Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Navajo, USA

Navajo, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Navajo USA 2010 Williams, Walter Jon. Days of Atonement. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 353. "'I found out about the bedspread,' Amardas Singh said... 'In the nineteenth century, the Anglos were trying to get the Indians to adopt weaving as a way of supporting themselves... The Navajos... asked the whites what kind of of blankets and rugs they might be interested in buying, and the Anglo traders gave them Indian--East Indian, I mean--blankets and tapestries as examples. They were fashionable in the West at the time and there was a market for them. The Navajos started making copies. So what we now think of as traditional Navajo patterns actually originated thousands of miles from the Navajo homeland.'

'Really,' Loren said. "

Navajo USA 2018 Thornley, Diann. "Thunderbird's Egg " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 141. "Captain Eddie Fox was a Sioux from South Dakota. Though the languages and customs of our respective Peoples were as different as they were from the white culture, we still found we had much in common. We shared histories and legends, and in time we discovered that we were in love.

'In the old days,' I had asked him once, 'was it just the young men of your people who had visions, or could girls have visions, too?'

Eddie had laughed at that. 'Among my People,' he said, 'if a girl claimed to have a vision, she'd be accused of drinking too much whiskey! Why? Do Navajo women have visions?'

I remembered fourteen-year-old Thomas waving Uncle's whiskey bottle. 'No,' I sighed. 'Everyone would accuse a Navajo woman of being drunk, too.' "

Navajo USA - Southwest 2043 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 62-63. "From the Navajo traders Ecosophia obtained computer chips, clothing, bricks of guano and other fertilizer, and bales of plastic trash for recycling--in exchange for the few commodities that Ecosophia was able to offer, such as genetically engineered fruit trees. "
Navajo Utah 1869 Bethke, Bruce. Wild Wild West. New York: Warner Books (1999); pg. 150. "'...Would you like to eat a handful of ants and locusts?'

Gordon's stomach somersaulted. 'Please!'

'The People do,' West said. 'Some years, about the only crop that grows out here is locusts...'

'You said, 'The People.' What people?'

West turned around, looked at Gordon, and spread his hands. 'The people who live here. The Dineh. The Lords of the Earth.' Gordon arched an eyebrow.

'The Spanish named 'em Navajo,' West translated.

Gordon felt his stomach stabilize, and looked around nervously. 'We're in Navajo territory?'

Wes nodded. 'I think so.' As an afterthought, he added, 'I sure hope so.'

Gordon sagged, and plunked down on a convenient rock outcropping. 'You hope so?'

West came over and sat down next to him. 'It's like this. We were in Texas. We were on our way to Utah. That means there's only about a half dozen places where Loveless could have dumped us.' West... looked around. 'This don't look like Cherokee country.' "

Navajo Utah 1869 Bethke, Bruce. Wild Wild West. New York: Warner Books (1999); pg. 152. Pg. 152: "'Yeah, well, out here, a lot of people feel kind of differently about him [Kit Carson]. If we do happen to meet up with any Navajo, I wouldn't go throwing his name around, if I were you.' "; Pg. 153: "'the most amazing guy I ever knew was this Navajo shaman. He could make gunshot wounds heal overnight and--' " [Other refs., incl. pg. 154-155, 160, 165.]
Navajo Utah 1988 Foster, Alan Dean. To the Vanishing Point. New York: Warner Books (1988); pg. 167. "'Burnfinger's spirit is pure and unencumbered with by guilt. It's amazing to encounter someone like that in your corrupted world. I think maybe he's a yeibichai.'

'A what?'...

'A Navajo spirit. What kind, I don't know.' "

Navajo Utah 1988 Foster, Alan Dean. To the Vanishing Point. New York: Warner Books (1988); pg. 170. [Burnfingers is half Comanche, half Navajo.] "We're all the army she's god, he told himself. Myself, Alicia, and the kids, and one crazy Comajo. Or maybe Burnfingers would prefer Navamanche. "
Navajo Utah 1988 Foster, Alan Dean. To the Vanishing Point. New York: Warner Books (1988); pg. 174. "'That's such a beautiful bracelet.'

