Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Orthodox Judaism, Israel

Orthodox Judaism, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Orthodox Judaism Israel 2000 Lowenthal, Michael. "Into a Mirror " in Circa 2000: Gay Fiction at the Millennium (Robert Drake & Terry Wolverton, eds). Los Angeles, CA: Alyson Pub. (2000; c. 1998); pg. 233. "The Same Embrace is the story of Jacob and Jonathan Rosenbaum, identical twins who, though close as boys, choose radically different lives as adults: Jacob as a gay activist in Boston and Jonathan as an Orthodox Jew in Israel. " [Refs. throughout story, not in DB.]
Orthodox Judaism New York: New York City 2076 Morehouse, Lyda. Archangel Protocol. New York: Penguin Putnam (2001); pg. 164. Pg. 164: "Men and women sat scattered about the suite in clumps of conversation, laughter, and heated debate. Silver hair was mixed liberally among the Orthodox men wearing payot, the side locks, and military buzz cuts. The smell of beef stew simmering in a Crock-Pot made my mouth water. "; Pg. 198: "It occurs to me that people aren't getting buried anymore because there ain't no more room in the inn, as it were. Only Orthodox Jews get to be buried, because they all seem to got the land somewhere . . . maybe in Israel, I don't know. " [Other refs., not in DB, to ultra-Orthodox Hasidic Jews, but no other refs. to them by the word 'Orthodox.']
Orthodox Judaism New York: New York City 2176 Bear, Greg. Moving Mars. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 196. "'The stuff here is the best in town,' she said. 'It was set up by New York Preserve. History scholars. They have a nano artist design the food--he's orthodox Gathering of Abraham. They have state dispensation to eat meat, for religious reasons. He quit eating meat ten years ago, but he remembers what it tastes like. "
Orthodox Judaism New York: New York City: Manhattan 3414 Farmer, Philip Jose. Dayworld. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons (1985); pg. 41. "'Hold it! Allergic to shellfish? Orthodox Jews don't eat shellfish!'

'Aha!' the major said, his tone indicating that he had just seen a great light. 'This Jew does! Did, I mean. Just once. See. . . he got dizzy and broke out in hives. See there. He said it was a judgment of God on him!' "; Pg. 116: "They would assume that Gril had shaved his beard, abandoned his yarmulke, stained his face darker and put on contact lenses of a color other than green. But crafty Gril had remained an obvious Orthodox Hebrew. HIs disguise was himself. " [Other refs. not in DB.]

Orthodox Judaism Poland 1941 Simmons, Dan. Carrion Comfort. New York: Warner Books (1990; c. 1989); pg. 120. "'The Old Man made his next move to the roar of the drunken mob. His king's pawn moved quickly to take our queen's pawn. Our pawn was a bearded Pole, obviously an Orthodox Jew. The rifle fired twice in quick succession. The black king's pawn was covered with blood as he took our queen pawn's place on the square...' "
Orthodox Judaism Poland: Lodz 1925 Simmons, Dan. Carrion Comfort. New York: Warner Books (1990; c. 1989); pg. 110. "'I was born in 1925, in Poland... We were Jews but not Orthodox Jews...' "
Orthodox Judaism Solomon's Row 2075 Baker, Virginia. "Rachel's Wedding " in Writers of the Future: Volume V (Algis Budrys, ed.). Los Angeles: Bridge Publications (1989); pg. 82. "Marta Bunt, certainly the oldest woman of the kibbutz--one who had been born on the eve of the Six Day War and had been six months of the Orthodox Civil Conflict before fleeing to Paris, to New York, to here--stood on her toes to whisper in Sara's ear. " [Other refs., not in DB. References to the past within this story tell of a civil war based in Israel, with Syria involved, between Orthodox and other Jews. Apparently Orthodox Jews won some power at the time.]
Orthodox Judaism Solomon's Row 2075 Baker, Virginia. "Rachel's Wedding " in Writers of the Future: Volume V (Algis Budrys, ed.). Los Angeles: Bridge Publications (1989); pg. 113. Pg. 113: "'What's to do? You're falling in love with an Orthodox girl. I don't have to tell you the trouble you're in.' "; Pg. 125: "This has been a week of other silences, unbearable as bright light or sound. No one speaks, no one says anything. Only the Orthodox women are happy. They have a wedding to prepare. A wedding is a beginning... " [Many refs. to Orthodox Jews and Orthodox Judaism throughout story. Other refs. not in DB.]
Orthodox Judaism USA 2040 Bova, Ben. Moonrise. New York: Avon Books (1996); pg. 228. "Eldridge hunched forward a little in his chair. 'As you know, Congressman, I represent a coalition of religious organizations--'

