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34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

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Ponca, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Presbyterian Antarctica 1999 Batchelor, John Calvin. The Birth of the People's Republic of Antarctica. New York: Dial Press (1983); pg. 185. "I never saw her naked; it was the cold, and her temperament, for she said she wanted me to know there was a needful part of her that was for me alone to touch and smell and remember, but not for the sins of the eyes. That was her Presbyterian soul in conflict with a heated-up nature. " [Other refs. to Presbyterian character(s), not in DB, but all refs. to 'Presbyterian' by name are thought to be in DB. Also pg. 259.]
Presbyterian Antarctica 1999 Batchelor, John Calvin. The Birth of the People's Republic of Antarctica. New York: Dial Press (1983); pg. 209. "The South Georgians were dominated by Scots Presbyterians, a people who suspect kingship but who are equally distrustful of permitting commoners--just everyman--a voice in matters of property and blood-kin authority. Lazarus counseled himself and the young people to remain patient. He explained to me that South Georgia fascinated him as a political phenomenon where, because of its isolation physically and now economically, time had seemingly stopped, or regressed, to something very close to what America had been at its birth, as a nation. "
Presbyterian Brazil: Rio de Janiero 1984 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 12: "Sunstroke ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Feb 1984); pg. 11. "Nearby, Rahne Sinclair steps hesitantly--almost fearfully--into a church... "; Rahne's thoughts: "If Reverend Craig saw me now, he'd have a fit. To him, Catholics are agents of the devil. But we all b'lieve in God, an' read the same Bible--an' I can find no Scots Presbyterian cairk in the city... " [Rahne, a Scots Presbyterian, prays, throughout page 11. More, not listed here, but listed under 'Christianity.']
Presbyterian California 1967 Koontz, Dean R. Lightning. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1988); pg. 37. "...had done charity work with Bob at St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church. "
Presbyterian California: Berkeley 1996 Sawyer, Robert J. Frameshift. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1997); pg. 151. "'What about his politics?'

'Republican...'

'And his religion?'

'Presbyterian.'

'Did he go to university?'

...'He's an eight-grade dropout.' "

Presbyterian California: San Francisco 1977 Leiber, Fritz. Our Lady of Darkness. New York: Berkley Publishing Corp. (1977); pg. 36. "'you know my long name is not Calvina, but Calpurnia--the minor Roman Cassandra who kept warning Caesar... I may be a puritan, but I wasn't named for Calvin. My parents were both Presbyterians, it's true, but my father early progressed into Unitarianism and died a devout Ethical Culturist. He used to pray to Emerson and swear by Robert Ingersoll...' "
Presbyterian Colorado 2010 Willis, Connie. "Samaritan " in Fire Watch. New York: Bluejay (1984; story copyright 1979); pg. 216. "He had seen it coming. The Reverend Natalie Abreu, twenty-two and only one year out of Princeton, was one enthusiasm after another. She had revamped the Sunday school, taken over the grief counseling department, and initiated a standard of priestly attire that outraged Reverend Hoyt's Presbyterian soul. Today she had on a triling cassock with a red-and-gold-embroidered stole edged with fringe. It must be Pentecost. " [Rev. Hoyt, a Presbyterian minister, is one of main characters in story. Story is about an orangutan who wants to be baptized. Other refs. not in DB, unless Presbyterianism mentioned by name.]
Presbyterian Falkland Islands 1995 Batchelor, John Calvin. The Birth of the People's Republic of Antarctica. New York: Dial Press (1983); pg. 151. Pg. 151: "We slid toward the church side of the square, near several ancient-looking nuns--whom I thought out of place, given that the church was Protestant, by the cornerstone, the First Presbyterian Church of West Falkland. "; Pg. 167: "We were armed and assigned to the graveyard of the Presbyterian church, its high wall topped by jagged glass. "; Pg. 171: "No one told me how I got from the Presbyterian church to the last barricades on the concrete wharves the next day, because none of the men I fought with in that graveyard survived to tell. "
Presbyterian Florida: Miami 1942 Simmons, Dan. The Crook Factory. New York: Avon Books (1999); pg. 36. "I had sensed an undercurrent of Presbyterian Sunday school correctness that would have made such a secret life all but unthinkable for him. "
Presbyterian galaxy 2075 Card, Orson Scott & Kathryn H. Kidd. Lovelock. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 62. [Year is estimated.] "Penelope looked disgruntled; then she swelled up importantly and took a deep breath. 'Well, I'll have to tell you about it myself. First of all, we're Presbyterians here.'

