Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Marxism, world

Marxism, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Marxism world 2100 Heinlein, Robert A. Starship Troopers. New York: Ace Books (1987; 1st ed. 1959); pg. 75. "He had been droning along about 'value,' comparing the Marxist theory with the orthodox 'use' theory. Mr. Dubois had said, 'Of course, the Marxist definition of value is ridiculous. All the work one cares to add will not turn a mud pie into an apple tart; it remains a mud pie, value zero. By corollary, unskillful work can easily subtract value; an untalented cook can turn wholesome dough and fresh green apples, valuable already, into an inedible mess, value zero. Conversely, a great chef can fashion of those same materials a confection of greater value than a commonplace apple tart, with no more effort than an ordinary cook uses to prepare an ordinary sweet.

'These kitchen illustrations demolish the Marxian theory of value--the fallacy from which the entire magnificent fraud of communism derives--and illustrates the truth of the common-sense definition as measured in terms of use.' "

Marxism world 2100 Heinlein, Robert A. Starship Troopers. New York: Ace Books (1987; 1st ed. 1959); pg. 75. "Dubois had waved his stump at us. 'Nevertheless--wake up, back there!--nevertheless the disheveled old mystic of Das Kapital, turgid, tortured, confused and neurotic, unscientific, illogical, this pompous fraud Karl Marx, nevertheless had a glimmering of a very important truth. If he had possessed an analytical mind, he might have formulated the first adequate definitino of value . . . and this planet might have been saved endless grief.' "
Marxism world 2131 Resnick, Mike. Kirinyaga: A Fable of Utopia. New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 54. "We had come to the world of Kirinyaga to create a perfect Kikuyu society, a Kikuyu Utopia. Could one gifted little girl carry within her the seeds of our destruction. I could not be sure, but it was a fact that gifted children grew up. They became Jesus, and Mohammed, and Jomo Kenyatta--but they also became Tippoo Tib, the greatest slaver of all... Or, more often, they became Friedrich Neitzsche and Karl Marx, brilliant men in their own right, but who influenced less brilliant, less capable men. "
Marxism world 2150 Zelazny, Roger. Lord of Light. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1967); pg. 154. "'Your fertility deities are worse than Marxists,' he said. 'You think that's all that goes on between people...' "
Marxism world 2200 Arnason, Eleanor. A Woman of the Iron People. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1991); pg. 14. "The masters of Chan and Zen warn us that when we discriminate, when we divide 'good' from 'evil' and 'high' from 'low,' we are moving away from true understanding.

Karl Marx tells us that action is inevitable and that we have to discriminate in order to understand.

You have your choice of sages.

However, remember that--according to Marx--the goal of socialism is mindful action, history made conscious, people who know what they are doing.

...Appendix F: Minority report on the relevance of Karl Marx. "

Marxism world 2200 Arnason, Eleanor. A Woman of the Iron People. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1991); pg. 102. "'You ought to have gotten a course in socialist medicine. Acupuncture, herbal lore, and Marxist ideology. As far as I can figure out, you are supposed to stick your companion full of needles and read selected passages from the Communist Manifesto to her.'

...Mr. Fang was close to eighty... He was from Zhendu in Sichuan... I had spent hours in his shop watching him work. From time to time we talked philosophy. He especially liked the ancient Daoists and Karl Marx. " [Many other refs., not all in DB. See also pg. 142-145, 347, 365, 400, 430, 443, 452, 472, 476-481, 486]

Marxism world 2200 Arnason, Eleanor. A Woman of the Iron People. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1991); pg. 235. "'She has a point,' Eddie said. 'I know that nonintervention makes everything more difficult. And maybe it is a farce. Maybe there is no way we can avoid changing this planet... If we abandon it or even begin to modify it, then it's only a matter of time--and not much time--before the planet looks the way America did in the nineteenth century. The natives will be knee deep in explorers and prospectors and Marxist missionaries.' "
Maya California 1975 Dick, Philip K. "Man, Android and Machine " in The Dark-Haired Girl. Willimantic, CT: Mark V. Ziesing (1988; c. 1975); pg. 206. Pg. 206: "What we must realize is that this deception, this obscuring of things as if under a veil--the veil of Maya, as it has been called--this is not an end in itself, as if the universe is somehow perverse and likes to foil us per se... "; Pg. 213: "'I feel the dream, the dokos, lifting; I feel Maya dissolving: I am waking up, He is waking up: I am the Dreamer: we are all the Dreamer.' One thinks here of Arthur Clarke's Overmind. " [Also pg. 217]
Maya California: Los Angeles 1969 Grimwood, Ken. Replay. New York: Arbor House (1986); pg. 136. "As in her office, the walls were hung with framed mandalas of many types: Navajo, Mayan, East Indian. "
Maya California: Los Angeles 2047 Bear, Greg. Queen of Angels. New York: Warner Books (1994; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 83. "E Hassida specialized in aliens. Half Japanese half Hispanglish, he alternated between bright primary colors of Mayan/Mexican motifs and the calm earth pastels of old Japan; between landscapes and transformed pop. "
Maya California: San Francisco 2036 Besher, Alexander. Mir: A Novel of Virtual Reality. New York: Simon & Schuster (1998); pg. 105. "His broad face, the shade of cinnamon, was crowned by a full head of Mayan hair, black with iron-gray streaks. Juan had raised Trevor from childhood; he had witnessed the terror and the promise . . . His compassionate brown eyes radiated from the steps with an inquiring gleam.