'The Christian Brethren, I know.'

'Not merely the Brethren,' said Eldridge. 'Not anymore. We have several Orthodox Jewish groups with us now. And the Muslims as well.'

Underwood suppressed a gasp of surprise. Instead, he let himself chuckle. 'Well, if you can keep those people together you're a better politician than I am.'

'The Lord moves in mysterious ways, Congressman.' "

Orthodox Judaism world 1944 Turtledove, Harry. Worldwar: Striking the Balance. New York: Del Rey (1996); pg. 263. "Nussboym had seen Lizards in Lodz do likewise when they spoke of their sovereign. They believed in the spirits of Emperors past as passionately as ultraorthodox Jews in God or good Communists in the dictatorship of the proletariat. "
Orthodox Judaism world 1985 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 133. "...the religious networks, where, with sustained and general excitement, the Message [from extraterrestrials] was being discussed... The Message, Ellie believed, was a kind of mirror in which each person sees his or her own beliefs challenged or confirmed... Messianic fervor had arisen among the Sossafer Chasids. In other congregations of Orthodox Jews there was a sudden renewal of interest in Astruc, a zealot fearful that knowledge would undermine faith, who in 1305 had induced the Rabbi of Barcelona, the leading Jewish cleric of the time, to forbid the study of science or philosophy by those under twenty-five, on pain of excommunication. "
Orthodox Judaism world 2059 Piercy, Marge. He, She and It. New York: Alfred A. Knopf (1991); pg. 286. "Shira [a female character] leaned on the doorpost, eager to get going. 'For centuries, I wouldn't have been included [in a minyon]. The Orthodox still don't count half the Jews as Jews...' "
Orthodox Judaism world 2106 May, Julian. The Many Colored Land in The Many-Colored Land & The Golden Torc (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (copyright 1981); pg. 58. "An ethnic assay of the travelers showed significant numbers of Anglo-Saons, Celts, Germans, Slavs, Latins, Native Americans, Arabs, Turks and other Central Asiatics, and Japanese... Inuit and Polynesian peoples were attracted by the Pliocene world; Chinese and Indo-Dravidians were not. Fewer agnostics than believers chose to abandon the present; but the devout time-travelers were often fanatics of conservatives disillusioned about modern religious trends, particularly the Milieu dicta that proscribed revolutionary socialism, jihads, or any style of theocracy. Many nonreligious, but few orthodox, Jews were tempted to escape to the past; a disproportionate number of Muslims and Catholics wanted to make the trip. "
Orthodox Judaism world 2200 Heinlein, Robert A. Double Star. New York: Ballantine (1986; first ed. 1956); pg. 78. "I had just completed running through the speech in which I was to accept membership in the Kkkah nest--a speech not unlike that, in spirit, with which an orthodox Jewish boy assumes the responsibilities of manhood... "
Orthodox Judaism world 3414 Farmer, Philip Jose. Dayworld. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons (1985); pg. 214. "The building... housed, on Saturday, anyway, Orthodox Jews who used the building gymnasium as a synagogue, worshiping their god amid the odor of sweat socks and sweat shirts... Bob Tingle, the data banker, had ascertained that there were only approximately half a million Orthodox Jews and two million of the Reformed in all of the seven days. "
Osage USA 1966 Lafferty, R. A. "Narrow Valley " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1966); pg. 280. "'Is there any wild Indians around here?' Fatty Rampart asked.

