Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

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Pentecostal, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Pentecostal Ontario: Toronto 1990 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Divide. New York: Doubleday (1990); pg. 75-76. "An illuminated Port-A-Sign announced:

REV HARMON BELWEATHER
REVIVAL TONIGHT 9:00
MIRACLES!
HEALING!

John gazed awhile at the sign... joined the small crowd in the overheated lobby, indoors and away from the rain.

The auditorium was three-quarters full when the ushers closed the doors... A woman in a gingham skirt... paused at the row in font of John and chatted with a hugely overweight man about his gall bladder troubles. She caught John's glance and moved toward him; when he did not look away she asked, 'Are you here for healing?'

He shook his head in the negative.

'Are you sure? You look like a man with a need.

He gave her a long, focused look. The woman in the gingham dress tugged at her earlobe, stared a moment longer, then shrugged uneasily and moved away. "

Pentecostal Ontario: Toronto 1990 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Divide. New York: Doubleday (1990); pg. 76. "The audience hushed as the lights dimmed. A local choir performed a hymn, and then Reverend Belweather took the stage. He was a squat, compactly fat man in a sincere Republican suit. His hair was cut to Marine length; he wore rings on his fingers. He began in a low-key fashion, whispering into the hand mike--you had to strain forward to hear him--but he was good, John thought. He read the crowd well and he was good with his body, with his aggressive strut and upraised palm. He preached to the crowd for forty minutes under the fierce klieg lights, rising to thunderous crescendos of damnation and salvation, the sweat rivering off the slope of his forehead. John closed his eyes and felt the crowd around him as a single, physical thing--an animal, aroused to some terrible confusion of eroticism and fear. The human odor was as physical as heat in the confined space of the auditorium and it beat against him like a pulse. " [More.]
Pentecostal Ontario: Toronto 1990 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Divide. New York: Doubleday (1990); pg. 78. "Spontaneous scars and wounds that appear in a religious trance are called 'stigmata.' The phenomenon occurs in faiths from Catholicism to Voodoo; an interaction between mind and body triggered by religious ecstasy.

John was able to do it at will.

Reverend Belweather stared with horror at the cross of raised, feverish skin that had formed on John's forehead.

He managed, 'Who are you?'

'It doesn't matter,' John said. 'What matters is that your wife has a radio transmitter built into her hearing aid and that you're using it to defraud these people. You're in violation of three federal statues and you're committing a sin. You should cancel tomorrow's performance.'

Reverend Belweather staggered back as if the floor had shifted under his feet. He looked for his stage crew--the big men in the wings. They had already sensed a ripple in the flow and moved forward. 'Get him the f--- out of here,' the Rev. Belweather said, his voice suddenly shrill and petulant. "

Pentecostal Tennessee 2039 Goonan, Kathleen Ann. Crescent City Rhapsody. New York: Tor (2001; c. 2000); pg. 445. "'Who are you?' asked one of the men.

'Johnnie Cash,' she said, and they all laughed. She smiled slightly. 'I'm protesting injustice in the world. And I am the minister of this church. It is the New Pentecostal Church of the Valley. I welcome you to the grounds. Stay as long as you want. You may call me Mother Cash.'

'We'll be leaving in the morning,' said one of the men nervously. 'Thank you for your hospitality.'

'It's nothing,' she said. 'I would like to invite you inside for a service.'

They muttered and yawned and said that it was late, they'd been traveling all day, it was time to crawl into their tents and get some sleep.

The woman looked hurt. Zeb said, 'I'd be pleased to come to your service, ma'am. If you don't mind having it just for one.'

Her face brightened. 'One soul saved is worth a million services.' "

Pentecostal Tennessee 2039 Goonan, Kathleen Ann. Crescent City Rhapsody. New York: Tor (2001; c. 2000); pg. 445. "As he followed her into the small white [Pentecostal] church, he read the marquee next to the door. He remembered from his past life that these signs sat out front of practically every church, with witty sayings that were changed weekly. This one read:

CIRCUMCISE THEREFORE
THE FORESKIN OF YOUR
HEART AND BE NO
MORE STIFFNECKED

He stepped inside.

There were twelve oak pews... 'We will sing 'What a Friend We Have in Jesus.' You know it?' " [More, pg. 445-447.]

