Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Native Americans, North Dakota

Native Americans, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Native Americans North Dakota 1996 McDevitt, Jack. Ancient Shores. New York: HarperCollins (1996); pg. 53. "One of the friends was Andrea Hawk, a Devil's Lake talk show host, who captured for April the sense of a people bypassed by history. April was saddened by the poverty she saw on the reservation and by Andrea's frustration. 'We live too much on the largesse of the whites,' Andrea had told her. 'We have forgotten how to make do for ourselves.' Andrea pointed out that Native-American males die so young, from drugs and disease and violence, that the most prosperous establishment on many reservations is the funeral home. " [More.]
Native Americans North Dakota 1996 McDevitt, Jack. Ancient Shores. New York: HarperCollins (1996); pg. 78. "'Who's the chairman?' asked Max.

'The head of the local Sioux,' said Lasker. 'Name's James Walker.'

'The head of the Sioux is a chairman?'

'Movie Indians have chiefs,' said Redfern. 'Now tell me about the boat.' " [More, pg. 79-80, 123-127, 134, 185-187, 224, 227, more. Some important characters are Native Americans.]

Native Americans Ohio 1943 Bishop, Michael. Brittle Innings. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 107. Cleveland Indians (baseball team) [Also pg. 351.]
Native Americans Oklahoma 1850 McHugh, Maureen F. "The Lincoln Train " in Alternate Tyrants (Mike Resnick, ed.) New York: Tor (1997); pg. 335. "Do they mean that she really came from Oklahoma? They talk about how bad it will be this winter. Michael says there are Wisconsin Indians resettled down there... "
Native Americans Oklahoma 1914 Turtledove, Harry. The Great War: American Front (alternate history novel). New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 244. "Sequoyah [where Oklahoma is], but itself, was a Confederate state. But within its borders lay five separate nations: those of the Creeks, Cherokees, Choctaws, Chickasaw, and Seminoles, the Five Civilized Tribes. They kept their local autonomy and guarded it with zeal; the governor of Sequoyah sometimes had more trouble getting their chiefs to cooporate with him than President Wilson did with the governors of the Confederate sates. And, since a lot of the stat'es petrolium and oil lay under the land that belonged to the Indian nations, they had enough money on their own to keep the state government coming to them hat in hand. "
Native Americans Oklahoma 1942 Turtledove, Harry. Worldwar: Upsetting the Balance. New York: Del Rey (1996); pg. 28. Pg. 28: "'Two of my great-grandfathers were Texas cavalyrmen, sure enough,' Auerbach answered. 'One of 'em did some fighting in the Indian Territory--what's Oklahoma now--and up in Missouri...' "; Pg. 29: "To that, Auerbach could only nod. The company rode past the ruins of Fort Aubrey, about four miles east of Syracuse. After the Civil War, the Army had used it as a base from which to fight Indians. There hadn't been any fighting in these parts since. There was now. "
Native Americans Oklahoma 1943 Bishop, Michael. Brittle Innings. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 10. Pg. 10: "In June of '43, I went into the CVL, the Chattahoochee Valley League, right off my high school team in Tenkiller, Oklahoma, near Tenkiller Lake, in Cherokee County. My county was part of the old Injun Territory set aside by the U.S. Congress for the Cherokees, that Beulahland in eastern Oklahoma the bluecoats herded them to in the winter of 1838 and '39. The Trail of Tears. Anyway, I'm one-eight or one-sixteenth or one-thirty-secondth Cherokee, some bollixed-up fraction, a kind of Injun octoroon. "; Pg. 11: "We were called after a renegade of Indians--Creeks, not Cherokees, but the Creeks belonged to the Five Civilized Tribes too--that'd fought General Jackson's Tennessee militiamen at Horeshoe Bend, Alabama. " [Many other refs., not in DB.]
Native Americans Ontario 2002 Sawyer, Robert J. Hominids. New York: Tor (2002); pg. 27. "Who could this man be, anyway? Maybe a Native Canadian zealot--an Indian who felt the mining was interfering with sacred ground. But the man's hair was blond, rare among Natives. Nor was this a youthful prank gone bad; the guy looked to be about thirty-give. " [Some other minor refs., incl. pg. 257, 298.]
Native Americans Ontario: Toronto 1990 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Divide. New York: Doubleday (1990); pg. 66. "Still, Tony recognized him. Tony was a quarter Cree on his mother's side and liked to think he had that old Indian thing, keeping his ear to the ground. "
Native Americans Ontario: Toronto 1990 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Divide. New York: Doubleday (1990); pg. 72. "...Lake Superior. The North Shore was a stark landscape of pine and rock and the brittle blue Superior horizon. Gas station towns, souvenir stands, Indian reservations... "
Native Americans Ontario: Toronto 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 35. Pg. 35: "CITY-TV calls its camerapersons--all young, all hip--'videographers.' There was one waiting, all right... standing around in anticipation of the return of the alien. The videographer, a Native Canadian man with black hair tied in a ponytail--surged forward. "; Pg. 38: "'...you there,' he pointed at the videographer. 'You are the representative of a media outlet; allow me to make a plea.' Hollus paused for a second while the Native Canadian adjusted his camera angle... " [The silent videographer is mentioned multiple times on the next few pages, pg. 35-40.]
Native Americans Ontario: Toronto 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 259. "Earlier in the day, Falsey and Ewell had sat through a seemingly endless film about a little wooden carving of a canoe with a male Native Canadian figure in it traveling down various waterways. But they didn't pay much attention to the movie... "
Native Americans Oregon 1895 Gloss, Molly. The Jump-Off Creek. Boston: Houghton Mifflin (1989); pg. 111. Pg. 111: "From the fence line above the house she could see neither Mr. Whiteaker nor the Indian, Mr. Odell. "; Pg. 114: "She had given up, on account of Mr. Odell, several large fancies having to do with the Wild Indians of the West. Now several smaller ones came undone all at once. She had seen, through the window glass of the train in the towns she had come through, a few Indian men and women standing in queues, solitary Indian men sitting on curbstones or walking up a street. Mr. Odell was her only great experience of them. " [More about Mr. Odell, pg. 112-116. Other refs. elsewhere, but his ethnicity is not mentioned.]
Native Americans Oregon 1895 Gloss, Molly. The Jump-Off Creek. Boston: Houghton Mifflin (1989); pg. 162. "Blue laughed, or anyway made a sound that was like a laugh, short and low. He didn't have that much Indian in him, a Salish grandmother married in a church to a Catholic Englishman. He looked more Indian than he was. He looked like his grandmother, maybe.

