Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Protestant, USA

Protestant, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Protestant USA 1950 Williams, Walter Jon "Witness " in Wild Cards (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1986); pg. 121. "MR. RANKIN: I would like to assure the Jewish gentleman from New York that he will encounter no bias on account of his race. Any man who believes in the fundamental principles of Christianity and lives up to them, whether he is a Catholic or Protestant, has my respect and confidence.

WITNESS: May I say to the committee that I object to the characterization of 'Jewish gentleman.'

MR. RANKIN: Do you object to being called a Jew or being called a gentleman? What are you kicking about? "

Protestant USA 1956 Jones, Raymond F. "The Non-Statistical Man " in The Non-Statistical Man. New York: Belmont Books (1964; copyright 1956); pg. 75. "A week later, Charles Bascomb was convinced she was right. Mark was in the hospital to get an arm set after it had been broken when the mob piled on him at school. Sarah had been read out of the two ladies clubs she belonged to; and the minister of their Church had informed her he had made different arrangements in the baby-sitting round robin which had been worked out during services. Sarah wouldn't need to bother with it any more. "
Protestant USA 1960 Maggin, Elliot S. Kingdom Come. New York: Time Warner (1998); pg. 23. "My father's oldest brother, Billy Pring McCay, may have been a better preacher even than Grandma. He'd been an advocate of something he called 'Spiritual Expansion.' He'd taught people that they could learn new things and acquire altogether-new abilities--things like skiing or playing the trumpet or speaking dead languages--from meditating on the ability for extended periods. He would go to little towns to 'wake up' the missing talents in people whose lives needed a little nudge here and there to make them interesting. He'd cured a lot of cases of math anxiety over the years, and quite a few cases of hysterical blindness. We were all convinced that he'd been the model for the character in that musical comedy about the small-town con man. Uncle Billy had actually been tarred and feathered and deposited on a freight car once when he claimed to be able to train a boy's marching band in a little town in northern Iowa. "
Protestant USA 1963 Grimwood, Ken. Replay. New York: Arbor House (1986); pg. 8. "He stood on the low rise below Glenn Memorial Church, looking down at North Decatur Road... "
Protestant USA 1967 Rush, Norman. "Closing With Nature " in The Ruins of Earth: An Anthology of Stories of the Immediate Future. (Thomas M. Disch, ed.) New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons (1971; first pub. 1970); pg. 41. "'How do you like the Reverend?'

'I'm not signed up for that I'm afraid.'

'Ah you should. Ah what a shame. They said two buses were coming tomorrow just for the seminar in the morning.'

'Really? when on Sunday is that?'

'Oh, I don't know.' "

Protestant USA 1969 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 29. "So every Sunday for most of one school year Ellie went to a regular discussion group at a nearby church. It was one of the respectable Protestant denominations, untainted by disorderly evangelism. There were a few high school students, a number of adults, mainly middle-aged women, and the instructor, the minister's wife. Ellie had never seriously read the Bible before and had been inclined to accept her father's perhaps ungenerous judgment that it was 'half barbarian history, half fairy tales.' So over the weekend preceding her first class, she read through what seemed to be the important parts of the Old Testament, trying to keep an open mind. She at once recognized that there were two different and mutually contradictory stories of Creation in the first two chapters of Genesis. She did not see how there could be light and days before the Sun was made, and had trouble figuring out exactly who it was that Cain had married. "
Protestant USA 1979 Bear, Greg. "The White Horse Child " in The Wind from a Burning Woman. Sauk City, WI: Arkham House (1983; story copyright 1979); pg. 51. Pg 51: "All hell had broken loose. I didn't understand half of it, but I could feel the presence of Great Aunt Sybil Danser. I could almost hear her crackling voice and the shustle of her satchel of Billy Grahams and Zondervans and little pamphlets with shining light in blue offset on their covers. ";

Pg. 55: "She carried a bag. Part of it was filled with knitting, part with books and pamphlets. I always wondered why she never carried a Bible--just Billy Grahams and Zondervans. One pamphlet fell out, and Dad bent to pick it up.

'Keep it, read it,' Auntie Danser instructed him. 'Do you good.' ";

Pg. 56: "Auntie Danser wanted to read Billy Graham books to us after dinner, but Dad snuck us out before Mom could gather us together... ";

Pg. 59: "But I didn't feel like a boy. I felt something big inside, and no amount of Billy Grahams and Zondervans read at me could change that feeling. " [Other refs. not in DB.]