'No, not really. I go on a bender about every three months and get a little bit wild, and there's a couple Osage boys from Gray Horse that get noisy sometimes, but that's about all,' Clarence Little-Saddle said. "

Osage USA 1966 Lafferty, R. A. "Narrow Valley " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1966); pg. 283. "After a while a bunch of them were off in that little tavern on the road between Cleveland and Osage. "
Osage USA 1995 Ing, Dean. The Big Lifters. New York: Tor (1988); pg. 200. Osage
Ossetians Georgia (country) 1999 Bear, Greg. Darwin's Radio. New York: Del Rey (1999); pg. 16. "Lado translated. 'He says the Georgians who dug this up are stupid. This is not for the UN. This was from long before the civil war. He says these are not Ossetians.'

'Who mentions Ossetians?' Beck asked dryly.

Ossetians Georgia (country) 1999 Bear, Greg. Darwin's Radio. New York: Del Rey (1999); pg. 20. "The grand and beautiful side of the Republic of Georgia. Now . . . Flip the coin... ethnic cleansers, Georgians trying to move out Armenians and Ossetians, Abkhazis trying to move out Georgians... "
Ossetians Georgia (country) 2005 Aldiss, Brian. Somewhere East of Life. New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers (1994); pg. 81. "Burnell knew from his WACH briefing that Ossetian occupation of this Georgian territory had endured for some while, until the hostility of their christian neighbors, together with climate changes, had forced the Muslim Ossetians to seek more hospitable territory to the north. Like the Balkans, Transcaucasia was a patchwork of conflicting ways of life. "
Ossetians world 2019 Russell, Mary Doria. The Sparrow. New York: Ballantine (1996); pg. 89. "'Jimmy, are you certain it's not just some kind of music you're not familiar with--South Ossetian or Norwegian or something? I mean, it's a big world.' "
Oto USA 1992 Simmons, Dan. "Sleeping with Teeth Women " in Lovedeath. New York: Warner Books (1993); pg. 122. "There were older enemies such as the Omahas, Otos, Winnebagoes, and Missouris, whose land the Ikce Wicasa had stolen... "
paganism Africa, West 2038 Jones, Gwyneth. White Queen. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 9. Pg. 9: "The lumpy clay fragments of the pagan palace glistened behind their crumbling UNESCO barricades. "; Pg. 12: "Without gold or oil, this area had been a significant continental trading mart since before the pyramids were raised. The modern country was a palimpsest of sub-Saharan history. Since the end of 'pagan times,' early thirteenth century by Christian reckoning, it had been Islamic, then Portuguese, then 'pagan' again... "
paganism Alabama 1981 Simmons, Dan. Carrion Comfort. New York: Warner Books (1990; c. 1989); pg. 506. "'...There's nothing wrong with the idea of putting a good Christian in the White House for a change.'

'I thought Jimmy Carter was supposed to have been a good Christian,' said Harod.

'Jimmy Carter was a born-again wimp,' said Sutter. 'A real Christian would have known just what to do with the Ayatollah when that pagan put his hands on American citizens...' "

paganism Avernus 4901 Aldiss, Brian W. Helliconia Winter. New York: Atheneum (1985); pg. 76. "...the young on the Observation Station [Avernus] rose up in despair and overthrew their masters. What though their masters were themselves slaves? The era of asceticism was gone. The old were slain. Minimalism was slain. Eudaemonism ruled in its stead. Earth had turned its back on the Avernus. Very well, then Avernus would turn its back on Helliconia.

At first, blind indulgence in sensuality had been sufficient. Just to have broken the sterile bonds of duty was glory enough. But--and in that 'but' lies possibly the fate of the human race--hedonism proved insufficient. Promiscuity proved as much of a dead end as abstention.

