it all [the Traders] forged an empire more enduring than the pseudo-religious despotism of the Four Kingdoms "
psychohistory/Seldonists* galaxy 23200 Asimov, Isaac. Foundation. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1951); pg. 137. "'I know the fellow involve. Can't walk out on a friend. What of it? I am in the hands of the Galactic Spirit and walk cheerfully in the way he points out.'

Gorm said blankly, 'Huh?'

Ponyets looked at him, and laughed shortly, 'I forgot. You never read the 'Book of the Spirit,' did you?'

'Never heard of it,' said Gorm, curtly.

'Well, you would if you'd had religious training.'

"Religious training? For the priesthood?' Gorm was profoundly shocked.

'Afraid so. It's my dark shame and secret. I was too much for the Revered Fathers, though. They expelled me, for reasons sufficient to promote me to a secular education under the Foundation. Well, look, I'd better push off...' "

psychohistory/Seldonists* galaxy 23200 Asimov, Isaac. Foundation. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1951); pg. 171. "'...Where's this missionary? Get him here in front of me.'

The trader sat down, while the scarlet-cloaked figure was carefully brought forward.

'What's your name, reverend?'

...'My son--my children. May you always be in the protecting arms of the Galactic Spirit.'

...'Save me from these brutes and darkened ones who raven after me and would afflict the Galactic Spirit with their crimes. I am Jord Parma, of the anacreonian worlds. Educated at the Foundation; the Foundation itself, my children. I am a Priest of the Spirit educated in all the mysteries, who have come here where the inner voice called me.' He was gasping, 'I have suffered at the hands of the unenlightened. As you are Children of the Spirit; and in the name of that Spirit, protect me from them.' "

psychohistory/Seldonists* galaxy 23200 Asimov, Isaac. Foundation. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1951); pg. 172. "'I've got more to do than guard missionaries. I'll do, so, what I please, and, by Seldon and all the Galaxy, if you try to stop me, I'll tear out your stining windpipe. Don't get in my way, Twer, or it wil be the last of you.'

He turned and strode past. 'You! Reverend Parma! Did you know that, by convention, no Foundation missionaries may enter the Korellian territory?'

The missionary was trembling, 'I can but go where the Spirit leads, my son. If the darkened ones refuse enlightenment, is it not the greater sign of their need for it?'

...'You hear them? Why do you talk of law to me, of a law made by men? There are higher laws. Was it not the Galactic Spirit that said: Thou shalt not stand idly by to the hurt of thy fellowman. And has he not said: Even as thou dealest with the humble and defenseless, thus shalt thou be dealt with.' " [More, e.g., pg.174-178, 204-208, 215-216, etc.]

psychohistory/Seldonists* galaxy 23200 Asimov, Isaac. Foundation. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1951); pg. 102-103. "'It would be . . . uh . . . sort of blasphemous, you know, to attack the Foundation. I mean--' He paused.

'Go on.'

Lepold said confusedly, 'I mean, if there were really a Galactic Spirit, he . . . uh . . . it mightn't like it. Don't you think?'

'No, I don't,' was the hard answer. Wienis sat down again and his lips twisted in a queer smile. 'And so you really bother your head a great deal over the Galactic Spirit, do you? That's what comes of letting you run wild. You've been listening to Verisof quie a bit, I take it.'

'He's explained a great deal--'

'About the Galactic Spirit?'

'Yes.'

'Why, you unweaned cub, he believes in that mummery a good deal less than I do, and I don't believe in it at all. How many times have you been told that all this talk is nonsense?' "

psychohistory/Seldonists* galaxy 23500 Asimov, Isaac. "The Mule " in Foundation and Empire. New York: Ballantine (1983; first published 1945); pg. 89. [Actual year unknown.] "'You picked a rotten day to return home, boy!'

'What? Oh, it is Seldon's birthday, isn't it?' "

psychohistory/Seldonists* galaxy 23500 Asimov, Isaac. "The Mule " in Foundation and Empire. New York: Ballantine (1983; first published 1945); pg. 91. "'it seems to me that the whole essense of Seldon's plan was to create a world better than the ancient one of the Galactic Empire. It was falling apart, that world, three centuries ago, when Seldon first established the Foundation--and if history speaks truly, it was falling apart of the triple disease of inertia, despotism, and maldistribution of the goods of the universe.' "; Pg. 92: "'If the story of Seldon is true, he foresaw the complete collapse of the Empire through his laws of psychohistory, and was able to predict the necessary thirty thousand years of barbarism before the establishment of a new Second Empire to restore civilization and culture to the humanity. It was the whole aim of his life-work to set up such conditions as would insure a speedier rejuvination.' "
psychohistory/Seldonists* galaxy 23500 Asimov, Isaac. "The Mule " in Foundation and Empire. New York: Ballantine (1983; first published 1945); pg. 93. "'...It's a disgrace to Seldon, a casting of dirt in his face, a spewing in his beard.'...