Protestant USA 1982 Straub, Peter. Koko. New York: E. P. Dutton (1988); pg. 468. "The Reverend Dengler had located the Lamb of God Butcher Shop two blocks away... "
Protestant USA 1982 Willis, Connie. "Lost and Found " in Fire Watch. New York: Bluejay (1984; story copyright 1982); pg. 68. "'Is it the end of the world?' Megan asked. 'Losing your cup, I mean?' Finney had come up to Reverend Mr. Davidson's study to see if he might have left it there and found Megan at her father's desk, pasting bits of cotton wool to a sheet of blue paper.

'No, of course not,' Finney said. 'It's only annoying. It's the third time this week I've lost it.'...

He watched Megan... She was making a botch of the pasting... The face of an angel and the body of a woman and she could not paste as well as her nursery church school class. It was her father the Reverend Mr. Davidson's voice one heard when she spoke, his learned speech patterns and quotations of scripture, but the effect was strong enough that one forgot she recited them without understanding. " [Other refs. throughout story, not in DB.]

Protestant USA 1982 Willis, Connie. "Lost and Found " in Fire Watch. New York: Bluejay (1984; story copyright 1982); pg. 69. Pg. 69: "St. John's at End sat on a round island in the middle of the River End. The river on both sides was so shallow one could walk across it... "; Pg. 72: "'A lame man and a half-witted girl. The Reverend Mr. Davidson is apparently not in a position to pick and choose who represents his church.'

Finney thought of Reverend Davidson bending over him, his shoes wet and his trousers splattered with Finney's blood. "

Protestant USA 1982 Willis, Connie. "Service for the Burial of the Dead " in Fire Watch. New York: Bluejay (1984; story copyright 1982); pg. 47. "She had come early so that she could set well to the back, but not so early that people would talk. She had hesitated at the back of the church for only a moment, to take a deep breath and put her head up proudly, and in that moment old Mr. Finn had swooped down on her, taken her arm, and led her to the empty pew behind the one tied off with black ribbon for the mourning family. " [Entire story takes place in a church. Refs. to the church and funeral service throughout story, not in DB.]
Protestant USA 1982 Willis, Connie. "Service for the Burial of the Dead " in Fire Watch. New York: Bluejay (1984; story copyright 1982); pg. 49. "There was a door just outside the vestry that led to the sideyard of the church. If she hurried, she could escape that way before Reverend Sprague brought the family in...

Reverend Sprague did not approve of robes and other 'papist trappings' except at Christmas. The black robes hanging on their pegs were heavy with dust. "

Protestant USA 1982 Willis, Connie. "Service for the Burial of the Dead " in Fire Watch. New York: Bluejay (1984; story copyright 1982); pg. 63. "Reverend Sprague bent and scooped up a handful of dirt from the edge of the grave. ' 'Unto the mercy of Almighty God, our heavenly Father, we commend the soul of the brother departed and commit his body to the ground, earth to earth--' ' He stopped, still holding the handful of earth.

...' 'Unto the mercy of Almighty God we commend the soul of our brother departed,' ' Reverend Sprague read, and stopped again, and stared. " [More.]

Protestant USA 1984 Heinlein, Robert A. Job: A Comedy of Justice. New York: Ballantine (1984); pg. 129. "Progress at our annual national prayer meeting on several subjects in which I was interested. One was the matter of how to remove the tax-free status of any private school not affiliated with a Christian sect. Policy on this was not yet complete because of the thorny matter of Roman Catholic schools. Should our umbrella cover them? Or was it time to strike? Whether the Catholics were allies or enemies was always a deep problem to those of us [Protestants] out on the firing line.

At least as difficult was the Jewish problem--was a humane solution possible? If not, then what? Should we grasp the nettle? This was debated only in... "

Protestant USA 1984 Heinlein, Robert A. Job: A Comedy of Justice. New York: Ballantine (1984); pg. 147. "'Ah-- Alec, are there not other institutions to which a person in distress may turn?'

