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34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Baptist, Arkansas

Baptist, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Baptist California 1953 Dick, Philip K. Mary and the Giant. New York: Arbor House (1987); pg. 29. "'At the conservatory,' Tweany said. 'My ability was noted at an early age.'

'Did you belong to the Baptist Church, too?'

Tweany laughed tolerantly. 'No, of course not.'

'Where were you born?'

'Here in California...' "

Baptist California 1989 Koontz, Dean R. Lightning. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1988); pg. 293. "'I'm not Sherlock Holmes. But the bumper stickers on your car say 'I Love Jesus' and 'Christ Has Risen.' And there's a Baptist convention in town, and you're all dressed in dark suits.'

That was why he had thought he could trust Klietmann not to fib. He believed they were Baptist ministers.

'That's right,' Klietmann said at once. 'We're with the Baptist convention, officer. Sorry about the illegal parking. We don't have real curbs where I come from. Now if--'

'Where do you hail from?' the cop asked, not with suspicion but in an attempt to be friendly.

Klietmann knew a lot about the United States but not enough to carry on a conversation of this sort when he did not control its direction to any degree whatsoever. He believed that Baptists were from the southern part of the country; he wasn't sure if there were any of them in the north or west or east, so he tried to think of a southern state. He said, 'I'm from Georgia,'... "

Baptist California: Gateway City 1997 Byrne, John. Wonder Woman: Gods and Goddesses. Rocklin, CA: Prima Publishing (1997); pg. 221-222. "'My borough is almost entirely black, as you know, Mr. Mayor, and blacks are hesitant to point the finger at someone because of their race, or creed, or color. We've been on the receiving end of that much too often. Still, there is a strong sentiment against Wonder Woman. We're overwhelmingly God-fearing Christians in my borough. Mostly Baptist. We believe what Rebecca Chandler has to say.' "
Baptist California: Hollywood 1955 Bradbury, Ray. A Graveyard for Lunatics. New York: Alfred A. Knopf (1990); pg. 51. "'I came to this studio in 1927 when they made Jesus the King. I was a woodworker out back in those sheds. I cut and polished the three crosses on Calvary, still standing. There was a contest in every Baptist basement and Catholic backwash in the land. Find Christ! He was found here. The director asked where I worked. The carpenter's shop. My God, he cried, let me see that face! Go put on a beard! 'Make me look like holy Jesus,' I advised the makeup man. I went back, dressed in robes and thorns, the whole holy commotion. The director danced on the Mount and washed my feet. Next thing you know the Baptists were lining up at Iowa pie festivals when I dusted through in my tin flivver with banners 'THE KING IS COMING,' 'GOING ON BEFORE.'

'Across country in auto bungalo courts, I had a great ten-year Messiah run, until vino and venality tattered my smock...' "

Baptist California: Hollywood 1955 Bradbury, Ray. A Graveyard for Lunatics. New York: Alfred A. Knopf (1990); pg. 51. "'...I flattened more broads than a steamroller at a Baptist skinny dip. I ran fast, hoping shotgun preachers wouldn't count hymens and hymnals and wallop me with buckshot...' "
Baptist California: Hollywood 1955 Bradbury, Ray. A Graveyard for Lunatics. New York: Alfred A. Knopf (1990); pg. 112. "'Been to Holy Rollers, also.'

'Like their mud wrestling, talking in tongues?'

'Yeah! but how about the Negro Baptist Church, Central Avenue? Hall Johnston choir jumps and sings Sundays. Earthquakes!'

'Hell, boy, you dog my steps! How come you been all those places?' "

Baptist California: Hollywood 1955 Bradbury, Ray. A Graveyard for Lunatics. New York: Alfred A. Knopf (1990); pg. 117. "'I gave orders to cut Judas! I didn't want to make an anti-Semitic film!'

'What!' I exploded, jumping up. 'This film is being released next Easter, right? That week, one million Baptists will see it. Two million Lutherans?'

'Sure.'