'Mamie sniffed. 'There's not a Presbyterian in the bunch of us.' she said. 'I'm Congregationalist, and Stef and Red and the girls are Episcopalian...' "

Presbyterian galaxy 2075 Card, Orson Scott & Kathryn H. Kidd. Lovelock. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 174. [Year is estimated.] "I have never had much use for human religions... Nevertheless, I enjoyed the weekly Presbyterian services... "
Presbyterian galaxy 2075 Card, Orson Scott & Kathryn H. Kidd. Lovelock. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 177. [Year is estimated.] "Naturally she was uncomfortable attending Presbyterian services instead of the Catholic ones of her childhood. "
Presbyterian galaxy 2075 Card, Orson Scott & Kathryn H. Kidd. Lovelock. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 51-52. [Year is estimated.] "We were in a village in ourselves, no matter that officially she was going to belong to an arbitrary clumping of effete Christians called Mayflower Village. She would be a Catholic among Congregationalists, I a low-order primate among Presbyterians... "
Presbyterian Illinois 1960 Simmons, Dan. Summer of Night. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1991); pg. 31. "...and the larger white building which was the Presbyterian Church where Dale and Lawrence went, farther north... "
Presbyterian Illinois 1960 Simmons, Dan. Summer of Night. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1991); pg. 65. "The elm-covered tunnel of Broad was behind them, only a few lights showing in the big Victorian homes set far back from the street. First Presbyterian, the Stewart family's church, glowed pale and empty on the corner across from the post office. "
Presbyterian Indiana 1965 Clarke, Arthur C. & Gentry Lee. Cradle. New York: Warner Books (1988); pg. 39. "The Winters family lived a simple Midwestern life. Mr. Winters was moderately successful, eventually becoming the senior vice-president of the largest bank in Columbus. The family's chief social activity was church. They were Presbyterians and spent almost all day Sunday at the church. Mrs. Winters ran the Sunday School. Mr. Winters was a deacon and voluntarily managed the church finances. Vernon and Linda helped supervise the smaller children at Sunday school and were responsible for the special Bible displays on the bulletin boards in the kindergarten and primary school rooms. " [Other refs. to these Presbyterian characters, not in DB. All refs. to 'Presbyterian' by name are in DB. More, pg. 40-42, 45.]
Presbyterian Indiana 1965 Clarke, Arthur C. & Gentry Lee. Cradle. New York: Warner Books (1988); pg. 40. "Mothers did not work, fathers were bankers or lawyers or businessmen... and believed fervently in God, country, and the entire litany that ends in apple pie. Vernon was a 'good kid,' even an 'exceptional kid,' who first drew attention to himself by his performances in the annual church pageants at Christmas and Easter. The pastor of their church was a great believer that reenactment of the birth and crucifixion of Christ, performed by the children of the town, was a powerful way to reconfirm the faith of the local citizenry. And Reverend Pendleton was correct. The Columbus Presbyterian Church pageants were one of the highlights of the local year. When the church congregation and their friends saw their children acting in the roles of Joseph, Mary, and even Christ, they became involved in the depicted events at an emotional level that was virtually impossible to achieve in any other way. "
Presbyterian Indiana 1972 Clarke, Arthur C. & Gentry Lee. Cradle. New York: Warner Books (1988); pg. 45. "Eventually Vernon managed to fall asleep again. But his sleep was fitful and disturbed by vivid dreams. In on dream Vernon was dressed in his midshipman's uniform but was on stage back at the Columbus Presbyterian church. It was the Easter pageant and he was again Christ, dragging the cross to Calvary. The sharp edge of the cross on his shoulder was cutting through his uniform shirt and Vernon was aware of anxiety that he might not pass inspection. He stumbled and fell, the cross cut deeper through the uniform as he had feared and he could see some running down his arm. 'Crucify him,' Vernon heard someone shout in the dream. 'Crucify him,' a group of people in the audience shouted together as Vernon tried vainly to see through the klieg lights. He woke up sweating... "
Presbyterian Indiana 1974 Clarke, Arthur C. & Gentry Lee. Cradle. New York: Warner Books (1988); pg. 46. "He graduated with honors and did his initial tour of duty on a large aircraft carrier. Two years later, in June of 1974, after Betty Pendleton had completed college and obtained her teacher's certificate, Vernon married her in the Columbus Presbyterian church where they had played Joseph and Mary a dozen years earlier. They moved to Norfolk, Virginia, and Vernon believed that the pattern of his life was set... "
Presbyterian Indiana 1994 Clarke, Arthur C. & Gentry Lee. Cradle. New York: Warner Books (1988); pg. 287. "The music swelled in the room. What Winters heard in his head was the introduction to the Doxology, the short hymn that he had heard every single Sunday for eighteen years in the Presbyterian church in Columbus, Indiana. In his mind's eye he was thirteen years old again and sitting next to Betty in his choir robes. He smiled at her and they stood up together.