'Oh, certainly. In a city this size the Roman Catholic Church is bound to have more than one refuge. And there will be other Protestant ones [other than the Salvation Army]. Probably a Jewish one...' "

Protestant USA 1984 Heinlein, Robert A. Job: A Comedy of Justice. New York: Ballantine (1984); pg. 288. Pg. 288: "Saved souls are second-class citizens. The notion, one that runs all through Protestant Christianity and maybe among papists [Catholics] as well, that a saved soul will practically sit in the lap of God... "; Pg. 351: "'Katie, I don't know of any Protestant Christian who thinks anything bad of Rahab...' "
Protestant USA 1985 Drake, David. The Tank Lords. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 372. "The Church of the Lord's Universe was officially launched in 1895 in Minneapolis, Minnesota, by the merger of 230 existing protestant congregations--Methodist, Presbyterian, Episcopalian, and Lutheran. In part the new church was a revolt against the extreme fundamentalism peaking at that time. "
Protestant USA 1985 Knight, Damon. "The God Machine " in One Side Laughing. New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; 1985); pg. 34. Pg. 33-34: "'...The first thing we tried was a really old set of the scrolls, the Torah. Bingo. Furthermore, we found out you can transfer this energy, immanence, we call it, by leaving your holy object in a lead-lined container with some other object. For a relic, like a piece of bone, say, we use bone. Lamb is the best.'

'That's unbelievable, Bill.'

'I know. That's the problem. All I can do is, is I can let you try it yourself. May I ask what your religion is, Terry?'

'I'm a Presbyterian.'

'Okay, I'll get you the Protestant model. For that, we had to go to old Bibles--we bought a Gutenberg, and maybe you think that didn't cost. We found out later the Wyclif is just as good.' "

Protestant USA 1985 Knight, Damon. "The God Machine " in One Side Laughing. New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; 1985); pg. 35. "The fall campaign is a success. 'HOLINEX for instant tranquility...' ...Hospitals buy the professional model at $1,795. Psychiatrists buy it. The home models retail for $695 plus tax. People line up for it in department stores. It comes in Protestant, Catholic, Orthodox and Reformed versions. "
Protestant USA 1986 Donaldson, Stephen R. The Mirror of Her Dreams. New York: Ballantine (1986); pg. 10. "At the mission, her day was more full of drudgery than usual. In the administrative office, seated at her desk with the ancient typewriter crouching in front of her like a foul-tempered beast of burden, she found a message from Reverend Thatcher, the old man who ran the mission. It said that the mission's copying costs were too high, so would she please type two hundred fifty copies of the attached letter in addition to her other duties. The letter was aimed at most of the philanghropic organizations in the city, and it containe dyet another appeal for money, couched in Reverend Thatcher's customary futility. She could hardly bear to read it as she typed; but of course she had to read it over and over again to get it right. "
Protestant USA 1986 Donaldson, Stephen R. The Mirror of Her Dreams. New York: Ballantine (1986); pg. 11. "She and Reverend Thatcher usually ate lunch together--by his choice, not hers. Since she was quiet and watched his face attentively, he probably thought she was a sympatheitc listener. But most of the time she hardly heard what he said. His talk was like his letters: there was nothing sh could do to help. She was quiet because that was the only way she knew how to be... So she sat with him in one corner of the soup kitchen the mission ran in its basement, and she keptt her face turned toward him while he talked. " [Other refs., not in DB, in the first few pages of the novel.]
Protestant USA 1987 Anthony, Patricia. "What Brothers are For " in Eating Memories. Woburn, MA: First Books; Baltimore, MD: Old Earth Books (1997; c. 1987); pg. 20. "He wondered if he'd fight to protect Daniel. He should. That's what brothers were for. But he didn't know if love could be stronger than fear, even though Reverend Sorenson said it cast fear out. It'd be easier if the ghosts took them both together. He prayed for that, and in the middle of the prayer fell into a sleep, forgetful sleep. "
Protestant USA 1987 Anthony, Patricia. "What Brothers are For " in Eating Memories. Woburn, MA: First Books; Baltimore, MD: Old Earth Books (1997; c. 1987); pg. 22. "After service, Pa and Ma drove up, old Reverend Sorenson, Pete Jones and Hady Miller behind them. They all looked towards the place where Zeke and Daniel waited. Pa seemed startled to see them still there. He sent Ma into the house and shooed them away.

They didn't go.

'Pa!' Zeke called. 'I don't think there are no ghosts. I don't think there's no ghosts noplace.'

Old Reverend Sorenson said something about Satan. His voice didn't carry.

Pete and Hady got out the deer rifles from their saddles.

'They're going hunting with Pa again,' Daniel said. "

Protestant USA 1987 Anthony, Patricia. "What Brothers are For " in Eating Memories. Woburn, MA: First Books; Baltimore, MD: Old Earth Books (1997; c. 1987); pg. 23. "Daniel had died in ignorance, but Zeke decided he wouldn't. He didn't want to die by chance, either... He and Daniel ha done something that they shouldn't have, and, one way or another, they were going to pay. Zeke was old enough to understand the relationship between God and man; between man and boy.