...'And when they all stagger forth on Easter Sunday and ask, 'Who cut Judas Iscariot out of the film?' how come the answer is: Manny Leiber!' "

Baptist California: Hollywood 1955 Bradbury, Ray. A Graveyard for Lunatics. New York: Alfred A. Knopf (1990); pg. 142. "Fritz Long came leaping over in great strides. 'God damn! We're all set for your scenes. That drunken Baptist Unitarian has disappeared. You know where the son-of-a-bitch hides?'

'You called Aimee Semple McPherson's?'

'She's dead!' "

Baptist California: Hollywood 1955 Bradbury, Ray. A Graveyard for Lunatics. New York: Alfred A. Knopf (1990); pg. 184. "'Why,' said J. C., 'that looks like the Central Avenue Negro Baptist Church! I can't go in there! I'm not black or Baptist. Just Christ, and a Jew! Tell him where to go!' "
Baptist California: Los Angeles 1987 Butler, Octavia E. Dawn. New York: Warner Books (1997; c. 1987); pg. 249. "About the Author

I'm a 50-year-old writer who can remember being a 10-year-old writer... I'm also comfortably asocial--a hermit in the middle of Los Angeles--a pessimist if I'm not careful, a feminist, a Black, a former Baptist... "

Baptist California: Los Angeles 1997 Sawyer, Robert J. Illegal Alien. New York: Ace Books (1997); pg. 210. "Dale had used the Reverend Oren Brisbee as an expert witness in other cases--no one could captivate a jury like a Baptist preacher. Brisbee was perhaps an odd choice, given his public clamoring for the death penalty for Hask. Still, it wasn't out of any presumption that Hask was guilty. And so:

'Reverend Brisbee,' said Dale. 'one of Dr. Calhoun's eyes was missing. Will you tell the Court what's significant, in your view, about the human eye, please?'

Brisbee smiled broadly, as if warming to a favorite topic. 'Ah, my brother, the human eye! Testament to God's genius! Proof of divine creation! Of al the marvels of the universe, perhaps none bears stronger testament than the human eye to the lie of evolution!'

'Why is that, Reverend?' "

Baptist California: Los Angeles 1997 Sawyer, Robert J. Illegal Alien. New York: Ace Books (1997); pg. 210. "'Why, Brother Dale, it's simply because nothing so complex as the human eye could possible have evolved by chance. The evolutionists would have us believe that life progresses in tiny incremental stages, a little at time, instead of having been created full-blown by God. But the eye--well, the eye is a perfect counterexample. It could not have evolved step-by-step.'

Someone in the courtroom snickered, presumably at the mental picture of eyes marching along. Brisbee [the racist, creationist Baptist minister] ignored the sound. 'The evolutionists,' he went on, his voice filling the courtroom as it had so many churches, 'say complex structures, such as feathers, must have evolved by steps, first as scales for insulation, which then perhaps elongated into a frayed coat to aid running animals in catching small insects... and only then, fortuitously, would the proto-bird discover, lo & behold, that they were also useful for flight. I don't believe that for one moment...' "

Baptist California: Los Angeles 1997 Sawyer, Robert J. Illegal Alien. New York: Ace Books (1997); pg. 211. "'...it's the kind of stuff they [evolutionists] spout. But that argument falls down completely when we contemplate God's masterwork, the human eye! What good is half an eye? What good is a quarter of an eye? An eye is either an eye, or it isn't; it can't evolve in steps.'

Brisbee [the creationist Baptist minister] beamed out at the camera. They were all his flock. 'Consider the finest camera you can buy today. It's still not nearly as effective as our eyes. Our eyes adjust automatically to wide variations in lighting...Yes, I can see why the Tosok took the human's eye as a souvenir--'

'Now, now, Reverend,' said Dale. 'You don't know that that's what happened.'

'I can see,' continued Reverend Brisbee, somewhat miffed, 'why anyone from anywhere would admire the human eye, as a sterling example of God's craftsmanship.' "

Baptist California: Los Angeles 2005 Gibson, William. Virtual Light. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 18. "...Mr. Turvey being described as a skilled craftsman, a steady worker, a loving father-figure for little Rambo and Kelly, a born-again Christian, a recovering addict to 4-Thiobuscaline, and the family's sole means of support.

