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34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Native Americans, United Kingdom: London

Native Americans, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Native Americans United Kingdom: London 1995 Ryman, Geoff. 253. New York: St. Martin's Press (1998); pg. 60. "Mr Andre Stanley... Ageing football coach? American letterman's jacket with beige sleeves, black trunk. OSHKOSH INDIANS it announces, NUMBER 22. "
Native Americans United Kingdom: London 2075 Ryman, Geoff. The Child Garden; or A Low Comedy. New York: St. Martin's Press (1989); pg. 90. "Outside, it was Indian Summer, almost warm with patchy sunlight and racing shadows of clouds. "
Native Americans United Kingdom: London 2546 Huxley, Aldous. Brave New World. New York: HarperCollins (1999; c. 1932, 1946); pg. 130. "...and Left Hand, between Wet and Dry; of Awonawilona, who made a great fog by thinking in the night, and then made the whole world out of the fog; of Earth Mother and Sky Father; of Ahaiyuta and Marsailema, the twins of War and Chance; of Jesus and Pookong; of Mary and Etsanatlehi, the woman who makes herself young again; of the Black Stone at Laguna and the Great Eagle and Our Lady of Acoma. Strange stories, all the more wonderful to him for being told in the other words and so not fully understood... "
Native Americans United Kingdom: Scotland: Muir Isle 1985 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 28: "Soulwar ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (June 1985); pg. 4. Danielle: "Avalanche! Smart move, Mr. Wayne. "; Jack Wayne: "Don't fret, Hiawatha--nothing can punch through my TK shields. "; Doug/Cypher: "'Hia--?!!' Gimme a break! "; Danielle: "Relax, Doug. Battles like this, I fight myself. "; Danielle's thoughts: "The creep! He reminds me of the heroes in the old-time Westerns--the ones that went around cheerfully massacring every Indian in sight. I suppose I shouldn't be so harsh, he's the Prof's pal. No accounting for taste. " [More, pg. 19.]
Native Americans United Kingdom: Scotland: Muir Isle 1985 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 28: "Soulwar ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (June 1985); pg. 20. "Dani... reaches out with her psi-talent--aware that this is her moment of truth as the mutants' team leader--praying to the Great Spirit and her Cheyenne ancestors for help as she uses her power to draw upon Jemail's happy memories to calm and revive him. " [Danielle is one of story's main characters.]
Native Americans USA 1750 Bradbury, Ray. "Dark They Were and Golden-eyed " in The Day it Rained Forever. London: Rupert Hart-Davis (1970; first ed. 1959); pg. 119. [People from Earth have traveled to Mars, and find abandoned cities, built by a now departed native Martian civilization.] "He returned to his philosophy of names and mountains. The Earthmen had changed names. Now there were Hormel Valleys, Roosevelt Seas, Ford Hills, Vanderbilt Plateaus, Rockefeller Rivers, on Mars. It wasn't right. The American settlers had shown wisdom, using old Indian prairie names: Wisconsin, Minnesota, Idaho, Ohio, Utah, Milwaukee, Waukegan, Osseo. The old names, old meanings. "
Native Americans USA 1865 Bethke, Bruce. Wild Wild West. New York: Warner Books (1999); pg. 16. Pg. 16: "He scowled at Hudson, and his stupid hat. The Indian, as always, was stony-faced and unreadable, and McGrath's scowl went completely wasted. "; Pg. 29: "Where'd that Indian get that stupid hat? West wondered. "
Native Americans USA 1869 Bethke, Bruce. Wild Wild West. New York: Warner Books (1999); pg. 44. "'Mexico. That fool Maximilian, declaring himself the Austro-Hungarian Emperor of America and demanding that we return Texas... and of course, the Navajo, the Cheyenne, the Apaches, the Nez Perce, and up in Dakota Territory, Sitting Bull and all those thousands of unhappy Sioux. " [Also, pg. 151-153.]
Native Americans USA 1869 Bethke, Bruce. Wild Wild West. New York: Warner Books (1999); pg. 155. "'...Between '63 and '65, the U.S. Army fought nearly ninety battles with the Sioux, the Nez Perce, the Apaches, the Cheyenne--and yeah, with the Navajo. There were massacres and atrocities enough to go around for both sides, and I'll tell you one thing for sure: If the Indians has been able to coordinate a little better, and if Chief Joseph had had modern rifles, the United States would end at the east bank of the Mississippi River!' "
Native Americans USA 1872 Anderson, Poul. The Boat of a Million Years. New York: Tor (1989); pg. 224. "'Meanwhile tribe after tribe got wiped out--by sickness, by war--or broken and herded onto a reservation. Then if the whites decided they wanted that land too, out the redskins went. I saw the Cherokees at the end of their Trail of Tears--' " [Book contains many reference to American Indians, most not in DB.]
Native Americans USA 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 11. "'But suppose the Hindoos or Indians pull up the rails,' replied Stuart; 'suppose they stop the trains, pillage the luggage-vans, and scalp the passengers!' "
Native Americans USA 1876 Sanders, William. "Custer Under the Baobab " in Drakas! (S. M. Sterling, ed.) New York: Baen (2000); pg. 8-9. "'After all,' Heimbach said, 'you do, I believe, have some experience of pursuing and punishing savages.'

