Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

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Native Americans, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Native Americans galaxy 2371 Graf, L. A. Caretaker (Star Trek: Voyager). New York: Pocket Books (1995); pg. 12. "'My great-grandfather had a poktoy,' he said to Torres as he prowled between the panels. At her dubious scowl, he smiled and clarified, 'A saying, that he passed on to my grandfather, who passed it to my father, who passed it to me. 'Coya anochta zab.'... 'Don't look back.' ' "
Native Americans galaxy 2371 Graf, L. A. Caretaker (Star Trek: Voyager). New York: Pocket Books (1995); pg. 66. "It had given him a chill in the pit of his stomach when he'd first piloted into the mess with Chakotay, no matter how smug the big Indian sounded when he promised that no Maquis ship had been torn apart by the storms... "
Native Americans galaxy 2371 Graf, L. A. Caretaker (Star Trek: Voyager). New York: Pocket Books (1995); pg. 121. Pg. 121: "Janeway tried not to fidget as Rollins fought with Voyager's damaged systems... Even so, she had to pace down to the main command level... just to wean enough frustration out of her system to keep from snapping at the big Native American who appeared on the screen. 'Commander Chakotay, I'm Captain Kathryn Janeway.'

His eyes narrowed. 'How do you know my name?' ";

Pg. 131: "She felt Chakotay start to move more than saw it, and stopped the Indian's forward lunge with her elbow. To her surprise, he obeyed the silent command, but gripper her arm in unconscious frustration... "

Native Americans galaxy 2371 Graf, L. A. Caretaker (Star Trek: Voyager). New York: Pocket Books (1995); pg. 239. "Paris... He planted his feet as firmly as he could on the rocking structure, and hauled Chakotay onto his shoulders with an exaggerated grunt. The Indian's cry of pain was real, Paris knew. He felt an unexpected spasm of guilt for not having the chance to be more careful.

Turning slowly to start his upward climb, he asked glibly, 'Isn't there some Indian trick where you can turn yourself into a bird and fly us out of here?'

'You're too heavy.'

well, it had been worth asking. "

Native Americans galaxy 2372 ab Hugh, Dafydd. The Final Fury (Star Trek: Voyager/Invasion! #4). New York: Pocket Books (1996); pg. 13. Pg. 13: "The senior staff assembled around the discussion table--or the 'peace rock,' as Chakotay jokingly thought of it. "
Native Americans galaxy 2372 ab Hugh, Dafydd. The Final Fury (Star Trek: Voyager/Invasion! #4). New York: Pocket Books (1996); pg. 184. "'I do not anticipate that the laws of physics will change to suit my present needs.'

'You're too cynical,' said Chakotay. 'I always try to believe six impossible things before breakfast, as the Red Queen said to Alice.'

'Is that reference part of the ancient lore of your people?'

'In a manner of speaking.' Yes, if 'my people' includes Lewis Carroll, thought Chakotay, amused but impassive. ";

Pg. 185: "'Commander Chakotay,' announced Tuvok, 'was taught to believe six impossible things before breakfast.'

Janeway turned, nonplussed by the unexpected reference. 'Yes,' she said, 'as the Red Queen said.'

'But I'm not Alice, and this isn't the looking-glass!' snapped B'Elanna.

Tuvok looked perplexed. 'I must make a mental note to research the original source legends; it is a powerful mythos that holds sway alike over Native American tribes, human Anglo-Saxons, and Klingons.' " [Refs to Chakotay throughout novel, but his ethnicity mentioned only here.]

Native Americans galaxy 2372 Betancourt, John Gregory. The Heart of the Warrior (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1996); pg. 82. "Philip Twofeathers sucked in a deep breath and tried to hide his growing nervousness. His wide, flat face with its prominent nose, dark eyes, and deep reddish brown skin told of his Native American heritage more than his conservative gray one-piece suit, and for an instant he almost wished he'd worn something more comfortable. His people--descendants of the Cherokee--had settled a frontier planet called Dorvanto twenty years previously, and they had gone back to their people's old ways. He would have felt more comfortable in a leather vest, breechcloth, and moccasins. It had been many years since he'd worn such confining clothing. Unlike the Starfleet vessels, Maquis ships had no stuffy dress codes. " [Other refs. to this character, not in DB, pg. 83-87, 96-99. No other refs. to his ethnicity/tribe by name.]
Native Americans galaxy 2372 Cox, Greg. The Black Shore (Star Trek: Voyager). New York: Pocket Books (1997); pg. 75. "'Lights,' he requested. The cabin responded instantly. Overhead lighting brightened, dispelling the shadows. Chakotay removed the akoonah from his forehead and placed it on the animal hide next to the feather and the stone. Slowly, methodically, he wrapped his medicine bundle, letting the familiar task soothe his jangled nerves even as his mind inspected the content of his disturbing vision.