'Recovering?' Rydell asked Karen Mendelsohn in his room in the airport Executive Suites. She'd just shown him the fax from Jenni-Rae's lawyer.

'Apparently he's been to a meeting that very day.' Karen said.

'What did he do there?' Rydell asked, remembering the Last Supper [tattoo] in drying blood.

'According to our witnesses, he openly horned a tablespoon of his substance of choice, took the podium by force, and delivered a thirty-minute rant on President Millbank's panyhose and the assumed current state of her genitalia. He then exposed himself... and left the basement of the First Baptist Church.' "

Baptist California: Los Angeles 2015 Leiber, Fritz. The Wanderer. New York: Walker & Co. (1964); pg. 59. "...in the heart of old Los Angeles... Tonight the inhabitants of Pershing Square spilled into Olive Street at the Fifth, where a bronze statue of Beethoven broodingly faces the Biltmore Hotel, Bunker Hill, and the Baptist Auditorium which serves as one of the city's chief theaters. "
Baptist Colorado 1978 King, Stephen. The Stand. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1978); pg. 529. "...biked out to north Boulder... Boulder's 'old' residents. Stan Nogotny said it was as if the Catholics, Baptist, and Seventh-day Adventists had gotten together with the Democrats and the Moonies to create a religious-political Disneyland. "
Baptist Colorado 1982 Bishop, Michael. The Secret Ascension; or, Philip K. Dick is Dead, Alas. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 77. "Aloud, he said, ' 'Philip K. Dick is dead, alas. / Let's all queue up to kick God's ass.' '

...'Go on.'

'That's it. That's the whole thing.'

'First line's okay, but the second's contemptible. Irreverent for the sake of irreverence. Which is crap typical of teenagers or maladjusted adults.'

'That's a psychological interpretation.'

'What did you want?'

'How about an unbiased aesthetic judgment?'

'There's not such animal, Cal.'

'A decade in Colorado couldn't completely wipe out your uptight Southern Baptist biases, could it?'

'What you'll never figure out, Pickford, is that I'm not upset because your stupid 'kick God's ass' line rubs me wrong. I'm upset because it demeans you.'...

'But you give me a psychological judgment instead of a literary one. A judgment tainted by small-town religiosity.' "

Baptist Colorado 1989 Simmons, Dan. Phases of Gravity. New York: Bantam (1989); pg. 97. "'...Then, it was one day in the fall of 1976, a friend invite Deedee and me to a Bible retreat weekend sponsored by his church. That was the beginning. For the first time--even though I'd been raised a Baptist--for the first time I really hear God's Word and realized that it applied to me...' "
Baptist Florida 1959 Frank, Pat. Alas, Babylon. Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott Co. (1959); pg. 157. "Randy saw a notice that was different:

EASTER SERVICES

An interdenominational Easter Sunrise Service will be held in Marines Park on Sunday, April 17th. All citizens of Fort Repose, of whatever faith, are invited to attend.

Signed,
Rev. John Carlin, First Methodist Chruch
Rev. M.F. Kenny, Church of St. Paul's
Rev. Fred Born, Timucuan Baptist Church
Rev. Noble Watts, Afro-Repose Baptist Church "

Baptist France 1916 Anthony, Patricia. Flanders. New York: Ace Books (1998); pg. 4. "He let loose at an innocent bystander duck who took cheerfully to the shower. The striped cat that I chose was not so sanguine. I laughed so, I fell into a nearby ditch. I was told that the Frenchman attempted to get my out; but since I was unwilling and he was drunk, he walked off and left me, forgetting to inform my sergeant where I was. There I lay until my mates stumbled upon me the next morning. The officers had assumed that I had deserted, and it was a trial explaining my hardshell Baptist upbringing. I told them, 'Don't y'all get me to dancing, then, for I ain't used to that, neither; and God only knows what I'd do.' " [Main character is an American soldier from Texas, stationed in France, and a Baptist. Many refs. to him throughout novel, of course, and many refs. to his religious background. Most refs. not in DB, but all refs to 'Baptist' by name are thought to be in DB.]
Baptist France 1916 Anthony, Patricia. Flanders. New York: Ace Books (1998); pg. 13. [The narrator, a Texas Baptist, thinks that non-Baptists will go to Hell.] "It fair shook me. A Jew. Now I understood why I never see Miller with the other brass...