Pentecostal USA 1943 Bishop, Michael. Brittle Innings. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 304. "The Prez met the hullabaloo with head nods, his arms in the air like those of some raptured Holy Roller... "
Pentecostal USA 1945 Maggin, Elliot S. Kingdom Come. New York: Time Warner (1998); pg. 23. "My maternal grandmother had spoken in tongues. She'd been a suffragette in her early days, but once women had gotten the vote, she no longer had a cause to champion, so she had taken to the evangelical circuit, at first as an audience shrill: On a signal, she would go into paroxysms of ecstasy and roll on the ground with the preacher's summoning of the Spirit upon the crowd; or she would come into a tent meeting on crutches, and then throw them off and walk a the appropriate time. Soon, however, she graduated to preaching, becoming quite well known in evangelical circles. 'Reverend Imogene Arcane, First Lady of the Holy Witness,' was how she billed herself. She had gone off on her own and pitched tents and presided over revival meetings all over the South and Midwest in the Depression and the War years. "
Pentecostal USA 1945 Maggin, Elliot S. Kingdom Come. New York: Time Warner (1998); pg. 23. "When she had no cripples to heal or heathens to convert, she'd spoken the words of the Scriptures and lost texts in the original languages, or so her roadies and retainers had claimed. It is very difficult to make up nonsense words and sounds and string them together, so they seemed to be from an unfamiliar language. If that, as I suspect, was what Grandma Imogene had done, then she'd marketed her skill very ably. "
Pentecostal USA 1952 Heinlein, Robert A. "Concerning Stories Never Written: Postscript " in Revolt in 2100. New York: Baen (1981); pg. 212. "It is a truism that almost any sect, cult, or religion will legislate its creed into law if it acquires the political power to do so, and will follow it by suppressing opposition, subverting all education to seize early the minds of the young, and by killing, locking up, or driving underground all heretics. This is equally true whether the faith is Communism or Holy-Rollerism; indeed it is the bounden duty of the faithful to do so. The custodians of the True Faith cannot logically admit tolerance of heresy to be a virtue. "
Pentecostal USA 1981 Simmons, Dan. Carrion Comfort. New York: Warner Books (1990; c. 1989); pg. 506. "'...a real Christian candidate.' [for U.S. Pres.]

'You?' said Harod. 'Aren't there others in line before you?'

Sutter scowled. 'Who, for instance?'

...'What about some of those older guys,' said Harod, trying to remember the names of the faith healers and snake charmers he had flipped by on L.A. cable. 'Rex Hobart . . .'

'Humbard,' corrected Sutter, 'and Oral Roberts, I suppose. Are you out of your mind...?'

'What do you mean?'

...'We're talking about people where with cowflop still sticking to their boots,' said the Reverend Jimmy Wayne Sutter. 'We're talking about good old boys who go on TV and say, 'Put your sick or ailing body part against the television screen, friends, and I will heal it!' Can you image, Anthony, all the hemorrhoids and boils and sores and yeast infections . . . and the man who blesses all that biology meeting foreign dignitaries, sleeping in Lincoln's bedroom?'

'It boggles the mind,' said Harod... "

Pentecostal USA 1993 Simmons, Dan. The Hollow Man. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 57. "Gail has decided early, even before Grama's passing over, that heaven is almost certainly a crock of sh--. Those are her Great-Uncle Buddy's words--'All this holy-roller stuff, Beanie, it's all a crock of sh--. This heaven and choirs-of-angels stuff . . . all a crock of sh--. We die and fertilize the ground...' "
Pentecostal USA 1995 Jonas, Gerald. "The Shaker Revival " in The Ruins of Earth: An Anthology of Stories of the Immediate Future. (Thomas M. Disch, ed.) New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons (1971); pg. 290. "...I assumed they were just another crackpot fundamentalist sect like the Holy Rollers [Pentecostals] or the Snake Handlers, an attempt to keep alive the pieties of a simpler age in the present age of abundance. "
Pentecostal USA 2003 Knight, Damon. The Observers. New York: Tor (1988); pg. 69. "The Steering Committee of the Evanston chapter of the Faith Ministry of Evangelical Churches consisted of the Reverend Arthur Hembert of the Church of the Word, the Reverend Lionel Winning of the Apostolic Healing Church, the Reverend Paul Goodhew of the Eastern Baptists, and two laymen, R. T. Fawson and Dick LeDoux. "
Pentecostal USA 2005 Gibson, William. Virtual Light. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 199. "...and maybe we'd all be listening to Pentecostal Metal and anyway the President was black. "
Pentecostal USA 2010 Brackett, Leigh. The Long Tomorrow. New York: Ballantine (1974); pg. 164. "'What do you mean... it depends?'

'On whether they've been 'struck' or not. Mostly they just wander and pray and do a lot of real holy starving. But then all of a sudden one of 'em'll start screaming and frothing and fall down kicking, and that's a sign they've been struck by the Lord's special favor. So the rest of 'em whoop and screech...' "

Pentecostal USA 2025 Stephenson, Neal. Snow Crash. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 182-183. "The customer stomps toward the double doors, drawn in by hypnotic organ strains. The interior of the chapel is weirdly colored, illuminated partly by fluorescent fixtures wedged into the ceiling and partly by large colored light boxes that simulate stained-glass windows. The largest of these, shaped like a fattened Gothic arch, is bolted to the back wall, above the altar, and features a blazing trinity: Jesus, Elvis, and the Reverend Wayne. Jesus gets top billing. The worshipper is not half a dozen steps into the place before she thuds down on her knees in the middle of the aisle and begins to speak in tongues: 'ar ia ari ar isa ve na a mir ia i sa, ve na a mir ia a sar ia . . .'
Pentecostal Washington, D.C. 1999 Anderson, Jack. Millennium. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 162. "And the guy next door who watched Holy Roller TV all night long was asleep, too, because there was no muffled talk of Jesus coming through the wall. "
Pentecostal world 1975 Shea, Robert & Robert Anton Wilson. Illuminatus, Vol. III: Leviathan. New York: Dell (1975); pg. 87-88. "Malaclypse smiled. ' 'To conceive of pentecostal training it is necessary to die. These are the words of the first, last, and between, Kallisti.' You must have won the prize for memorizing verse in that Bible class, George.'