He stepped out from behind the tree and started down in a steady walk towards the yard. Hady--thank God it was Hady--raised his rifle and sighted slow. "

Protestant USA 1988 Godwin, P. Waiting for the Galactic Bus. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 177. "Protestant and Jewish girls just got bored and did their nails, talked about leaving and finding a steady man and never did either. "
Protestant USA 1988 Martin, George R. R. & John J. Miller. Wild Cards VII: Dead Man's Hand. New York: Bantam Books (1990); pg. 9. "Most of the news was devoted to the Democratic National Convention, convening today in Atlanta... Gregg Hartmann was the favorite, but his nomination would be a struggle, particularly with the man directly opposite him in political philosophy and belief--the Reverend Leo Barnett.

Brennan distrusted all politicians, but if he could vote, he would cast his ballot for Hartmann. The man seemed honest and caring, especially when compared with the demagogue Barnett. " [Other refs. to Rev. Barnett, not in DB.]

Protestant USA 1989 Wilson, Robert Charles. Gypsies. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 73. "The situation was desperate, or why would he have been sent here, eking out this dubious liaison with the Americans on the chance that they might in fact have produced a secret weapon? Because, Palestrina thought, for all their naive Protestantism and unrepentant superstition, they are more like us [Catholic empire] than the Arabs... politics make strange bedfellows. "
Protestant USA 1989 Wilson, Robert Charles. Gypsies. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 144. "'Until recently,' Cardinal Palestrina observed, 'the Americans were the infidels.'

'Hardly,' Korchnoi said. 'Heretics perhaps. A mongrel nation of Freemasons and Protestants--isn't that what the clerks say? But the industrial power, the wealth, the military strength . . . these are things you can see for yourself.' "

Protestant USA 1989 Wilson, Robert Charles. Gypsies. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 164. "History had happened a little differently. Rome and the Roman Church still dominated Europe; America had won its independence and had become a refuge for Europe's oppressed Protestants. It was not called the United States but the Novus Ordo, the New Order of the Americas, a major military and economic power... The Novus Ordo, a heretical nation, was able to experiment with forces the [Catholic] Church wouldn't touch. Alchemy, kabalistic magic, astrology--it was all very different there, all very real. "
Protestant USA 1993 Hoffman, Diana Lofgran. "Other Time " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 90. "Other Time had become an addiction--time abuse. Like the minister she'd read about who ruined his life taking speed and sedatives so he could work harder and longer than anyone else and look good. He had his drugs. She had her timemaker. It would cut just as many years from her life. "
Protestant USA 1993 Stern, Roger. The Death and Life of Superman. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 82. "'...I mean, aren't there better ways to work things out, other than caving in someone's head?'

Superman nodded appreciatively... 'There certainly are better ways, and we must use them whenever possible. The Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., spoke of the need for humanity 'to overcome oppression and violence without resorting to oppression and violence.' That's a goal that every one of us must strive to meet.' "

Protestant USA 1995 Ing, Dean. The Big Lifters. New York: Tor (1988); pg. 183. "'I wonder if you do; you Protestants have it easy, Peel. If I don't tell you about that confession, well, you might not take this seriously enough...' "
Protestant USA 1996 Dreyfuss. Richard & Harry Turtledove. The Two Georges. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 376. "'Our Lord said, 'Render therefore unto Caesar the things which are Caesar's; and unto God the things that are God's.' Doing one's duty renders unto Caesar, but doing what is right renders unto God.'

'It is not doubted, Your Excellency, that you must have been formidable as a man of the cloth, even if you suffered the misfortune of Protestantism,' Bonaparte said. 'There must of necessity, however, be a difference between the views of a man of the cloth and those of the world...' "

Protestant USA 1996 Hauman, Glenn. "On the Air " in The Ultimate X-Men (Stan Lee, ed.) New York: Berkley (1996); pg. 173. [Radio interview with Warren Worthington III, a.k.a. 'Angel' of the X-Men.]

Finckley: Do you follow a particular faith or religion?

Worthington: My religious beliefs have been hard thought out and are constantly under revision. I suspect that every holy person has gotten a chunk of it and passed on what he could; I think every religious belief has a hunk of truth, and/or every religion is true for the one who believes in it.