Custer managed not to wince. 'Yes, sir,' he said...

'Colonel Custer, was it not your mission to pursue and punish the savages?'

'I learned that their forces were overwhelmingly superior to mine. I saw no reason, sir, to lead my men to certain defeat.'

'And on what basis did you make this evaluation?'

'My Crow scouts reconnoitered the Sioux encampment and reported it contained thousands of warriors.'

'So on the word of a few . . . aborigines, you not only abandoned the offensive but ordered a general withdrawal from the area? Colonel, are you aware that expert witnesses have testified that no Indian band has ever been seen in the numbers you allege...? " [This story is about the famous Colonel George Armstrong Custer. This alternative history story takes place after his career as an Indian fighter, but includes some reminiscences of those times.]

Native Americans USA 1876 Thomsen, Brian M. "Bloodstained Ground " in Alternate Generals (Harry Turtledove, ed.) New York: Baen (1998); pg. 277. "He was killed by an arrow shot by some crazed Indian guide " [Other refs. throughout story, not in DB. The story focuses on American military battles with Indians.]
Native Americans USA 1881 Sanders, William. "Custer Under the Baobab " in Drakas! (S. M. Sterling, ed.) New York: Baen (2000); pg. 12. "'...After all, our former duties against the Indians could be considered in the nature of police work...?' " [Other refs., not in DB.]
Native Americans USA 1888 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "A Study in Scarlet " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1888); pg. 74. "No, nor drink. And Mr. Bender, he was the fust to go, and then Indian Pete, and then Mrs. McGregor...
Native Americans USA 1888 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "A Study in Scarlet " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1888); pg. 77. At the sight there was a general reining up of horses and unslinging of guns, while fresh horsemen came galloping up to reinforce the vanguard. The word "Redskins " was on every lip.

"There can't be any number of Injuns here, " said the elderly man who appeared to be in command. "We have passed the Pawnees, and there are no other tribes until we cross the great mountains. "

Native Americans USA 1888 Willis, Connie. To Say Nothing of the Dog. New York: Bantam (1997); pg. 195. "'I... was sent... to the States for treatment.'

'Did you see Red Indians?' Tossie asked.