'I would have, only the teacher didn't like my attitude.'

'Good,' said Malaclypse. 'I also taught the Pentecost Gimmick to Hagbard. What he's saying sounds flat to you, because you don't need to be persuaded. Everybody else is hearing as much emotion and rhetoric as is needed to motivate them. It's a good gimmick, the Pentecost Gimmick.' "

Pentecostal world 1985 Stephenson, Neal. Snow Crash. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 376. "'The Reformation opened the door a little wider. But Pentecostalism didn't really take off until the year 1900, when a small group of Bible-college students in Kansas began to speak in tongues. They spread the practice to Texas. There it became known as the revival movement. It spread like wildfire, all across the United States, and then the world, reaching China and India in 1906. The twentieth century's mass media, high literacy rates, and high-speed transportation all served as superb vectors for infection. In a packed revival hall or a Third World refugee encampment, glossolalia spread from one person to the next as fast as panic. By the eighties, the numbers of Pentecostals worldwide numbered in the tens of millions.' "
Pentecostal world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 50. "Poe is not alone in finding it good sport to feign madness. Many drunks (including Poe) drink so that they may behave like drunks. Opium and other drugs are used to provide recreational hallucinations. Mediums and channelers offer the credulous the solace of socially sanctioned delusions, or if one's budget is more limited there are pentecostal churches that encourage speaking in tongues. "
Pentecostal world 2025 Stephenson, Neal. Snow Crash. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 104. "'Rife contributed $500 to the Highlands Church of the Baptism by Fire, Reverend Wayne Bedford, head minister; $2,500 to the Pentecostal Youth League of Bayside, Reverend Wayne Bedford, president; $150,000 to the Pentecostal Church of the New Trinity, Reverend Wayne Bedford, founder and patriarch; $2.3 million to Rife Bible College, Reverend Wayne Bedford, President and chairman of the theology department; $20 million to the archaeology department of Rife Bible College, plus $45 million to the astronomy department and $100 million to the computer science department.'

...'That Wayne Bedford guy--is this the same Reverend Wayne who runs the Reverend Wayne's Pearly Gates?'

'The same.'

'Are you telling me that Rife owns the Reverend Wayne?'

'He owns a majority share in Peargate Associates, which is the multinational that runs the Reverend Wayne's Pearly Gates chain.' "

Pentecostal world 2025 Stephenson, Neal. Snow Crash. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 192. "'What can you tell me about speaking in tongues?' Hiro says.

'The technical term is 'glossolalia,' ' the Librarian says.

'Technical term? Why bother to have a technical term for a religious ritual?'

The Librarian raises his eyebrows. 'Oh, there's a great deal of technical literature on the subject. It is a neurological phenomenon that is merely exploited in religious rituals.'

'It's a Christian thing, right?'

'Pentecostal Christians think so, but they are deluding themselves. Pagan Greeks did it--Plato called it theomania. The Oriental cults of the Roman Empire did it. Hudson Bay Eskimos, Chukchi shamans, Lapps, Yakuts, Semang pygmies, the North Borneo cults... Spirit mediums of Tonga and the Brazilian Umbanda cult. the Tungus tribesmen of Siberia say that when the shaman goes into his trance and raves incoherent syllables, he leaves the entire language of Nature.' "

Pentecostal world 2025 Stephenson, Neal. Snow Crash. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 193. " 'And they were all filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak in other tongues, as the Spirit gave them utterance. Now there were dwelling in Jerusalem Jews, devout men from every nation under heaven...' "What does it mean? " ' Acts 2:4-12. "

"Damned if I know, " Hiro says. "Sounds like Babl in reverse. "

"Yes, sir. Many Pentecostal Christians believe that the gift of tongues was given to them so that they could spread their religion to toher peoples without having to actually learn their language. The word for that is 'xenoglossy.' "

"That's what Rife was caliming in that piece of videotape, on top of the Enterprise. He said he could understand what those Bangladeshis were saying. "

"Yes, sir. "

"Does that really work? "

"In the sixteenth century, Saint Lous Bertrand allegedly used the gift of tongues to convert somewhere between thirty thousand and three hunddred South American Indians to Christianity, " the Librarian says.

Pentecostal world 2025 Stephenson, Neal. Snow Crash. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 277. "'...The [Russian Orthodox] who came to TROKK were total rejects. They had been forced out by the mainline Russian Orthodox Church.'

'Why?'