But I'll tell you this much--I used to be a hell of a lot more tolerant of organized religion before I heard of William Stryker.

Finckley: Obviously. Reverend Stryker tried to wipe out every mutant in the world.

Worthington: When a man takes out a loaded gun in the middle of Madison Square Garden on public television and gets ready to shoot it at friends of mine, I get disgusted. And more, I get scared. "

Protestant USA 1996 Lane, Andy & Rebecca Levene. "Four Angry Mutants " in The Ultimate X-Men (Stan Lee, ed.) New York: Berkley (1996); pg. 133. "The only illumination came from torches held by some of the hundred-odd congregation below. All looking at one man, the 'preacher' on his stage, shouting outa sermon of hate against mutants. He finished some rousing phrase and then all cheered, lifting up their torches in an old salute, Logan remembered an SS meeting he'd broken into in a German castle, back in World War II. This was like that, only worse, because these people knew about that war and hadn't learned from it. " [These references refer to the anti-mutant group called 'Friends of Humanity.' Much of the terminology and culture is Protestant-derived, although the group isn't necessarily Protestant. Still, it closely mirrors the Ku Klux Klan, which was made up primarily of conservative Protestants, primarily Baptists.]
Protestant USA 1996 Swanwick, Michael. "Covenant of Souls " in Omni Visions One (Ellen Datlow, ed). Greensboro, NC: Omni Books (1993; story copyright 1986); pg. 176. "The toddlers' room had been part of the Sunday School program when Covenant was still an expanding congregation. A good dozen cribs stood serene in the soft light... " [Some other refs, not in DB.]
Protestant USA 1999 Kessel, John. Good News from Outer Space. New York: Tor (1990; c. 1989); pg. 24. "These notes concerned various religious movements, in particular the Millennialist preachings of the Reverend Jimmy-Don Gilray. The Millennialists believed that, as foretold in the scriptures, the end of the world was coming. The signs were there. The Antichrist was alive, and the movements offered various candidates to fill in the role in the drama of the Last Days. The Reverend Jimmy-Don tied the prophecies in with the wave of UFO reports that had swept the world in recent years... They said he heralded the new order, a thousand years of peace and freedom under the rule of the Lord, after which would come the final judgment. " [Many more refs. throughout novel, not in DB.]
Protestant USA 1999 Kessel, John. Good News from Outer Space. New York: Tor (1990; c. 1989); pg. 207. "...handling of the grand jury investigation of the riot, collusion between the mainline Protestant churches and the SBI, and microbes in the drinking water at Falls Lake. "
Protestant USA 1999 Willis, Connie. "Epiphany " in Miracle and Other Christmas Stories. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 286. "'According to the evangelists, that's supposed to refer to nuclear war,' Mel said. 'And before that, to the Communist threat. Or fluoridation of water. Or anything else they disapprove of.' "
Protestant USA 1999 Willis, Connie. "Inn " in Miracle and Other Christmas Stories. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 58. "Christmas Eve. The organ played the last notes of 'O Come, O Come Emmanuel,' and the choir sat down. Reverend Wall hobbled slowly to the pulpit, clutching his sheaf of yellowed typewritten sheets.

In the choir, Dee leaned over to Sharon and whispered, 'Here we go. Twenty-four minutes and counting.'

...Reverend Wall set the papers on the pulpit, looked rheumily out over the congregation, and said, ' 'And all went to be taxed, every one into his own city. And Joseph also went up from Galilee, out of the city of Nazareth, into Judeo, unto the city of David, which is called Bethlehem, because he was of the house and lineage of David. To be taxed with Mary, his espoused wife, being great with child.' ' " [Many other refs. throughout story, not in DB. Story is about a Christmas pageant in a Protestant church.]

Protestant USA 1999 Willis, Connie. "Inn " in Miracle and Other Christmas Stories. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 63. "Miriam Hoskins was just going into the adult Sunday school room with a paper plate of frosted cookies. 'Do you know where Reverend Farrison is?' Sharon asked her. "
Protestant USA 1999 Willis, Connie. "Inn " in Miracle and Other Christmas Stories. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 88. Pg. 88: "She needed a map. The ministers' officers were locked, but there were books on the bottom shelf of the display case in the adult Sunday school room. Maybe one was an atlas.

