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34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to New Age, Washington, D.C.

New Age, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
New Age Washington, D.C. 1999 Anderson, Jack. Millennium. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 55. "Ghost cursed as he examined his loot. He was certain it was worthless. The suit was some kind of weird cheap plastic--not even metallic, as he had first thought--and the rock that had been the belt buckle resembled some of the rocks he had seen at one of the city's New Age shops. "
New Age Washington, D.C. 1999 Anderson, Jack. Millennium. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 74. "'We must lift ourselves up into a greater phase of being. By evolving, ourselves, we will receive what has been promised us and will become--'

The woman began wagging her finger at him. 'Shame on you!' she hissed. 'You go addin' to the Word of the Lord with that New Age and nothin' gonna save you from the lightning that's gonna come out of the sky and burn you down!...' "

New Age Washington, D.C. 1999 Anderson, Jack. Millennium. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 86. "'This is one scripture you may want to become familiar with. Elijah was taken up to heaven in what is described as a 'chariot of fire' that came down in a whirlwind. As you might guess, some New Agers have put their own twist to that story. They claim that Elijah was abducted by aliens.' "
New Age Washington, D.C. 1999 Anderson, Jack. Millennium. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 142. "'But what kind of god is he telling you to run toward? Ah, that is why he is the Deceiver! He is telling you to run toward whichever god suits your needs! From the foulest and most insidious cults to the New Age concept that we are all God--to the ancient Gnostics who felt that God was cold, distant... "
New Age Washington, D.C. 1999 Anderson, Jack. Millennium. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 238. "'Not today, Victor. You can talk all you want, with conviction and articulation. But when it comes right down to it, what you're passing out is the same New Age nonsense. The packaging is a bit different, but once you open it up, it's the same stinking thing, foul and sour.' "
New Age Washington, D.C. 1999 Anderson, Jack. Millennium. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 299. "'I'm warning you, Max. Back off. This guy has a core following. Talk of the town is that he's in the middle of a huge comeback. Even the New Age whackos are paying attention.'

'Really?' Kiernan turned toward Kemper now, eyebrows up and eyes wide. 'What's his pitch?'

Kemper shrugged. 'He's been whining for years about how bad off America was. Now he's dispensing advice on how to save the world.

'He's preaching New Age philosophy?'

'He's not into the hard-core metaphysics. Most of it's just common sense. But some of what he's saying has that New Age lilt. You know. Spiritual renewal. Wisdom of the Ages--'

'Buried under the floor of the high desert,' Kiernan said.

'Yeah.'

'Scrolls of ancient wisdom.'

...He strode out of the bar, fingering the pouch on his belt. New Age. Ancient scriptures. Healing crystals. Alien technology... "

New Age world 1976 Moffett, Judith. Time, Like an Ever-Rolling Stream. New York: St. Martin's Press (1992); pg. x. "...the discovery of the O'Hara Equations. This is the remnant of a once-numerous association of amateur archeologists, chiefly British, who call themselves 'ley hunters.' Leys are straight lines drawn on the landscape, on which important features such as churches, castles, stone circles... are precisely aligned. Of prehistoric origin, they are nevertheless found worldwide; the Nazca lines are perhaps the most famous. Half a century ago [circa 1975], ley lines briefly appeared in the popular press, as a host of credulous people came forward to claim that certain leys had been seen by psychics to glow with magnetic force, that they were dowsable, that they were part of a global network of power. Inevitably, serious investigation suffered as leys became linked in the public mind with crackpot theories and 'New Age' spiritualism. "
New Age world 1994 Bradbury, Ray. "Unterderseaboat Doktor " in Quicker Than the Eye. New York: Avon Books (1996; c. 1994); pg. 12. "We got out of the elevator to be confronted by a long line of worshippers and supplicants. There must have been seventy people strung out between the elevator and the Baron's door, waiting with copies of books by Madame Blavatsky, Krishnamurti, and Shirley MacLaine under their arms. "
New Age world 1994 Morrow, James. Towing Jehovah. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1994); pg. 109. "Say 'rationalist' to the average New Age chucklehead, and you conjured up unappetizing images: killjoys obsessed with rules, boors fixated on order, logic-mongers skating around on the surface of things, missing the cosmic essence. "
New Age world 1995 Wolverton, Dave. "Wheatfields Beyond " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 17-18. "In 1995... It would have been a good summer, if not for a carbonaceous asteroid dubbed 1995 BA.