What did it mean? he wondered. A hostile environment. A dangerous--and triumphant--predator. Was this nightmarish fantasy merely a reflection of my own unspoken anxieties, Chakotay thought, or a desperate warning from the spirits of my ancestors? His Starfleet training, and experiences among the Maquis, provided him with few clues with which to interpret his vision. Not for the first time, he wished his father was alive and around to talk to. Kolopak had always possessed a greater understanding of the old ways than his occasionally wayward son. " [More.]

Native Americans galaxy 2372 Cox, Greg. The Black Shore (Star Trek: Voyager). New York: Pocket Books (1997); pg. 195. "She turned to confront Chakotay, towering over the fallen first officer like some bloodthirsty pagan goddess. Her dark aura flickered around her, casting a bestial shadow over her deceptively refined features. I know you now, he thought. My ancestors showed me your true face days ago. "
Native Americans galaxy 2372 Friedman, Michael Jan. Saratoga (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1996); pg. 25. "The Bolian nodded congenially. 'Tactical officer on the Crazy Horse. At your service. " [This starship mentioned a few other times, e.g., pg. 65.]
Native Americans galaxy 2372 Garland, Mark A. & Charles G. McGraw. Ghost of a Chance (Star Trek: Voyager). New York: Pocket Books (1996); pg. 1. Pg. 1: "Commander Chakotay's spirit guide had visited him many times in his dreams. Unlike the often arbitrary of chaotic dreams of others, the spirit guide brought clarity through visions that helped explain the world outside as well as the world within. But it was not the guide that came into the mind of the commander tonight, finding him as he slipped deeper into his dreams. It was a ghost . . . ";

Pg. 19: "'I had a vision last night,' Chakotay said, focusing on many things in the room before finally looking at Janeway. 'Or a premonition. I'm not sure which, but it was unlike anything I've ever experienced. I was visited by . . . by a ghost.' "

Native Americans galaxy 2372 Garland, Mark A. & Charles G. McGraw. Ghost of a Chance (Star Trek: Voyager). New York: Pocket Books (1996); pg. 121. "People walked in and out of numerous shops, and the Drenarians' now familiar beasts of burden pulled wagons loaded with goods and children down the center of each street. Again, Janeway was reminded of a frontier town--or perhaps an early American Indian village, she reflected, as she watched a woman pass by carrying a baby on her back in what could easily have passed for a papoose board. "
Native Americans galaxy 2372 Garland, Mark A. & Charles G. McGraw. Ghost of a Chance (Star Trek: Voyager). New York: Pocket Books (1996); pg. 128. "'It reminds me of the Five Nations,' Janeway said.

Tuvok looked at her. 'I do not believe I am familiar.'

'The Iroquois Confederation,' Janeway said. 'A self-governing Native American coalition of sorts. It guaranteed peace and cooperation over an entire region. The framers of the early American Constitution drew heavily upon the Indians' ideas.'

'I'll bet Chakotay would have gotten a kick out of this conversation,' Kim said.

'When we see him, we'll tell him about it,' Janeway answered. "

Native Americans galaxy 2372 Haber, Karen. Bless the Beasts (Star Trek: Voyager). New York: Pocket Books (1996); pg. 3. "Commander Chakotay, the Native-American first officer, was already on his knees beside the fallen pilot, searching for a pulse. " [Many refs. to Chakotay in novel, although he isn't a focal character. But no other refs. to his ethnicity.]
Native Americans galaxy 2372 Wilson, David Niall. Chrysalis (Star Trek: Voyager). New York: Pocket Books (1997); pg. 271. "Chakotay noticed the silence, and he appreciated it. Not being needed, at that moment, he slipped quietly off to his stateroom and sank into the chair at the head of his table. He closed his eyes and fell into the trance more quickly and easily than he ever had in the past. He moved inward serenely, seeking his guide--seeking his silent special place.