Cruel perversions grew from the sullied beds of the Avernus. Woundings, slashings, cannibalism, pederasty, paedophilia, intestinal rape, sadistic penetrations of infants and the ageing became commonplace. Flayings, public mass fornications, buggery, irrumation, mutilation--such was the daily diet. Libido waxed intellect waned. "

paganism Avernus 4901 Aldiss, Brian W. Helliconia Winter. New York: Atheneum (1985); pg. 76. "Everything depraved flourished. The laboratories were encouraged to bring forth more and more grotesque mutations. Dwarfs with enlarged sex organs were succeeded by hybrid sex organs imbued with life. These 'pudendolls' moved with legs of their own; later models progressed by labile or preputial musculature. These reproductive leviathans publicly aroused and engulfed each other, or overwhelmed humans thrown in their path. The organs became more elaborate, more aposematic. They proliferated, reared and tumbled, sucked, slimed, and reproduced. Both those forms... were ceaselessly active, their colours flaring and fading according to their flaccidity or engorgement. In their later stages of evolution, these autonomous genitalia grew enormous; a few became violent...

Several generations of Avernians venerates these strange polymorphs almost as if they were the gods which had been banished from the station long ago. The next generation would not tolerate them. "

paganism California 1985 Dick, Philip K. "Introduction: How to Build a Universe that Doesn't Fall Apart Two Days Later " in I Hope I Shall Arrive Soon. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1985); pg. 7. "This technically is a Gnostic idea. Gnosticism is a religion which embraced Jews, Christians, and pagans for several centuries. "
paganism California 1995 Powers, Tim. Earthquake Weather. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 379. "...the bonfires and waving torches, and the smells of ocean and wet leaves on the cold wind, all made him think of some pre-Christian Mediterranean island, with mad, half-human gods demanding worship and sacrifice. "
paganism California: Gateway City 1997 Byrne, John. Wonder Woman: Gods and Goddesses. Rocklin, CA: Prima Publishing (1997); pg. 17. "'She [Wonder Woman] preaches heresy,' Mother Superior snapped. 'She teaches of the old gods, the pagan gods. She talks of them as if they are real.'

'To her they are,' Morris said, himself not a little afraid to risk an argument with so formidable an opponent.

Mother Superior's eyes blazed. 'What has that to do with anything? All pagans believe their abominations are real. It is for us to teach the truth.'

'What is truth?' Morris felt suddenly emboldened by his bitterness. 'All my life I have served God and Jesus, never questioning, never doubting, yet always operating solely on faith, on the sure and certain belief that what I have been taught is true.'

...'What are you saying, Father Morris?'...

'I mean,' said Father Donald Morris, picking his words carefully, understanding... the terrible power they held, 'that I have believed in and worshiped Jesus all my life, but I have never met him. Wonder Woman, it is my understanding, has had lunch with Zeus!' "

paganism California: Los Angeles 1993 Shiner, Lewis. Glimpses. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1993); pg. 161. "'..Then once they had it they invited all their Wiccan friends to move in.'

'Their what friends?'

'Wiccans. Witches. Pagans, you know.'

Alex had always talked about being a witch in high school. She never called it wicca, though, and I'd never taken her very seriously.

'Are we talking Aleister Crowley and sacrificing animals and all that?'

'Basically they worship the Goddess and keep a low profile. They're trying to kick technology.' "

paganism California: Los Angeles 1993 Shiner, Lewis. Glimpses. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1993); pg. 164. "'Lori told me you guys are witches.'

Her 'yeah' sounded like 'jah.' 'Pagans, witches, whatever you want to call us. We worship the Goddess, which basically is Gaia, the Earth. We see her as a living being. We try to live inside her rhythms. To be clean and peaceful and reverent.'