Praise God from whom all blessings flow. " [More.]

Presbyterian Luna 1961 Simmons, Dan. Phases of Gravity. New York: Bantam (1989); pg. 209. "'You remember the first thing Buzz Aldrin did when they had a few minutes of personal time after Apollo 11 landed?'

'Celebrated communion,' said Baedecker. 'He brought the wine and stuff in his personal preference kit. He was . . . what? . . . Presbyterian?'

'It doesn't matter,' said Dave. 'But what Buzz didn't realize is that the mission itself was already the ritual, the sacrament was already in place, just waiting for someone to celebrate it.' "

Presbyterian Maryland 2031 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Chronoliths. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 145. "The meeting took place in the assembly hall of a Presbyterian church in what had been a working-class neighborhood before it slipped into outright poverty some years ago. Regina Lee Sadler, strutting across the stage in a flowered dress and with an old-fashioned handless mike bobbing in front of her head, looked both more robust and about twenty pounds heavier than she had looked in the video window... It wasn't exactly a Twelve-Step meeting, but it wasn't far off. Five new members introduced themselves and their problems. Four had lost children to Kuinist or haj cells within the last month. One had been missing her daughter for more than a year and wanted a place where she could share her grief... Then Regina Lee stood up again and read from a printed sheet of news and updates--children recovered, rumors of new Kuinist movements in the West and South, a truckload of underage pilgrims intercepted at the Mexican border. "
Presbyterian Metropolis 2010 Maggin, Elliot S. Kingdom Come. New York: Time Warner (1998); pg. 4. "Wesley was far and away the most influential member of the congregation in those days. He praised my preaching and counseling skills to such an embarrassing degree that my interview with the search committee was no more than a perfunctory conversation with a pleasant group of people over tea and fresh strawberries in a midtown apartment that smelled of mildew and rust. It was the home of one of the committee members, a lovely man in his eighties who passed on soon afterward. We spoke about the change of seasons, and a little bit, as I recall, about the comet that decorated the evening skies that month. "
Presbyterian Metropolis 2010 Maggin, Elliot S. Kingdom Come. New York: Time Warner (1998); pg. 5. "'But don't worry about luck, Reverend McCay. You've got the job already if you want it.'

'Norman, you might have noticed'--Wesley grinned, leaning toward me as we gathered up our fellowship and carried it out of the search committee meeting--'that the average age of the congregation is dead.'

It was an amazing church nonetheless. It took up the entire ground floor of the LexCorp building, which had risen at the height of the city's last great building boom. The company founded by Lex Luthor, the industrialist and sometime felon, had acquired the square block containing... an old Presbyterian church. It had not been a historic building by any means; the church had burned or fallen in or decayed and been rebuilt half a dozen times in the previous two hundred years. The congregation went back to the Eighteenth Century on that site, and there was always someone or other paying homage to the Creator on that corner. "

Presbyterian Metropolis 2010 Maggin, Elliot S. Kingdom Come. New York: Time Warner (1998); pg. 5. "Luthor had gotten tired of waiting for the last of the congregants to give up or die. One day at a news conference on the street outside the old church, he'd made a big show of promising that if the elders gave the go-ahead, he would build a finer church on that site than Metropolis had ever seen. The congregation--those awake enough to know what they were voting on--had said sure, and Luther proved good to his word. The new church had opened for worship even as LexCorp's skyscaper-in-progress had risen above it, the construction crews had adjusted their schedule to accommodate that of the Presbyterians of Jefferson Avenue.