'Yeretic. That's how Russians say 'heretic.' The Orthos who came to TROKK were a new sect--all Pentecostals. They were tied in somehow with the Reverend Wayne's Pearly Gates. We had misionaries rom Texas coming up all the... time to meet with them. They were always speaking in tongues. The mainline Russian Orthodox Church thought it was the work of the devil.'

'So how many of these Pentecostal Russian Orthodox people came over to TROKK?'

'Jeez, a hell of a lot of them. At least fifty thousand.'

'How many Americans were in TROKK?' "

Pentecostal world 2025 Stephenson, Neal. Snow Crash. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 375. "At the same time, the Pentecostal church was being founded. The early Christians spoke in tongues. The Bible says, 'And all were amazed and perplexed, saying to one another, "What does this mean " ' Well, I think I may be able to answer that question. It was a viral outbreak. Asherah had been present, lurking in the population, ever since the triumph of the deuteronomists. The informational hygiene measures practiced by the Jews kept it suppressed. But in the early days of Christianity, there must have been a lot of chaos, a lot of radicals and free thinkers running around, flouting tradition. Throwbacks to the days of prerational religion. Throwbacks to Sumer. And sure enough, they all started talking to each other in the tongue of Eden. "
Pentecostal world 2025 Stephenson, Neal. Snow Crash. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 376. "'The mainline Christian church refused to accept glossolalia. They frowned on it for a few centures and officially purged it at the Council of Constantinople in 381. The glossalic cult remained on the fringes of the Christian world. The Church was willing to accept a bit of xenoglossia if it helped convert heathens, as in the case of St. Louis Bertrand who converted thousans of Indians in the sixteenth century, spreading glossolalia across the continent faster than smallpox. But as soon as they were contained, those Indians were supposed to shut up an speak Latin like everyone else.' "
Pentecostal world 2025 Stephenson, Neal. Snow Crash. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 376. "'And then came television, and the Reverend Wayne, backed by the vast media power of L. Bob Rife. The behavior that the Reverend Wayne promulgates through his television shows, pamphlets, and franchises can be traced in an unbroken line back to the Pentecostal cults of early Christianity, and from there back to pagan glossolalia cults. The cult of Asherah lives. the Reverend Wayne's Pearly Gates is the cult of Asherah.' "
Pentecostal world 2025 Stephenson, Neal. Snow Crash. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 377. "'Rife likes to think big. He immediately saw that this idea could be much more powerful. he took Lagos's idea and told Lagos himself to buzz off. Then he started dumping a lot of money into Pentecostal churches. He took a small church in Bayview, Texas, and built it up into a unversity. He took a small-time preacher, the Reverend Wayne Bedford, and made him more important than the Pope. He constructed a string of self-supporting religious franchises all over the world, and used his unversity, and its Metaverse campus, to crank out tens of thousands of missionaries, who fanned out all over the Third World and began converting people by the hundreds of thousands, just like St. Louis Bertrand. L. Bob Rife's glossolalia cult is the most successful religion since the creation of Islam. They do a lot of talking about Jesus, but like many self-described Christian churches, it has nothing to do with Christianity except that they use his name. It's a postrational religion.' "
Pentecostal world 2025 Stephenson, Neal. Snow Crash. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 192-193. "'C. W. Shumway observed the Los Angeles revival of 1906 and noted six basic symptoms: complete loss of rational control; dominance of emotion that leads to hysteria; absence of thought or will; automatic functioning of the speech organs; amnesia; and occasional sporadic physical manifestations such as jerking or twitching Eusebius observed similar phenomena around the year 300, saying that the false prophet begins by a deliberate suppression of conscious thought, and ends in a delirium over which he has no control.'

'What's the Christian justification for this? Is there anything in the Bible that backs this up?'

'Pentecost.'

'You mentioned that word earlier--what is it?'

'From the Greek pentekostos, meaning fiftieth. It refers to the fiftieth day after the Crucifixion.'

'Juanita just told me that Christianity was hijacked by viral influence when it was only fifty days old. She must have been talking about this. What is it?' "

Pentecostal world 2094 Sladek, John. Tik-Tok. London: Victor Gollancz Ltd. (1985; 1st printed 1983); pg. 77. "Lint was our undoing. Not having had a naval before, I didn't realize that it would accumulate lint, requiring daily harvesting. Lint jammed my pentecostal button, so that I pressed it and blurted out, without thinking, 'Okay, Rev, let down your nets and pull up some cash. You know, when I look around at all these Neanderthals, I "m not surprised they don't believe in evolution. Most of 'em have got enough fingers to count their own IQs--twelve. If God loved the common people so much, as Lincoln said, how come He made them so common? And ugly? I--'

Lint and charisma were our undoing. Reverend Flint's great organization was not going to be stopped by a little incident like this. "

People, The* Arizona 1941 Henderson, Zenna. Pilgrimage: The Book of the People. New York: Avon (1961); pg. 22. "'What will the Old Ones say to a marriageable Outsider in the Canyon?'