Young Mister Trevor looked not so good, like he was going through another midlove crisis. Juan had seen the look before in varying degrees of human self-sacrifice.

The goddess, she is hungry today, he decided. Poor Trevor. "

Maya California: San Francisco 2095 Sterling, Bruce. Holy Fire. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 32, 47. "...Mia managed to shakily scrawl a random message, the first thing that had come into her head:

MAYA WAS HERE
" [Maya is one of the main characters in the novel, and is mentioned throughout. No apparent connection to the Mayan culture, however.]

Pg. 47: "'Are you rich, Maya?'

'In a way,' Mia said. 'Yes. I'm well-to-do.'

'How'd you get that way?'

'Steady income, low expenditures, compound interest and a long wait.' Maya laughed. 'Even inanimate objects can get rich that way.' "

Maya Central America 1973 Tiptree, Jr., James. "The Women Men Don't See " (published 1973) in The Norton Book of Science Fiction (Ursula K. Le Guin & Brian Atterbery, editors). New York: W. W. Norton & Co. (1993); pg. 255-256. "...while the Mexicana 727 is barrelling down to Cozumel Island... Cozumel airport is the usual mix of panicky Yanks... and calm Mexicans... Captain Esteban turns out to be four feet nine of mahogany Maya puro. He is also in a somber Mayan snit. "; Pg. 256: "Our captain's classic Maya profile attracts my gaze: forehead sloping back from his predatory nose, lips and jaw stepping back below it. If his slant eyes had been any more crossed, he couldn't have made his license. That's a handsome combination, believe it or not. On the little Maya chicks in their minishifts... " [Many other refs. to Mayas in this story, not in DB.]
Maya galaxy 2500 Leigh, Stephen. Dark Water's Embrace. New York: Avon (1998); pg. xi. "Mictlan: Human, from Nahuatl: 'The Land of the Dead.' In Aztec/Mayan creation myths, this is the Land of the Dead, from where the god Quetzalcoatl brought the bones of man. This was used as the world-name after the bones of a sentient race were found here. "
Maya Guatemala 1986 Harper, Leanne C. "Blood Rights " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 71. "The young Lacandon Maya coughed as the smoke followed him across the newly cleared field. " [Refs. to this character and Lacandon Maya culture throughout story, pg. 71-124.]
Maya Guatemala 1986 Harper, Leanne C. "Blood Rights " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 71. "The dream took him to Xibalba, the domain of Ah Puch, the Lord of Death. Xibalba always smelled of smoke and blood. He coughed as the atmosphere of death entered his lungs. The coughing awakened him, and it took him a moment to realize that he was no longer in the underworld. Eyes watering, he backed away from the fire, out of range of the smoke that the wind had sent to follow him. Maybe his ancestors were angry with him too.

He stared at the flames, now slowly dying down, and moved a little closer to the bonfire in the center of the milpa. Wild-eyed, he slid into a crouch before the fire and watched it closely. Jose had told him again and again to trust what he felt and go where his intuition led him. This time, frightened but glad there was no one to see him, he would do it. "

Maya Guatemala 1986 Harper, Leanne C. "Blood Rights " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 72. "He made no sound. Nor did he move as the bright blood ran down his fingers to fall on the deep green of the leaves. Only his eyes narrowed and his chin lifted. When the branch was covered with his blood, he picked it up with his left hand and threw it into the flames. The air smelled of Xibalba again and of his ancestors' ancient rituals, and he returned to the underworld once more.