'So you've said.' He raised his arm so it would catch more of the light. A huge turquoise nuggest was set deep in a thick band of sand-cast metal. 'Skystone and silver.' With a finger he traced the recess with the turquoise reposed. 'This is called a shadowbox. The Navajo like to wear their wealth. I have more jewelry, but it can be awkward to travel with. This piece I wear because my father made it. He was very skilled. I keep it with me always.' "

Navajo Utah 1989 Bennion, John. "Dust " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1989); pg. 292. "The prophet of the polygamists and a Navaho India I once knew both believed that they could make it rain by thinking. "
Navajo Utah 1995 Thornley, Diann. "Thunderbird's Egg " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 128. "I was born in 1995, the youngest of seven children, on the Navajo Indian Reservation that stretches across the southwest corner of Utah. My father named me Betsy Ablehorse, but by the time I reached my third summer my brothers and sisters and mother all called me Asks Why.

My great-grandmother was still living then. On winder nights when the wind whistled down from the stone arches of Moab or across Glen Canyon and Lake Powell, we would gather at Great-grandmother's home. She had a tiny wooden house, and we would sit on blankets woven by her mother and listen to her tell of gods and dreams and other holy things. " [The protagonist is a fairly traditional Navajo, and there are many refs. to Navajo people, culture, traditional beliefs, etc. throughout story. Not all in DB.]

Navajo Utah 2002 Thornley, Diann. "Thunderbird's Egg " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 128-129. "Of course Great-grandmother's tales were already old when she was born in 1910, but to my young mind they might have happened just the day before. I loved the story of Lost Arrows, who had a dream of a fish that talked. He swam the Colorado to find it and learn its secrets. Lost Arrows lived well past 100 summers and was a Shaman when he died. "

'Have you ever had a vision, Grandmother?' I asked her once.

She... said, 'The gods haven't given dreams or visions for many generations. Lost Arrows was one of the last.'

'Why?' I asked.

'Perhaps... it's because the People [Navajo] no longer walk in harmony with the Holy Ones. They've turned from the ways of Earth Mother.'

I thought about that for a while... then I asked, 'If I walk in the ways of Earth Mother, will the Holy Ones give me a vision?'

'Great-grandmother smiled again. 'No, no, Asks Why. Only the young men of The People have visions. A woman of The People is born knowing the path she should walk.' "

Navajo Utah 2005 Thornley, Diann. "Thunderbird's Egg " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 132. "From behind me I heard the cry of the eagle. It hung eerily on the morning breeze for several seconds. Still jumpy, I wrenched around.

The great bird's shadow fell for a moment on the face of the bluff where I had lain the day before, but when I looked up there was no eagle circling in the sky.

A tingle started at the nape of my neck and made its way like a trickle of chilly water all the way down my spine. But it was a tingle of realization, not of fear:

I had seen a vision!
Thunderbird had shown herself to me!
Herself!

Even that was a revelation. In al the ancient tales, Thunderbird had always been portrayed as a warrior, striking from the heart of the storm. But Thunderbird was a mother, like the earth! Her egg lay here in the mud before me, a few inches from my knees! "

Navajo Utah 2005 Thornley, Diann. "Thunderbird's Egg " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 131-132. "Steeped as I was I the traditions of The People [Navajo], my next thought was that it must have been caused by a ghost. Maybe even by the ghost of my great-grandmother as a punishment for my desire to see a vision. I shuddered and whispered a few words to the Holy Ones, invoking their protection.