Still, how could the Tommies know by looking? Miller seemed like an ordinary man. I mean, I can pick out a colored, even if he's high yellow. I can pick out a Mexican. The only Jews I've seen were in cartoons, and they didn't look at all like Miller. How could the Tommies know for sure?

And what's against him, anyway, more than an idol-worshipping papist, I mean? And this army's full of papists. Jews, papists, they're all of them the same--all walking that long road to Hell. And so what? I have the suspicion Lutherans and Church of Christers will end up sucking flames. If God's fair, the Congregationalists will, too. I figure that, despite 'Once saved, always saved,' I'll meet with all of them there. "

Baptist galaxy 2350 Bear, Greg. Beyond Heaven's River. New York: Dell (1980); pg. 62. "'What about that planet you come from, with all the zealots. Didn't any of their sense get through to you?'

Elvox rubbed his eyes and laughed. 'Sense? Tivvers, they were Baptists and three or four other kinds of fool. They schismed from the lot that colonized God-Does-Battle, but they have the same goal--to bring Christian heaven down to Earth. Well, they couldn't have Earth, so they settled for Ichthys...' "

Baptist galaxy 2780 Simmons, Dan. The Fall of Hyperion. New York: Bantam (1991; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 452. "Keats closed his eyes again. 'Can't. I'm not the One Who Comes but the One Who Comes Before. Not the baptized but the baptist. Merde, Hunt, I'm an atheist! Even Severn couldn't convince me of these things when I was drowning in death!' " [Pg. 494.]
Baptist Georgia 1973 Bishop, Michael. Catacomb Years. New York: Berkley (1979); pg. 13. [Timeline] "1973: "Maynard Jackson, first black mayor of Atlanta. Mrs. Martin Luther King, Sr., dies at hands of gunman in Ebenezer Baptist Church. "
Baptist Georgia, USA 1982 Bishop, Michael. The Secret Ascension; or, Philip K. Dick is Dead, Alas. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 77. "'We really should go to church here, Cal. I've wanted us tosince the first day we arrived.'

'Dear God.' Me? thought Cal. Squeezed into a pew of the First Baptist Church? I'd have to put my Indian braid down my shirt collar. It even bugs Mr. Kemmings, and the folks at First Baptitst [sic] are going to find it harder to take than he does. But maybe you might really meet God over there. In Georgia, He has to hang out somewhere around Baptist churches. Too many of the... things to ignore. "

Baptist God-Does-Battle 3460 Bear, Greg. Strength of Stones. New York: Warner Books (1991 revised ed.; copyright 1981, 1988); pg. 96. "'Children are exiled as much as adults.'

'Are children filled with sin?'

'Yes. This city's creed is Baptist. Those--'

'Stop that! You're repeating the very contradiction that makes you sick. I am the leader. You will send our city parts to retrieve the sick children.' "

Baptist Indiana 1940 Turtledove, Harry. Worldwar: In the Balance. New York: Ballantine (1994); pg. 389. Pg. 389: "A Lizard threw open the door to the Baptist church in Fiat, Indiana. The people inside jerked their heads around in surprise and alarm; this was not a usual time for the aliens to bother them. They'd learned a basic lesson of war and captivity: anything out of the ordinary was frightening. "; Pg. 392: "Along with the drug-induced euphoria, Jens now had his own genuine variety. He put his cold-weather gear back on, all but floated over the snow back to the Baptist church. " [More in this scene. No other refs. to 'Baptists' by name.]
Baptist Indiana 2026 Moffett, Judith. Time, Like an Ever-Rolling Stream. New York: St. Martin's Press (1992); pg. 28. "'The other thing I can quote besides poetry,' Pam told him, 'is the Bible. The King James Version. The prose is very rhythmical. But I have to sweat a little to get Bible verses to stick in my head.'

'So why try?'