The University of Hawaii's 2.2 meter telescope atop Mauna Kea first picked up the asteroid, which, with a diameter of 214 miles, would pass within 300,000 miles of earth. Many astronomers believed the asteroid would impact the moon, while others argued that its mass was too great and it would simply blow on past.

Quacks, new-agers, and fanatics of every ilk decided it was a sign, that the asteroid would bring the end of the earth or begin the Millennium or raise Atlantis. "

New Age world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 30. "James Wolcott, reviewing a recent tome of UFO lore in the New Yorker, describes his own close encounters with 'abductees':
They bugged me. I came to feel that I was dealing with a quasi-cult of deluded cranks. The abductees I interviewed, far from being people plucked out of the ordinary workday, had browsed the entire New Age boutique of reincarnation, channeling, auras, and healing crystals. . . . For them the aliens were agents of spiritual growth [but beneath that] was a pinched righteousness; the ones I met tended to be classic pills of passive aggression...
"
New Age world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 56. "Madame Blavatsky's heirs in the UFO era have recognized the same need to produce 'phenomena' that will impress the guileless groundlings. Blavatsky offered levitations, spirit music, letters from the ether; UFO promoters simulate crop circles as evidence of saucer landings, create 'alien autopsy' film footage, and script 'reenactments' for tabloid TV. At the same time, by way of fudging the issue and attracting a higher class of clientele, a pseudoscientific rationale is deployed in combination with the incense of a new Age religion that is all effortless transcendence. The afterlife described by spirit mediums was a balmy and shadowless eden, with scarcely a whiff of brimstone. Such has increasingly become the tone taken even by professional UFO abductees. " [More.]
New Age world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 84. "Despite his track record, Heinlein was a favorite writer of the '60s counterculture, and not simply for the New Age fantasies of Stranger in a Strange Land (1961)... "
New Age world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 140. "As a way of life, fandom offers many of the benefits of disorganized religion--religion, that is to say, of the New Age variety, emphasizing self-fulfillment at the expense of doctrinal orthodoxy or a code of ethics, without tithing, pricey churches, or official hierarchies, but a religion, even so, whose gospel is preached at conventions and in fanzines. "
New Age world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 144. "His motive is to save the woman he loves, who is none other than Gaea, Mother Earth herself, goddess of the New Age, who can be brought back to health only by this supreme sacrifice. " [More, pg. 145, etc.]
New Age world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 146. "Most New Age prophets and profiteers derive whatever systematic theology they have to the scheme set forth in Science and Health: Only the spiritual world is real; the physical world... is an illusion. " [More, pg. 156, 159.]
New Age world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 198. "On the one hand, one award-winning black SF writer, Octavia Butler, has made racial (and sexual) confrontations, in the future and in alternative pasts, almost her exclusive theme. Like [Orson Scott] Card, she works on large canvases. A first series of Patternist novels ran to five volumes, and that was followed by the Xenogenesis trilogy. Both sequences concern the interracial, or interspecies, breeding of humans to improve the species--in the first case, to create mutants with psychic powers; in the second, to defuse human aggressiveness. Butler's attitude to these undertakings is interestingly ambivalent. She has a New Age enthusiasm for telepathy, out-of-body experience, and kindred knacks, but her eugenics programs are run by malign supernatural beings or by Strieber-style alien experiments. As with Card, or... Anne Rice, an intense conviction coupled with a total lack of human allows Butler to invent compelling, if implausible plots. "
New Age world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 221. "The Number of the Beast... The last chapter is entitled 'Rev. XXII:13,' the verse of the book of Revelations: 'I am the Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end, the first and the last.'

Even with many grains of salt, one must wonder how Heinlein expected readers to view this revelation. Surely not as the gospel truth, even if interpreted with New Age liberality as meaning that each man is his godhead--but not as an ironic jape, either. Rather, it is the freakout to which he's entitled as a good American, whose right to lie is protected by the Constitution.

...In 1979 John Varley... published 'The Persistence of Vision,' a story in which a group of disastrously disabled (but psychically gifted) New Agers achieve nirvana and semiomnipotence by virtue of the secret wisdom that 'reality is a crutch.' Predictably, SF fans loved it, and it won both the Hugo and Nebula awards. " [More, pg. 228.]