'Adonday Veeah!' Father muttered. 'That never occurred to me. None of our teachers was ever of an age to worry about.'

'What would happen?' I asked. 'I mean if one of the Group married an Outsider?'

'Impossible,' Father said, so like the Old Ones that I could see why his name was approved in Meeting last Spring. "

People, The* Arizona 1941 Henderson, Zenna. Pilgrimage: The Book of the People. New York: Avon (1961); pg. 34. "...Valancy... There was something very un-Outsiderish and also very un-Groupish about her mind and I couldn't figure what...

'She won't have me,' he said flatly.

'Oh, Jemmy! You asked her--'

'Yes. She siad no.'

'I'm so sorry... But Jemmy--'

'Yes, I know!' he retorted savagely. 'She's an Outsider. I have no business even to want her. Well, if she'd have me I wouldn't hesitate a minute. This purity-of-the-Group deal is--'

'Is fine and right,' I said softly, 'as long as it doesn't touch you personally? But think for a minute, Jemmy. Would you be able to live a life as an OUtsider? Just think of the million and one restraints that you would have to impose on yourself--and for the rest of your life, too, or lose her after all. Maybe it's better to accept 'no' now than to try to build something and ruin it completely later...' "

People, The* Arizona 1941 Henderson, Zenna. Pilgrimage: The Book of the People. New York: Avon (1961); pg. 42. "I tasted with her the hidden frightening things--the need for living as an Outsider, the terrible need for concealing all her differences and suppressing all the extra Gifts of the People, the ever-present fear of betraying herself and the awful lostness that came when she thought she was the last of the People.

And then suddenly she came in to me and my mind was flooded with a far greater presence than I had ever beore experienced.

My eyes flew open and I saw all of the Old Ones staring at Valancy. Even the Oldest had his face turned to her, wonder written as widely on his scarred face as on the others.

He bowed his head and made the Sign. 'The lost Persuasions and Designs,' he murmered. 'She has them all.' "

People, The* Arizona 1943 Henderson, Zenna. Pilgrimage: The Book of the People. New York: Avon (1961); pg. 53. "'How do you know?' he asked.

I ducked my head in confusion. 'I don't know,' I muttered.

Mother pressed her hands together, hard... 'He knows because I know. I know because my mother knew. She knew because our People used to--' Her voice broke. 'Those were her words--'

She stopped... 'Oh, Bruce, I'm sorry!... I've never said a word to him, honest.' Mother's voice quivered. 'Oh, Bruce, I try so hard, but sometimes--oh sometimes!'

'I know, Eve. And you've done a wonderful job of it. I know it's hard on you, but we've talked it out so many times. It's the only way, honey.'

'Yes,' Mother said. 'It's the only way, but--oh, be my strength, Bruce! Bless the Power for giving me you!' "

People, The* Arizona 1943 Henderson, Zenna. Pilgrimage: The Book of the People. New York: Avon (1961); pg. 59. "And behind my closed eyes I remembered. Unhampered flight through a starry night, a flight of a thousand happy people like birds in the sky, rushing to meet the dawn--the dawn of the Festival. I could smell the flowers that garlanded the women and feel the quiet exultation that went with the Festival dawn. Then the leader sounded the magnificent opening notes of the Festival song as he caught the first glimpse of the rising sun over the heavily wooded hills. A thousand voices took up the song. A thousand hands lifted in the Sign. . . . "
People, The* Arizona 1943 Henderson, Zenna. Pilgrimage: The Book of the People. New York: Avon (1961); pg. 65. "'I married your father,' she said clearly... 'We loved each other so, and they were all dead--all my People. Of course I told him first, and oh, Peter! He believed me! After all that time of having to guard every word and every move I had someone to talk to---someone to believe me. I told him all about the People and lifted myself and then I lifted the car... It pleased him a lot but it made him thoughtful and later he said, 'You know, honey, your world and ours took different turns way back there. We turned to gadgets. You turned to the Power.' '

Her eyes smiled. 'He got so he knew when I was lonesome for the Home. Once he said, 'Homesick, honey? So am I. For what this world could have been. Or maybe--God willing--what it may become.' "

People, The* Arizona 1943 Henderson, Zenna. Pilgrimage: The Book of the People. New York: Avon (1961); pg. 66. "Then her head tilted attentively and she gave a laughing sob. 'Oh, Peter! Oh, Bethie! Did you hear it? I've been called! I've been called!' Her hand lifted in the Sign and her lips moved tenderly.

'Mother!' I cried fearfully. 'What do you mean? Lie down. Please lie down!' I pressed her back against the pillows.

'I've been called back to the Presence. My years are finished. My days are totaled!... I have felt them calling the last year or so, and now that I am on the way to the Presence I can hear them clearer, and clearer...' "

People, The* Arizona 1943 Henderson, Zenna. Pilgrimage: The Book of the People. New York: Avon (1961); pg. 67. "They are now strangers,' she said clearly and slowly. 'They are the People. We shared the ship with them during the Crossing. They were with us when we were out in the middle of emptiness with only the fading of stars behind and the brightening before to tell us we were moving. They, with us, looked at all the bright frosting of stars across the blackness, wondering if on one of them we would find a welcome.