There was a lot to absorb. He'd never felt anything so deeply spiritual, not in the jungles with his father, not in his own spirit journeys. It had been a pure moment of cleansing, a moment in which centuries of knowledge and evolution had passed into and through his own belief system. It had changed nothing, really, but it had altered his perspective.

He had always known that his spirit must move on beyond his present form, but to truly believe that? Belief in the unknown is not an easy thing, especially for one grounded in a life of harsh physical reality. "

Native Americans galaxy 2373 Carey, Diane. Flashback (Star Trek: Voyager). New York: Pocket Books (1996); pg. 38. "Being of Native American descent, Chakotay seemed to understand the value of cleansing the mind, pausing for thought, waiting for inspiration, or actively seeking it. Tuvok took that as a commonality between them, because at the moment he desperately needed one. " [Many other refs. to Chakotay in novel, but no other refs. to his ethnicity by name.]
Native Americans galaxy 2373 Wright, Susan. The Badlands, Book Two (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 85. "Since the truce, Evek had been a constant presence in the Demilitarized Zone. Gul Evek had been at Dorvan V when the Native American colonists refused to evacuate. Gul Evek and Captain Picard had been instrumental in reaching a mutually beneficial agreement, whereby Federation colonists agreed to become Cardassian colonists, subject to Cardassian rule. " [Also, one of the main characters of part one of this novel is Chakotay, a Native American from one of these colonies, although his ethnicity isn't mentioned by name except here.]
Native Americans galaxy 2374 Golden, Christie. Seven of Nine (Star Trek: Voyager). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 37. Pg. 37: "Chakotay... certainly could identify with the need to put down roots. His own adolescence and youth had been turbulent, filled with a quest to find a place in the universe. Ironically, that quest for individuality, his stubborn 'contrariness,' had led him in a circle back to his father's teachings--the very thing he had thought he wished to escape. ";

Pg. 38: "'what is the meaning of the mark on your face?...'

'Completely comfortable with the conversation, Chakotay told Tamaak of his father's people, the meaning of the tattoo, and of the Sky Spirits who had given them so much. And as he talked, it was almost as if he were back in those days of his youth. he could have practically sworn he smelled the sweet, calming fragrance of sage, the herb his father burned in purification rituals. " [Other refs. to Chakotay, not in DB, without less explicit reference to his religious and cultural background.]

Native Americans galaxy 2375 David, Peter. Excalibur: Restoration (ST: New Frontier). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 46. "Kahn, by contrast, was of mixed Native American ancestry, and was absolute lightning in a variety of martial arts. "
Native Americans galaxy 2375 Golden, Christie. Cloak and Dagger (Star Trek: Voyager/Dark Matters #1). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 89. [1] "Chakotay couldn't sleep... Finally, he sighed heavily and rose... he opened a drawer and withdrew his medicine bundle.

For a long time, he simply held it, feeling its familiar, comforting weight in his hands. Chakotay wondered if he was doing the right thing. Taking a trip to the spirit world in his mind might not be such a good idea. On the other hand, maybe there would be some good advice waiting for him on the other side.

At any rate, it sure beat counting sheep.

The word made him think of the Shepherds, and the Shepherds made him think of dark matter... He needed some help, and it was time to ask for it. "

Native Americans galaxy 2375 Golden, Christie. Cloak and Dagger (Star Trek: Voyager/Dark Matters #1). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 90. [2] "In his eagerness, he wanted simply to seize the akoonah and get right to the heat of the thing, as he had done on his first vision quest so many years ago. But the old Chakotay, despite this strange anger and resentment that burned inside him like a stoked fire, knew that the experience would be enriched by the care taken in assembling the implements.

He unfolded the small fur blanket, letting his hands caress the smooth feathers of the blackbird's wing and linger over the carvings etched in the river stone. Chakotay breathed deep and composed himself.

'Akoochimoya. We are far from the sacred places of our grandfathers. We are far from the bones of our people. But perhaps there is one powerful being who will embrace this man and give him the answers he seeks.' "

Native Americans galaxy 2375 Golden, Christie. Cloak and Dagger (Star Trek: Voyager/Dark Matters #1). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 90. [3] "He placed his hand on the akoonah and concentrated on the stone. The familiar tingling sensation crept through his hand. It was comforting, and Chakotay responded. He could feel the muscles in his back and neck unknotting as if being manually untied by an unseen presence. He took a deep breath and released it slowly, letting it trickle through his nostrils. Peace enveloped him. He opened his eyes.