'That's our modern Lathan Devers,' said Randu... 'this Fran of ours. Devers died in the slave mines eighty years ago with your husband's great grandfather, because he lacked wisdom and didn't lack heart--'

'Yes, by the Galaxy, I'd do th same if I were he,' swore Fran. 'Devers was the greatest Trader in history--greater than the overblown windbag, Mallow, the Foundationers worship...' "

psychohistory/Seldonists* galaxy 23500 Asimov, Isaac. "The Mule " in Foundation and Empire. New York: Ballantine (1983; first published 1945); pg. 95. "'...an attack on the Foundation is suicide. Bel Riose of the old Empire was a better man than any of them, and he attacked with the resources of a galaxy, and couldn't win against the Seldon Plan. Is there one general that doesn't know that?'...

'...Not every man with sufficient ambition would believe i Hari Seldon and his laws of psychohistory. We could encourage that disbelief. He might attack.'

'And the Foundation would win.'

'Yes--but not necessarily easily. It might be a crisis, and we could take advantage of such a crisis to force a compromise with the despots of the Foundation...' " [Many other references in book to psychohistory and the Seldon plan, most not in DB. Seldon's psychohistory is the central plot element in the Foundation books.]

psychohistory/Seldonists* galaxy 23500 Asimov, Isaac. "The Mule " in Foundation and Empire. New York: Ballantine (1983; first published 1945); pg. 103. "'...it has already been proven that the generals of the Imperial Age and the warlords of the present age are equally impotent against us. Seldon's science which predicts the course of the Foundation is based, not on individual heroism, as you seem to believe, but on the social and economic trends of history. We have passed successfully through four crises already, have we not?'

'...Yet Seldon's science is known--only to Seldon. We ourselves have but faith. In the first three crises, as I have been carefully taught, the Foundation was led by wise leaders who foresaw the nature of the crises and took the proper precautions. Otherwise--who can say?'

'Yes... but you omit the fourth crisis... we faced the cleverest opponent, the heaviest armor, the strongest force of all. Yet we won by the inevitability of history.'

'...But this history you mention became inevitable only after we had fought desperately... Seldon's plan helps those who help themselves.' "

psychohistory/Seldonists* galaxy 23500 Asimov, Isaac. "The Mule " in Foundation and Empire. New York: Ballantine (1983; first published 1945); pg. 173. "The captain said, 'It's a fundamental eror. You live in the exploded past. The eighty years our organization has been waiting for the correct historical moment. We've been blinded by Seldon's psychohistory, one of the first propositions of which is that the individual does not count, does not make history, and that complex social and economic factors override him, make a puppet out of him... What is one man--one out of quadrillions. The Galaxy won't stop rotating because one man dies. But the Mule is not a man, he is a mutant. Already he has upset Seldon's plan, and if you stop to analyze the implications, it means that he--one man--one mutant--upset all of Seldon's psychohistory. if he had never lived, the Foundation would not have fallen. If he ceased living, it would not remain fallen...' "
psychohistory/Seldonists* galaxy 35000 Asimov, Isaac. Foundation's Edge. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1982); pg. 5. [Year is estimated.] "Since by the Seldon doctrine, historical change is to a large degree difficult to swerve (always barring the unpredictable, something most Seldonists forget, despite thewrenching incident of the Mule), the Foundation might have retained its capital on Termius under any conditions. That is a 'might,' however, Seldon, in his just-finished appearance as a five-century-old simulacrum, had calmly placed the probability of remaining on Terminus at 87.2 percent.

Nevertheless, even to Seldonists, that meant there was a 12.8 percent chance that the shift to some point to the center of the Foundation Federation would have been made... "

[Hari Saldon's discipline of 'psychohistory' is the central thematic element in this book. 'Seldonism', of course, is not so much a religion as a historical philosophy and scientific discipline. There does not appear to be any reference by name to actual Earth religions in this book.]

psychohistory/Seldonists* galaxy 35000 Asimov, Isaac. Foundation's Edge. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1982); pg. 19. [Year is estimated.] "The first two centuries had been the Golden Age of the Foundation, the Heroic Age--at least in retrospect... Salvor Hardin and Hober Mallow had been the two great heroes, semideified to the point of rivaling the incomparable Hari Seldon himself. The three were a tripod on which all Foundation legend (and even Foundation history) rested.