The church was more than thirty years old by the time I came to take my job as part-time pastor, and it was by any measure the finest building in which I'd ever served. It was marble, granite, and steel, like the rest of the building above it, but with hardwood paneling inside. "

Presbyterian Metropolis 2010 Maggin, Elliot S. Kingdom Come. New York: Time Warner (1998); pg. 3-4. "It began with an ending: that of Wesley Dodds, my friend. Wesley was challenging and smart and the kind of man I hoped to be someday. He was much older than I was and most of the reason I'd come to Metropolis a little over ten years before. It was thanks to Wesley that I took the part-time position in the pulpit of the old Presbyterian church on Jefferson Avenue and Fifty-Fourth Street.

...I took on this job after I ostensibly had retired to collect my pension and enjoy whatever golden years God held in trust for Ellen and me. The congregation was down to just a few dozen families, though that number worked its way as high as a hundred again for a brief time in the years just after I'd arrived. The church could not afford, nor did they need, a full-time pastor, and for that matter I was not even Presbyterian.

Wesley told me, and I suppose he told all his fellow congregants who would listen, that Dutch Reformed was close enough to suit my new flock. "

Presbyterian Metropolis 2010 Maggin, Elliot S. Kingdom Come. New York: Time Warner (1998); pg. 5-6. "The main floor of the sanctuary sat about a story and a half below ground level so that a battery of large stained-glass windows decorated eye-level on the Jefferson Avenue side for passersby. It had a stunning pipe organ like one I had ever seen or heard elsewhere, taking up the eastern wall and reaching up the entire three-story height of the sanctuary. A balcony and choir loft sat around ground level, with doors to classrooms that we used only for storage. I do not think that in the time I was there we had a single regular congregant under sixty, and certainly none of Sunday School age. "
Presbyterian Metropolis 2020 Maggin, Elliot S. Kingdom Come. New York: Time Warner (1998); pg. 7. "'So the question of truth in the Bible thus becomes irrelevant,' I put forth to the congregation, and most of them listened and nodded as they always did. Or slept. The big sanctuary had about thirty people in it this Sunday morning, more than I was usually getting these days. The only one who had any particular reaction at all to what I was saying was Wesley, and I perceived his reaction only because he was my friend. " [Other refs., not all in DB.]
Presbyterian Metropolis 2020 Maggin, Elliot S. Kingdom Come. New York: Time Warner (1998); pg. 44. "But now I stood in the center of people's frames of vision in the sanctuary of this splendid [Presbyterian] church in which, through my twilight years, I have been able to serve. I stood before perhaps eighty frightened people, the largest Sabbath morning crowd that my congregation had been able to muster in years. Now they were all here because of the dread events of the past days, and this was the only place they had to turn. And now instead of the comfort for which they had come, I was spouting forth what I had long believed to be words from a dying fever dream of Saint John the Divine. In those days the apostle had lain hallucinating through the last days of his life, banished to a desert island by a frightened king, scribbling or dictating these words of the most horrifying unfulfilled prophecy in the Scriptures. "
Presbyterian Netherlands 1994 Morrow, James. Towing Jehovah. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1994); pg. 347. "'I'm not sure how Dutch Presbyterians go about it,' said Okham, slipping a King James Bible from his parka, 'but I know they're fond of this translation.' "
Presbyterian New Mexico: Atocha 2010 Williams, Walter Jon. Days of Atonement. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 147. "But Debra was off helping to costume a production of The Gondoliers at the Presbyterian church, a favor to a friend. "
Presbyterian New Mexico: Atocha 2010 Williams, Walter Jon. Days of Atonement. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 282. "Mrs. Jernigan and the children were left with the Presbyterian pastor. "
Presbyterian New York: New York City 1921 Scholz, Carter. "The Amount to Carry " in Starlight 2 (Patrick Nielsen Hayden, ed.). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 145. "He remembers the two pianos side by side in the Sunday school room of Central Presbyterian. "
Presbyterian New York: New York City 1982 Straub, Peter. Koko. New York: E. P. Dutton (1988); pg. 159. "Almost exactly a year later, during his pediatric residency at Columbia-Presbyterian Hospital in New York... "
Presbyterian New York: New York City 2050 Pohl, Frederik. The Years of the City. New York: Timescape (1984); pg. 331. "'I was brought up as a God-fearing Presbyterian,' she went on, settling into an oration. 'I married young, to a man who died in the serice of his country. Some years later I married again, to a distinguished engineer and philanthropist, and remained his wife for nearly thirty-five years... I was a good wife,' she said strongly, 'but I was also mindful of God's law. Reverend Arbneth used to say that the best birth-control device was the silver dollar. Hold it between your knees and never drop it, and you'll never have a problem. He was right. Girls today-- I mean, girls then, before I was suspended, they should have taken that advice, and then there wouldn't be any need for legalized murer, and I'm sure that's till true now, whatever else has changed. Murder is a sin, and it's also a crime. You should prevent it! Put them in jail if they can't live decently! What kind of a world would it be if you let people do whatever they wanted?' "
Presbyterian North America 1914 Turtledove, Harry. The Great War: American Front (alternate history novel). New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 171. "McSweeney disapproved of everything on general principles, and of Mantarakis not just on general principles but also--and particularly--because he wasn't Presbyterian.