...Curiosity overcame fear. I crept forward, still whispering for the protection of the Holy Ones. I bent down to look first... "

Navajo Utah 2013 Thornley, Diann. "Thunderbird's Egg " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 137. "The only question physics didn't answer was why girls were not supposed to have visions. Not that it mattered anymore. Many times at night, while my roommates were out late with their boyfriends, I'd get my Thunderbird egg meteorite out of the back of my dresser drawer and unwrap the bandanna to stroke its metallic surface. "
Navajo Utah 2017 Thornley, Diann. "Thunderbird's Egg " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 139. "'...What drew you to become a pilot in the first place, Lieutenant Ablehorse? It had to be something momentous. I don't believe I've ever seen a native American woman come through UFT in all my years here.' "
Navajo Utah 2025 Wolverton, Dave. "Wheatfields Beyond " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 24. "...Willy's grandson, a black-haired boy that could have been a Mexican or Navajo. "
Navajo Utah: Kanab 2000 Gates, John. Brigham's Day. New York: Walter & Co. (2000); pg. 62. "...the jail proper. It was a plain-looking affair... built years before simply to house shoplifters and drunks--Navajos, mostly... "
Navajo Utah: Kanab 2000 Gates, John. Brigham's Day. New York: Walter & Co. (2000); pg. 144. "Watters, at the Buckskin, had said something about a Navajo stalking her... "
Navajo Utah: Salt Lake City 2020 Bell, M. Shayne. "The Thing about Benny " in Vanishing Acts (Ellen Datlow, ed.) New York: Tor (2000); pg. 283. "'You check out the Indian jewelry store while I check Mr. Q's Big and Tall,' he told me. 'We meet outside in five.'

I did like I was told. I smiled at the Navajo woman in traditional dress, but she did not smile back. She wanted to lock up. I made a quick sweep of the store and noted the various species of endangered cacti and left. "

Navajo world 1990 Wilhelm, Kate. "And the Angels Sing " (published 1990) in The Norton Book of Science Fiction (Ursula K. Le Guin & Brian Atterbery, editors). New York: W. W. Norton & Co. (1993); pg. 802. "Underfoot was another Navaho rug. "
Navajo world 2015 Sullivan, Tricia. Someone to Watch Over Me. New York: Bantam (1997); pg. 254. "That was a female face, with the breeze blowing through the skin like Navajo flute music. "
Navajo world 2050 Stephenson, Neal. The Diamond Age. New York: Bantam (1995); pg. 447. "...strolled through encamptments of Ashantis, Kurds, Armenians, Navajos, Tibetans, Senderos, Mormons, Jesuits, Lapps, Pathans, Tutsis... "
Navajo world 2250 Zelazny, Roger & Jane Lindskold. Donnerjack. New York: Avon (1998; c.1997); pg. 433. "...reflecting Kwinan's latest fascination. Today it resembled a Navajo hogan--a rounded structure with log and mud walls and a softly curved mud roof. "
Navajo world 2375 Dillard, J. M. Star Trek: Insurrection. New York: Pocket Books (1998). Based on the movie; story by Rick Berman & Michael Piller; screenplay by Michael Piller.; pg. 122. "He knocked upon the wooden door of a house sculpted from clay, rather like the adobe dwellings of the Navajo... "
Nazism Africa 1990 Dick, Philip K. The Man in the High Castle. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons (1962); pg. 16. "And then he thought about Africa, and the Nazi experiments there. And his blood stopped in his veins, hesitated, at last went on. "
Nazism Africa 2008 McDonald, Ian. Evolution's Shore. New York: Bantam (1997; c. 1995); pg. 392. Pg. 392: "...and are complete militarist Nazis who are jealous because all they do is drive the taxi... "; [Also pg. 74]
Nazism Africa - North 1986 Bishop, Michael. No Enemy But Time. New York: Timescape (1982); pg. 16. "'During the war, the second one, I walked to Bravanumbi from Makoleni, my home village, and enlisted for service against the evil minions of Hitler in North Africa...' "
Nazism Albania 1944 Ing, Dean. Blood of Eagles. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 1-48. [Book jacket:]

"May 1944
The Nazi column moves slowly through the mountain pass toward an ambush prepared by Albanian partisans. After the battle, a ton of gold disappears.