'I was in Boston,' I stammered... "

Native Americans USA 1893 Lafferty, R. A. "Narrow Valley " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1966); pg. 273. "In the year 1893, land allotments in severalty were made to the remaining eight hundred and twenty-one Pawnee Indians. Each would receive on hundred and sixty acres of land and no more, and thereafter the Pawnees would be expected to pay taxes on their land, the same as the White-Eyes did. "
Native Americans USA 1925 Sanders, William. "Billy Mitchell's Overt Act " in Alternate Generals (Harry Turtledove, ed.) New York: Baen (1998); pg. 158. "So he spent the next fifteen years in a series of obscure posts where nothing had happened since the Indian Wars... "
Native Americans USA 1930 Stapledon, Olaf. Last and First Men. Los Angeles: Jeremy P. Tarcher, Inc. (1988; first published 1930); pg. 24. "Here [Americans] was a rce brewed of all the races, and mentally more effervescent than any.... Here also was the sensitive and stormy Slav, a youth-giving Negroid infusion, a faint but subtly stimulating trace of the Red Man... "
Native Americans USA 1932 Wilson, Robert Charles. A Hidden Place. New York: Bantam (1989; c. 1986); pg. 114. "She understood. A pattern was emerging. The Courier, Susan Farris, the police, even her mother: all knitted together. They were the Conestoga wagons, circling, and Nancy had been elected Indian. "
Native Americans USA 1932 Wilson, Robert Charles. A Hidden Place. New York: Bantam (1989; c. 1986); pg. 123. "'...There is the ancient human tradition of the vision-quest, the spirit-walk. The Greeks at Eleusis, the American Indians in the wilderness, the stylites on their pillars. They all want the same thing. To see--if only for a moment. A glimpse of the Jeweled World.' "
Native Americans USA 1940 Burton, Levar. Aftermath. New York: Warner Books (1997); pg. 34. "A sign of light will appear, but it will tilt and bring death. And the sun will rise, not in the east as we know it but in the west. Those were the words that foretold the coming of the second shaking. As the elders at Third Mesa pondered over the meaning of the tablet's words, an insane corporal rose to become a dictator in Germany. His heart black with evil, he took an ancient religious symbol used by Native Americans and their brothers far to the east--reversed and tilted it--and called it the swastika.

And the sun did rise in the west instead of the east: the rising sun of the empire of Japan. Once again the sacred [Hopi] tablets had predicted the future. "

Native Americans USA 1942 Turtledove, Harry. Worldwar: Upsetting the Balance. New York: Del Rey (1996); pg. 372. "'...The Red Indians hadn't the faintest notion how to smelt iron or make gunpowder, but when they got muskets in their hands, they had no trouble shooting at the colonials in America. That's where we are right now: we need to use the Lizards' devices against them. Understanding can come at its own pace.'

'The Red Indians never did understand how firearms work,' Goldfarb said, 'and look what became of them.'

'The Red Indians didn't have the concept of research and development, and we do,' Roundbush said.' "

Native Americans USA 1943 Bishop, Michael. Brittle Innings. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 295. "My attackers, whose arrows flew wide or rebounded from my granite throne, wore the dress of the Sahaptin group of North American Indians: Cayuse, Palouse, or Wallawalla. I identified them by their vestments and, when they audibly conferred, by certain quirks of their Penutian-derived tongue. "
Native Americans USA 1959 Bradbury, Ray. "And the Rock Cried Out " in The Day it Rained Forever. London: Rupert Hart-Davis (1970; first ed. 1959); pg. 221. "'...And if you happen to road-block another Indian, hell, all you do is go out and help him change tyres.' "
Native Americans USA 1960 Barnes, John. "Upon Their Backs, to Bite 'Em " in Drakas! (S. M. Sterling, ed.) New York: Baen (2000); pg. 315. "I had no idea what they thought of him a few thousand timelines over, where he came from--a timeline where the assassination of Andrew Jackson prevented the Trail of Tears, the German Fever devastated the North, and Napoleon fils cut off European emigration for more than forty years. I'd been there once, on a training trip; the USA of 1960 had less than a hundred million people, and they were about one-third Native, one-third Euro, and one-third African in ancestry. Pretty country, but empty. "
Native Americans USA 1963 Grimwood, Ken. Replay. New York: Arbor House (1986); pg. 158. "'There's a cult--white, not Indian--that still worships the mountain...' "
Native Americans USA 1966 Geary, Patricia. Strange Toys. New York: Bantam (1989; c. 1987); pg. 13. Pg. 13: "...a woman wearing a wild headdress with green, yellow, and blue spiraling points, a cross between an Indian chief and an angel. "; Pg. 69: "We only passed one more sign for Running Redskin's: no Hannah... his blue and yellow loincloth, his feathered headdress; her pink and green polka-dot bikini, the flowing mane of platinum hair. But also their bodies were godlike, his sleek and linear a runner this Indian, and hers all curve and muscle bulge. Slave bracelets on her upper arms emphasized the power of her biceps. " [More. Also pg. 68, 151-152.]
Native Americans USA 1966 Lafferty, R. A. "Narrow Valley " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1966); pg. 273. Pg. 280: "'...She thinks she's a short-horn cow named Sweet Virginia. I think I'm a Pawnee Indian named Clarence. Break it to us real gentle if we're not.'