As always, a rabbit scribe greeted him, speaking in the ancient language of his people. Clutching the bark paper and brush to its furry chest, it told him in an odd, low voice to follow. Ahau Ah Puch awaited him. "

Maya Guatemala 1986 Harper, Leanne C. "Blood Rights " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 73. "'The cycle ends.' The grandmother continued to speak. 'Change comes for the hach winik. The white stickmen have created their own downfall. You, Hanapu, brother to Xbalanque, are the messenger. Go to Kaminaljuyu and meet your brother. Your path will become clear, ballplayer.'

'Do not forget us, ballplayer.' Ah Puch spoke and his voice was vicious and hollow as if he spoke through a mask. 'Your blood is ours. Your enemies' blood is ours.'

For the first time real fear broke through Hunapu's numbness. His hand throbbed in pain to the rhythm of Ah Puch's words... "

Maya Guatemala 1986 Harper, Leanne C. "Blood Rights " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 73. "The stocky Mayan worker stood in the shadow of one of the work tents as he watched the last group of archaeological students and professors break up. As they wandered into their sleeping tents, he withdrew even farther into the protection of the tent. His classic Maya profile marked him as a pure-blood Indian, the lowest class in Guatemala's social hierarchy; but here among the blonde students, it marked him as a conquest. It was rare that a student of the past got to sleep with a living example of a race of priest-kings. The worker, dressed in overlarge blue jeans and filthy University of Pennsylvania T-shirt, saw no reason to discourage this impression. He made himself as unattractive as possible to watch their simultaneous desire and repulsion. "
Maya Guatemala 1986 Harper, Leanne C. "Blood Rights " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 75. "The gin was good. He leaned back against a convenient tree trunk and watched the moon. Ix Chel, the Old Woman, was the moon goddess. The old ones' gods were ugly, not like the Virgin Mary or Jesus or even God in the Church where he had been raised. "
Maya Guatemala 1986 Harper, Leanne C. "Blood Rights " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 77. "A rhythmic ga-pow, ga-pow brought him through the quiet to a ball court. Three human figures sat on the platform on top of the walls. He recognized them as Ah Puch, Izamna, and Ix Chel--the Death God, the Old Man, and the Old Woman, supreme in the Mayan pantheon, or as supreme as any of the many deities were. The three were surrounded by animals who assisted them as scribes and servants. Drawing his gaze back down the stone walls to the packed-dirt court itself, he saw the source of the noise. Not deigning to notice him, a creature that was half-human, half-jaguar repeatedly attempted to knock a ball through one of the intricately carved stone hoops high on the walls of the court. The creature never used its paws. Instead it used head, hips, elbows, and knees to send the ball bouncing up the wall toward the ring. The jaguar-man and its fangs frightened him. Since the dream had begun, it was the first thing he had felt besides curiosity... "
Maya Guatemala 1986 Harper, Leanne C. "Blood Rights " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 77-78. "'Ai! Not bad!' He yelled at them in Spanish. Lord Death shook his head and glared at the old couple. Itzamna spoke to him in pure Maya. Although he had never spoken the language in his life, he recognized it and understood it.

'Welcome, Xbalanque, to Xibalba. You are as fine a ballplayer as your namesake.'

'My names not Xbalanque.'

'From this time, it is.' The black death-mask of Ah Puch glared down at him and he swallowed his next comment.

'Si, this is a dream and I am Xbalnque.' He spread his hands and nodded. 'Whatever you say.'

Ah Puch looked away.

'You are different; you have always know this.' Ix Chel smiled down at him. It was the smile of a crocodile, not a grandmother. "

Maya Guatemala 1986 Harper, Leanne C. "Blood Rights " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 90. "Akabal was again mixing Maya and Spanish in a speech that centered on Xbalanque and his 'mission.' Akabal had taken what Xbalanque had said to him and linked it to a Christian second coming and the end of the world as prophesied by ancient priests.

Xbalanque, the morning star, was the herald of a new age in which the Indians would take back their lands and become the rules of their land as they had been centuries before. The coming doom was that of the Ladinos and norteamericanos, not the Maya, who would inherit the Earth. No longer should the Quiche follow the lead of outsiders, socialist, communist, or democratic. "

Maya Guatemala 1986 Harper, Leanne C. "Blood Rights " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 91. "And whether he was the accidental creation of the norteamericanos' sickness or the child of the gods, he swore to all the deities he recognized, Mayan and European, Jesus, Mary, and Itzamna... "
Maya Guatemala 1986 Harper, Leanne C. "Blood Rights " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 123. "'It is the time of the Fourth Creation. The birth of Huracan, the heart of heaven, our home. The gods have returned to us! Death to the enemies of our people!' Akabal knelt and stretched his hand toward the hero Twins. 'Lead us to glory, favored of the gods.'