The one who had smiled, smiled again. He looked sidelong at Blue. 'He looks Indian,' he said.

Tim lifted his hands again. 'Yeah, he does.' Then he said, 'He was raised up by wolves, though. I guess there's no way of telling what breed he is for sure.' "

Native Americans Oregon 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 82. -
Native Americans Oregon 1994 Ing, Dean. Spooker. New York: Tom Doherty Associates (1995); pg. 56. "On Oregon reservations, the visitor is encouraged to risk a bit of cash in tribal casinos where the state government cannot prevent gambling. "
Native Americans Oregon 2001 Callenbach, Ernest. Ecotopia. New York: Tor (1977; c. 1975); pg. 37. "'You'd never catch an Indian wearing a watch.' Many Ecotopians sentimental about Indians, and there's some sense in which they envy the Indians their lost natural place in the American wilderness. Indeed this is probably a major Ecotopian myth; keep hearing references to what Indians would or wouldn't do in a given situation. Some Ecotopian articles--clothing and baskets and personal ornamentation--perhaps directly Indian in inspiration. But what matters most is the aspiration to live in balance with nature, 'walk lightly on the land,' treat the earth as a mother. "
Native Americans Oregon 2011 Brin, David. The Postman. New York: Bantam (1985); pg. 181. Pg. 181: "The farmers looked at each other. The women representing the Cascade Indian communities seemed to speak for all of them.

'I'm sure that these night scopes might do some good defending a few important sites against sneak attacks. But I want to know how they'll help after the snow melts...' ";

Pg. 193: "It was more as battles had been fought among the American Indians . . . with victory measured in quick, bloody raids, and in the number of scalps taken. "

Native Americans Pennsylvania 1665 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 104-105. "After a while Danny said, 'Did William Penn know the Indians were there when he went to Pennsylvania?'

'Sure. Is your history that bad. Columbus was 1492, Penn's charter was 1665.'

'Well--what did he think would happen? After he was dead, I mean--say in a hundred years or so?'