And then, to Mantarakis' amazement, those gllomy features rearranged themselves into a smile so bright, it was almost sweet. 'Merry Christmas, Paul,' McSweeney said. 'God bless you on the day.' "

Presbyterian Ohio 1999 Willis, Connie. "Epiphany " in Miracle and Other Christmas Stories. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 259. "And were they right? Had he really had a vision or was it some kind of midlife crisis? Or psychotic episode?

He was a Presbyterian, not a Pentecostal. He did not have visions. The only time he had experienced anything remotely like this was when he was nineteen, and that hadn't been a vision. It had been a call to the ministry, and it had only sent him to seminary, not haring off to who knows where.

And this wasn't a vision either. He hadn't seen a burning bush or an angel. He hadn't seen anything. He had simply had an overwhelming conviction that what he was saying was true. " [The story's main character is a Presbyterian minister. Refs. to him throughout, of course, but 'Presbyterian' is mentioned only here.]

Presbyterian Ontario: Toronto 1990 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Divide. New York: Doubleday (1990); pg. 34. "'...We were that kind of family, the Formica counters in the kitchen, Sunday at the Presbyterian church every once in a while, the neighbors coming over to play bridge...' "
Presbyterian Switzerland 1971 Leiber, Fritz. "America the Beautiful " in The Ruins of Earth: An Anthology of Stories of the Immediate Future. (Thomas M. Disch, ed.) New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons (1971); pg. 310. "...this puritanism was ultimately based on the same swollen concern about property and money--industry, in its moral sense--that one found in the Swiss and Scottish Presbyterians and most of the early Protestants...' "
Presbyterian United Kingdom: England 1773 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 36. "He might have found comfort in the Bible. But he did not believe in the Virgin Birth, or in the Divine Christ either. Baptized a Presbyterian, he counted himself a Unitarian... "
Presbyterian United Kingdom: Scotland 1971 Leiber, Fritz. "America the Beautiful " in The Ruins of Earth: An Anthology of Stories of the Immediate Future. (Thomas M. Disch, ed.) New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons (1971); pg. 310. "...this puritanism was ultimately based on the same swollen concern about property and money--industry, in its moral sense--that one found in the Swiss and Scottish Presbyterians and most of the early Protestants...' "
Presbyterian United Kingdom: Scotland 1984 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 15: "Scaredy Cat! ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (May 1984); pg. 19. Rahne: "Did you know, Sam, my mum died in childbirth? When he was most angry with me, Reverend Craig would say it was my fault, a sign of the Lord's displeasure at my mother's life... an'... an my creation. It fell to me, he'd say, to atone for her sins, an' save her from the pit. How can I do that, Sam, if I fell myself becoming... more wicked than she could ever have been? I miss her so. I wish I'd had a chance to know her. " [Rahne refers here to Rev. Craig, the Scots Presbyterian minister who raised her in Scotland. He conversation with Sam takes place on a bus en route from NYC to the Massachusetts Academy. More, pg. 18.]
Presbyterian United Kingdom: Scotland: Muir Isle 1985 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 26: "Legion ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Apr. 1985); pg. 15. [On dock in Ullapool, on Western coast of Scotland.] Rev. Craig: "Rahne Sinclair! By what right d'you profane God's good land by your unholy presence?! "; Rahne: "Reverend Craig! "; Mirage: "That's the man who raised you? "; Rev. Craig: "Leave this place, ye dinna belong here, among true people. "; Mirage: "Lay off, mister. We're minding our own business, why don't you do the same?! "; Rev. Craig: "Hold yuir tongue, missy! Yon brat is a spawn of Satan... and any who consort with her are as damned and doomed as she! "; Rahne: "Don't argue, Dani, please--let's just go. "
Presbyterian United Kingdom: Scotland: Muir Isle 1985 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 26: "Legion ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Apr. 1985); pg. 20. "On the ground she [Rahne] becomes a full wolf... and dashes towards Moira's lab. Around her, the world becomes a magical place, a fantastic kaleidoscope of light and sound and color that I totally hidden from her human form. The beauty leaves her breathless, and the strength and grace of her lupine body make her giddy. This is why Reverend Craig curses her--and tried once to kill her--she's a werewolf. She believes in him and the word of God he taught her since she was born. Yet she feels so right and natural and wonderful in her furform, how can that be evil? But if she isn't evil, what then does that say for the minister and his teachings? The harder she seeks her answers... the more confused she becomes. "