...'The people, Simon. It's some kind of procession. I wonder if it's a religious occasion.' "

Maya Guatemala 1986 Martin, George R. R. "From the Journal of Xavier Desmond " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 125. "Guatemala took its toll on my spirit, I'm afraid. We are, of course, stringently neutral, but when I saw the televised news reports of the insurrection and heard some of the rhetoric being attributed to the Mayan revolutionaries, I dared to hope. When we actually met with the Indian leaders, I was even briefly elated. They considered my presence in the room an honor, an auspicious omen, seemed to treat me with the same sort of respect... they gave Hartmann and Tachyon... Well, I am an old man--an old joker in fact... Now the Mayan revolutionaries have proclaimed a new nation, an Amerindian homeland, where their jokers will be welcomed and honored. The rest of us need not apply. " [Other refs. not in DB.]
Maya Guatemala 1986 Martin, George R. R. "From the Journal of Xavier Desmond " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 126. "I'm afraid that ultimately Barnett and the Ayatollah and the Mayan priest are all preaching the same creed.--that our bodies in some sense reflect our souls, that some divine being has taken a direct hand and twisted us into these shapes to signify his pleasure (the Mayas) or displeasure (Nur al-Allah, the Ayatollah, the Firebreather). Most of all, each of them is saying that jokers are different.

...Still brooding about Guatemala and the Mayas. A point I failed to make earlier--I could not help noticing that this glorious idealistic revolution of theirs was led by two aces and a nat. Even down there, where jokers are supposedly kissed by the gods, the aces lead and the jokers follow. "

Maya Guatemala 1994 Harper, Leanne C. "Paths of Silence and of Night " in Wild Cards: Book II of a New Cycle: Marked Cards (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Baen (1994); pg. 130. Pg. 130: "Switching form one point of view to the next among her sentries in the forest, she watched the strangers approach the tiny Quiche Mayan village of Chotol... The Eks were the village leaders. When Rosa Ek came out of her house fully armed with machete and ancient rifle, carrying both her youngest child and a bag of supplies, Suzanne explained the danger to her in the Quiche dialect which she struggled to learn... "; Pg. 131: "Now she could see them with her own eyes. The leader was Maya, in his late forties and already beating the statistics, a Caqchiquel she guessed from his embroidered shirt... " [Many other refs. throughout story to the Quiche Maya in this story, pg. 129-168. Other refs. not in DB.]
Maya Guatemala 1994 Harper, Leanne C. "Paths of Silence and of Night " in Wild Cards: Book II of a New Cycle: Marked Cards (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Baen (1994); pg. 134. Pg. 134: "'...I don't have any idea what you know about the Maya, but he's a chuchkajawib, an ajk'ij, umm, a priest-shaman type. Sometimes they're called the Daykeepers...' "; Pg. 137: "'...the imprisonment of most of the Maya separatists who weren't killed...' "
Maya Guatemala 1994 Harper, Leanne C. "Paths of Silence and of Night " in Wild Cards: Book II of a New Cycle: Marked Cards (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Baen (1994); pg. 145. "Saints had become a Maya codeword for the old gods, fit one way or another into the Catholic pantheon. As a lapsed Catholic, she was fascinated by the way it had been done over the centuries, with the gift of Mayan gods' attributes to the various saints. In her part of the country the fundamentalist protestants had made little progress in converting the people to their new Christianity. "
Maya Guatemala 1994 Harper, Leanne C. "Paths of Silence and of Night " in Wild Cards: Book II of a New Cycle: Marked Cards (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Baen (1994); pg. 146. "'...I know the people who covered the Maya uprising. They believe. Me, I think maybe they were aces. Or maybe they really were the reincarnation of the heroes of the Popol Vuh. They came close...' "
Maya Haiti 2048 Bear, Greg. Queen of Angels. New York: Warner Books (1994; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 305. Quote from "Maya Deren, Divine Horsemen: The Living Gods of Haiti " [Author's name is 'Maya.']
Maya Honduras 2050 Branham, R. V. "In the Sickbay " in Writers of the Future: Volume III (Algis Budrys, ed.). Los Angeles: Bridge Publications (1987); pg. 213. [Year estimated.] Pg. 213: "The Honduran-registered spacetug Popol Vuh screamed across the vacuum of space, unheard, unsensed. As it approached the moon Titan, the control module detached, like a sated insect... "; Pg. 242: "Marianna ws embalmed and sent on the next outbound shuttle to the spacetug Popol Vuh, which now had full radiation shielding. "
Maya Latin America 1985 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 133-134. "...the religious networks, where, with sustained and general excitement, the Message [from extraterrestrials] was being discussed... The Message, Ellie believed, was a kind of mirror in which each person sees his or her own beliefs challenged or confirmed... The Great Cycle of the ancient Maya was to be completed in the year 2011, when--according to this independent cultural tradition--the cosmos would end. The convolution of the Mayan prediction with Christian millenarianism was producing a kind of apocalyptic frenzy in Mexico and Central America. "
Maya Massachusetts: Nantucket -1250 B.C.E. Sterling, S. M. Island in the Sea of Time. New York: Penguin (1998); pg. 280. Pg. 280: "'Research on what?' Cofflin asked.