'Well because,' said Pam, 'we're Baptists in my family. The college in Indiana where my father's the head librarian, Scofield College, is affiliated with the Southern Baptist Convention, even though we're a little bit on the wrong side of the Mason-Dixon Line. Baptist kids all have to memorize a lot of Bible verses, it's one of the main things we do. They bribe us with Bible bookmarks and Wordless Books and pictures and certificates. Ask me to show you my collection of Bible bookmarks sometime.' "

Baptist Iowa 1967 King, Stephen. The Stand. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1978); pg. 100. "...in Big Springs, Iowa... We lived here until 1967... The Baptist Church gave my mamma a charity funeral. This same church, ghe Grace Baptist sent me to the Children of Jesus orphanage in Des Moines. This is a place that all sorts of churches chip together to support. That was where I learned to read and write . . . "
Baptist Iowa 2010 Disch, Thomas M. On Wings of Song. New York: St. Martin's Press (1978); pg. 19. "There were either books or pictures on all the walls, including a very careful watercolor of the First Baptist Church and a store next to it (where there wasn't any now) called A & P. "
Baptist Iowa 2030 Disch, Thomas M. On Wings of Song. New York: St. Martin's Press (1978); pg. 24. "The real aristocracy of Iowa, the farmers, were undergoders--Lutherans, Baptists, Methodists--but it was impossible to pretend to be an undergoder since it involved giving up almost anything you might enjoy--not just music, but tv and most books and even talking with anyone who wan't another undergoder. Besides, the farmers lumped all the townspeople together anyhow, with the great unregenerate mass of agitators, middlemen, and the unemployed that comprised the rest of the country, so it didn't do much good even for those who tried to pretend. "
Baptist Kansas 2000 Knight, Damon. Rule Golden in Three Novels. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (c. 1954); pg. 58. "Delegates to a World Synod of Christian Churches began arriving at a tent city near Smith Center, Kansas, late Saturday night. Trouble developed almost immediately between the Brethren Church of God (Reformed Dunkers) and the Two-Seed-in-the-Spirit Predestinarian Baptists--later spreading to a schism which led to the establishment of two rump synods, one at Lebanon and the other at Athol. "
Baptist Louisiana 1987 Shepard, Lucius. Green Eyes. New York: Ace Books (1984); pg. 118. "'...and we'll bulldoze them under and build the Heavenly City in their place! Oh, they've been Congregationalists and Baptists and Methodists, but we'll have something new. The first truly franchised religion! That's real salvation, brothers and sisters. Economic and spiritual at the same time. Hallelujah!' "
Baptist Maine 1979 King, Stephen. Carrie. New York: Pocket Books (2000; c. 1974); pg. 18. "She had fought Momma tooth and nail over the Christian Youth Camp, and had earned the money to go herself by taking in sewing. Momma told her darkly that it was Sin, that it was Methodists and Baptists and Congregationalists and that it was Sin and Backsliding. "
Baptist Maine 1979 King, Stephen. Carrie. New York: Pocket Books (2000; c. 1974); pg. 41. "Carrie knew vaguely that Momma and Daddy Ralph had been Baptists once but had left the church when they became convinced that the Baptists were doing the work of the Antichrist. "
Baptist Maine 1998 King, Stephen. Bag of Bones. New York: Scribner (1998); pg. 145. "'Then Lance Devore and Mattie Stanchfield got married at the Grace Baptist Church right up there on Highway 68 [by]... Reverend Gooch...' "
Baptist Maine 1998 King, Stephen. Bag of Bones. New York: Scribner (1998); pg. 435. "Mattie, it's all right, " I said. Down at the Grace Baptist Church, at the far end of the zone I was in, they were singing 'Blessed Assurance'... "
Baptist Maine 1998 King, Stephen. Bag of Bones. New York: Scribner (1998); pg. 486. "What she doesn't know is today is also Dedication Day for the new Grace Baptist Church, the first real church ever to be built on the TR. A slug of locals have gone, heathen as well as Baptist. "
Baptist Maine 1999 Hand, Elizabeth. Glimmering. New York: HarperCollins (1997); pg. 32. "They were singing at the Grace Fellowship Baptist Church over to Jonesport, not a long drive... "
Baptist Mars 2003 Bradbury, Ray. The Martian Chronicles. New York: Bantam (2000; c. 1958); pg. 99. "'I suppose you got names for your rockets?'