'You are woven of their fabric. Even thought your father was not of the People--' "

People, The* Arizona 1943 Henderson, Zenna. Pilgrimage: The Book of the People. New York: Avon (1961); pg. 68. "Her voice strained to a whisper. 'Let me die! Help me die!'

Both of us were shocked to silence by her words. Help her die? I leaned against her hand. Go back to the Presence with the weight of unfinished years dragging at her feet? For if she went I went, too.

Then my eyes flew open and I stared at Bethie's hand. What Presence? Whose ethics and mores were talking in my mind? "

People, The* Arizona 1943 Henderson, Zenna. Pilgrimage: The Book of the People. New York: Avon (1961); pg. 76. "'Thank the Power they aren't hurt too badly...' "
People, The* Arizona 1950 Henderson, Zenna. Pilgrimage: The Book of the People. New York: Avon (1961); pg. 161. "'I caught your struggle to save Lucine when we were still miles away, and, praise the Power, I got there in time.' "
People, The* Arizona 1950 Henderson, Zenna. Pilgrimage: The Book of the People. New York: Avon (1961); pg. 141-142. "'The Home was destroyed. We looked for a refuge and found this earth. our ships crashed or burned before they could land. But some of us escaped in life slips. My grandparents were with the original Group that gathered at the Canyon... I've got to find the Canyon again. I can't go on living forever limping... I can't achieve any stature at all until I am with my People.' "
People, The* Arizona 1951 Henderson, Zenna. Pilgrimage: The Book of the People. New York: Avon (1961); pg. 85. "The man was tall, well built, good-looking--and old. Older than his face--older than years could have made him because he was really young, not much older than I. His face was a stern unhappy stillness, his hands stiff on the brim of his Stetson as he helt it waist high.

In that brief pause before his 'Miss Amerson?' I felt the same feeling coming from him that you can feel around some highly religious person who knows God only as a stern implacable vengeful deity, impatient of worthless man, waiting only for an unguarded moment to strike him down in his sin. I wondered who or what his God was that prisoned him so cruelly. " [Melodye here encounters one of the People group of Bendo, a dysfunctional Group which has attempted to repress their extraterrestrial Gifts.]

People, The* Arizona 1954 Henderson, Zenna. Pilgrimage: The Book of the People. New York: Avon (1961); pg. 173. "'Mother had a mind-reading act. She was good. she was better than anyone knew--better than she wanted to be. It hurt and scared her sometimes to walk through people's minds. Somtimes she would come back to the trailer and cry and cry and take a long long shower and wash herself until her hands were all water-soaked and her hair hung in dripping strings. They curled at the end. She couldn't get all the fear and hate and--and tired dirt off even that way. Only if she could find a Good to read, or a dark church with tall candles.' "
People, The* Arizona 1955 Henderson, Zenna. Pilgrimage: The Book of the People. New York: Avon (1961); pg. 12. "'But--you--don't--know!' Lea sobbed tearlessly, stumbling miserably along...

'You might be surprised,' Karen snapped. 'But anyway God knows, and you haven't thought even once of Him this whole evening. If you're so all-fired eager to busting into His house uninivited you'd better stop bawling and start thinking up a convincing excuse.' "

People, The* Arizona 1955 Henderson, Zenna. Pilgrimage: The Book of the People. New York: Avon (1961); pg. 18. "Jemmy half sat on one corner of the teacher's desk in front of the Group, a piece of paper clutched in one hand. All heads bowed. 'We are met together in Thy Name,' Jemmy said. A settling rustle filled the room and subsided. 'Out of consideration for some of us the proceedings here will be vocal. I know some of the Group have wondered that we included all of you in the summons. The reasons are twofold. One, to share this joy with us--' A soft musical trill of delight curled around the room, followed by faith laughter. 'Francher!' Jemmy said. 'The other is because of the project we want to begin tonight... The Old Ones have decided it would be wise to record our history to this point. That's why all of you are here...' "
People, The* Arizona 1955 Henderson, Zenna. Pilgrimage: The Book of the People. New York: Avon (1961); pg. 80. "'...Your inner mind is sacredly your own. The People are taught reverence for individual privacy. Whatever powers we have are for healing, not for hurting. We have health and life for you if you'll accept it. You see, there is balm in Gilead! Don't refuse it, Lea.' "
People, The* Arizona 1955 Henderson, Zenna. Pilgrimage: The Book of the People. New York: Avon (1961); pg. 120. "'They baby--a new baby--crying. Do babies of the People cry? They must, having to leave the Presence for Earth. The baby--tiny fists clenched tightly, eyes clenched tightly shut. All powder and flannel and tiny curling feet. I can hold her. Tomorrow I can hold her. And feel the continuity of life--the eternal coming of God into the world. Rockabye baby. Sleep, baby, sleep. Thy Father watches His sheep. A new baby--tiny red fingers to curl around my finger. A baby--Valancy's baby--' "
People, The* Arizona 1955 Henderson, Zenna. Pilgrimage: The Book of the People. New York: Avon (1961); pg. 121. [The little girl reveals in this conversation that the People have been praying for Lea each night at their regular prayer together.] "'You're Lea,' Santhy said, smily shyly.