It wasn't. They were self-help books, about coping with grief and codependency and teenage pregnancy, except for an ancient-looking concordance and a Bible dictionary. "; Pg. 91: "She started along the rows of padded pews, bending down to look under each one. 'Our Lady of Sorrows had their Communion silver stolen right off the altar.' "

Protestant USA 2000 Cullin, Mitch. "Excerpt from The Cosmology of Bing " in Circa 2000: Gay Fiction at the Millennium (Robert Drake & Terry Wolverton, eds). Los Angeles, CA: Alyson Pub. (2000); pg. 72. "Then she'd ask for money (a check if he had less than ten dollars on him), something for Brother Van Horn in Atlanta, or The Faith Ministries in Baton Rouge, or Helpful Blessings in Orlando. And he' give her whatever was in his wallet. And she'd accept his offering without a thank you; her black eyes revealing naught--no promise of salvation, no hopes for prayers to be answered--even as her fingers closed around the bills. "
Protestant USA 2000 Dick, Philip K. "The Pre-Persons " in The Golden Man. New York: Berkley (1980; c. 1974); pg. 325. [Philip K. Dick's notes about his story 'The Pre-Persons', which is about a near-future in which pro-abortionists have legalized abortion up to the age of twelve years old. In this story, the author takes a strong pro-life/anti-abortion stance.] "Sorry, people. But for the pre-persons' sake I am not sorry. I stand where I stand: Hier steh' Ich; Ich kann nicht anders,' as Martin Luther is supposed to have said. "
Protestant USA 2002 Ing, Dean. Single Combat. New York: Tor (1983); pg. 13. "In a genuine ecumenical spirit, LDS tithes helped defray the costs of some protestant sects and promoted open forums for debate. "
Protestant USA 2009 England, Terry. Rewind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 228-229. [News report.] "'I understand there is a mixture of religious affiliations in the group'

'Eight Protestants of various stripes, three Catholics, two Jews, one who calls himself a New Age minister, three Mormons.'

'No Muslims...?'

'No Muslims, no Anglicans, no Unitarians.' "

Protestant USA 2010 Brunner, John. The Sheep Look Up. New York: Harper & Row (1972); pg. 106. "'Well, I guess that's by the way, Jacob. Your private life is your concern and presumably a white Protestant is entitled to prefer white Protestant boys.' "
Protestant USA 2010 Bury, Stephen. Interface. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 199. "The out-of-power party had their front-runner (Norman Fowler, Jr.), their runner-up (Nimrod T. ['Tip'] McLane), and their plucky underdog (the Reverend Doctor Billy Joe Sweigel). " [The Reverend also mentioned pg. 316, 321-322, elsewhere.]
Protestant USA 2025 Dick, Philip K. The Penultimate Truth. New York: Dell (1964); pg. 164. "But even below that there seemed something more. Charism, perhaps. That magic aura that great leaders in history such as Gandhi, Caesar, Innocent III, Wallenstein, Luther, F.D.R. have had? " [Luther presumably is Martin Luther, who founded the Protestant reformation.]
Protestant USA 2025 Harrison, Harry. "Brave New World " in Stainless Steel Visions. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 144. "'...Perhaps a world of fair-skinned, blue-eyed, blond, and muscular Anglo-Saxon Protestants is your idea of an ideal society. It is not mine...' "
Protestant USA 2030 Disch, Thomas M. On Wings of Song. New York: St. Martin's Press (1978); pg. 54. "The front cover showed an ingratiating Jesus crowned with thorns, holding out a hamburger. Drops of blood from Jesus and drops of catsup from the burger mingled in a crimson pool from which the words of the title rose up like little lime-green islands: THE PRODUCT IS GOD by Jack Van Dyke. It came with testimonials from a number of unfamiliar show business celebrities and from the Wall Street Journal, which called Reverend Van Dyke 'the sinister minister' and declared his theology to be 'the newest wrinkle in eternal truth. A real bombshell.' He was the head of Marble Collegiate Church in New York City. "
Protestant USA 2035 Butler, Octavia. Parable of the Talents. New York: Seven Stories Press (1998); pg. 313. "...Reverend Marcos Duran... the best-known minister of the Church of Christian America... By then, though, the Church was just one more Protestant denomination. "
Protestant Utah 2054 Harmon, Charlene C. "Pueblo de Sion " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 193. "Every time we encountered someone, Martin and Janet would begin their spiel about all of us being saved to prepare for Christ. And anyone who didn't listen would be damned. We're just glad you guys are here so we didn't have to take any more of their crap. Man, they were worse than any preacher,' Karl continued. "
Protestant Utah: Beaver County 2010 Hickman, Tracy. The Immortals. New York: ROC/Penguin Books (1997; c. 1996); pg. 33. "'I am Quinton Weston. Reverend Weston if you like. As the appointed administrator of this facility, it is my honor to stand before you today and bid you welcome. Welcome, I say, to Newhouse Center!'