'He didn't think,' said George. 'Nobody every seems to look that far ahead. He started something he couldn't see to the end of. Oh, his conscience was clear enough; the Delawares thought very well of him--of Quakers generally, matter of fact. But,' he said, 'it didn't occur to Penn where Friends had led, others were bound to follow. And get out of hand. It probably didn't occur to many Indians, at least for a while.' "

Native Americans Pennsylvania 1722 Keyes, J. Gregory. A Calculus of Angels. New York: Ballantine (1999); pg. 4. Pg. 4: "Red Shoes cleared his throat. 'I have come for the council meeting,' he said.

...'God, John,' another voice sputtered. ' 's an Ind'yun.'

...'You a Delaware? Mohawk?' John demanded... Red Shoes could tell that they were craning their necks, looking for his imaginary red army. He had heard rumors that the unreasonable cold had provoked warfare between some of the northern tribes and white towns like Philadelphia--but surely no one would mistake him for a Sis Nations man or a Delaware. He was Choctaw, and looked Choctaw. "; Pg. 95: Shawano [Here, and extensive other refs., not in DB. Red Shoes, a Choctaw Indian, is one of the main characters.]

Native Americans Pennsylvania 1756 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 103-104. "'...William Penn... founded Pennsylvania... something about William Penn's sons cheating the Indians and the Quakers having to get out of the government...'

'...Penn bought land from the Delawares even though he had a charter from the king of England; he recognized the Indians' land claims as legitimate. Friends ran the legislature for years on a principle of equality and nonviolence that kept everybody happy. But as time went by, more and more non-Quakers kept pushing across the mountains and homesteading the western part of the territory. They'd just squat there--put up cabins and clear a parcel of land, and when the Indians objected they'd howl to the colonial government for protection.'

'I'd say it was the Indians that needed protecting.'

'...Friends still in office were crunched between the peace testimony and the obligation of any government to protect its citizens from being massacred... In 1756 they gave up their authority and stepped down...' "

Native Americans Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 64. "'...Their name for the planet sounded to one Friend, who's an amateur anthropologist and up on Amerindians, like the Sioux Indian name for the great Spirit: Tanka Wakan...' " [Other refs. under 'Sioux']
Native Americans Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 86. "The pastures and fields he had been shown at Swarthmore were too far removed from his experience, too quaint, to seem covetable or even real. But it had never been his childhood fantasy to live on an Amish farm... "
Native Americans Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 114. "Members of the team:

...Bob Wellwood (32). Chosen for his considerable knowledge of various Amerindian cultures, acquired and deepened steadily from early adolescence clear up tot he time of his preflight training. the nearest thing we have to a 'real,' if amateur, anthropologist, and equipped--as a builder--to make sense of hross dwellings and artifacts, or better sense than any of the rest of us. "

Native Americans Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 201. "not some young construction-navvy-cum-Amerindian buff with no advanced scientific training. " [Possibly some refs. not in DB.]
Native Americans Peru 1500 C.E. Moorcock, Michael. Gloriana. New York: Warner Books (1986; c 1978); pg. 192. "Or the envoy from Peru, a land notorious for its casual letting of blood, its human sacrifice. "
Native Americans Peru 1986 Morlan, A. R. "Fast Glaciers " in Vanishing Acts (Ellen Datlow, ed.) New York: Tor (2000); pg. 289. "'Initially it was thought that this unprecedented facial abnormality might b the result of physical intervention on the part of the tribe members themselves (akin to the Native American practice of altering cranial shape by lashing a baby's head to a cradle board, etc.) but further study disproved this theory. In 1986, Dr. Kaitlin Tanner managed to videotape the birth of a Whistler baby, and the characteristic facial 'tube' was present (albeit less pronounced) as the child emerged from its mother's...' "
Native Americans Peru 2002 Morlan, A. R. "Fast Glaciers " in Vanishing Acts (Ellen Datlow, ed.) New York: Tor (2000); pg. 288. [Faux news report.] "The Peruvian Amazon was called a Tower of Babel by early Spanish missionaries stunned by the number of languages they found among isolated communities separated by dense jungle.

'Missionaries estimated that more than 500 languages were spoken in an area half the size of Alaska. Linguists now estimate there were probably 100-150 languages, but with dizzying variety of dialects.

'Today, only 57 survive, and 25 of them are on the road to extinction, said Mary Ruth Wise, a linguist with the Dallas-based Summer Institute of Linguistics.