'If you're an Indian where's your war bonnet?' There's not a feather on you anywhere.'

'How you be sure?... How you expect me to believe you're a little white girl and your folks came from Europe a couple hundred years ago if you don't wear it? There are six thousand tribes, and only one of them, the Oglala Sioux, had the war bonnet...' "; Pg. 281: "'If you're an Indian where's your bow and arrow?' Tom Rampart interrupted. 'I bet you can't even shoot one.'

...'Hey, you old Indian, you lied!' Cecilia Rampart shrilled from the doorway of the shack. 'You do have a war bonnet. Can I have it?'

'My son Clarence Bare-Back sent that to me from Japan for a joke a long time ago. Sure, you can have it.' " [Many other refs., not in DB.]

Native Americans USA 1966 Lafferty, R. A. "Narrow Valley " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1966); pg. 280. "'Is there any wild Indians around here?' Fatty Rampart asked.

'No, not really. I go on a bender about every three months and get a little bit wild, and there's a couple Osage boys from Gray Horse that get noisy sometimes, but that's about all,' Clarence Little-Saddle said. "

Native Americans USA 1972 McCullough, Ken. "Chuck Berry, Won't You Please Come Home " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 468. "...no more preachers teachers Indian chiefs--just cats sitting around vibrating with their eyes closed. "
Native Americans USA 1977 Simmons, Dan. Song of Kali. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1985); pg. 26. [Talking to a native of India, in Calcutta.] "'I went to university in the States for almost three years... I worked with blacks, Chicanos, red Indians. The oppressed people of your country.' "
Native Americans USA 1978 King, Stephen. The Stand. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1978); pg. 729. "'There were several American Indian tribes that used to make 'having a vision' an integral part of their manhood rite. When it was your time to become a man, you were supposed to go out into the wilderness unarmed. You were supposed to make a kill, and two songs--one about the Great Spirit and one about your own prowess as a hunter and a rider and a warrior... and have that vision. You weren't supposed to eat. You were supposed to get up high and wait for that vision to come. And eventually, of course, it would.' He chuckled. 'Starvation is a great hallucinogenic.' "
Native Americans USA 1978 King, Stephen. The Stand. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1978); pg. 779. "...it reminded Stu more of a crazy rickshaw thatn a travois like the ones the plains Indians had used. "
Native Americans USA 1980 Tucker, Wilson. The Year of the Quiet Sun. New York: Ace (1970); pg. 123. "The gentleman from Delaware was discussing the intent of a resolution to improve the lot of the American Indian, by explaining that his resolution would diret the Bureau of Indian Affairs to act on a previous resolution passed in 1954, direting them to terminate government control of the Indians and return their resources to them. The gentleman complained that no worthwhile action had been taken on the 1954 resolution and the plight of the Indian was as sorry as ever; he urged his fellows to give every consideration to the new resolution, and hoped for a speedy passage. "
Native Americans USA 1980 Waldrop, Howard. "Ugly Chickens " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1980); pg. 489. "All this stuff was herded out west to the trading post in the midst of the Chickasaw Nation. (The tribes around there were part of the confederation of Dancing Rabbits.)