He was surprised at the sight that greeted him. Always before, his spirit guides had met him in the lushness of a tropical rain forest or the cool comfort of a wooded glen. This, too, was a wild place, but as unlike the jungle or forest as could be imagined.

Chakotay stood in a desert. " [More, not in DB.]

Native Americans galaxy 2375 Golden, Christie. Cloak and Dagger (Star Trek: Voyager/Dark Matters #1). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 92. "In front of him, sitting on its haunches, its mouth open as if it were laughing at him, sat a coyote.

This was not good. This was not good at all. Coyote was the Trickster. Chakotay yearned for his friend, the wise if occasionally infuriating snake, or some of the other animals who had come to him when he needed their aid. He'd never before encountered Coyote.

'Ah,' said Coyote mockingly. It tilted its head to the side. 'Not happy to see me?'

Its voice, Chakotay realized with a further sensation of dread, was that of Q.

'So right now you're wondering, is Q Coyote, or is Coyote Q, and just what the hell am I doing conjuring up either one of them at a time like this? Am I right?' Coyote flipped over and wriggled into the sand, all four paws in the air. " [More, pg. 92-94.]

Native Americans galaxy 2375 Golden, Christie. Ghost Dance (Star Trek: Voyager/Dark Matters #2). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 89. "'Don't worry about Tommy,' said the voice. Q's voice. The voice of a Trickster par excellence. 'You should be worried about yourself.'

'Coyote,' said Chakotay. He recalled being aboard Voyager when the dark matter had not yet been purged. He had utilized the akoonah and gone deep within his subconscious in a quest for guidance. His usual animal guide had not appeared. Instead, he had faced off with Coyote, an incarnation--perhaps the ultimate incarnation, he mused--of the classic Trickster deity. It had spoken with the voice of the omnipotent alien Q, and it was using the same taunting voice now.

'The one and only,' said Coyote, trotting over a sand dune, rising on his hind legs, and executing a bow. 'Or should I say, one of many?' " [More, pg. 90, 181-184.]

Native Americans galaxy 2375 Golden, Christie. Ghost Dance (Star Trek: Voyager/Dark Matters #2). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 142. "Suddenly, Chakotay gasped.

'What is it?' asked Paris.

For a long moment Chakotay didn't reply. He stared at the dancers as if transfixed. then slowly, with pain in his voice he replied, 'The Ghost Dance. they're doing the Ghost Dance.'

'What's the Ghost Dance?'

Chakotay turned to look at him, his dark eyes picking up the red glint of the flickering flames. 'In Earth's nineteenth century, there was a great deal of conflict between the European settlers and the natives of the Americas. There arose a leader named Wovoka, who prophesied that al white men would be swallowed by the Earth, and all dead Indians would emerge and enjoy a world free from their conquerors. It would be a new era for the native peoples...' " [More, pg. 142-143. See refs. under 'Ghost Dance.']