Presbyterian United Kingdom: Scotland: Muir Isle 1986 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 44: "Runaway! ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Oct. 1986); pg. 18. Rev. Craig: "DEMONS! At last, Rahne Sinclair, child of sin, you show yuir true face to the world! "; Rahne: "Reverend Craig! "; Roberto: "The minister who raised you? That creep?! "; Rahne: "You're mistaken, sir. We're trying to help . . . "; Rev. Craig: "Of that, I am certain. All I need do for proof is look about me. And small wonder I find you in this foul corner of town. Like mother, like daughter. "; Rahne: "Liar! LIAR!! My mother was a good woman--she was! She was no dockyard tramp-- " [Rahne transforms into her werewolf form.]; Rev. Craig: "By the holy rood-- A creature from the pit! "; Sam: "She's as human as anyone, mister. An' a lot more decent than most. You got no call to speak like that. "; Danielle: "Leave him, Sam. You're wasting your breath. "
Presbyterian United Kingdom: Scotland: Muir Isle 1986 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 44: "Runaway! ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Oct. 1986); pg. 18. Danielle: "How ya doin'? "; Rahne: "'m fine. "; Danielle: "Could'a fooled me. Rahne, what Reverend Craig said doesn't matter. He's an old man, filled to the brim with prejudice and hate. Without you, Jack would have escaped. Moira and those policemen would have died. That's nothing to be ashamed of. You're not alone. You have friends, Moira loves you. And I . . . "; Rahne: "I know. But that doesn't make me ache any the less. "; Danielle: "Rahne, in town. Did you really mean it, about total destruction--the death of all those people--being no more than they deserve? "; Rahne: "I was upset. "; Danielle: "I know. But did you mean it?! Would you have let Jack carry out that threat?!! "
Presbyterian USA 1835 Forstchen, William R. "A Hard Day For Mother " in Alternate Generals (Harry Turtledove, ed.) New York: Baen (1998); pg. 202. "Then it was more of a game, my playing soldier like my friend Thomas with battery practice, followed by a supper in the basement of the Presbyterian Church and prayer service together afterwards. "
Presbyterian USA 1913 Simmons, Dan. "Iverson's Pits " in Prayers to Broken Stones. New York: Bantam (1992; c. 1988); pg. 238. "The Reverend Hodges had formed the first Troop in Chestnut Hill, our little town outside of Philadelphia, now a suburb. The Reverend allowed only boys of good character and strong moral fiber to join: Presbyterian boys. I had sung in the Fourth Avenue Presbyterian Boys' Choir for three years and, in spite of my frailness and total inability to tie a knot, I was allowed to become a Bout Scout. " [More about the Reverend Hodges and his Scouts, not in DB.]
Presbyterian USA 1963 Grimwood, Ken. Replay. New York: Arbor House (1986); pg. 141. "'...but during my residency at Columbia Presbyterian I met a young orthopedist...' "
Presbyterian USA 1970 Anderson, Poul. The Dancer from Atlantis. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971); pg. 7. "It wasn't his usual behavior. If anything, he was too withdrawn unless a few beers or a couple of Scotches had relaxed him. Tonight he was seeking to escape his thoughts. And why not? If he'd shaken off the Presbyterian theology of his boyhood, did he have to carry around the associated conscience? "
Presbyterian USA 1984 Heinlein, Robert A. Job: A Comedy of Justice. New York: Ballantine (1984); pg. 375. "We don't believe in shoving religion down a kid's throat but the truth is that young people like our community church--thanks to our pastor, the Reverend Dr. M. O. Loch. Malcolm is a Presbyterian, I think; he still has a Scottish bur in his speech. But there is nothing of the dour Scot about him and kids love him. He leads the revels and directs the rituals--our daughter Elise is a Novice Ecdysiast under him and she talks of having a vocation. (Piffle. She'll marry right out of high school; I could name the young man--though I can't see what she sees in him.) "
Presbyterian USA 1985 Drake, David. The Tank Lords. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 372. "The Church of the Lord's Universe was officially launched in 1895 in Minneapolis, Minnesota, by the merger of 230 existing protestant congregations--Methodist, Presbyterian, Episcopalian, and Lutheran. In part the new church was a revolt against the extreme fundamentalism peaking at that time. The Universalists sought converts vigorously from the start. Their liturgy obviously attempted to recapture the traditional beauty of Christianity's greatest age, but there is reason to believe that the extensive use of Latin in the service was part of a design to avoid giving doctrinal offense as well. Anyone who has attended both Presbyterian and Methodist services has felt uneasiness at the line, 'Forgive us our debts/trespasses . . .' St. Jerome's Latin version of the Lord's Prayer flows smoothly and unnoticed from the tongue of one raised in either sect. "
Presbyterian USA 1985 Knight, Damon. "The God Machine " in One Side Laughing. New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; 1985); pg. 33. "'...The first thing we tried was a really old set of the scrolls, the Torah. Bingo. Furthermore, we found out you can transfer this energy, immanence, we call it, by leaving your holy object in a lead-lined container with some other object. For a relic, like a piece of bone, say, we use bone. Lamb is the best.'