...'Yes, sir.'

'Like Elijah and the Chariot, The Big Wheel and The Little Wheel, Faith, Hope, and Charity, eh?'

'We got names for the ships, Mr. Teece.'

'God the Son and the Holy Ghost, I wouldn't wonder? Say, boy, you got one named the First Baptist Church?'

'We got to leave now, Mr. Teece.'

Teece laughed. 'You got one named Swing Low, and another named Sweet Chariot?'

The car started up. 'Good-bye, Mr. Teece.'

'You got one named Roll Dem Bones?'

'Good-by, mister!'

'And another called Over Jordan! Ha! Well, tote that rocket, boy, lift that rocket, boy, go on, get blown up, see if I care!' "

Baptist Mars 2003 Bradbury, Ray. The Martian Chronicles. New York: Bantam (2000; c. 1958); pg. 101. "Where they had been carefully set down and left, in neat bundles every few feet along the empty country road, were old roller skates, a bandanna full of knickknacks... cartons of Confederate money, washtubs, scrubboards, wash lines, soap, somebody's tricycle... a stained-glass window from the Negro Baptist Church, a whole set of brake rims... "
Baptist Massachusetts: Boston 1806 Lobdell, Scott & Elliot S. Maggin. Generation X. New York: Berkley (1997); pg. 100. "In the early days of the nineteenth century--when English and Arab slave traders were still dropping boatloads of kidnapped Africans onto the docks of Charleston and Annapolis and New Orleans like so many striped bass--a prominent black preacher from New Hampshire named Thomas Paul came to Boston to found the First African Baptist Church. Black people were allowed to attend white churches in Boston in those days, as long as they sat up in the balconies and did not try to speak or vote at congregational meetings.

For a little over a year, Preacher Paul led worship services at Faneuil Hall, a stop on the Freedom Trail. A generation earlier, the Adams boys had raised the rabble against their British overlords in that same location. Then, near the end of 1806, Preacher Paul's followers opened the spanking new African Meeting House on land that the black Baptist congregation had bought in a little cul-de-sac off Joy Street near Smith Court. "

Baptist Massachusetts: Boston 1806 Lobdell, Scott & Elliot S. Maggin. Generation X. New York: Berkley (1997); pg. 100. "At the dedication ceremony [of the First African Baptist Church], attended and celebrated by the creme de Boston's creme, there was only the cremey faces of white officials and abolitionists allowed in the floor-level pews while the members of the congregation huddled in their own balcony and craned to see [Rev.] Thomas Paul sitting behind the pulpit and listening to the mayor speak.

Nearly two hundred years later, with his friend Angelo tapping a foot impatiently at the doorway, a young black mutant from St. Louis vaulted over the cloth barrier that still attempted to keep history buffs of all races, creeds, colors, and genetic conditions off the merchandise. He plopped himself down in a high-backed chair behind the pulpit and... " [Scene in the church continues pg. 101-102, but doesn't mention Baptists again.]

Baptist Massachusetts: Nantucket -1250 B.C.E. Sterling, S. M. Island in the Sea of Time. New York: Penguin (1998); pg. 216. "The organ started, thundering in the high vaulted white spaces of the church. She'd attended Baptist churches in her childhood, of course--mostly built out of weathered pine, down sandy tracks and surrounded by rattletrap cars. Not much like this Congregational one, three-storied snowy spire and stately white walls on what passed for a hill on this sandspit island. We had better singing, though. Everyone stood. The sound was like a subdued slither under the trembling of the instrument, a rustle of cloth as people looked back toward the entrance. "
Baptist Massachusetts: Nantucket -1250 B.C.E. Sterling, S. M. Island in the Sea of Time. New York: Penguin (1998); pg. 327. "She nodded as expressionless as usual. Toffler wasn't quite sure about her. He didn't really approve of women in situations like this, and he certainly didn't approve of her private life; he was a good Baptist. On the other hand, he was pretty certain she wouldn't lose her nerve. "
Baptist Massachusetts: Nantucket -1249 B.C.E. Sterling, S. M. Island in the Sea of Time. New York: Penguin (1998); pg. 411. "He trusted the little priest's judgment. So did his colleagues, evidently. The Town Building office held the pastors of the Episcopal and Baptist churches as well, the Congregationalists, the Methodists . . . even the Unitarians...