'The process of language extinction begins when children stop learning a language,' Ms. Wise said. . . .'

'Cultural Loss Seen as Languages Fade'
The New York Times, May 16, 1999 "

[Many other refs. throughout story to Native Americans of Peru, particularly to the newly discovered 'Whistler tribe.']

Native Americans Peru 2002 Morlan, A. R. "Fast Glaciers " in Vanishing Acts (Ellen Datlow, ed.) New York: Tor (2000); pg. 289. "'Initially it was thought that this unprecedented facial abnormality might b the result of physical intervention on the part of the tribe members themselves (akin to the Native American practice of altering cranial shape by lashing a baby's head to a cradle board, etc.) but further study disproved this theory. In 1986, Dr. Kaitlin Tanner managed to videotape the birth of a Whistler baby, and the characteristic facial 'tube' was present (albeit less pronounced) as the child emerged from its mother's...' "
Native Americans Peru 2002 Morlan, A. R. "Fast Glaciers " in Vanishing Acts (Ellen Datlow, ed.) New York: Tor (2000); pg. 290. "'...While the Whistler tribe seems to have no written language... their language is utterly unique, far more so than even the Taushiro Indians with their lack of labial consonants and accompanying lack of lip movements...' "
Native Americans Quebec 2001 Stroyar, J.N. The Children's War. New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 928. "He was in great humor. Their funding was way up, donations were rolling in. Congress was making appropriate noises, parliament was fuming, and even the Quebecois had taken time out of their feuding over Indian lands to comment...' "
Native Americans Quebec 2345 Bear, Greg. "Scattershot " in The Wind from a Burning Woman. Sauk City, WI: Arkham House (1983; story copyright 1981); pg. 109. "'We've an Indian on board,' he said. 'Big, with black hair in three ribbons'--he motioned from crown to neck between his ears--'and a snappy dresser.'

...I got up and followed the bear. Sitting on a bench pulled from the wall, the man in red and black watched us as we entered the chamber. He was big--at least two meters tall--and hefty, dressed in a black silk shirt with red cuffs. His cape was black with a red eagle embroidered across the shoulders. He certainly looked Indian--ruddy skin, aristocratic nose, full lips held tight as if against pain. "

Native Americans Quebec 2345 Bear, Greg. "Scattershot " in The Wind from a Burning Woman. Sauk City, WI: Arkham House (1983; story copyright 1981); pg. 109-110. "The Indian didn't break his stolid expression. He nodded and turned on the bench to put his hand against a grill. 'I was taught in the British school at Nova London,' he said, his accent distinctly Oxfordian. 'I was educated in Indonesia, and so I speak Dutch, High and Middle German, and some Asian tongues, specifically Nippon and Tagalog. But at English I am fluent.'

...'I'm from Earth, too,' I said. 'From Terre.'

'I know the word for Earth,' the Indian said sharply.

...'...What year are you from?'...

'Year of Our Lord 2345,' he said.

'Sonok crossed himself elegantly. 'For me 2290,' he added. The Indian examined the bear dubiously.

I was sixty years after the bear, five after the Indian. The limits of the grab bag were less hazy now. 'What country?'

'Alliance of Tribal Columbia,' he answered, 'District Quebec, East Shore.' " [Apparently this Indian is a main character. Other refs., not in DB.]

Native Americans Riverworld 2008 Farmer, Philip Jose. To Your Scattered Bodies Go. New York: Berkeley Medallion Books (1971); pg. 91. "He had been resurrected somewhere along the River among a people about ninety percent early fourteenth-century English and Scottish and ten percent ancient Sybarites. The peoples across The River were a mixture of Mongols of the time of Kubla Khan and some dark people the identity of which Greystoke did not know. HIs description fitted North American Indians.