Native Americans galaxy 2375 Golden, Christie. Shadow of Heaven (Star Trek: Voyager/Dark Matters #3). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 12. "'...For example, Chakotay's family was pretty traditional. They grew a lot of their own food and didn't really avail themselves of all the technology they could have...' " [Other refs., not in DB.]
Native Americans galaxy 2375 Golden, Christie. Shadow of Heaven (Star Trek: Voyager/Dark Matters #3). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 167. "Now he understood why his subconscious had begun conjuring Coyote. Coyote symbolized something from another culture, a Native American culture, but one in which Chakotay had not been raised. Coyote was not his tribe's totem animal, but that of other Indians, among them a nation called the Navajo. The lesson Chakotay needed to recall was that of the Navajo, of Coyote's people. He could almost sense the spirit creature leaping joyfully as it realized that Chakotay finally understood. " [More, pg. 167-168.]
Native Americans galaxy 2375 Mack, David. "The Star Trek: New Frontier Minipedia " in Excalibur: Restoration (ST: New Frontier). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 359. "Aztecs
Ancient society of Native Americans who resided in Central America until the arrival of European explorers, whose foreign disease vectors infected and rapidly wiped out the native population. "
Native Americans galaxy 2375 Moon, Dustan. "Seventh Moon " in Star Trek: Strange New Worlds II (Dean Wesley Smith, ed.) New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 367. "Janeway shook her head. Vulcans. She smiled privately to her first officer, Commander Chakotay, who had risen from his chair when she entered. Warmth glittered from his eyes, and not for the first time Janeway felt the subtle tug of attraction for this handsome Native American... " [Other refs. to this character in story, not in DB. But his ethnicity isn't further mentioned.]
Native Americans galaxy 2500 Leigh, Stephen. Dark Water's Embrace. New York: Avon (1998); pg. ix. "The Languages of Mictlan, Human, and Miccail... New terms and descriptions might as easily be drawn from Cantonese, Japanese, Russian, Spanish, or Kiswahili as English, or even (as was the case with the world-name itself) an ancient Native American language such as Nahuatl. "
Native Americans galaxy 2800 Brin, David. The Uplift War in Earthclan (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (first pub. 1987); pg. 655. [Year is estimated.] "I'm probably starting to look like an oldtime Indian, he thought with some amusement... Little Robert Oneagle had never had to take turns as a bad guy when the kids played Confederation Uprising. He always got to be a Cherokee or Mohawk warrior, whooping it up in make-believe spacesuit and warpaint... "
Native Americans galaxy 3000 Burkett Jr., William R. Blood Lines. New York: HarperCollins (1998); pg. 4. "His coarse black hair was held off his face Geronimo-style with a wide scarlet headband. "
Native Americans galaxy 3000 Burkett Jr., William R. Blood Lines. New York: HarperCollins (1998); pg. 80. "'Raven was the ancient shape-changer and trickster for Indian tribes in the American Pacific Northwest on Old Earth. One of the legends says Raven stole a ball of fire from the gods to give to humanity--a kind of Salish Prometheus. Get it? Ball of fire?...' " [Also pg. 119.]
Native Americans galaxy 3000 Laumer, Keith. Retief of the CDT. New York: Baen (1985; c. 1971); pg. 115. "'...At a stroke, I will reveal you Terries for the Indian givers you are while at the same moment...' "
Native Americans galaxy 3131 Simmons, Dan. The Rise of Endymion. New York: Bantam (1998 mass market edition; first ed. 1997); pg. 40. "'The market's gone because we won't need it anymore,' said Aenea. 'The Indians are real enough--Navajo, Apache, Hopi, and Zuni--but they have their own lives to live, their own experiments to conduct. Their trading with us has been . . . a favor.' " [Other refs., not in DB.]
Native Americans galaxy 4002 Drew, Wayland. The Gaian Expedient in The Erthring Cycle (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (c. 1985); pg. 389. "'...Your scholars will recognize its essential elements as Japanese, Spanish, and Tahitian, with an admixture of Indian dialects...' "
Native Americans Georgia, USA 1943 Bishop, Michael. Brittle Innings. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 6. Atlanta Braves (baseball team) [Also pg. 214]
Native Americans Georgia, USA 2019 Burton, Levar. Aftermath. New York: Warner Books (1997); pg. 14. "The woman who stared back at her was a twenty-nine-year-old African-American... She stood a trim five foot seven, with long straight hair that was probably the hereditary result of her great-grandfather being full-blooded Cree Indian. "
Native Americans Georgia, USA 2066 Bishop, Michael. Catacomb Years. New York: Berkley (1979); pg. 216. Pg. 215-216: "He looked like he ought to be wearing moccasins and the traditional turban of the old Creek Indians... "; Pg. 217: "...lapse into an incomprehensible Mushkohogean dialect... and the Indian Menewa and the 'Gyptian Cleopatra exchanged a glance... and followed their black pharaoh-chieftain into the dark. "; Pg. 220: "...to the old Ocmulgee Mounds. At these mounds and the territory called the Ocmulgee Old Fields, the Creek Indians had long ago formed the Creek Indian Confederacy. Several prehistoric cultures had thrived here, too... Mound Builders in Georgia... " [Many other refs. not in DB.]
Native Americans Germany 1944 Vonnegut, Kurt. Slaughterhouse-Five. New York: Random House (1999; c. 1969); pg. 41. "They went Indian file. First came the scouts, clever, graceful quiet... Next came the antitank gunner... "
Native Americans Grenada 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 79. "'Y'all can try some of these little tamale things, 'pastels' they call 'em. They're like little curries in pastry. Indian food. East Indians I mean, they snuffed all the local Indians a long time ago... Year, they chased 'em off Sauteur's Point, Leaper's Point that means... The Carib Indians. They knew the Grenada settlers had their number, so they all jumped off a cliff into the sea together, and died. That's where we're going today--Sauteur's Point...' "
Native Americans Guatemala 1986 Harper, Leanne C. "Blood Rights " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 73. "His classic Maya profile marked him as a pure-blood Indian, the lowest class in Guatemala's social hierarchy... "; Pg. 74: "The Indian once again assured himself that there were no observers before grasping the padlock... "
Native Americans Guatemala 1986 Harper, Leanne C. "Blood Rights " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 75. "The norteamericano women with whom he slept always asked lots of questions about the old ones. They seemed to think that he should have the knowledge of a brujo [witch] just because his was an Indian. "
Native Americans Guatemala 1986 Harper, Leanne C. "Blood Rights " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 82. "The second prisoner was also an Indian, tall with eyeglasses knocked askew on his narrow face. "
Native Americans Guatemala 1986 Harper, Leanne C. "Blood Rights " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 90. Pg. 90: "Xbalanque, the morning star, was the herald of a new age in which the Indians would take back their lands and become the rules of their land as they had been centuries before. The coming doom was that of the Ladinos and norteamericanos, not the Maya, who would inherit the Earth. No longer should the Quiche follow the lead of outsiders, socialist, communist, or democratic. "; Pg. 116: "'We are going to form an Indian nation..' " [Other refs. to Indians/Native Americans throughout this story, usually referring specifically to Mayans. Most other refs. not in DB.]
Native Americans Guatemala 1986 Martin, George R. R. "From the Journal of Xavier Desmond " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 63. "And then it will be on to Guatemala . . . Perhaps. the daily press has been full of reports on an insurrection down there, an Indian uprising against the central government... "
Native Americans Guatemala 1986 Martin, George R. R. "From the Journal of Xavier Desmond " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 125. "Now the Mayan revolutionaries have proclaimed a new nation, an Amerindian homeland, where their jokers will be welcomed and honored. The rest of us need not apply.