'We have indeed,' Gomez said. 'We've been trying to come to some understanding of what God meant by the Event, in a specifically religious sense. Some things are obvious. Questions of episcopacy and papal supremacy are...' "

Baptist Michigan: Two Rivers 1998 Wilson, Robert Charles. Mysterium (parallel world novel). New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 183. "Reverend Lockheed of the Mission Baptist said his young people were also anxious to do something to mark the season, so how about decorating the big pine in the Civic Gardens near City Hall--as a kind of test case?... The combined Lutheran and Baptist youth groups... converged on the Civic Gardens east of City Hall... "
Baptist Michigan: Two Rivers 1998 Wilson, Robert Charles. Mysterium. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 181. "Congreve... had assembled a delegation from every religious group in town... The churches had not always been on friendly terms, and it was still a chore to keep the Baptists talking to the Unitarians, for instance, but they all faced a common danger in this peculiar new world. "
Baptist Middle East 2114 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Green Mars. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 338. "The Sufis danced under the clasped hands still wearing their white billowing clothes... looking like Hindus in the Ganges, or Baptists in the Jordan. "
Baptist Missouri 1993 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. Of Tangible Ghosts. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 122-123. "ST. LOUIS (RPI) -- A series of explosions ripped through the Aster Memorial Electronic Sciences Center at the University Missouri at St. Louis shortly after midnight this morning... Governor Danforth denounced the action as that of 'ill-informed zealots.' Speaking for the Alliance for World Peace, Northrop Winsted added the Alliance's condemnation of violence. Similar statements were also issued by the Midwest Diocese of the Roman Catholic Church and the Missouri Synod of the Anglican-Baptists. "
Baptist New Jersey 1770 Anthony, Piers. Vision of Tarot. New York: Berkley Books (1985; 1st ed. 1980); pg. 34. "'...Walking through the coastal forest [Murray] came upon a good-sized church, all by itself in dense woods. Amazed, he inquired at the next house and learned that an iliterate farmer had built the church at his own expense in thanks to God for his successes. The Baptists had petitioned to use that church, but the man told them 'If you can prove to me that God Almighty is a Baptist, you may have it.' He said the same to other denominations for he wanted all people to be equally welcome there...' "
Baptist New Mexico: Atocha 2010 Williams, Walter Jon. Days of Atonement. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 11. "He passed the Southern Baptist Assembly and turned right onto West Plaza. The deco Chamber of Commerce... "
Baptist New Mexico: Atocha 2010 Williams, Walter Jon. Days of Atonement. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 126. "'Birthplace?'

'New Delhi, India.'

...'Someone told me you were Pakistani.'

'I was born in India. My grandparents were killed by Hindus in a riot following the death of dictator Indira Gandhi. My surviving family fled to Rawalpindi, in Pakistan.'

The words were matter-of-fact, said with a slight smile. Loren tried to picture Atocha divided along those kinds of bitter ethnic lines, with... armed Knights of Columbus cruising the plaza armed with shotguns, blasting Baptist heretics with iron pellets... "

Baptist New Mexico: Atocha 2010 Williams, Walter Jon. Days of Atonement. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 197. "'I'm an atheist, so I'm not exactly an authority on matters theological.' He fell silent for a moment, then added irrelevantly, 'I was raised Quaker, though.'