'Yes,' Lea said. 'How did you know?'

'Oh, we all know you. You're our new God-bless every night.'

'Oh.' Lea was taken aback. "

People, The* Arizona 1955 Henderson, Zenna. Pilgrimage: The Book of the People. New York: Avon (1961); pg. 122. "They were the last to arrive. Invocation over, Dita was already in the chair behind the desk... "
People, The* Arizona 1955 Henderson, Zenna. Pilgrimage: The Book of the People. New York: Avon (1961); pg. 165. "'Karen, do you think I'll ever get straightened out?' she asked.

'If you're not too enamored of your difficulties,' Karen said, her hand on the doorknob. 'If you're not too firmly set on remodeling 'nearer to your heart's desire.' We may think this is a 'sorry scheme of things' but we have to learn that our own judgment is neither completely valid nor the polestar for charting our voyage. Too often we operate on the premise that what we think just has to be the norm for all things. Really, you'd find it most comforting to admit that you aren't running the universe--that you can't be responsible for everything, that there are lots of things you can and must relinquish into other hands.' "

People, The* Arizona 1955 Henderson, Zenna. Pilgrimage: The Book of the People. New York: Avon (1961); pg. 166. "Miss Carolle murmured into the sudden silence, 'We are met together in Thy Name.' "
People, The* Arizona 1955 Henderson, Zenna. Pilgrimage: The Book of the People. New York: Avon (1961); pg. 221. "'Well, your most immediate somewhere is the Canyon,' Karen said. 'I'll be by for you tomorrow evening. You're not so far from us as the People fly! Your luggage?'

Lea laughed. 'I have a toothbrush now, and a nightgown.'

'Materialist!' Karen put ou her forefinger and touched Lea's cheek softly. 'The light is coming back. The candle is alight again.'

'Praised be the Power.' The words came unlearned to Lea's lips.

'The presence be with you.' Karen liged to the porch railing, her back to the moon, her face in shadow. Her hands were silvered with moonlight as she reached out to touch Lea's two shoulders in farewell. "

People, The* Arizona 1955 Henderson, Zenna. Pilgrimage: The Book of the People. New York: Avon (1961); pg. 226. "'These are people who will listen when I cry. They will help me find my answers. They will sustain me in the long long way that I must grope back to find myself again. But I'm not alone! Never alone again!'

She let everything but the present moment shudder away on a happy shaken sigh as she murmured with the Group, 'We are met together in Thy Name.' "

People, The* Arizona 1955 Henderson, Zenna. Pilgrimage: The Book of the People. New York: Avon (1961); pg. 230. "Who was in there? How many were in there? A ship of this size could carry hundreds. Their communicator and ours had spoken briefly together, ours stumbling a little with words we remembered of the Home tongue that seemed to have changed or fallen out of use, bu tno mention of numbers was made before the final thought: 'We are tired. It's a long journey. Thanks be to the Power, the Presence and the Name that we have found you. We will rest until morning.' "
People, The* Arizona 1955 Henderson, Zenna. Pilgrimage: The Book of the People. New York: Avon (1961); pg. 238. "The Oldest, his blind face turned to the ship, spoke on a Group stream.

'Welcome to the Group.' His thought was organ-toned and cordial. 'Thrice welcome among us. You are the first from the Home to follow us to Earth. We are eager for the news of our friends.'

There was a sudden babble of thoughs. 'Is Anna with you? Is Mark? Is Santhy? Is Bediah?'

'Wait, wait--' The Father lifted his arms imploringly. 'I cannot answer all of you at once except by saying--there are only the four of us in the ship.'

'Four! The astonished thought almost lifted an echo from Baldy.

'Why, yes,' answered--he gave us his name--Shua. 'My family and I and our Motiver here, Laam.'

'Then all the rest--?' Several of us slipped to our knees with the Sign trembling on our fingers.

'Oh no! No!' Shua was shocked. 'No, we fared very well in our new Home. Almost all your friends await you eagerly... Why, we brought this ship empty so we could take you all Home!' "

People, The* Arizona 1955 Henderson, Zenna. Pilgrimage: The Book of the People. New York: Avon (1961); pg. 242. "'Can't we just no-bi and transgraph? It's so much simpler.'

'Indubitably,' I said, lifting sitting as she did and straightening up in the air above the path. 'If I knew what you were talking about.' We headed for the house.