...Why must we draw these lines, these fine distinctions, these labels and barriers that set us apart?... capitalist and communist, Catholic and Protestant, Arab and Jew, Indian and Ladino... " [Some other refs., not in DB.]

Native Americans Guatemala 1994 Harper, Leanne C. "Paths of Silence and of Night " in Wild Cards: Book II of a New Cycle: Marked Cards (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Baen (1994); pg. 131. "By traveling alone with an Indian, he proclaimed himself a liberal journalist. " [Other refs. throughout story, not in DB, to the Quiche Maya.]
Native Americans Guatemala 1994 Harper, Leanne C. "Paths of Silence and of Night " in Wild Cards: Book II of a New Cycle: Marked Cards (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Baen (1994); pg. 144. "'Which 'our people'? Jokes and aces, or Indians?'

'Why do you think it matters?'

Suzanne was furious. She was being guilt-tripped by an Indian shaman. " ['Indians' mentioned by name also pg. 147.]

Native Americans Guatemala 2025 Shepard, Lucius. "Fire Zone Emerald " in Future on Fire (Orson Scott Card, ed.) New York: Tor (1991; story copyright 1987); pg. 97. "'...The Queen was one of them psychics. She's linked up with this little ol' tiger cat. What the Indians call a tigrillo...' "
Native Americans Haiti 2048 Bear, Greg. Queen of Angels. New York: Warner Books (1994; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 196. "'...In the past our children wandered around the globe seeking education, and now we accept students who travel here to be educated. our island has come of age... Hispaniola is well aware of the winds of history. Never has any spot on Earth suffered so much at the hands of outsiders. The natives who first dwelled here in paradise were killed not just by Europeans, but by other Indians, the Carib, who in turn were massacred by Europeans...' "
Native Americans Haiti 2166 Farmer, Philip Jose. "Riders of the Purple Wage " in The Hugo Winners: Volumes One and Two. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971; story copyright 1967); pg. 663. "The beasts in the foreground are those that have been exterminated by man or survive only in zoos and natural preserves. The dodo, the blue whale, the passenger pigeon, the quagga... Behind them are other animals and, on a hill, the dark crouching shapes of the Tasmanian aborigine and Haitian Indian. "
Native Americans Hawaii 1866 Simmons, Dan. Fires of Eden. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1994); pg. 187. "I believe that my horse would have stood sleeping through an attack by whooping Red Indians, so sluggish was the beast. "
Native Americans Hawaii 1994 Simmons, Dan. Fires of Eden. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1994); pg. 152. "'Your ancient culture?' said Paul.