'I was raised Baptist,' Kurita blurted, 'but so what? Listen! We can make a universe! It'll be terrific! Some thesis, huh?' "

Baptist New Mexico: Atocha 2010 Williams, Walter Jon. Days of Atonement. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 237. "Loren had been inclined, for all sorts of good reasons, to disregard the stories, and in any case there hadn't been any complains. Unlike, for example the case of the Evangelical Baptist minister he'd hauled off to jail for statutory rape. Loren had been careful to use only soft-tissue strikes then, gut and groin and kidneys, driving in with the end of his baton--no chance of broken bones to embarrass the department, and scarcely any bruises. Whether the girls had consented or not--and in this particular case it appeared they had--Loren knew damn well they were still someone's daughters. "
Baptist New York: New York City 1953 Barnes, Steven. Far Beyond the Stars (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 238. "The joys of the holiday season reached also as far as Harlem, where the irony of worshipping a white Jesus was entirely lost on the churchgoers who stood in myriad storefronts, or in the great Episcopal edifice of Saint Phillips, or the Baptist fortress of Redeemer's Blood Church of Faith. "
Baptist Newmanhome 2103 Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 128. "The Baptists had refused to be ecumenical with the Unitarians; the Church of Rome had separated itself from Greek Orthodox and Episcopalian. Even Captain Bu had declared himself a born-again Christian, and every other soul on Newmanhome tragically doomed to eternal hellfire. "
Baptist North America 1993 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. Of Tangible Ghosts. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 122-205. "'I have to sing for the Anglican-Baptist chapel tomorrow.'

'Why?'

'Because they will pay me.'

'That's as good a reason as any.' "; Pg. 209: "'I cannot believe you are going to sing for the Anglican-Baptists. Especially for just ten dollars.' "; Pg. 369: "Llysette pursed her lips and nodded. 'It will just follow you. Tomorrow, I must sing for the Anglican-Baptists.'

'Again? You don't want me to drive?' "

Baptist North Carolina 1980 Simmons, Dan. Carrion Comfort. New York: Warner Books (1990; c. 1989); pg. 104. "'And Wofford College. That is in South Carolina, is it not?'

'Sure,' said Natalie. 'An Bob Jones is up in Greenville, but my father wanted me to get as far away from what he called the Redneck Belt as I could. Washington University of St. Louis has an excellent graduate school of education . . .' "

Baptist North Dakota 1993 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Harvest. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 96. "He would be immortal. There would be a Place Prepared For Him, as Kindle's mother used to say. His mother had been religious. Dakota Baptist. Cold winter Baptist. Her philosophy went something like: Kick me till I go to heaven. "
Baptist Oregon 1993 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Harvest. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 20. "Places change. People pass on. Love dies. The world becomes, in time, almost uninhabitably strange.

Faith abides.

She seldom attended church. It was Miriam's opinion tht the local churches--even the Truth Baptist, which people thought of as a fundamentalist church, misrepresented the Bible. "

Baptist Oregon 1993 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Harvest. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 86. "'What I think,' Tyler said, 'is that everybody has been infected with a hallucination. The hallucination is that we can live forever. That we can cohabit like the lamb and the lion in a Baptist psalm book...' "
Baptist Oregon 1993 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Harvest. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 97. "He had learned 'Jesus Loves Me' at the Baptist Sunday School, but he was damned if he'd sing a Sunday School song when there wasn't evena Place Prepared For Him. He knew 'The Streets of Laredo,' but only one verse. "
Baptist Oregon 1993 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Harvest. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 155. "But I haven't given that up. People used to say, is there marriage in heaven? well, this isn't exactly heaven. But I think there will still be marriage. People are people, Daddy. They're each unique. They fall in love. Maybe they don't get married at the First Baptist anymore. But we're not turning into loveless monsters.'

'It's hard for me to know that.'

Rachel said, 'I don't know how to convince you.'

'What's troubling me is that there's a mechanism that's altering your brain...' "

Baptist Peru 2002 Morlan, A. R. "Fast Glaciers " in Vanishing Acts (Ellen Datlow, ed.) New York: Tor (2000); pg. 292. "In his field notes, Dr. Ridley often spoke of the Mayans, and what the Spanish Catholics did to them--their culture, their history. Strange equals inferior. Then and now. And now the Catholics have help; the Baptists and Methodists are stomping around Peru's jungles, too, competing for souls, racking up holy brownie points for the Almighty. But not the All-caring--how could He be, if he lets something so insidiously wrong take place? "


Baptist, continued

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