April 1985
Enver Hoxha, the man who kept Albania virtually isolated from the rest of the world for almost forty years, lies in state in Tirana. Russian and Chinese leaders begin to make very special plans. "

[Extensive Nazi refs. throughout first section of the novel, pages 1-48.]

Nazism Arizona 2011 Willis, Connie. "The Last of the Winnebagos " in Impossible Things. New York: Bantam (1994; story copyright 1988); pg. 31. "The [Humane] Society is efficient. Like Hitler and his Nazis. "
Nazism Australia 2025 Egan, Greg. "Cocoon " in Isaac Asimov's Detectives (Gardner Dozois and Sheila Williams, eds.) New York: Ace Books (1998; c. 1994); pg. 76. "'Don't you know any history, Mr. Pig?... The Nazis put us in their death camps...' "
Nazism Australia 2044 Turner, George. Drowning Towers. New York: William Morrow (1987); pg. 72. "He was authority without explanation or reason. We had read of the old military juntas, the Nazis, the Red Kremlin... "
Nazism Australia 2100 Lawson, Chris. "Written in Blood " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 211. "'...In my blood is a code that says that I am a Muslim, not just by birth, but by active faith. I have marked myself. I might as well walk into a neo-Nazi rally wearing a Star of David.' "
Nazism Austria 1896 Bova, Ben. "Inspiration " in Twice Seven. New York: Avon Books (1998; c. 1994); pg. 25. "The six-year-old's eyes went wide with terror as his mother let her threat dangle in the air between them.

'Scrub that table good, Adolph,' his mother told him. 'Get rid of that damned Jew's stink.'

I looked down at the boy. His eyes were burning with shame and rage and hatred. Save as much of the human race as you can, I told myself. But it was already too late to save him. " [The story tells of an encounter in a restaurant between a young Albert Einstein and an even younger Adolf Hitler, and Hitler's mother.]

Nazism Austria 1920 Maggin, Elliot S. Superman: Miracle Monday. New York: Warner Books (1981); pg. 29. "In 1920 Saturn won when he posed as an angel who offered eternal salvation to a young Austrian house painter in return for the Austrian's agreement to take his greater reward then and there, foregoing the remainder of his allotted years. Adolf Hitler foolishly refused, and as a result of the encounter, he was encouraged to go on to establish the Third Reich. "
Nazism Austria 1937 Dunn, J. R. "Long Knives " in L. Ron Hubbard Presents The Best of Writers of the Future (Algis Budrys, ed.) Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (2000; c. 1987); pg. 106. "...Vienna, 1937, remaking history, righting old wrongs, but it had come down to this, getting spat at by Nazis, working with people who were no better... " [Other refs. to Nazis throughout story. For all other refs., see entries already indexed in DB from this same story's original publication.]
Nazism Austria 1937 Dunn, J. R. "Long Knives " in Writers of the Future: Volume III (Algis Budrys, ed.). Los Angeles: Bridge Publications (1987); pg. 154. [This story is about time travelers from the future who guard Adolf Hitler and eventually remove him from the timeline. There are references to Nazism throughout the story, most not in DB.] Pg. 154: "Adolf himself had rather liked it, the last time he had been out. He had stepped from the building, surrounded, as always, by his four guards, dressed in the double-breasted mock military jacket he had worn as Chancellor. He had been ashen-faced, with bags under those weird, piercing eyes, and Keegan had thought that he had looked much as he would on the main line, eight years on as the Red Army closed in on the bunker. "
Nazism Austria 1937 Dunn, J. R. "Long Knives " in Writers of the Future: Volume III (Algis Budrys, ed.). Los Angeles: Bridge Publications (1987); pg. 157. "The Nazis had ended up in a pretty bad part of town, what the Vienners considered to be a slum... "
Nazism Austria 1937 Dunn, J. R. "Long Knives " in Writers of the Future: Volume III (Algis Budrys, ed.). Los Angeles: Bridge Publications (1987); pg. 163. Pg. 163: "'...By the end of the week, that block will be crawling with our people, and Hitler won't go anywhere except in a convoy...' "; Pg. 164: "'...Remember, they don't know their future history. Mussolini, Hitler and the rest of them aren't thought of as being the bad guys we know they are. A lot of the best peopl here in England and the U.S. think we were way out of line for dumping them in the first place. They think that Roosevelt, Baldin, whoever, will be next.' He stood up and turned to Annie. 'And that, unpleasant as it may be, is why we've got to protect Hitler.' "
Nazism Austria 1937 Dunn, J. R. "Long Knives " in Writers of the Future: Volume III (Algis Budrys, ed.). Los Angeles: Bridge Publications (1987); pg. 154-155. "Keegan thought for a moment that he'd give the car a salute. Handricks was a strange bird, the only one of the unit who seemed to enjoy the assignment. More than enjoy it, he loved it: treating the guards and party members with respect, speaking of the Fuehrer in hushed tones. The Service had been careful not to send back anyone who had a personal reason for hating Hitler, nobody of Jewish or Slavic background, nobody who had a relative killed in the war. With Hendricks they had erred in the opposite direction.