In those days, though, the Foundation had been one puny world, with a tenuous hold on the Four Kingdoms and with only a dim awareness of the extent to whcih the Seldon Plan was holding its protective hand over it, caring for it even against the remnant of the mighty Galactic Empire. "

psychohistory/Seldonists* galaxy 35000 Asimov, Isaac. Foundation's Edge. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1982); pg. 71. [Year is estimated.] "The Golden Rule of the Second Foundation was, 'Do nothing unless you must, and hwenyou must act--hesitate.

The First Speaker sighed softly. Living in the old University, with the brooding grandeur of the ruins of the Imperial Palace not too far distant, made one wonder on occasion how Golden the Rule might be.

In the old days of the Great Sack, the Golden Rule had been strained to the breaking point. "

psychohistory/Seldonists* Japan 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 143. "But Aum does have a specific SF connection in the work of Isaac Asimov, whose Foundation series provided a crucial element of the Aum mythology. In Aum's version, Asahara takes on the role of Asimov's Hari Seldon, a genius who discovers the laws of 'psychohistory,' which predicts, infallibly, that 'interstellar wars will be endless. Interstellar trade will decay; population will decline; worlds will lose touch with the main body of the Galaxy.' The answer to this threat is a secret society of subsidiary geniuses to act as guardians of civilization's flame during the destined dark ages.

'The similarities [of Asimov's Foundation] to Aum and its guru's quest were remarkable,' note David Kaplan and Andrew Marshall, in an authoritative history of the cult. 'In an interview, Murai [one of Aum's inner circle] would state matter-of-factly that Aum was using the Foundation as the blueprint for the cult's long-term plans. " [More]

psychohistory/Seldonists* Japan 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 143. "But it was real enough to the cult. Shoko Asahara, the blind and bearded guru from Japan, had become Hari Seldon; and Aum Supreme Truth was the Foundation.'

Asimov cannot be blamed for Shoko Asahara's megalomania any more than Heinlein can be held responsible for the deeds of... "

psychohistory/Seldonists* Tidewater 2300 Swanwick, Michael. Stations of the Tide. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1991); pg. 129. "'Do you handle magic?'

'Magic of all sorts, sir. Necromancy, geomancy... social Darwinism, psychohistory... and more. Indeed, what is magic but impossible science?' "

psychology California 1981 Dick, Philip K. Dr. Bloodmoney. New York: Bluejay Books (1985; c. 1965); pg. 126. "Mrs. Tallman was scrutinizing the new teacher's stack of books. 'I see you have Carl Jung's Psychological Types. Is one of your sciences psychology? How nice, to acquire a teacher for our school who can tell edible mushrooms and also is an authority on Freud and Jung.'

'There's no value in such stuff,' Strous said, with irritation. 'We need useful science, not academic hot air.' " [More, not in DB.]

psychology California: Los Angeles 1996 Powers, Tim. Expiration Date. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 96. "'...You must know as well as I do that your methods have no place in a modern hospital. Voodoo dolls! Ouija boards! And how many of these candles you have got on your shelves in there, the tall ones with . . . saints, and, and God, and the Virgin Mary painted on them? It's not helpful to... Your office smells like a church, and looks like some kind of ignorant Mexican fortuneteller's tent!'

...In an even voice she said, 'These methods are no more--'

'Voodoo dolls, Dr. Elizalde! I can't believe you credit such--'

'I don't credit them, any more than I credit Rorschach blots as really being pictures of monsters!... By having patients do readings with cards and planchettes I get them to be unself-consciously objective--about themselves, their spouses, parents, children...'

'The subject is closed,' Alden said tremulously. 'I order to you to resume the standard psychiatric routines.' " [More, not in DB.]

psychology California: Los Angeles 1996 Powers, Tim. Expiration Date. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 97. "Some of the other members of the psychiatric team had frequently talked about raising 'spiritual awareness' in their patients, and had liked to use the blurry jargon of New Age mysticism, but even they found Elizalde's use of spiritualism vulgar and demeaningly utilitarian--especially since Elizalde insisted that there was not a particle of intrinsic truth behind any sort of spiritualism.