And Colonel Crisby's father prospered, and so did the guinea fowl and the dodos. Then Andrew Jackson came along and marched the Dancing Rabbits off up the trail of Tears to the heaven of Oklahoma... "

Native Americans USA 1981 Crowley, John. Little, Big. New York: Bantam (1981); pg. 3. "Through the afternoon he negotiated those Indian-named places, usually unable to take the straight route... "
Native Americans USA 1981 Crowley, John. Little, Big. New York: Bantam (1981); pg. 345. "'...Certainly none [stories] are told of the so-called fathers of our country; the idea that one of those gentlemen is not dead but asleep, say, in the Ozarks or the Rockies is funny but not anywhere held. Only the despised ghost-dancing Red Man has a history and a memory long enough to supply such a hero; and the Indians have shown as little interest in Russell Eigenblick as in our Presidents, and he as little in them. What people then?' "
Native Americans USA 1982 Bishop, Michael. The Secret Ascension; or, Philip K. Dick is Dead, Alas. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 291. "Here, Jeff nudged his horse into an all-out trot. Martin and carina, whooping like Indians, followed suit. "
Native Americans USA 1982 Simmons, Dan. "The River Styx Runs Upstream " in Prayers to Broken Stones. New York: Bantam (1992; c. 1982); pg. 23. "It was not long after the Fourth that I found the dead squirrel. Simon and I had been playing Cavalry and Indians in the forest preserve. We took turns finding each other . . . shooting and dying repeatedly in the weeds until it was time to start over. "
Native Americans USA 1982 Willis, Connie. "Mail-Order Clone " in Fire Watch. New York: Bluejay (1984; story copyright 1982); pg. 206. "She comes sauntering out in her Indian nightgown which don't have no sides, just strings to hold it together, and which is open in the front just about down to kingdom come. She's got her hair up in braids, too. That means she's in one of her Indian moods, prancing around not letting me touch her 'cause she's got royal Kiowa blood. "
Native Americans USA 1982 Willis, Connie. "Mail-Order Clone " in Fire Watch. New York: Bluejay (1984; story copyright 1982); pg. 207. "She pulls that Kiowa stuff whenever she don't have a good answer. She's no more Indian than them old hippies out on the edge of town. They got long hair and live in tepees, smoking mushrooms and talking a lot of gibberish, but they ain't Indians, and the Welfare guys know it. They don't get no Indian checks and neither does Marjean Ramona. So I don't put no faith in this Kiowa stuff. " [Also, pg. 208.]
Native Americans USA 1984 Tiptree, Jr., James. "Her Smoke Rises Up Forever " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1974); pg. 434. "Do the butchers' blows still fall at Ravensbruck and Wounded Knee? "
Native Americans USA 1986 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 41: "Way of the Warrior ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (July 1986); pg. 10. Danielle's thoughts: "...that rotten Hellfire Club... Those creeps couldn't care less about mutants as people. We're tools to them--commodities--to be bought, sold, used. Thrown away. The same attitude--the same arrogance and greed--that slaughtered the buffalo and destroyed the Human Beings [Cheyenne]. All the Indian nations. But what do I know? The White Man--and his way of life--won. Maybe that means it's better? Which matters more . . . survival or honor? "
Native Americans USA 1986 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 41: "Way of the Warrior ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (July 1986); pg. 10. Pg. 9: Pat: "Yo! Papoose! "; Danielle's thoughts: "Oh, perfect. "; Pat: "What ill wind blew you into town?! "; Danielle: Hello, Pat. It's been a long time. "; Pat: "Not long enough, Red. "; Pg. 11: Pat: "Figured you were gone for good, Moonstar--shipped off to some fancy school back east after your gran'pa croaked. "; Danielle: "Black Eagle was murdered. "; Pat: "Happens. Especially to Redskins. " [More conversation] Pat: "Whoa-ho--the squaw has spunk! You don't like what I say, Injun, or the way I say it--make something of it... Red, this is way too nice an outfit for the likes of you. Anyone else interested? I'm feeling generous, Dani. You don't have to fight me like a white. You can use your stinking, special redskin way. How's that?! " [More, not in DB.]
Native Americans USA 1986 Martin, George R. R. "All the King's Horses " in Wild Cards V: Down and Dirty (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 133. Tom remembers a hippie "with cornflower-blue eyes beneath an Indian headband... "