...It had seemed exciting when they had offered it to him--Vienna, 1937, remaking history, righting old wrongs, but it had come down to this, getting spat at by Nazis, working with people who were no better, and being treated by the Vienners like some kind of Turk. "

Nazism Austria 1990 Dick, Philip K. The Man in the High Castle. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons (1962); pg. 91. "'Doctor Seyss-Inquart. Former Austrian Nazi, now in charge of Reich colonial areas...' "
Nazism California 1971 Dick, Philip K. Valis. New York: Bantam (1981); pg. 26. "'...He was later murdered by pro-Nazi partisans. Now, consider the Tiger tank the Germans had and their Panthers.' "
Nazism California 1972 Dick, Philip K. The Dark-Haired Girl. Willimantic, CT: Mark V. Ziesing (1988; c. 1972); pg. 91. "Norman Spinrad and I spoke for three hours live over KPFK FM, L.A., spending most of our time on the theme slated by the moderator: Fascism in Science Fiction. Norman just brought out a s-f book alleging itself, as in the blurbs, to be by Adolf Hitler. " [More.]
Nazism California 1975 Dick, Philip K. The Transmigration of Timothy Archer. New York: Timescape Books (1982); pg. 57. Pg. 57: Hitler, Nazis; Pg. 58-59, 76, 111, 121, 137: Hitler
Nazism California 1982 Bishop, Michael. The Secret Ascension; or, Philip K. Dick is Dead, Alas. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 38. "Cal walked to the fiction section, row upon row of paperbacks emblazoned with Nazi swastikis, ghoulishly complexioned children... "
Nazism California 1985 Ing, Dean. Blood of Eagles. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 156. "'...Now Stu, here, don't give a ---- if you're Adolf Hitler: or so he said when I wanted to go to the feds. He just wants the truth...' "
Nazism California 2020 Zelazny, Roger. Damnation Alley. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1969); pg. 7. "All the old irons were gone from his jacket, and he missed the swastika, the hammer and sickle, and the upright finger, especially. " [Referring to a Hell's Angel's anti-establishment outfit.]
Nazism California 2050 Dick, Philip K. The Simulacra. New York: Random House (2002; c. 1964); pg. 24. Pg. 24: "Days of Barbarism--that was the sweet-talk for the Nazi Period of the middle part of the previous century, now gone nearly a century but still vividly, if distortedly, recalled. "; Pg. 42: "'He was involved in the losing military campaign, whereas the Gestapo people and those close to Hitler gained in power, Bormann and Himmler and Eichmann, the blackshirts. Goering would understand... what losing the military part of the Party's campaign meant.' " [Much more about Nazism and Hitler, e.g., pg. 43-45 69-70, 72, 81, 84, 116, 183, etc.]
Nazism California 2051 Niven, Larry & Steven Barnes. Dream Park. New York: Ace (1981); pg. 275. [In a simulation/game.] "'Now what in the world is a Nazi patrol boat doing in the Pacific?' "; "'Like that Nazi ship. Stands out, doesn't it?...' "
Nazism California: Berkeley 1995 Sawyer, Robert J. Frameshift. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1997); pg. 130. Pg. 127: "'Why... would a neo-Nazi be after me?' ";

Pg. 130: "'The officers over in Berkeley said Hanratty had been a member of a neo-Nazi group. I've been racking my brain trying to figure out what such a person would have against me.'