Too, she had not been inclined to come up with the trendy sorts of diagnoses. It had been popular among psychiatrists then to uncover hitherto unsuspected childhood memories of sexual abuse, just as ten years earlier all the patients had been diagnoses as having 'anger' that needed to 'be worked through.' Elizalde was sure that guilt and shame were the emotions that patients would be encouraged to rid themselves of. "

psychology California: Los Angeles 2010 Dick, Philip K. "Recall Mechanism " in The Minority Report and Other Classic Stories by Philip K. Dick. New York: Kensington (2002; c. 1959); pg. 103. "The analyst said: 'I'm Humphrys, the man you came to see.' There were fear and hostility on the patient's face, so Humphrys said: 'I could tell a joke about analysts. Would that make you feel better? Or I could remind you that the National Trust is paying my fee; it's not going to cost you a cent. Or I could cite the case of Psychoanalyst Y...'

...'No couch,' he observed.

'The couch vanished around 1980,' Humphry's said. 'Post-war analysts feel enough confidence to face their patients on an equal level.' " [More. Humphrys is the main character.]

psychology galaxy 1987 Hubbard, L. Ron. Mission Earth Vol. 10: The Doomed Planet. Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (1987); pg. 145. Pg. 291: "Psychology, psychiatry,' said Crobe, 'and all the works of Sigmund Freud. All the basic texts of psychotherapy on Earth. But they won't let me use it here. They are very unenlightened and retarded. I could clean out this whole asylum for them but every day they gag me before they let the cleaning crew in...' "; [Much more, pg. 145, 151, 188-189, 200, 292-299, 311, elsewhere.]
psychology galaxy 1995 Aldiss, Brian. "Galaxy Zee " in Supertoys Last All Summer Long. New York: St. Martin's Griffin (2001); pg. 182. "The Rich were always busy. The Rich were always busy. In darkened rooms, members of the Rich consulted therapists on the question of why they had so much to do. The healthier ones joined clubs where they were likely to kill one another. "
psychology Mars 2100 Dick, Philip K. The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch. New York: Random House (1991; c. 1964); pg. 38. "'We have a question,' she said to the three men. 'I say that psychoanalysts back on Earth were charging fifty dollars an hour and Fran says it was for only forty-five minutes.' She explained, 'We want to add an analyst to our layout and we want to get it right, because it's an authentic item, made on Earth and shipped here...' " [More, not in DB.]
psychology Metropolis 1980 Maggin, Elliot S. Superman: Miracle Monday. New York: Warner Books (1981); pg. 145. "It was years ago--the year Abraham Maslow, the pioneering humanistic psychologist, and Noam Chomsky, the linguist from MIT, both had visiting professorships... "
psychology New Jersey 1986 Hubbard, L. Ron. Mission Earth Vol. 6: Death Quest. Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (1986); pg. 11. "Females are vicious, treacherous, lying beasts who spend every waking minute conniving amongst themselves, plotting and scheming how to destroy every single male... Take those two Earth lesbians, Miss Pinch and Candy, for example. Miss Pinch took all my money and locked it up in a safe. I was broke and wanted it back. Earth psychology, which is never wrong, has something they call 'aversion therapy.' (In the Apparatus we call it 'torture.') So I tied them up and despite their protests raped them both. What did they do? Did they adhere to the unwavering truths of psychology? No! They ended up liking it! " [More about psychology, not in DB.]
psychology New York: New York City 1976 Silverberg, Robert. Dying Inside. New York: Ballantine (1976; c. 1972); pg. 142. "The psychological era [of what books he read]: Freud, Jung, Adler, Reich, Reik. "
psychology New York: New York City 1986 Hubbard, L. Ron. Mission Earth Vol. 2: Black Genesis. Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (1986); pg. 153. "He wrote: Got to have a diploma before anyone will listen to you. Then he wrote: Psychology is fake. It can't do anything to change anybody. It is the government tool of population control.

I fumed! Now he was writing heresy! Oh, the International Psychological Association would get him! Fry his brains with every electric shock machine they could put on him! They are very adamant in protecting their monopoly. " [Other refs., not in DB.]

psychology Russia 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 116. Pg. 116: "Petra shook her head. 'I knew you were stupid, because you became a talk-therapy shrink, which is like being a minister of a religion in which you get to be God.'

The psychiatrist tuned red. Petra liked that. He was stupid, and he didn't like hearing it... ";

Pg. 118: "'This discussion is over,' said the psychiatrist. 'You can shut up now.'