'Early Mesoamerican cultures,' she said.

'Aztecs?'

'Oh, no, much earlier than that--Olmec and proto-Mayan, this century we're in. Really trying to learn something, too...' "; [Also pg. 318, 341.]

Maya Mexico -3000 B.C.E. Murphy, Pat. The Falling Woman. New York: Tor (1986); pg. 87. "The Maya had occupied the Yucatan peninsula since 3000 B.C. They absorbed several invasions from Mexico. From the book, I got the impression that the Maya's strength was not in their military prowess, but in their ability to absorb invaders, adoopt some of the new customs, retain some of their own. For the most part, they held their own until the Spanish came along. The Spanish conquistadors overcame the Mayan armies; the Catholic Church subdued the survivors. The friars seemed, from the book's account, to be concerned with saving the heathens' souls even if that meant ending their lives. "
Maya Mexico -1000 B.C.E. Murphy, Pat. The Falling Woman. New York: Tor (1986); pg. 9. "...Mexico's Yucatan peninsula... The Maya called such pools ts'not--an abrupt, angular sort of a word... Hidden beneath the water are fragments of the old Mayan civilization: broken pieces of pottery, figurines, jade ornaments, and bits of bone--sometimes human bone. In the mythos of the Maya, the cenotes were places of power belonging to the Chaacob, the gods who come from the world's four corners to bring the rain.

Dzibilchaltun, the oldest city on the Yucatan peninsula, was biuld around a cenote known as Xlacah. By Mayan reckoning, people settled in this place in the ninth katun. By the Christian calendar, that is about one thousand years before the death of Christ. " [There are references to Mayan archaeology, history, culture, religion, etc. throughout book. The Mayans are the main topic of the book. Most refs. not in DB.]

Maya Mexico -1000 B.C.E. Murphy, Pat. The Falling Woman. New York: Tor (1986); pg. 17. "Three thousand years ago, the Maya had built a temple here. One thousand years ago, they had abandoned the temple and retreated into the forst. No archaeologist knew why, and the ancient Maya were not saying. "
Maya Mexico 800 C.E. Murphy, Pat. The Falling Woman. New York: Tor (1986); pg. 16. "In the moonlight, I went for a stroll down to the sacred cenote, the ancient well that had once supplied water to the city. Along the way, I passed a woman returning from the well. She walked gracefully, one hand lifted to steady the water jug on her head. From the black and white pattern that decorated the rim of her jug, I guessed that she had lived during the Classic Period, around A.D. 800.

I do not live entirely in the present. Sometimes, I think that the ghosts of the past haunt me. "

Maya Mexico 1000 C.E. Murphy, Pat. The Falling Woman. New York: Tor (1986); pg. 65. "Her attitude, when she speaks of the ancient Maya and their sacrifices to the gods, implies that we are civilized now, we have left that nonsense far behind... The gods of the ancient Maya are closer and more demanding [than the Christian God]. At the turning of the katun, the time comes for fasting and drinking balche, for cleasning the sacred books, for dancing on stilts and burning incense. At that time, the people gather at the Sacred Well at Chichen Itza, a city fifty miles from Dzibilchaltun. The well is a place of power, home of many gods. At the turning of the katun, priests fling jade ornaments, gold bells, copper rings, painted bowls, and incense into the Sacred Well.

With these gifts, they send messengers to the gods. If the messengers do not wish to visit the gods, they are sent--hurled over the edge by muscular priests who only wish to do them honor. "

Maya Mexico 1000 C.E. Murphy, Pat. The Falling Woman. New York: Tor (1986); pg. 66. "The messengers [thrown into the well] fall, bright feathers fluttering in the sunlight, their voices smothered by the shouting of the crowd, the processional music, the chanting of the priests. Far below, they float, specks of silent color on the jade-green water.