New Age world 2003 Knight, Damon. Why Do Birds. New York: Tor (1992); pg. 124. Pg. 123-124: "'And, of course, we can do anything we want with colors, according to local tastes... white is the color of mourning in China, so here we have our Chinese red, for good luck and prosperity. Here's your basic Shiite black, and here's the New Age psychedelic model.' "
New Age world 2007 Knight, Damon. A Reasonable World. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 90. "Encouraged by the success of these trial balloons, during the next few months Stevens went to the introductory lectures of an Indian guru, a self-maximization program, and a New Age chiliastic organization, and enrolled in classes at all three. "
New Age world 2008 England, Terry. Rewind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 65. "'...Our own government had prepared an elaborate [landing] site [for the alien visitors] at Edwards Air Force Base where access could be controlled despite pleas from scientists, New Agers, UFO believers, science fiction writers, and the Dalai Lama...' "
New Age world 2026 Moffett, Judith. Time, Like an Ever-Rolling Stream. New York: St. Martin's Press (1992); pg. xi. "Half a century ago [circa 1976], ley lines briefly appeared in the popular press... Inevitably, serious investigation suffered as leys became linked in the public mind with crackpot theories and 'New Age' spiritualism.

O'Hara himself is generous about all this, 'I've learned a lot about leys since the sorry of the Equations broke. Some of it sounds pretty mumbo-jumbo, but no all. Maybe some of those New Age types really could see a glow. Many leys radiate out from a central point, usually a hill or a mountain, with a tradition of being a holy place. Lots of aligned churches in England are built on the former sites of pagan temples. Those sites are old--and nobody knows what the leys were there for--nobody! Now we have a tool we can use to find out if primitive peoples, people with a relationship to the landscape we can't even imagine, may have been sensitive to forces most modern humans can't sense at all.' "

New Age world 2094 Sladek, John. Tik-Tok. London: Victor Gollancz Ltd. (1985; 1st printed 1983); pg. 105. "The assembled guests included no one of importance: Adair Sumpter, the Zen sociologist; Nemo Aka Omen, the Hollywood wardrobe psychic; Jockeline Noos, the brilliant but obscure forensic musicologist... "
New Mexico California 1959 Knight, Damon. A For Anything. New York: Tor (1990; 1959); pg. 16. "'You really want to build a spaceship?'

'Going to build one, boy. Up in Santa Rosas--the Kennelly labs, they're made to order. All the rooms you want, and heavy equipment--two months to get organized, and then watch us go.'

'Why not White Sands?' [in New Mexico]

Platt shook his head impatiently. 'I don't want it, Davey. One thing, every space-happy nut in the country will be there by now--you'll have to elbow 'em out of the way to spit. Then, what they have got that we need? Hardware, yes, missile frames, yes, but most of it is the wrong scale. We're going to start fresh...' "

New Mexico galaxy 2376 Carey, Diane. "Exodus " in What Lay Beyond (Star Trek: Challenger). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 55. "...his own hands were a bizarre computer-generated pearly texture instead of their normal shade of Santa Fe. "
New Mexico galaxy 3000 Zahn, Timothy. Angelmass. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 90. "The Barrio had extended maybe two kilometers at its widest; the whole of New Mexico City had stretched only thirty. " [Also pg. 219. Actually a reference to a new 'Mexico City', not a reference to 'New Mexico.']
New Mexico New Mexico 1365 C.E. Steele, Allen. Chronospace. New York: Ace Books (2001); pg. 1. [Pages 1 to 7 takes place in New Mexico. Also, pg. 46.]
New Mexico New Mexico 1869 Bethke, Bruce. Wild Wild West. New York: Warner Books (1999); pg. 210. "'Texas, New Mexico, California, and Arizona return to Mexico!' "
New Mexico New Mexico 1940 Turtledove, Harry. Worldwar: In the Balance. New York: Ballantine (1994); pg. 284. -
New Mexico New Mexico 1947 Cox, Greg. The Eugenics Wars: The Rise and Fall of Khan Noonien Singh: Volume One (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 157. "She had heard whispers about an alien spacecraft that the United States military had supposedly captured back in 1947, at a place called Roswell. " [Also mentioned pg. 331-332.]
New Mexico New Mexico 1953 Dick, Philip K. Puttering About in a Small Land. Chicago, IL: Academy Chicago Publishers (1985); pg. 290. "Within the car, he spread out the map. Highway 66, he thought to himself. Up to Barstow and then across the Mojave Desert to Needles, and then a long grade, across the Arizona border to Kingman. And then straight east, through New Mexico and then the Texas Panhandle, to western Oklahoma as far as Oklahoma City, and then north. All the way to Chicago. "
New Mexico New Mexico 1963 Dick, Philip K. Radio Free Albemuth. New York: Arbor House (1985); pg. 44. Santa Fe
New Mexico New Mexico 1963 Freedman, Nancy. Joshua Son of None. New York: Delacorte Press (1973); pg. 12. Los Alamos
New Mexico New Mexico 1965 Ing, Dean. The Big Lifters. New York: Tor (1988); pg. 1. Pg. 1-9, 10-11: New Mexico; Pg. 2-3, 11, 114: Albuquerque; Pg. 25, 44, 53, 57, 123, 127-129, 133, 164: Santa Fe [More.]
New Mexico New Mexico 1965 Vonnegut, Kurt. Slaughterhouse-Five. New York: Random House (1999; c. 1969); pg. 113. Carlsbad Caverns
New Mexico New Mexico 1966 Geary, Patricia. Strange Toys. New York: Bantam (1989; c. 1987); pg. 7. Carlsbad Caverns [also pg. 124, 218.]
New Mexico New Mexico 1973 Sagan, Carl. Cosmic Connection: An Extraterrestrial Perspective. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2000; c. 1973); pg. 124. -
New Mexico New Mexico 1979 Ing, Dean. Soft Targets. New York: Tor (1996; c. 1979); pg. 175. Socorro, New Mexico
New Mexico New Mexico 1982 Zelazny, Roger. "Unicorn Variations " in Unicorn Variations. New York: Timescape (1983; story c. 1982); pg. 15. "He listened to the New Mexico wind moaning as it passed, to grains of sand striking against the windowpanes. "
New Mexico New Mexico 1984 Cox, Greg. The Eugenics Wars: The Rise and Fall of Khan Noonien Singh: Volume One (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 310. "'Just the master copy, in my office in Los Alamos.'...