Jeff, on the other side of her, said, 'Sounds like the Boy Scouts.' Then we had to explain to her what Boy Scouts are and how they're different from Hitler Youth, which turned out to be tricky. "

paganism California: Los Angeles 1999 Koman, Victor. Jehovah Contract. New York: Franklin Watts (1984); pg. 275. "I found Corbin in a bookstore in Hollywood, thumbing through a copy of Theodore Golding's latest effort, Contra-Paganism--The Case Against Goddess. "
paganism California: Los Angeles 1999 Koman, Victor. Jehovah Contract. New York: Franklin Watts (1984); pg. 69-70. "'Can you think of a better way to co-opt your foes?... How do you think the Christians co-opted the Jews and the pagans? Certainly not by offering a totally different religion to usurp its predecessors. They incorporated the old religions almost whole cloth while simultaneously striping the symbols of their former meaning...' "
paganism California: San Francisco 2036 Besher, Alexander. Mir: A Novel of Virtual Reality. New York: Simon & Schuster (1998); pg. 109. "Midnight at the Brain Wash Cafe & Laundromat on Folsom Street was prime time for the South of Market vampires and Valkyries to do their laundry. This was a pagan rite of cleansing that Trevor felt compelled to participate in. "
paganism Central America 1998 Wilson, Robert Charles. Mysterium. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 47. "Pagan Cults of Meso-America was the first tangible fruit of her long struggle for tenure. It both consolidated and justified her career. She was proud of the book. "; Pg. 51: "The Proctor smiled again. 'You've spent too much time proofreading... I've read the manuscript. Your publishers have been cooperative. It's a fine scholarly work, insofar as I can judge. The Ideological Branch gave it careful attention. Disseminating falsehoods anti-religio is still a felony. But we do try to be reasonable...' "
paganism Europe 865 C.E. Harrison, Harry. The Hammer and the Cross. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 73. "One thing that soon became clear was that the Great Army of the pagans, feared through Christendom, was by no means a unit. At its heart were the Ragnarssons and their followers, maybe half the total. But to these were attached any number of separate contingents, joined to share the loot, of any size from the twenty ships brought down by the Orkney jarl to single crews from villages in Jutland or Skaane. " [Refs. throughout novel to Vikings who worship Norse gods. But the word 'pagan' is rarely used.]
paganism Europe 865 C.E. Harrison, Harry. The Hammer and the Cross. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 75. "All this began, he said, many generations before, maybe a hundred and fifty years ago. At that time a great jarl of the Frisians--the people on the North Sea coast opposite England--had been a pagan. But because of the tales that had been told him by missionaries in Frankland and from England, and because of the old kinship felt between his people and the now-Christian English, he had decided to take baptism. "
paganism Europe 865 C.E. Harrison, Harry. The Hammer and the Cross. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 357. "'...They wear crosses on their arms and their surcoats, and say that they have come to establish the Church of England against the pagans. The pagans! for a hundred years we have fought against the pagans, we Englishmen. Every year we sent Peter's pence to Rome as a token of our loyalty...'

'But it is an army against the pagans,' said Shef. 'Maybe us. Not you.'

...'You forget. Daniel, my bishop, declared me excommunicate. The messengers say these Cross-wearers, these Franks, announce on all sides that there is no king in Wessex and they demand submission to King Charles. Till that is done they will ravage every shire. They come against the pagans. But they rob and kill only Christians.' " [More, pg. 357-358. 377, other.]