At noon, when the disc of the sun fills the well with light, only one messenger floats on the water. The others are gone, taken down by the Chaacob to the submarine rooms beneath the water's smooth surface. The priests draw out this survivor, who has returned to tell the message of the gods, bringing the prophecy for the coming year.

It is not a simple thing, this human sacrifice, any more than the crucifixion of Jesus Christ was a simple execution. The messengers who do not return are among the gods; the one who does return is the oracle, the interpreter for the gods. "

Maya Mexico 1000 C.E. Murphy, Pat. The Falling Woman. New York: Tor (1986); pg. 125. "In Mayan society, suicide is a perfectly respectable act. The patron goddess of suicide was Ixtab. She is generally pictured as a woman over emptiness, supported only by the noose around her neck. Her eyes are closed, her hands are relaxed, and her expression is calm, as if she were raptly contemplating an inner vision. Ixtab escorts people who die by suicide... The gods of the Maya were demanding, much more demanding than the distant patriarch of a God that most Christians worship. Mayan gods governed each day's activities, and each day a different set had to be praised and propitiated. And a Mayan who ignored the dictates of the gods and decided to behave as he pleased would be as mad, relative to his society, as a resident of Los Angeles who ignored the traffic regulations and decided to drive as he pleased. "
Maya Mexico 1000 C.E. Murphy, Pat. The Falling Woman. New York: Tor (1986); pg. 131. "'...I suspect that people overestimate the number of human sacrifices made by the Maya. One sometimes gets the impression that Mayan priests spent most of their time beating their fellows over the head and tossing them willy-nilly into the nearest well. And that's not so. It was a rare and important occasion... they have rules of their own. This woman may have participated in human sacrifices--but by her standards, that was good. The sacrificial victims went to a sort of paradise, and all was well.' "
Maya Mexico 1500 C.E. McAuley, Paul J. Pasquale's Angel. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1994); pg. 129. "Rome supported the contention of Spain that the Savages of the New World, from the innocent Indians of the Friendly Isles to the proud bloodthirsty Mexican and Mayan empires, must be conquered in the name of Christ, & that Florentines were endangering their souls by consorting with Savages and accepting them as equals. "
Maya Mexico 1986 Leigh, Stephen. "The Tint of Hatred " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 64. "'I stand in El Templo de los Jaguares, the Temple of the Jaguars, in Chichen Itza. Under the fierce Yucatan sun the archway is impressive, two thick columns carved in the likeness of gigantic snakes, their huge, stylized heads flanking the entrance, their linked tails supporting the lintel.

'A thousand years ago, the guide books tell us, Mayan priests cheered the players in El Juego de Pelota, the ball court 25 feet below. It was a game that would be familiar to any of us. The players struck a hard rubber ball with their knees, elbows, and hips scoring as the ball caromed through rings set in the long stone walls flanking the narrow field. A simple game, played for the glory of the god Quetzalcoatl, or Kukulcan... As his reward, the captain of the victorious team would be carried to the temple. The losing captain would behead his opponent with an obsidian knife, sending him into a glorious afterlife. A bizarre reward for conquest, by our standards.

Maya Mexico 1986 Leigh, Stephen. "The Tint of Hatred " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 64-65. "'I look out on this ancient place, and the walls are still brown with blood; not of Mayans, but of jokers. The wild card plague struck here late and virulently... still, perhaps it's not surprising that in the ancestral lands of the Mayans, there have been no less than a dozen plumed serpents over the year: images of Kukulcan himself. And here in Mexico, if those of Indian blood had any say, perhaps even the jokers would be well-treated, for the Mayans considered the deformed blessed by the gods. But those of Mayan descent don't rule.

'In Chichen Itza, over fifty jokers were killed only a year ago.

'Most of them (but not all) were followers of the new Mayan religion. These ruins were their places of worship. They thought that the virus was a sign to return to the old ways; they didn't think of themselves as victims. The gods had twisted their bodies and rendered them different and holy.' "

Maya Mexico 1986 Leigh, Stephen. "The Tint of Hatred " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 65. "'...And here in Mexico, if those of Indian blood had any say, perhaps even the jokers would be well-treated, for the Mayans considered the deformed blessed by the gods. But those of Mayan descent don't rule.' " [Many other refs. to 'Indians' in story, specifically to Mayans. Most other refs. not in DB. See also entries under 'Maya'.]
Maya Mexico 1986 Leigh, Stephen. "The Tint of Hatred " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 65. "'Their [neo-Mayan] religion was a throwback to a violent past. And because they were so different, they were feared. The locals of Spanish and European descent hated them. There was gossip concerning animal and even human sacrifice, of blood rites. It didn't matter if any of it was actually true; it never does. They were different. Their own neighbors banded together to rid themselves of this passive threat. They were dragged screaming from the surrounding villages.