The nineteenth day after Resurrection, the savages across The River had attacked. Apparently they did so for no other reason than they wanted a good fight, which they got. "

Native Americans Riverworld 2008 Farmer, Philip Jose. To Your Scattered Bodies Go. New York: Berkeley Medallion Books (1971); pg. 142. "The warriors of Goring and Tullius were ground between the two forces, Onondaga and slaves, like husts between millstones. The Indians, who had probably raided only to loot and get more slaves and their grails, retreated. They climbed aboard their dugouts and canoes and paddled across the lake. " [Other refs. not in DB. Many refs. to specific tribes listed under tribe name.]
Native Americans South America 1550 C.E. Stephenson, Neal. Snow Crash. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 194. "'In the sixteenth century, Saint Lous Bertrand allegedly used the gift of tongues to convert somewhere between thirty thousand and three hunddred South American Indians to Christianity,' the Librarian says. "
Native Americans South America 1550 C.E. Stephenson, Neal. Snow Crash. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 376. "'The mainline Christian church refused to accept glossolalia. They frowned on it for a few centures and officially purged it at the Council of Constantinople in 381. The glossalic cult remained on the fringes of the Christian world. The Church was willing to accept a bit of xenoglossia if it helped convert heathens, as in the case of St. Louis Bertrand who converted thousans of Indians in the sixteenth century, spreading glossolalia across the continent faster than smallpox. But as soon as they were contained, those Indians were supposed to shut up an speak Latin like everyone else.' "
Native Americans South America 1637 Russell, Mary Doria. The Sparrow. New York: Ballantine (1996); pg. 134. "So many martyrs like Isaac Jogues. Trekking eight hundred miles into the interior of the New World--a land as alien to a European in 1637 as Rakhat is to us now... Feared as a witch, ridiculed, reviled for his mildness by the Indians he'd hoped to gain for Christ. "
Native Americans South America 1700 Burroughs, William S. "The Ghost Lemurs of Madagascar " in Omni Visions One (Ellen Datlow, ed). Greensboro, NC: Omni Books (1993; story copyright 1987); pg. 28. "Mission had smoked opium and hashish and had used a drug the Indians of South America called yage. "
Native Americans South America 1758 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 186. Pg. 185: "Swedish mystic... Emanuel Swedenborg wrote one of the first eyewitness accounts of a close encounter of the third kind. In his treatise of 1758, De telluribus [Concerning Other Worlds]... "; Pg. 186: "As a recent commentator on De telluribus observes... The 'remote space,' in this case, is the New World, as known to Swedenborg from the reports and apocryphal tales of the first explorers. The giants of Venus were modeled on the Patagonians of South America described by Magellan's fanciful chronicler, Antonio Pigafetta, who witnessed 'a naked man of giant stature on the shore of the port, dancing, singing and throwing sand on his head. . . . He was so tall we reached only to his waist.' Later reports held the Patagonians to be crudely developed cattle herders of bestial stupidity. " [More]
Native Americans South Dakota 1985 Bishop, Michael. No Enemy But Time. New York: Timescape (1982); pg. 279. "'What happened to the Indian who spirit-traveled back to Seventh Cavalry Days?'

...'Nothing happened to the Indian.'

'He quit, didn't he?'

'yes, he quit. Not because of any emotional trauma, however. He didn't like being surounded by machinery--technological artifacts, he called the components that helped get him back. He decided the dreamfaring process violated his heritage. And so he went his way, sadder but wiser, I suppose.' "

Native Americans South Dakota 1989 Simmons, Dan. Phases of Gravity. New York: Bantam (1989); pg. 269. "He had a sudden, visceral sense of the physical freedom the Pains Indians must have felt a century and a half earlier when they had roamed without restriction across that seemingly boundless land. 'Are you a Sioux?' he asked, not knowing whether the question was polite but wanting to know the answer.

Robert Sweet Medicine shook his head. 'Cheyenne.' " [More, pg. 269-274.]

Native Americans South Dakota 1992 Simmons, Dan. "Sleeping with Teeth Women " in Lovedeath. New York: Warner Books (1993); pg. 121. "The Black Hills which Hoka Ushte visited for his hanbleceya are not the ones you can drive through today. And not just because there were no stone heads then, or towns or highways or ranches or rock shops or rattlesnake reptile gardens or taxidermy studios or Indian Craft souvenir shops or Jellystone Park campgrounds or casino towns or RV parks... "
Native Americans South Dakota 2019 Burton, Levar. Aftermath. New York: Warner Books (1997); pg. 32. "Jacob was only a boy, living on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, when the elders told him how, long ago, the Great Spirit had gathered together the four races of man, giving each a responsibility known as the Guardianship. To the red people He gave the Guardianship of the Earth, bestowing upon them the sacred knowledge of plants, minerals and animals. To the yellow race He gave the Guardianship of the Wind, teaching them about the sky and how to draw air within their bodies for spiritual advancement. Chinese monks, their lives spent in ancient monasteries, still relied on those teachings in their daily meditations. The black race was given the Guardianship of Water, the chief of all elements... The white race received the Guardianship of Fire... " [Many other refs. to Native Americans, pg. 32-34, 66-69, 82-87, 117-124, 168-184, more.]
Native Americans South Dakota 2019 Burton, Levar. Aftermath. New York: Warner Books (1997); pg. 32. "The bundle was made of buckskin, stained and brittle with age, its edges carefully decorated with bead- and quillwork. Some of the rows of beads were missing, but Jacob didn't mind. The value of the medicine bundle did not lie in its colorful decorations. I was what was on the inside that mattered.