'Is that how you end your sessions with your patients?'

'I never said I was a psychiatrist,' said the psychiatrist.

'Psychiatry was your education,' said Petra. 'And I know you had a practice for a while, because real people don't talk like shrinks when they're trying to reassure a frightened child. Just because you got involved in politics and changed careers doesn't mean you aren't still the kind of bonehead who goes to witch-doctor school and thinks he's a scientist.' ";

Pg. 119: "'I'm a psychologist,' he said.

'Ouch... That must have hurt, to admit you're only half-educated.' " [More, pg. 114-119.]

psychology Trantor 23000 Asimov, Isaac. Prelude to Foundation. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 87. "Randa, an instructor in psychology, was a little man, short and plump... " [Much about psychology in this novel. Psychology is one of the foundational sciences of psychohistory.]
psychology United Kingdom 1988 Adams, Douglas. The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul. New York: Simon and Schuster (1988); pg. 122. "'As a psychologist I am aware of the important role that ornamentation plays in nourishing the human spirit,' he pronounced. " [More.]
psychology United Kingdom 1999 Willis, Connie. "Adaptation " in Miracle and Other Christmas Stories. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 131. "'I should think these would be good times, with any number of Scrooges you could reform.'

'And so there are,' he said, 'but they are praised and rewarded for their greed, and much admired. And... they do not believe in spirits. They lay their visions to Freud and hormonal imbalance, and their therapists tell them they should feel no guilt, and advise them to focus further on themselves.' "

psychology United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 559. "Lancelot and Guenever were sitting at the solar window. An observer of the present day, who knew the Arthurian legend only from Tennyson and people of that sort, would have been startled to see that the famous lovers were past their prime... In those days people loved each other for their lives, without the conveniences of the divorce court and the psychiatrist. "
psychology USA 1969 Panshin, Alexei. "What's Your Excuse? " in Farewell To Yesterday's Tomorrow. New York: Berkley Publishing Corp. (1975; c. 1969); pg. 1. "Wooley's beard and manner were all that you would expect of any psychology instructor, particularly one who enjoys his work. He leaned back in his swivel chair, his feet on his desk, hands folded behind his neck, and looked at the graduate student who had been sharing his partition-board office for the past two weeks.

'I'm curious about you, Holland,' he said. 'By my conservative estimate, ninety-five percent of degree candidates in psychology are twitches. What's your problem?' "

...He looked warily up at Wooley, who had a certain reputation, and then returned his attention to his work.

'No,' Wooley said expansively. 'On the face of it, I would have said that you had a very low twitch rating.'

Wooley's reputation was half for being a thoroughgoing son of a bitch, half for being fascinating in the classroom. " [Entire story, pg. 1 through 6, is about psychology and characters in a university psychology department.]

psychology USA 1986 Anderson, Jack. Control. New York: Kensington Publishing Corp. (1988); pg. 178. "'...There are all kinds of crutches. Some folks find their crutch in a bottle. Some find it in powders and pills and palliatives. Some lay down once a week on a psychiatrist's couch. And some folks find their crutch in the scriptures...' "
psychology USA 2010 Baxter, Stephen. Manifold: Time. New York: Ballantine (2000); pg. 10. "In fact Malenfant himself started to attract unwelcome personal attention. There were barroom psychoanalysts all over the media who found a common pattern in his failure to have kids, his frustrated ambition to fly in space, and his lofty ambitions for the future of humankind. And then there were the kooks--the conspiracy theorists, the UFO nuts, the post-New Age synthesists, the dreaming obsessives--none of whom had anything to offer Malenfant but bad PR. "
psychology world 1953 Sturgeon, Theodore. More Than Human. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (1953); pg. 63. "'Psychiatry attacks the onion of the self, removing layer after layer until it gets down to the little sliver of unsullied ego. Or: psychiatry drills like an oil well, down and sidewise and down again, through all the muck and rock until it strikes a layer that yields. Or: psychiatry grabs a handful of sexual motivations and throws them on the pinball machine of your life, so they bounce on down against episodes. Want more?'

I had to laugh. 'That last one was pretty good.'

'That last one was pretty bad. They are all bad. They all try to simplify something which is complex by its very nature. The only thumbnail you'll get from me is this: no one knows what's really wrong with you but you; no one can find a cure for it but you; no one but you can identify it as a cure; and once you find it, no one but you can do anything about it.'

'What are you here for.'

'To listen.' " [More.]



psychology, continued

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