'You Jewish?'

Pierre shook his head.

'But you are a foreigner. The skinheads aren't keen on immigrants.' " [Much more about the neo-Nazis in the Berkeley and San Francisco area who are killing health insurance customers with genetic diseases and other expensive conditions at the behest of the insurance company's president. More, pg. 137-138, etc. Nazis are the novel's primary villains, particularly a Nazi who is the founder and head of a large health insurance company based in San Francisco.]

Nazism California: Berkeley 1997 Sawyer, Robert J. Frameshift. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1997); pg. 9. "The cop nodded. 'Nasty fellow, that Chuck Hanratty. He was involved with a neo-Nazi group called the Millennial Reich. They're mostly across the Bay in San Francisco, but they've been recruiting here in Berkley, too.' " [Extensive other refs. to Nazism, most not in DB. The primary villain of the novel is a Ukrainian-born Nazi who had been in charge of a Nazi death camp during World War II, and later is the founder of a neo-Nazi group in the United States. The Nazi is also the founder of a health insurance company, underpinning one of the themes of the novel: that American health insurance companies are essentially evil.]
Nazism California: Hollywood 1955 Bradbury, Ray. A Graveyard for Lunatics. New York: Alfred A. Knopf (1990); pg. 13. Pg. 13: "The international director who ran back to and then got out of Berlin ahead of Hitler... "; Pg. 239: "'I looked at Hitler's picture on the wall and clicked my heels--'sir!'

Fritz glanced up, angrily. 'Stupid! That picture of the maniac housepainter is there to remind me of the big bastards I ran from so as to arrive at little ones...' "

Nazism California: Los Angeles 1985 Swanwick, Michael. "Anyone Here From Utah? " in Another Round at the Spaceport Bar (edited by George H. Scithers and Darrell Schweitzer). New York: Avon Books (1989; c 1985); pg. 157-162. [8] "'...My God, the things I've seen. I was in Los Angeles last month whn the President of the United States presented the key to the city to Adolf Hitler--in public Except for this little crowd who applauded, nobody seemed to notice... Hitler was in a wheelchair, wearing a white suit. I think he was senile.' "
Nazism California: Los Angeles 1993 Shiner, Lewis. Glimpses. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1993); pg. 164. "'Lori told me you guys are witches.'

Her 'yeah' sounded like 'jah.' 'Pagans, witches, whatever you want to call us. We worship the Goddess, which basically is Gaia, the Earth. We see her as a living being. We try to live inside her rhythms. To be clean and peaceful and reverent.'

Jeff, on the other side of her, said, 'Sounds like the Boy Scouts.' Then we had to explain to her what Boy Scouts are and how they're different from Hitler Youth, which turned out to be tricky. "