'We can get you to New Mexico before news of this incident reaches America...' "

New Mexico New Mexico 1985 Zelazny, Roger. Trumps of Doom. New York: Arbor House (1985); pg. 59. "I opened the letter, written on motel stationary, and read:
Merle,
Too bad about dinner. I did wait around. Hope everything's okay. I'm leaving in the morning for Albuquerque. I'll be there three days. Then up to Santa Fe for three more. Staying at the Hilton in both towns...

Hm.
I phoned my travel agent and discovered that I could be on an afternoon flight to Albuquerque if I hustled. " [Other New Mexico refs., pg. 60-63.]
New Mexico New Mexico 1986 Hubbard, L. Ron. Mission Earth Vol. 6: Death Quest. Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (1986); pg. 51. -
New Mexico New Mexico 1987 Shepard, Lucius. Green Eyes. New York: Ace Books (1984); pg. 116. Albuquerque
New Mexico New Mexico 1988 Barnes, John. Kaleidoscope Century. New York: Tor (1995); pg. 250. "'...I'm sure you'll be happy to find yourself in 1988. The ship will drop you off on a low hill in the New Mexico desert. Head west on the two-lane road at the base of the hill...' "
New Mexico New Mexico 1989 Wilson, Robert Charles. Gypsies. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 90. "Arizona, New Mexico, then the Rockies and an early threat of snow... "
New Mexico New Mexico 1990 Byatt, A.S. Possession. New York: Random House (1991; c. 1990); pg. 4. "Ash's books were most regrettably scattered across Europe and America. By far the largest single gathering was of course in New Mexico, where Mortimer Cropper worked on his monumental edition of the Complete Correspondence of Randolph Henry Ash. " [Other refs. to New Mexico, as the Ash collection there is important to the main characters. Also pg. 111, 113, 337.]
New Mexico New Mexico 1991 Blaylock, James P. The Paper Grail. New York: Ace Books (1991); pg. 5. "What he wanted was to glue decals all over his truck and camper shell windows. he had a couple dozen of them already, from places in Arizona and Nevada and New Mexico. "
New Mexico New Mexico 1991 Ing, Dean. Butcher Bird. New York: Tom Doherty Associates (1993); pg. 113. Pg. 113-114: Whites City, New Mexico.; Pg. 123-127: Chapter 21 takes place near Las Cruces, New Mexico [Other refs., not in DB, e.g., pg. 135, 175, 222-224, 341-342, etc.]
New Mexico New Mexico 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 41. -
New Mexico New Mexico 1991 Simmons, Dan. Children of the Night. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1992); pg. 193. Santa Fe
New Mexico New Mexico 1992 Anthony, Patricia. "Blue Woofers " in Eating Memories. Woburn, MA: First Books; Baltimore, MD: Old Earth Books (1997; c. 1992); pg. 166. "Beyond the night in the window, a bloated moon coats the desert with fish-belly light. He stares out, wondering where he is. Arizona. Maybe New Mexico, he thinks. "
New Mexico New Mexico 1992 Powers, Tim. Last Call. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1992); pg. 47. "...driving with Ozzie along the 66 and the 20 and the 40, through Arizona and New Mexico and Texas... "
New Mexico New Mexico 1993 Bova, Ben. "Conspiracy Theory " in Twice Seven. New York: Avon Books (1998; c. 1993); pg. 59. "'In 1946... an experimental spacecraft crash-landed in the Sonoran Desert of New Mexico. Contrary to the rumors that have arisen every now and again, the crew was not killed, and their bodies have not been kept frozen in a secret facility at some Air Force base.' "