'That's unbelievable, Bill.'

'I know. That's the problem. All I can do is, is I can let you try it yourself. May I ask what your religion is, Terry?'

'I'm a Presbyterian.'

'Okay, I'll get you the Protestant model. For that, we had to go to old Bibles...' "

Presbyterian USA 1986 Anderson, Jack. Control. New York: Kensington Publishing Corp. (1988); pg. 139. "'...I'm guess I'm an atheist.'

She shrugged. 'I understand. Thad and I don't make a point of it, but I suppose we're really atheists, too.'

'Even though,' said Bert, continuing his line of thought,' my father is a devout Presbyterian--'

Anne giggled softly. 'I never heard of anyone being a devout Presbyterian.'

'Even so, the mother of my child refused to marry me because she and her family consider me a Jew,' said Bert. 'So there's a hidden chapter from my personal life.'

'You? . . . A child?' "

Presbyterian USA 1989 Simmons, Dan. "Shave and a Haircut, Two Bites " in Prayers to Broken Stones. New York: Bantam (1992; c. 1989); pg. 291. "'All right,' I said... 'tell me this one wasn't essential. Number Eight--'All vampires hate and fear crosses and will avoid them at all cost.' ' I paused dramatically. Kevin knew what was coming and slumped lower. 'Kev, Mr. Denofrio goes to St. Mary's. Your church, Kev. Every morning before he goes down to open up the shop.'

'Yeah. Innis goes to First Prez [Presbyterian] on Sundays. My dad told me about Denofrio being in the parish. I never see him because he only goes to early Mass.' " [Some other refs., not in DB.]