'Bound, pleading for mercy, the jokes of Chichen Itza were laid here. Their throats were slit in brutal parody of Mayan rites--splashing blood stained the carved serpents red. Their bodies were cast into the ball court below. Another atrocity, another 'nat vs. joker incident. Old prejudices amplifying the new...' " [More.]

Maya Mexico 1986 Martin, George R. R. "From the Journal of Xavier Desmond " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 63. "The rest of us will be traveling down to Yucatan and the Quintana Roo to look at Mayan ruins and the sites of several reported antijoker atrocities. Rural Mexico, it seems, is not as enlightened as Mexico City... "
Maya Mexico 1986 Murphy, Pat. The Falling Woman. New York: Tor (1986); pg. 7. "This is the true account, when all was vague, all was silence, without motion and the sky was still empty. This is the first account, the first narrative. There was neither man nor beat, no bird, fish nor crab, no trees, rocks, caves nor canyons, no plants and no shrubs. Only the sky was there.
--Popol Vuh of the Quiche Maya "
Maya Mexico 1986 Murphy, Pat. The Falling Woman. New York: Tor (1986); pg. 15. "The sun was setting. The hollow wailing of conch shell trumpets blown by Mayan priests rose over the trilling of the crickets and echoed across the plaza. I alone listened to the sweet mournful sound--neigther Tony nor Salvador could hear the echoes of the past. "
Maya Mexico 1986 Murphy, Pat. The Falling Woman. New York: Tor (1986); pg. 18. "I greeted her in Maya, a language I speak tolerably well after ten long years of stammering and mispronounciation... She spoke Maya with an ancient accent.... "; Pg. 19: "'You speak Maya,' the woman said softly, 'but do you speak the language of the Zuyua?' Her voice held a challenge.

The langauge of the Zuyua was an ancient riddling game. I had read the questions and answers in the Books of Chilam Balam, Mayan holy books that had been transcribed into European script and preserved when the original hieroglyphic books were destroyed. The text surrounding the questions suggested that the riddles were used to separate the true Maya from invaders, the nobility from the peasants. If I spoke the language of the Zuyua, I belonged. If not, I was an outsider. "

Maya Mexico 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 1. "Harry knew very well that samples imply relics; and a conviction for the illegal export of Mexico's ancient Maya relics is among the surest ways for a scholar to become an expert on... Mexican prison.

So Harry applied to no one, certainly not to Mexico's director of antiquities, for any sanction, because it made things simpler, and Harry liked to do things the simple way. Which was not say that Harry was a simple man. A Mormon with a graduate degree from BYU, good Spanish, and a decent command of Maya--still the first tongue of many Indios in Southern Mexico--Harry knew how to charm a village godfather. He could hire all the help he needed without the folderol of government documents. That is why it took Harry almost three months to get himself found, shot at, and chased all the way to Guatemala. " [Other refs., not in DB.]

Maya Mexico 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 2. "Harry's [Mayan] guide, Yaxpoc, thought perhaps the airplane that buzzed his little group was an arm of the Mexican Air Force.

'Then it should have the triangle insignia,' Harry replied, catching a good glimpse of what looked like an old Lockheed jet trainer as it swept away toward the sun.

'It has none at all, Senor Harry, murmured Yaxpoc, pointing with his chin in the old way. The Maya ways made a lot of sense when a man needed both hands to grip a limestone outcrop that looked like a head of gray broccoli and crumbled rather more easily. Harry nodded and kept on climbing, his sweat-soaked old snapbrim hat askew. "

Maya Mexico 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 2. "'Could we get near enough to these federales to learn why they seem so determined? Near enough to hear them, I mean.'

Though he often paused to give a question time for consideration, Yaxpoc answered this one instantly. 'We could not, senor Harry, of a certainty. But alone, I think I could.'