New Mexico New Mexico 1993 Busby, F. M. The Singularity Project. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 78. Albuquerque
New Mexico New Mexico 1993 DeChance, John. MagicNet. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1993); pg. 151. Albuquerque
New Mexico New Mexico 1993 Shiner, Lewis. Glimpses. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1993); pg. 53. Pg. 53: "Joe Hastings, who ran the field school in New Mexico... "; Pg. 62: Santa Fe to Albuquerque
New Mexico New Mexico 1993 Stern, Roger. The Death and Life of Superman. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 47. "Supergirl's ship went off course, crash-landing in the New Mexico desert. "
New Mexico New Mexico 1994 Ing, Dean. "Anasazi " in Anasazi. New York: Tor (1987; c. 1979); pg. 127. "Gallup and Farmington had closer air terminals, but Boise to Albuquerque was a direct flight. "
New Mexico New Mexico 1994 Ing, Dean. "Anasazi " in Anasazi. New York: Tor (1987; c. 1979); pg. 113-269. [This novella takes place primarily in New Mexico.]
New Mexico New Mexico 1995 Aldiss, Brian. "Becoming the Full Butterfly " in Supertoys Last All Summer Long. New York: St. Martin's Griffin (2001; c. 1995); pg. 212. "Private automobiles were banned. They were corralled in huge parks as far north as Blanding, Utah; at Shiprock, New Mexico, in the east; and at Tuba City, Arizona, to the south. The Hopis and Navajos were making a killing. "
New Mexico New Mexico 1995 Bonta, Vanna. Flight. San Diego, CA: Meridian House (1995); pg. 331. -
New Mexico New Mexico 1995 Chalker, Jack L. The Cybernetic Walrus (Book One of The Wonderland Gambit). New York: Ballantine (1995); pg. 84. "'It begins in 1947, near a desolate town called Roswell, New Mexico.' "
New Mexico New Mexico 1995 Grant, Charles. Whirlwind (X-Files). New York: HarperCollins (1995); pg. -3. [Dedication] "This is for Kathryn Ptacek.

For lots of reasons, but in particular, this time, because I've mangled her New Mexico homeland before, and she still hasn't shot me. ";

Back book jacket: "Serial killers come in all shapes and sizes. But this one is particularly puzzling. There's no pattern to the mutilated bodies that have been showing up in Albuquerque: both sexes, all races, ages, ethnic groups. There is no evidence of rape or ritual... "; Pg. 4-5: Santa Fe; Pg. 24: "He hated New Mexico. The Rio Grande was supposed to be this wide awesome river... "; Pg. 72: Bernalillo [Novel takes place primarily in New Mexico. Refs. throughout, not in DB.]

New Mexico New Mexico 1995 Hawke, Simon. The Whims of Creation. New York: Warner Books (1995); pg. 325. "About the Author

Simon Hawke became a full-time writer in 1978 and has almost sixty novels to his credit. He received a BA in Communications from Hofstra University and an MA in English and History from Western New Mexico University. He teaches science fiction and fantasy writing through Prima College in Tucson, Arizona.

Hawke lives alone in a secluded Santa Fe-style home in the Sonoran desert about thirty-five miles west of Tucson, near Kitt Peak and the Tohono O'Oodham Indian Reservation. He is a motorcyclist, and his other interests include history, metaphysics, gardening, an collecting fantasy art. "

New Mexico New Mexico 1995 Powers, Tim. Earthquake Weather. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 26. Albuquerque


New Mexico, continued

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