Nazism California: Los Angeles 1996 Powers, Tim. Expiration Date. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 226. "Under some other name, Oaks had been a follower of all kinds of spiritualist leaders, even joining William Dudley Pelley's pro-Nazi 'Legion of Silver Shirts'... "
Nazism California: Los Angeles 1999 Kessel, John. Good News from Outer Space. New York: Tor (1990; c. 1989); pg. 271. "THE 1993 ACADEMY AWARDS:... the Best Picture category, when the aging actress who was to present the award announced the winner as a musical remake of Triumph of the Will. Switch to a clip of ecstatic Nazis (resembling the major heads of state of the Western Alliance) dancing around the infield of an olympic stadium singing 'Springtime for Hitler.' "
Nazism California: Los Angeles 2005 Gibson, William. Virtual Light. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 9. "What with the black IntenSecure uniform and his dry blond hair, the contact made him look like some kind of Klan-assed Nazi robot. "
Nazism California: San Francisco 1955 Dick, Philip K. The Broken Bubble. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 72. "'...You're going out to fool around, and you don't know if you're playing a game--it would be playing revolutionary, I guess, Nazi or something, with that car...' "
Nazism California: San Francisco 1977 Leiber, Fritz. Our Lady of Darkness. New York: Berkley Publishing Corp. (1977); pg. 53. "Gun added, 'The hippie-era analogue to the SS Nazis being the Manson family. " [More.]
Nazism California: San Francisco 1996 Sawyer, Robert J. Frameshift. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1997); pg. 276. "It all made sense. What better job for an out-of-work Nazi than being an actuary? He'd spent the war years dividing people into good and bad classes--Aryan, Jew; master, slave--and now he'd found a way to continue doing that. And the murders, conducted by neo-Nazis led by a man they called Grozny... "
Nazism California: San Francisco 2036 Besher, Alexander. Mir: A Novel of Virtual Reality. New York: Simon & Schuster (1998); pg. 14. "'They're rounding up Jewish avatars again on the RecihNet and putting them in 'concentration camps' for 'reeducation in the nationalistic ideals. Doesn't all this seem horribly familiar?'

'History clones itself, I guess . . . But have you heard what their minister of propamedia, Josef Grossmeister, is now saying? That it's no worse than what we're doing with our own foreign problem--our own 'gypsies south of the border.' '

'Yeah, but at least we're not proclaiming the 'New Volkisch'--the 'master race of avatars' ' "

Nazism Cambodia 1993 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Harvest. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 236. "'...The Romans left unwanted children to die by the side of the road... How horrible. Well, it is horrible . . . but compared to what? The century of Auschwitz, of Hiroshima and the Khmer Rouge?...' "
Nazism Canada 2000 Quan, Andy. "Hair " in Circa 2000: Gay Fiction at the Millennium (Robert Drake & Terry Wolverton, eds). Los Angeles, CA: Alyson Pub. (2000); pg. 315. "'...Have you been frolicking with the gym Nazis lately?' "
Nazism Colorado 1974 Disch, Thomas M. Camp Concentration. New York: Random House (1999; c. 1968); pg. 77. "'The wages of sin is death, but death is likewise the wages of virtue. So you'll need a better bugaboo than that. Hell, perhaps? Why, this is hell, nor am I out of it! Dante has no frights for the inmates of Buchenwald. Why didn't your sainted Pope Pius protest the Nazi's ovens? Not through prudence or cowardice, but form an instinct of corporation loyalty. Pius sensed that the deathcamps were the nearest approximation that mortal man has yet made to Almighty's plan. God is Eichmann writ large.'

'Really!' I said. Because there are some limits.

'Really,' Mordecai insisted... 'Consider that fundamental organizational principle of the camps--that there by no relation between the prisoners' behavior and their rewards or punishments. In Auschwitz when you do something wrong you're punished, but you're just as likely to be punished when you do as you're told, or even if you do nothing at all...' " [More. Pg. 78: Himmler.]

Nazism Colorado 1974 Disch, Thomas M. Camp Concentration. New York: Random House (1999; c. 1968); pg. 83. [The narrator/main character writes a play called 'Auschwitz: A Comedy']
Nazism Colorado 1974 Disch, Thomas M. Camp Concentration. New York: Random House (1999; c. 1968); pg. 130. "Remarks expressing contempt of beauty, accompanied by a fairly candid admission of a desire to destroy it wherever found. (The best example of this is the quotation from the Nazi youth leader Hans Yost, which he has had burnt onto a pine plaque and hung above his desk: 'Whenever I hear the word culture, I release the safety catch of my Browning.') "


Nazism, continued

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