Removing the cords, he unwrapped the bundle to reveal an assortment of dried herbs, which he used for healing both the body and spirit, a half dozen hawk feathers, two tail feathers from a golden eagle, a twist of sweatgrass, sage, a leather pouch filled with tobacco, a pocket lighter and his medicine pipe.

...'O grandfather, hear my prayer, for I am but a child lost in the wilderness. Look down upon me with pity and compassion, for many years I have walked the medicine path. I am old now, Grandfather, and I know that my time upon this earth grows short. soon I will join my ancestors around the great council fire.' " [More.]

Native Americans Sweden 1973 Batchelor, John Calvin. The Birth of the People's Republic of Antarctica. New York: Dial Press (1983); pg. 6. "Grandfather did not hate Jews, Negroes, Arabs, Orientals, Indians, Americans. To my knowledge, he had never talked with one. Accordingly, they terrified him... "
Native Americans Tau Ceti 2370 Friedman, Michael Jan. All Good Things . . . (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1994); pg. 80. "His teacher continued to smile. 'Not so long ago, it appeared that there would be violence in this village. Do you remember?'

Wesley nodded. How could he forget? The Indians who lived here had made prisoners of some Cardassians, and Captain Picard had been duty-bound to free them... "

Native Americans Tau Ceti 3000 Niven, Larry; Jerry Pournelle & Steven Barnes. Beowulf's Children. New York: Tor (1995); pg. 132. On 4th planet in the Tau Ceti system: "At thirteen years of age, Aaron had analyzed grendel bile ducts, livers, and other organs of cleansing with a vew to psychopharmacology.

At fourteen he had created the Ritual. Since then, he had indoctrinated ten others into the mysteries of grendel flesh.

'The First Church of the Grendel,' Jessica had laughed. Aaron had barely smiled...

The Earth Born had come as the Europeans to the new world. Aaron said that they would have to learn the traditions of the Native American peoples in order to survive here. They could not own theland, but they could be part of it. "

Native Americans Tennessee 2054 Dick, Philip K. & Ray Nelson. The Ganymede Takeover. New York: Ace Books (1967); pg. 7. "'There are,' he said presently, 'unpacified Negroes in that bale. And hordes of Chipua and Chawkta Indians holed up there in the mountains. It's the bung-hole of the conquered realms. And they know it; that's why they gave it to me. It's deliberate!' "
Native Americans Tennessee 2054 Dick, Philip K. & Ray Nelson. The Ganymede Takeover. New York: Ace Books (1967); pg. 14. "The Japanese blood was rather dilute, unfortunately. It gave her chitin-like black hair and eyes to match and a small, delicate body . . . but very little else. Perhaps she could pass for an Indian. There were Indians among the Neeg-parts, she had heard. "
Native Americans Tennessee 2054 Dick, Philip K. & Ray Nelson. The Ganymede Takeover. New York: Ace Books (1967); pg. 52. "He flicked his tongue at an impressive wall map which showed the bale, and, most specifically, the unspecified hill-areas controlled by both the Indian tribal remnants and the Neeg-parts. "
Native Americans Texas 1916 Anthony, Patricia. Flanders. New York: Ace Books (1998); pg. 8. "'...So tell me. Were you acquainted with any wild Indians, there in Texas?'

'Ma's half Cherokee.'

He took to that, too. 'How charmingly American of her. Which side?'