Presbyterian USA 1991 McCammon, Robert R. Boy's Life. New York: Pocket Books (1992; c. 1991); pg. 447. Pg. 447: "The minister from the Union Town Presbyterian Church, where the Callans belonged, entered and asked us all to link hands and pray. "; Pg. 448: "Gradually, the relatives thinned out. The Presbyterian minister said he would stay as long as they wanted him there. Mrs. Callan grasped my mother's hand, and asked her not to go just yet... " [More, pg. 454, 460, etc.]
Presbyterian USA 2010 Willis, Connie. "Samaritan " in Fire Watch. New York: Bluejay (1984; story copyright 1979); pg. 225. "'It worked both ways, remember. We could hardly stand by and let the [Charismatics] get them. Besides, everyone else had fiddled away their compromise points on trespassers versus debtors and translations of the Bible. You Presbyterians, as I recall, were determined to stick in the magic word 'predestination' everywhere you could.' "
Presbyterian USA 2015 Sullivan, Tricia. Someone to Watch Over Me. New York: Bantam (1997); pg. 241. "He might have bundled her into a cab and taken her to Columbia Presbyterian. "
Presbyterian Utah 1881 Turtledove, Harry. How Few Remain. New York: Ballantine (1997); pg. 55. "'...Presbyterians like me, Catholics, Baptists, Jews, what have you--in Utah Territory, we're all outsiders looking in...' "
Presbyterian Virginia 1987 Willis, Connie. Lincoln's Dreams. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 186. "'I did have a dream,' she said. 'I remember it now. I think I was in our church, the Presbyterian church on Main Street back home, and they were taking up the collection, only it wasn't a church service. It was a meeting of some kind.'

A vestry meeting. At Grace Church.

'I don't remember very much of it... It was cold. I remember thinking I should have worn my other coat and wishing they'd stop arguing so I could go home.'

They had been arguingover a raise of fifty-five dollars for the minister. The meeting had gone on for three hours, and finally Lee had said [character dreamt of Robert E. Lee in 1862], 'I will give that sum,' just so it could be over. Lee had only worn his military cape, and he walked home through the chilly rain.

The family was waiting for him at the tea table. he sat down heavily on the sofa, cradling his left arm, and his wife said, half-jokingly, 'Where have you been? You've kept us waiting a long time,' and asked him to say grace. "

Presbyterian Virginia 1987 Willis, Connie. Lincoln's Dreams. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 190. "'...The meeting you dreamed was at Grace Church in Lexington. Lee went to that meeting and sat there all afternoon in the cold and then walked home in the rain and had a heart attack! I'm not going to let that happen to you!' " [Grace Church (Presbyterian} also mentioned pg. 198.]
Presbyterian world 1800 Anthony, Piers. Vision of Tarot. New York: Berkley Books (1985; 1st ed. 1980); pg. 200. "...Protestant groups, and the latter into multiple splits. The Lutherans, the Calvinists, Episcopals, Presbyterians, Puritans, Baptists, Congregationalists, Quakers, Methodists... "
Presbyterian world 1993 Morrow, James. Only Begotten Daughter. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1990); pg. 170. [Julie Katz apparently visits Hell.] "Day by day, the categories of iniquity grew even more arbitrary and excessive. Julie could understand why there was an Island of Atheists. Ditto the Island of Adulterers, the Island of Occultists, the Island of Tax Dodgers. Depending on one's upbringing, the precincts reserved for Unitarians, Abortionists, Socialists, Nuclear Strategists, and Sexual Deviates made sense. But why the Island of Irish Catholics? The Island of Scotch Presbyterians? Christian Scientists, Methodists, Baptists?

'This offends me,' she said...

The devil's [replied] 'Throughout history, admission to Hell has depended on but one criterion... You must belong to a group some other group believes is heading there.'

'That's perverse.'

'It's also the law...' "

Presbyterian world 2030 Jablokov, Alexander. Nimbus. New York: Avon Books (1993); pg. 368. "'...Linden Timothy Straussman, born Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, December 12, 1960, and died on the slopes of Mt. May, Alberta, Canada, March 27, 2021.' "
primal-indigenous Afghanistan 2096 Sterling, Bruce. Holy Fire. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 108. "'Does the polity have any enemies?'

'Of course! Many! Countless hordes! A vast spectrum of refuseniks and dissidents! Amish. Anarchists. Andaman Islanders. Australian aborigines. A certain number of tribal Afghanis. Certain American Indians. And that's just in the A's!' "



primal-indigenous, continued

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