You must be joking, Michael thought...

There was a smattering of dazed applause ripping through the large crowd. Rev. Weston smiled warmly toward its meager offering, milking it for all he could.

'Yes, welcome! These are desperate times requiring desperate measures,' Rev. Weston intoned in his best doomsday voice, normally reserved for more distant apocalypses safely ensconced in the Old Testament. 'Our nation finds itself in the grip of peril--even from ourselves. This plague has ravaged the land even as it ravages our bodies now. We are here that others will not have to be. We are here, quarantined from the rest of our fellows so that the plague in our bodies will not destroy them as well. Our sacrifice here makes for a stronger nation--and... humanity.' "

Protestant Utah: Beaver County 2010 Hickman, Tracy. The Immortals. New York: ROC/Penguin Books (1997; c. 1996); pg. 34. "Michael smile suddenly at this. So far, most of the reverend's quotes were taken directly from the President speeches over the last six months--not that there was anyone left to quote other than the President these days.

'Under the direction of the President, the ERIS centers like this one were established in the desolate western deserts to quarantine us and our terrible virus from the healthy world until such time as a cure for our malady may be found.' The reverend's voice turned suddenly cold as his words spat out forcefully. 'Make no mistake. You are interned here, and here you will stay--for your own good and for the greater good that lies outside the fence. If you stay here, you will continue to live. If you leave, except as invited by ERIS and their programs--you will die. Some of you have already disobeyed this commandment on the way here. No one would want to see the results of that tragic mistake repeated again.' "

Protestant Utah: Beaver County 2010 Hickman, Tracy. The Immortals. New York: ROC/Penguin Books (1997; c. 1996); pg. 34. "'Now, a few important things before you get processed and settled into your homes.' Reverend Weston spoke through a smile again. It was as though a church social had just begun. 'There are some things you need to know right away for your own safety. First, this center is surrounded by several rings of Nulgravity fencing...' " [More refs., not in DB, to Reverend Weston, the administrator at the ERIS internment center in Beaver County. The ERIS centers are part of a federal government project, and do not themselves have anything to do with Protestantism. These refs. are included here because the Reverend is Protestant, and uses some Protestant/Christian terminology in his opening speech. See also pg. 35-36.]
Protestant Utah: Beaver County 2010 Hickman, Tracy. The Immortals. New York: ROC/Penguin Books (1997; c. 1996); pg. 44. Pg. 44: "'...The [Dark Queen has] got ears in every corner of this camp and is supreme ruler of the X, Y, and Z blocks in the compound--believe that no matter what the Right Reverend Weston may say to the contrary...' "; Pg. 45: "'...I got this from Reverend Weston himself today--and he got it from ERIS Central.' "; Pg. 47: [Chapter 4 is titled 'The Reverend and the Bulldog', and deals extensively with Rev. Weston.]
Protestant Utah: Beaver County 2010 Hickman, Tracy. The Immortals. New York: ROC/Penguin Books (1997; c. 1996); pg. 59. "'Your son is, indeed, in this camp, Michael--in Barracks 10-Y-2D or E, if memory serves me correctly. If you have not yet been so informed, that's in the very heart of that collection of homosexuals and perverts known as the G/L blocks. You would be well advised to avoid entering that area alone, especially during evening and nighttime hours.'

'You consider it a dangerous place, then?'

The reverend leaned back, looking for words... 'Michael, most of the people in this camp are decent folks. They were hard-working people who were caught up in V-CIDS through no fault of their own. They are the innocents. They are the true victims here. Such is not the case with the perverted heathens in the G/L blocks. They caused this, Michael. V-CIDS came from them--they spawned it. They are the ones who are in need of punishment! They are the ones who have brought this curse on us all. It is a judgment from God, and it is his justice that we administer in this camp...' "

Protestant Utah: Beaver County 2010 Hickman, Tracy. The Immortals. New York: ROC/Penguin Books (1997; c. 1996); pg. 59. "'...The sodomite corrupt are kept strictly separate from the righteous here, Michael. They stay within the law and boundaries we have set for them.'

'And if they don't?' Michael asked quickly.

'Then, their punishment is sure if not swift.'