paganism Europe 867 C.E. Harrison, Harry & John Holm. One King's Way. New York: Tor (1995); pg. 8. Pg. 8: "'...I want everyone to see that I am supported fully by the men of the North, the conquerors of Ivar the Boneless and Charles the Bald. The pagans. Not the wild pagans, the slavers and sacrificers, like the sons of Ragnar: but the men of the Way, the Way of Asgarth, the pendant-folk.' "; Pg. 16: "How under pressure from both the Vikings of the North and his own bishops at home the youthful King Alfred of the West Saxons had made common cause with some pagan sect--called, so they heard, the Way. "; Pg. 32: "How did Christianity get here? Hamburg and Bremen were pagan towns to Charlemagne. It was brought here by the English missionaries, by the men of my own blood, by the blessed Willibrord and Wynfrith and Willebald the breaker of idols. My ancestors brought them a great gift, Erkenbert told himself with a flush of pride. The Christian religion and the learning with which to understand it. " [Other refs., not in DB. Refers mainly to Norse paganism.]
paganism Europe 867 C.E. Harrison, Harry & John Holm. One King's Way. New York: Tor (1995); pg. 101. "Deep beneath both the tree-serpent and the ocean-serpent Shef's new sight could see the dim outlines of some even more monstrous shape, chained to the foundations of the world, but writhing in pain so that the earth shook. It too was tormented, continually it struck back, one day it would break free to urge on the wolves of the sky and the serpent of the sea.

That is the world the pagans knew of, Shef thought. No wonder they hate and fear their gods and seek only to propitiate them with cruelty. Their gods are afraid too, even Othin Allfather fears Ragnarok but does not know how to avert it. If there were a better way for the pagans to follow, they would take it. "

paganism Europe 867 C.E. Harrison, Harry & John Holm. One King's Way. New York: Tor (1995); pg. 264. "The vision faded, left Shef sitting on the barren rock. He blinked, thinking about what he had seen. he trouble is, he saw in a moment of contrast, that the Christians put their trust in rescue, and so do not struggle for themselves, just put their faith in their Church. The pagans struggle for victory, but they have no hope. So they bury girls alive and roll men under their longships, for they feel there is no good in the world. The Way must be between these two. Something that offers hope, which the pagans do not have: even Othin could not bring back his son Balder from the dead. Something that depends on your own efforts, which the Christian Church rejects: to them salvation is a gift, a grace, not something mere humanity can earn. "
paganism Europe 1150 C.E. Le Guin, Ursula K. "The Barrow " in Orsinian Tales. New York: Harper & Row (1976); pg. 6. "...but they had sprinkled holy water on the ram and it made no more trouble, indeed was a fine breeder, and the girl, who had been pregnant out of wedlock, had married a good peasant from Bara and borne him five little Christians, one a year. 'Heresy, adultery, ignorance!' the foreign priest had railed [about Arianism]. Now he prayed for twenty minutes before he ate his mutton, slaughtered, cooked, and served by the hands of heretics. What did he want? thought Freyga. Did he expect comfort, in winter? Did he think they were heathen, with his 'Arianism'? No doubt he had never seen a heathen, the little, dark, terrible people of Malafrena and the farther hills. No doubt he had never had a pagan arrow shot at him. That would teach him the difference between heathens and Christian men, thought Freyga. "
paganism Europe 1150 C.E. Le Guin, Ursula K. "The Barrow " in Orsinian Tales. New York: Harper & Row (1976); pg. 10. "'What do you mean?' the stranger's voice was sharp, and Father Egius, cowering slightly, said, 'They--they kill goats, too.'

'Sheep or goats, what's that to me? Where do they come from, these pagans? Why are they permitted to live in a Christian land?'

'They've always lived here,' the old priest said, puzzled.

'And you've never tried to bring the Holy Church among them?'

'Me?' " [Many other refs. to pagans throughout the story, most not in DB.]

paganism Europe 1150 C.E. Le Guin, Ursula K. "The Barrow " in Orsinian Tales. New York: Harper & Row (1976); pg. 6-7. "The boy smiled and sat up, and begun at once in a high, sweet voice:

King Alexander forth he came,
Armored in gold was Alexander,
Golden his greaves and great helmet,
His hauberk all of hammered gold.
Clad in gold came the king,
Christ he called on, crossing himself,
In the hills at evening,
Forward the army of King Alexander
Rode on their horses, a great host,
Down to the plains of Persia
To kill and conquer, they followed the King
In the hills at evening.

The long chant droned on...

'Why do you have the boy sing of pagan kings?' said the guest.

Freyga raised his head. 'Alexander was a great king of Christendom.'