Harry thought that over. Yaxpoc was of average height for a Maya, a full head shorter than Harry's six-foot-two; and his coppery skin blended matter into the shadows of the bosque, the high Chiapas rain forest. Better still, Yaxpoc's squarish little feet made no more noise than the shadows did. Best of all, he seemed willing, though it meant at least an hour each way in darkness that soon would be relived only by patches of moonlight. "

Maya Mexico 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 3. "Harry's little group was a half-hour closer to Guatemala. In passing the seedlings a few days before, Harry had given them little thought, noting only that underbrush had been cleared for shrubby young plants. He had been intent as ever on the overgrown mounds that sometimes proved to be ancient platforms and, in a few cases, temples of crudely dressed limestone. If a man could discover a hidden passageway into a temple, it was just barely possible that he might find the kind of ceremonial place that had made Ruz Lhullier famous, midway through the century. "
Maya Mexico 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 4. "On a previous expedition, Harry had found not only a temple north of Tzimol but a mighty pyramid under its age-old blanket of trees and vines. Not as high as Pelenque, maybe, but high enough for Harry. He had found the passageway he sought, or at least Yaxpoc had, but the steep stairwell had been found centuries before by someone who left the tip of a Toledo steel blade between blocks of cut stone while forcing entry. Harry had taken the artifact, reasoning that it was not truly a relic.

Harry might have taken more artifacts on that trip, using whatever reasoning he could dream up, except that someone had beaten him to it. The only things of value left inside were the classic Maya carvings and wall murals, which Harry copied with rubbings and Polaroids after studying the carvings for a week in vain. The evidence of Nephite presence that Harry was looking for was a Star of David. "

Maya Mexico 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 8. "Exactly why he had commanded that Cesar Machado learn the ancient Maya language was still dim in Teniente's mind; something about the expansion of the movement... Their secret voyage to Mexico's isthmus, in wallowing old steamers provided by El Condor and his friends, had left them squarely in the center of the only region on earth where Maya was the language of the farmers and villagers, a population in which the senderistas must hide as they gained strength in Mexico. "
Maya Mexico 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 247. [1] "'...I hear the Maya learned to distill the stuff.'

She could hear his progress with the food, and the ding of the microwave unit. 'I thought the Mayans faded out centuries ago,' she said...

'Nope, the Maya just faded into he jungle for a while. They're still around. Damn' near threw the whites out of the Yucatan in a civil war a hundred years or so ago and now, little by little, they're coming back out of the uncharted areas with their old ways. My kinfolks in Puebla cross themselves when they talk about it.'

...'What for? They're not devil-worshipers or anything, are they?'

...'Okay, no devil worship exactly--but they speak a language that was old when Rome was new, and they pray directly to the sun and sacrifice live animals, and in some places they've thrown the Catholic priests out so they can burn black candles and make sacrifices in the old ways...' "

Maya Mexico 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 247. [2] "'...I gather it's not healthy to spend a night in some of those villages unless you speak Maya. And from what my Mexican grandfather claimed, their shamans have ways of knowing things, ways that have nothing to do with newspapers or TV news. Personally, I think that part has the reek of bullsh--. Satisfied now?' " [More.]
Maya Mexico 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 266. "Once he spotted a stark white skeleton of stone, a church with a bell tower in the Spanish style, its bell missing, its roof long since crumbled. At least the Yucatan Maya in the lowlands still maintain most of their Catholicism, Contreras thought. These people have gone back to something a whole lot older. Though not much of a Catholic himself, Mike Contreras found these thoughts unsettling as the Cessna's engine lazed back to a purr. " [Many other Maya refs.]
Maya Mexico 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 271. "Colleen's survival kit booklet had tried to say a little about everything in Central America and squandered a full page on the Maya. Pre-Columbian language with many dialects; small, tireless people whose worship of the old gods lay half-hidden beneath a veneer of Catholicism; self-sufficient, conservative, living in poverty; each village led by a council of elders. Most spoke Spanish, and would be only too happy to show a stranger the quickest way out of their neighborhood. "
Maya Mexico 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 337. "Once they lugged the body down inside, Harry dismissed Yaxpoc. Harry had studied Maya pictographs for so long he could grind the colors and formulate paints himself, rendering the fats from small game to yield lamp oil and paint base without help.

Besides, if Yaxpoc did not see Harry drawing those pictures, God would be his only witness. And that is how it happened that the Great True Man of the Highland Maya came to rest in a pyramidal temple in Chiapas, awaiting discovery in the sweet by and by, surrounded by pictographs with prominent Stars of David. "

Maya Mexico 1992 Anderson, Poul. "Appendix A: Design for Two Worlds " in Murasaki (Robert Silverberg, ed.) New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 256. "Thus it may appear that a great civilization has died and its descendants have reverted to primitivism, like descendants of the Mayas in the jungles of Yucatan. "
Maya Mexico 2010 Card, Orson Scott. "America " (published 1987) in The Norton Book of Science Fiction (Ursula K. Le Guin & Brian Atterbery, editors). New York: W. W. Norton & Co. (1993); pg. 673. "'The feathered serpent god of the Aztecs. Or maybe the Mayas. Mexican, anyway...' "


Maya, continued

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