'Well, at Home we have Healers--'

'This is Earth,' I said. 'We have no Healers as yet. Only in so far as our Sensitive can help out those who know about healing. It's mostly a do-it-yourself deal with us. And who knows, you might be allergic to us and sprout day lillies at every puncture. It'll probably worry your mother--'

'Mother--' There was a curious pause. 'Mother is annoyed with me already. She feels that I'm definitely undene. She wishes she'd left me Home...' "

People, The* Arizona 1955 Henderson, Zenna. Pilgrimage: The Book of the People. New York: Avon (1961); pg. 245. "'And yet,' Salla almost whispered, 'if you're lost in vast enough vastness you find yourself--a different self, a self thathas only Being and the Presence to contemplate.'

'True,' I said, breathing deeply of sun and pine and hot granite. 'But not many reach that vastness. Most of us size our little worlds to hold enough distractions, to keep us from having to contemplate Being and God.' "

People, The* Arizona 1955 Henderson, Zenna. Pilgrimage: The Book of the People. New York: Avon (1961); pg. 255. "So, somewhere way back there, there is a tiny cave with a dime glowing in it, keeping a trust of preciousness between Salla and me--a candle in the window of memory. Somewhere way back there are the sights and sounds, the smells and tastes, the homeness of Earth. For a while I have turned my back on the Promised Land. For our Jordan was crossed those long years ago. My trouble was that I thought wherever I looked, just because I did the looking, was the goal ahead. But all the time, the Crossing, the shimmering in the light of memory, had been something completed, not something yet to reach. My yearning for the Home must have been a little of the old hunger for the fleshpots that haunts any pioneering effort. "
People, The* Arizona 1955 Henderson, Zenna. Pilgrimage: The Book of the People. New York: Avon (1961); pg. 117-118. "'They can help,' Melodye touched Lea's shoulder gently. 'And, Lea, they neer judge. They mend where mending is needed and leave the judgment to God.' And she was gone.

'Maybe,' Lea mourned, 'if I had some enormous sins I could have something big to forgive myself so I could start over, but all these niggling nibbling little nothingnesses--'

'All these niggling little, nibbling little nothingnesses that compounded themselves into such a great despair,' Karen said. 'And what is despair but a seapration from the Presence--'

'Then the People do believe that there is--'

'Our Home may be gone,' Karen said firmly, 'and all of us exiles if you want to look at it that way, but there's no galaxy wide enough to separate us from the Presence.' "

People, The* Arizona 1955 Henderson, Zenna. Pilgrimage: The Book of the People. New York: Avon (1961); pg. 16-17. "'Listen, Jemmy says you're to come to the Gathering tonight. I can't tell you--I mean, you wouldn't be able to understand without a lengthy explanation, and even then--' She looked into Lea's hauntd eyes. 'It's bad, isn't it?' she asked softly. Even Stilled, it comes through like a blunt knife hacking, doesn't it? Can't you cry, Lea? Not even a tear?... You don't have to bear it along. You need never have borne it alone. And I won't release you until you have enough strength.

'Anyway--' Karen stood up briskly, 'food again--then a nap. I'll give sleep you you. Then the Gathering. There will be your new beginning.' "

People, The* Arizona 1955 Henderson, Zenna. Pilgrimage: The Book of the People. New York: Avon (1961); pg. 9. "'Let me go!'

'I can't.' The voice was soft, the hands firm. 'The Power sent me by on purpose. You can't return to the Presence with your life all unspent. But you'r not hearing me, are you? Let me tell you.

'You name is Lea Holmes. Mine, by the way is Karen. You left your home in Clivedale two days ago... You're not even quite sure what state you're in, except the state of utter despair and exhaustion--right?'

'How--how did you know?' "

People, The* Australia 1987 Bryant, Edward. "Down in the Dreamtime " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 287. "'There are others from the shadow world who can enter the Dreamtime. One is Murga-muggai, whose totem is the trap-door spider. But there is something . . . wrong with her. You would call her psychotic. To me she is an Evil One, even though she claims kinship with the People.' " ['The People' in this context refers to Australian Aborigines.]
People, The* galaxy 1983 Cooper, Susan. Seaward. New York: Atheneum (1983); pg. 35. "'And understand one thing about the People, so that we'll have no more hysterics.' He pointed to the great stone creatures standing motionless before him. 'The sun wakes them. When the sun is gone, the . . . go to sleep. All of us here live by that rule, but for them it must by the touch of the sun that brings them back to life.'

Cally remembered the beam of sunlight on the grey rock. She said, 'The People?'

'It is what they call themselves.' The words were a dismissal; he turned away.

Cally glanced at the stone figures, but there was no way of telling of the blank faceless heads were looking back. "

People, The* galaxy 1983 Cooper, Susan. Seaward. New York: Atheneum (1983); pg. 37. "Baffled, Cally went back out into the sunshine with the basket. She turned away from the muffled thunder that was Stonecutter and the People at work, into a meadow beside the house. It stretched in a long lush sweep to the distant edge of the trees; as she wandered through the grass, she was puzzled, and did not know why... enclosing nothing, marking no particular boundary. But it was newly-built, with trampled land and splintered young trees all around it. She imagined the clumsy crashing of the People, their handless arms raising great boulders into place, and shuddered. "


People, The*, continued

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