'He was a Greek, a heathen idolator.'

'No doubt you know the song differently than we do,' Fregya said politely. 'As we sing it, it says, 'Christ he called on, crossing himself.' ' "

paganism Europe 1993 DeChance, John. MagicNet. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1993); pg. 214. "'I was getting to that. you see, Persian mythology incorporates a lot of stuff that's central to the entire sweep of Indo-European culture. The rots are in Persia. It was a watershed that fed Indian, Euro-pagan, Judeo-Christian, and Islamic cultures. That takes in just about everything...' "
paganism France 1693 McIntyre, Vonda N. The Moon and the Sun. New York: Pocket Books (1997); pg. 131. "Innocent's voice remained kind, but Yves did not mistake the sternness of his words.

'I'm distressed by your sister's pagan composition.'

'Your Holiness, I beg you, she meant nothing by it--it was perfectly innocent.' "

paganism France 1693 McIntyre, Vonda N. The Moon and the Sun. New York: Pocket Books (1997); pg. 310. "'It must be studied. It's dangerous. If Father de la Croix is in error, then the creature is a demon, and it must be exorcised. But perhaps Father de la Croix is correct, and we've witnessed a miracle of creation. If that is true, the creature must be brought to God. Converted from its pagan wildness, for the glory of God.' "
paganism France 1693 McIntyre, Vonda N. The Moon and the Sun. New York: Pocket Books (1997); pg. 320. "How much I would have cherished a secret friend, in the convent, she thought. Not a man! Not for. . . . Not for rapture. For affection, for conversation, for friendship... If a pagan, a heretic, had appeared in my cell and begged for asymlum, I would have hidden her and protected her. "
paganism galaxy 2075 Card, Orson Scott & Kathryn H. Kidd. Lovelock. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 71. [Year is estimated.] "'...Odie Lee lived as a Christian--an exemplar of Christianity at its best--but she belonged to all of us in the Ark, Christian. . .' The words pagan, heathen, heretic, and infidel no doubt crossed his mind. '. . . non-Christian...' "
paganism galaxy 2150 Pohl, Frederik. "Hatching the Phoenix " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 226. [Year estimated. Passage refers to a computer AI based on Hypatia of Alexandria.] "'You were supposed to be beautiful, too,' I reminded her. 'And you died a virgin anyway.'

'By choice, Klara. Even that old Hypatia didn't care much for all that messy meat stuff. And I didn't just die. I was brutally murdered. It was a cold wet spring in A.D. 450, and a gang of those damn Nitrian monks tore me to shreds because I wasn't a Christian. Anyway,' she finished, 'you're the one who picked my identity. If you wanted me to be someone else, you could have given me a different one.'

She had me grinning by then. 'I still can,' I reminded her. 'Maybe something like Joan of Arc?'

She shuddered fastidiously at the idea of being a Christian instead of a gods-fearing Roman pagan and changed the subject. 'Would you like me to put a call through to Mr. Tartch now?' "