Native Americans USA 1987 Bryant, Edward. "The Second Coming of Buddy Holly " in Wild Cards V: Down and Dirty (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 203. [Buddy Holley tells his story.] "I keep lookin'. I search everywhere. When I played a string of bars in the Dakotas and the Midwest I learned about Rolling Thunder and the generations of Black Elk. The more I learned, the more I wanted to know... When I was with the Lakota, I cried for a vision. The shaman took me through the inipi ceremony and sent me up the hill to receive the wakan, the holy beings.' Holley said ruefully. 'The Thunder Beings came, but that was about all. I got wet and cold.' He shrugged. 'So it goes.' "
Native Americans USA 1988 Bison, Terry. Fire on the Mountain. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 12. Pg. 12: "...rows of earrings in the Indian fashion. "; Pg. 139: "The boy joined me on the seat, a smoking pistol in each hand, still wrapped in my red blanket like a red Indian. " [Multiple other references to Indians of specific tribes: Menominee, Creek, Cherokee and others. See entries under those categories. See, for example, pg. 154.]
Native Americans USA 1988 Foster, Alan Dean. To the Vanishing Point. New York: Warner Books (1988); pg. 94. "A red headband controlled his shoulder-length straight black hair... 'Hey, Dad,' Steven whispered urgently, 'he looks like a real Indian!'... 'Name is Burnfingers Begay. First thing now is you will ask yourselves how I come by such a name... Actually I am Navajo and Comanche. Begay is Navajo. Burnfingers is Anglo transliteration of my Comanche name, which you could not pronounce. My mother was visiting the all-Indian powwow in Gallup one year, where my father was exhibiting. They begot yours truly.' He laughed softly. 'Half of me wants to settle down and make jewelry and the other half wants to go on the warpath. No wonder I am crazy.' " [Other refs. to this character in book, not in DB.]
Native Americans USA 1988 Foster, Alan Dean. To the Vanishing Point. New York: Warner Books (1988); pg. 174. "'...It is very difficult for an Indian to stay sane and live in your world, where insanity seems to be the normal state of affairs...' "
Native Americans USA 1991 McCammon, Robert R. Boy's Life. New York: Pocket Books (1992; c. 1991); pg. 34. Pg. 34, 238, 330-332, 416, more.
Native Americans USA 1992 Simmons, Dan. "Sleeping with Teeth Women " in Lovedeath. New York: Warner Books (1993); pg. 122. "There were the other branches of the Ikce Wicasa--the Oglalas, Miniconjous, and the Brules Sioux. And there were those who would scalp a Lakota boy on sight: the Susuni, whom you called Shoshoni, and the Shahiyela, the Cheyenne, and the Kangi Wicasha or Crows, who were sometimes friends and allies and frequently deadly enemies, and the Blue Clouds, whom you call Arapahoes. There were older enemies such as the Omahas, Otos, Winnebagoes, and Missouris, whose land the Ikce Wicasa had stolen or had tried to steal before Hoka Ushte was born. And there were the Pawnees and Poncas, whose land we were trying to steal in the days that Hoka Ushte knew. The Pawnees were ass-kissers and the asses they chose to kiss were Wasicun, even then... " [Refs. throughout story, not in DB. Particular focus on the Sioux.]
Native Americans USA 1992 Turrow, Scott. Personal Injuries. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (1999); pg. 13. "...carrying a beam and some daredevil ironworker riding on it. In this town, they were all American Indians, who, reputedly, knew no fear. I envied them that. "
Native Americans USA 1993 Bova, Ben. "Conspiracy Theory " in Twice Seven. New York: Avon Books (1998; c. 1993); pg. 62. "'No,' said the professor, in a sad and heavy voice. 'Just the opposite. The shock would be too much for the Martians. We humans are driven by fear and greed and lust, my boy. We would have ground the Martians into the dust, just as we did with the Native Americans and the Polynesians.' "
Native Americans USA 1993 Ellison, Harlan. Mefisto in Onyx. Shingletown, CA: Mark. V. Ziesing Books (1993); pg. 88. "...slaughtered unarmed women and kids at Wounded Knee... "
Native Americans USA 1994 Harper, Leanne C. "Paths of Silence and of Night " in Wild Cards: Book II of a New Cycle: Marked Cards (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Baen (1994); pg. 146. "'...Their success would have meant revolutions by native populations from the Arctic to Tierra del Fuego. Nobody wanted the American Indian Movement getting any ideas...' "
Native Americans USA 1994 Simmons, Dan. Fires of Eden. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1994); pg. 114. "'...But some of us think that some sort of limited sovereignty is possible . . . rather like the mainland Native Americans.'