'Her ma came across the Trail of Tears and stopped when she got tired of walking. Hell, she was always tired after that, for Granddaddy de Vrees sired fourteen children off her. He sired more off a widder woman he knew...' "

Native Americans Texas 1998 Wood, Crystal. Cut Him Out in Little Stars. Denton, TX: Tattersall Publishing (revised and reprinted 1998; c. 1994); pg. 228. "'A land of mighty contrasts is your Texas. You know, I've heard of Texas all my life, from cowboys and Indians on the frontier through 'Dallas' on telly...' "
Native Americans Texas: Galveston 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 7. "'Cabeza de Vaca called it that. His galleon was shipwrecked here in 1528. He was almost eaten by cannibals. Karankawa Indians.'

'Oh? Well, the Indians must have had some name for the place.'

'Nobody knows it,' David said. 'They were all wiped out by smallpox...' "

Native Americans United Kingdom 1900 Farmer, Philip Jose (written as Harry Manders). "The Problem of the Sore Bridge--Among Others " in Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Space. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) USA: Bluejay Books (1984); pg. 39. "I could see nothing, but I trusted Raffles, whose eyesight was as keen as a Red Indian's. "
Native Americans United Kingdom 1994 Holdstock, Robert. The Hollowing. New York: Roc (1994); pg. 6. Pg. 6: "picture of an Apache Indian boy he had seen in a book at school. The boy in the picture had worn animal skins. The boy in the mirror was naked. The picture of the Apache now blurred and shifted in his mind, then faded. "; Pg. 7: "memory of the Indian boy from the book. "; Pg. 129: Trickster Coyote [Other refs., e.g., pg. 159, 172, 182-188, 354, etc.]
Native Americans United Kingdom 1994 Holdstock, Robert. The Hollowing. New York: Roc (1994); pg. 354. "'Of course! Helen Silverlock is an almost pure blood Lakota. Or did she say Dakota? Minnesota? Anyway, she's Sioux. I think. Maybe Cherokee.' "
Native Americans United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 6. "It was July, and real July weather, such as they had in Old England. Everybody went bright brown, like Red Indians, with startling teeth and flashing eyes. "
Native Americans United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 49. "Archery was a serious occupation in those days. It had not yet been turned over to Indians and small boys. "
Native Americans United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 158. "'The pigeon... a race of peace lovers continually caravaning away from the destructive Indian in covered wagons. They are loving individualists surviving against the forces of massacre only by wisdom in escape.' "
Native Americans United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 177. Pg. 177: "There were other peaks, when, for instance, their line of flight was crossed by an Indian file of Bewick Swans who were off to Abisko... "; Pg. 539: "Indian Summer "
Native Americans United Kingdom: England 1987 Adams, Douglas. Dirk Gentley's Holistic Detective Agency. New York: Simon and Schuster (1987); pg. 131. From out of its branches the Electric Monk dropped onto the horse's back, with a cry which sounded suspiciously like "Geronimo. "
Native Americans United Kingdom: London 1500 C.E. Moorcock, Michael. Gloriana. New York: Warner Books (1986; c 1978); pg. 254. "And from beyond Albion came Sir Hakan of Tauron, the Huron King, with his armour all decorated with warfeathers and beads; Sir Herlwin of Wicheetaw [Wichita]... " [Some other refs., under specific tribe names or not in DB.]
Native Americans United Kingdom: London 1989 Laidlaw, Marc. "His Powder'd Wig, His Crown of Thornes " in Omni Visions One (Ellen Datlow, ed). Greensboro, NC: Omni Books (1993; story copyright 1989); pg. 147. [Alternative history.] "Grant Innes first saw the icon in the Indian ghettos of London but thought nothing of it. There were so many gewgaws of native 'art' being thrust in his face by faddishly war-painted Cherokees that this was just another nuisance to avoid, like the huge radios blaring obnoxious 'Chocktawk' percussions and the high pitched warbling of Tommy Hawkes and the effeminate Turquoise Boys, like the young Mohawk ruddies practicing skateboard stunts for sluttish cockney girls whose kohled black eyes and slack blue lips betrayed more interest in the dregs of the bottles those boys carried than in the boys themselves. " [Many refs. to Native American's throughout story. Some other refs. in DB under specific tribe categories.]
Native Americans United Kingdom: London 1995 Ryman, Geoff. 253. New York: St. Martin's Press (1998); pg. 19. "Mr Victor Reventos... He looks like Geronimo -- high cheek-bones, long nose, short mouth... " A train fan and civil engineer from Guadalajara, Mexico... "


Native Americans, continued

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