paganism galaxy 2369 Smith, Dean Wesley & Kristine Kathryn Rusch. The Soldiers of Fear (Star Trek: TNG/Invasion! #2). New York: Pocket Books (1996); pg. 135. "'The Vulcans wrote only of the terror... Humans, on the other hand, had several reactions to their protectors. The ancient Greeks made them into gods, Moors and the ancient pagans agreed with the Klingons. Their graphic representations of these 'saviors' was grotesque. Over time they became stylized in garden statuary.' "
paganism galaxy 2372 Cox, Greg. The Black Shore (Star Trek: Voyager). New York: Pocket Books (1997); pg. 195. "She turned to confront Chakotay, towering over the fallen first officer like some bloodthirsty pagan goddess. "
paganism galaxy 2422 Kato, Ken. Yamato: A Rage in Heaven. New York: Time Warner (1990); pg. 129. "'Two in every five of the Kan slaves on Sado have deserted their masters. They live in the forests and worship pagan gods and eat pig flesh, as they do in Xanadu. "
paganism galaxy 2733 Simmons, Dan. Hyperion. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 20. "Martin Silenus... '...I have been a Catholic, a revelationist, a neo-Marxist, an interface zealot, a Bound Shaker, a satanist, a bishop in the Church of Jake's Nada, and a dues-paying subscriber to the Assured Reincarnation Institute. Now, I am happy to say, I am a simple pagan.' He smiled at everyone. 'To a pagan,' he concluded, 'the Shrike is a most acceptable deity.' "
paganism galaxy 2733 Simmons, Dan. Hyperion. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 185. "It is not difficult, I have learned, to remain a pre-Copernican pagan in the postscientific Hegemony. "
paganism galaxy 2891 Barnes, John. Sin of Origin. New York: Congdon & Weed (1988); pg. 60-61. "Most worlds had many faiths, of course, but the Church generally classified them by the dominant type. Innocent worlds, of course, were off limits... That left Unenlightened, Pagan, Infidel, and, technically, Visited.... Unenlightened worlds were ones with no trace of anything like a religion. Missionary work on them usually failed completely, but there was generally little friction over it. Pagan planets had non-Christian pluralistic faiths--they generally tolerated missionaries without dificulty and could be readily converted. Randall, unfortunatly, might be Infidel--that is, might be actively resisting the missions. "
paganism God-Does-Battle 3460 Bear, Greg. Strength of Stones. New York: Warner Books (1991 revised ed.; copyright 1981, 1988); pg. 89. "'...I once trained to be a rab [rabbi]. What do you think of that? I was young, but devout. Then I decided the creed of the Catholic was more attractive. Then I joined a group which worshipped a very dark, ugly sort of goddess. None of them satisfied me. From rab to pagan, and then to agnostic.' "
paganism God-Does-Battle 3562 Bear, Greg. Strength of Stones. New York: Warner Books (1991 revised ed.; copyright 1981, 1988); pg. 195. "'I am Matthew, son of Reah! My mother was Moslem, raped by pagans, killed by an apostate Jew-Christian!...' "
paganism Greece -300 B.C.E. Brin, David. Earth. New York: Bantam (1990); pg. 55. "It was Ate, first-born daughter of Zeus, who used the golden apple to tempt three vain goddesses, setting the stage for tragedy... " [This story is described at some length.]
paganism Haiti 2200 Zelazny, Roger. This Immortal. New York: Ace Books (1966); pg. 33. "When Myshtigo returned, Dos Santos was at his side.

'What is this about you taking Mister Myshtigo to a pagan ceremony?' he asked... " [referring to a vodoun ceremony at a hounfor.]

paganism Hawaii 1866 Simmons, Dan. Fires of Eden. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1994); pg. 163. "After ten months of laboring in the baptismal vineyards, Reverend Whister and his supporters had managed to save only a single Hawaiian soul--and even he had backslid upon the celebration of some pagan holiday and had to be excommunicated by a disappointed Reverend W. "
paganism Hawaii 1994 Simmons, Dan. Fires of Eden. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1994); pg. 151. "The philosophers were put off by the mythopoeic mind-set that had preceded them--that is, the Christian and Judaic--but they labored to return to an essentially pagan point of view.' "
paganism Hyperion: Keats 2732 Simmons, Dan. Hyperion. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 35. "I am tired of this city. I am tired of its pagan pretensions and false histories. Hyperion is a poet's world devoid of poetry. Keats itself is a mixture of tawdry, false classicism and mindless boomtown energy. "
paganism Indonesia: Java 1999 Hand, Elizabeth. Glimmering. New York: HarperCollins (1997); pg. 37. "Then the channel changed again. The moss-grown ruins of a pagan temple filled the screen.

'. . . ritual in Probolinggo, Java,' a woman's voice said softly... On the temple steps stood a beautiful young man wearing mask-white makeup and silks stiff with pearls and glass beads... "



paganism, continued

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