'You murder them?' Michael's voice sounded strangely calm in his own ears.

'We execute them as publicly and as painfully as possible,' the reverend said easily. 'It has proven to be a most effective deterrent. They are, after all, not really human like you and I. They have squandered away their humanity on their own carnal and base desires. Our policy just keeps the animals in their place.' "

Protestant Utah: Beaver County 2010 Hickman, Tracy. The Immortals. New York: ROC/Penguin Books (1997; c. 1996); pg. 60. "Michael couldn't decide whether to laugh or choke at the vile absurdity of the [Reverend Weston's] statement. 'I take it that these, uh, animals, don't much care for your policy. That's why the G/L barracks are avoided?'

'It is, indeed, a dangerous place, Michael. Not even Brother Bullock here goes in there at night. However, I suspect that you will, indeed, enter into that unholy flock to find such a wayward son.' The reverend leaned forward, the cold fire again alight in his eyes. 'And when you do, you will, of course, let us know anything you may hear that may be of use to us. There are certain deviant elements in this camp--centered in those blocks--which would propose to bring about the destruction of our entire social order. Their unenlightened and pagan viewpoints are contrary not only to our traditional values but the will of God. If you were to hear any such elements meeting or where their leaders might be found, would you keep such knowledge from us?...' "

Protestant Utah: Salt Lake City 1949 Knight, Damon. "Not with a Bang " in The Best of Damon Knight. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1976; c. 1949); pg. 4. [Last two people on Earth:] Pg. 3: "'Darling,' he said, "I respect your views, naturally. But I've got to make you see that they're impractical.'

She looked at him with faint surprise, then away again. Her head shook slightly. No. No, Rolf, I will not live with you in sin. ";

Pg. 4: "She was, apparently, naturally immune [to the plague]. There must have been others, a few at least; but the bombs and the dust had not spared them.

It seemed very awkward to Louise that not one Protestant minister was left alive.

The trouble was, she really meant it. It had taken Smith a long time to believe it, but it was true. She would not sleep in the same hotel with him, either; she expected, and received, the utmost courtesy and decorum. Smith had learned his lesson. He walked on the outside of the rubble-heaped sidewalks; he opened doors for her, when there were still doors... he refrained from swearing. He courted her. "

Protestant Utah: Salt Lake City 1949 Knight, Damon. "Not with a Bang " in The Best of Damon Knight. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1976; c. 1949); pg. 6. Pg. 5: "Louise had been talking lately, in the cloudy language she used about everything, of going up in the mountains to pray for guidance. ";

Pg. 6: "He was saying, '. . . and you'll have the finest wedding dress you ever saw, with a bouquet. Everything you want, Louise, everything . . .'

A wedding dress! And flowers, even if there couldn't be any minister! Well, why hadn't the fool said so before? "

Protestant Vietnam 1965 Scarborough, Elizabeth Ann. The Healer's War. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 7. [An American nurse serving in the U.S. military during Vietnamese War.] "The prayers were for Tran, because I didn't know anything else to do, not because I'm this holy, religious person. Like all my family, I've always been a lukewarm, nonchurchgoing, nonspecific Protestant. People like us pray only at ritualized occasions, like funerals, and when there's a really big crisis. It isn't nice to pray for something you want for yourself, according to my upbringing, and God expects you to help yourself most of the time. But this was for Tran, not for me--not mostly Well, not only me, anyway.

Maybe that was the trouble. Maybe God wasn't listening because my heart was not pure. Every time I squeezed my eyes shut and started mumbling humble apologies for my sin and error I ended up snarling that it wasn't all my fault. Even though I knew damned good and well I was going to have to take the whole rap. "

Protestant Washington, D.C. 1965 Sawyer, Robert J. Illegal Alien. New York: Ace Books (1997); pg. 62. "In 1965, he and two hundred and fifty thousand other people marched on Washington, D.C., and heard the Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr., give his 'I Have a Dream' speech.'

Dale Rice had known King, and he'd known Malcolm X. He knew Jesse Jackson and Louis Farrakhan. There were those who called him the top civil-rights lawyer in the United States. "

Protestant Washington, D.C. 1982 Straub, Peter. Koko. New York: E. P. Dutton (1988); pg. 29. "It was sort of like the Emperor's New Clothes--nobody had the balls to tell Protestant millionaires they looked ridiculous. (Conor was certain that none of these people could be Catholic.) Bow ties! Red suspenders with pictures of babies on them! "


Protestant, continued

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