'A reservation?' said Eleanor. "

Native Americans USA 1995 Chalker, Jack L. The Cybernetic Walrus (Book One of The Wonderland Gambit). New York: Ballantine (1995); pg. 82. "...an exotic-looking Native American man woman who seemed old beyond her years and dressed with an emphasis on Amerind designs... "
Native Americans USA 1995 Chalker, Jack L. The Cybernetic Walrus (Book One of The Wonderland Gambit). New York: Ballantine (1995); pg. 152. "'There's a huge Indian reservation contiguous to the test area,' I commented. " [Also pg. 231-232, 243, 276, 287, 301, etc.]
Native Americans USA 1995 Chalker, Jack L. The Cybernetic Walrus (Book One of The Wonderland Gambit). New York: Ballantine (1995); pg. 232. "Her tales of the Native American shamen and their powers and secret knowledge began to ring some bells, if not in Angel then certainly in me as well. Spirits in trees and rocks and such weren't something I was ready to accept... "
Native Americans USA 1995 Hand, Elizabeth. Waking the Moon. New York: HarperPrism (1995); pg. 330. "'...He said these Potnia people have apparently joined up with an alliance of Native Americans' civil rights groups, some African-American groups, the Celtic Gay and Lesbian National Congress--' "
Native Americans USA 1995 Ing, Dean. The Big Lifters. New York: Tor (1988); pg. 30. Pg. 30: "but some Caddo Indian ancestor had given her perfect skin the color of apricot flesh and her lustrous dark hair... " [Also pg. 200.]
Native Americans USA 1996 Dreyfuss. Richard & Harry Turtledove. The Two Georges. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 46. "Not only did the Sons of Liberty want North America free from Britain, they wanted it free of Negroes, Jews, East Indians, Chinese . . . everyone but the pure and original settlers of the land--or so they said. Just how they managed to want to be rid of the Red Indians, too, Bushell wasn't quite sure, but they did; one of their grievances against the Crown was that it had acted to slow white settlement of the continent and let a few Indian nations remain intact and locally autonomous, much like the princely states of East India. " [Other refs., e.g., pg. 80, 171-181, etc.]
Native Americans USA 1996 Dreyfuss. Richard & Harry Turtledove. The Two Georges. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 171. "'George Washington is very important to the Hodenosaunee, too, sir,' the bellhop said... 'Those of us who follow Hawenneyu, the Great Spirit, and not your Christian God... we say Washington is the only white man who has joined Hawenneyu in his heaven.'

'The rest of us are in hell?'

...'No, sir. Hawenneyu takes no notice of you, for good or ill. But Washington was such a noble man, the Great Spirit smiled on him no matter what his color.'

...On the wall across from the bed hung a smaller print, this one of a man with dark, Red Indian features... " [More.]



Native Americans, continued

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