'Pre-Christian Europe,' said Eleanor. 'The mystical Scots. And some of my lineage is Native American . . . Sioux, I believe.' "

Native Americans Hawaii 1994 Simmons, Dan. Fires of Eden. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1994); pg. 174. "He discussed the hierarchy of Hawaiian animism: the aumakua, or important family gods; the kapua...; the akua kapu, who, like the ghosts of mainland Native Americans, merely frightened people and presaged bad luck... "
Native Americans Idaho 1930 Boyer, Elizabeth H. "A Foreigner Comes to Reddyville " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 205. "I looked at old Brick... His ears were still pricked up and twitching... I wasn't enjoying this much, I can tell you. Not that I was any more superstitious than the next person. My mama was mortally terrified of Indians, and she'd put the same fear into me as a child. Even though I knew the Indians had moved on out of Marsh Valley, I couldn't help remembering some of her bloodier stories of what had happened to the early settlers of Reddyville and other little forgotten places now buried under the sagebrush. "
Native Americans Idaho 1941 Turtledove, Harry. Worldwar: Tilting the Balance. New York: Del Rey (1995); pg. 381. "He wondered if anybody this side of an Andean Indian could hope to get used to the thin air of Berthoud Pass. "
Native Americans Idaho 1942 Turtledove, Harry. Worldwar: Upsetting the Balance. New York: Del Rey (1996); pg. 53. "'First the Arapaho goddamn National Forest, now the Payette goddamn National Forest--or is it the Nez Perce goddamn National Forest yet?' he asked... "
Native Americans Idaho 1995 Chalker, Jack L. The Cybernetic Walrus (Book One of The Wonderland Gambit). New York: Ballantine (1995); pg. 287. "There's still some of our people on our ancestral lands here in Washington, Idaho, and Oregon. The Nez Perce's Chief Joseph... "
Native Americans Idaho 1999 Banks, Iain. The Business. New York: Simon & Schuster (1999); pg. 50. "On the US mainland, we own a couple of casinos and a few other business ventures in the Rez (as it's usually called; formally it's the Wolf Bend Native American Reservation) in a desolate corner of Idaho where -- again conveniently -- the full remit of US law does not apply. "
Native Americans Idaho: Burley 1999 Kessel, John. Good News from Outer Space. New York: Tor (1990; c. 1989); pg. 289. "'The swastika's a historical Indian sign,' he said. 'The Zionist Occupation Government just wants to stop us from honoring Native Americans.' "
Native Americans Illinois 1928 Bradbury, Ray. Dandelion Wine. New York: Bantam (1982; c. 1957); pg. 195. "'...in Green Town, Illinois--working for Indian-headed pennies instead of the crown heads of Europe!' "
Native Americans Illinois 1940 Turtledove, Harry. Worldwar: In the Balance. New York: Ballantine (1994); pg. 381. "'Probably playing Lizards and Americans,' Sam answered. 'It could be cowboys and Indians, though.' He spent the next few minutes trying to get the alien to understand what cowboys and Indians were, to say nothing of why they were part of a game. He didn't think he had much luck. "
Native Americans Illinois 2008 Kress, Nancy. Beggars in Spain. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1993); pg. 8. "Four men and three women sat around the polished mahogany table of the conference room. Doctor, lawyer, Indian chief, thought Susan Melling, looking from Ong to Sullivan to Camden. "
Native Americans Iowa 2050 Stephenson, Neal. The Diamond Age. New York: Bantam (1995); pg. 17. "He still owned the family farm in northwestern Iowa... complete with herds of bison and real Indians who had discovered that riding around on horses hunting wild game as a better deal than pissing yourself in gutters in Minneapolis or Seattle. "


Native Americans, continued

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