Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to literature - Shakespeare, world

literature - Shakespeare, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
literature - Shakespeare world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 91. Shakespeare: pg. 91, 151.; Pg. 162, 225: Hamlet
literature - Shakespeare world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 162. "Let us assume that the thirty nine believers were not, in the event, taken up by aliens approaching Earth in the shadow of the Hale-Bopp comet. What did they stand to gain--beyond what Hamlet called a consummation devoutly to be wished? "
literature - Shakespeare world 1999 Bradbury, Ray. "Last Rites " in Quicker Than the Eye. New York: Avon Books (1996; c. 1994); pg. 235. -
literature - Shakespeare world 1999 Pellegrino, Charles & George Zebrowski. Dyson Sphere (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. -3. [Frontispiece] "There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio,
Than are dreamt of in your philosophy.

--William Shakespeare
Hamlet "

literature - Shakespeare world 2000 Baxter, Stephen. Manifold: Time. New York: Ballantine (2000); pg. 5. [Epigraph.]

"What seest thou else
In the dark backward and abysm of time?

William Shakespeare "

literature - Shakespeare world 2000 Bellamy, Edward. Looking Backward. New York: Random House (1951; c. 1887); pg. 117. "'Here are your friends,' said Edith, indicating one of the cases, and as my eye glanced over the names on the backs of the volumes, Shakespeare, Milton, Wordsworth...' "
literature - Shakespeare world 2000 McDevitt, Jack. Infinity Beach. New York: HarperCollins (2000); pg. 321. [Epigraph] "Courage mounteth with occasion.

William Shakespeare, King John II, c. 1596 C.E. "

literature - Shakespeare world 2004 Dick, Philip K. The Zap Gun. New York: Bluejay Books (1985; c. 1965); pg. 193. -
literature - Shakespeare world 2005 Delany, Samuel R. "Time Considered as a Helix of Semi-Precious Stones " in Nebula Award Stories Five (James Blish, ed.) New York: Pocket Books (1972; 1st ed. 1970; story c. 1969); pg. 140. "Then she broke the whole thing up by suddenly turning to me and saying, perfectly deadpan: 'Why, if it isn't Hamlet Caliban Enobarbus!' "
literature - Shakespeare world 2010 Anthony, Patricia. Cold Allies. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich (1993); pg. 153. "...And here's the funny part. The alien was fishing. He had this nice Shakespeare rod and reel, an expensive son of a bitch, like he'd gone shopping at Abercrombie and Fitch.'

'A strange dream.' "

literature - Shakespeare world 2010 Anthony, Patricia. Cold Allies. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich (1993); pg. 241. "A weighty volume of Shakespeare smacked against the pane with an ice-pellet rattle. "
literature - Shakespeare world 2011 Willis, Connie. "Even the Queen " in Impossible Things. New York: Bantam (1994; story copyright 1992); pg. 65. [Author's introduction.] "I've gotten a bunch of flack recently for not writing about Women's Issues. You hear a lot of this kind of talk these days--as if we were dogs and cats and parakeets instead of people, and had not only different things on our minds but different mental processes altogether.

Shakespeare also gets flack, in his case for being a Dead White Elizabethan Male, which apparently limits him to addressing only Dead White Elizabethan Male Issues. (Are there any? What on earth are they?)

I hate this kind of literary demagoguery. Anyone who's ever read Shakespeare knows he had bigger fish to fry than Elizabethan Issues. He wrote about Human Issues--fear and ambition and guilt and regret and love... "

literature - Shakespeare world 2018 Bova, Ben. Voyager II: The Alien Within. New York: Tor (1986); pg. 55. Pg. 55: Hamlet
literature - Shakespeare world 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 331. "He was as taut as strung wire. 'But I'm just a little person, a private person. I'm not Hamlet, Prince of Denmark, I'm not God. I just wanted my wife and my baby and my work...' "
literature - Shakespeare world 2030 Miller, Jr., Walter M. "The Darfsteller " in The Hugo Winners: Volumes One and Two. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971; story copyright 1955); pg. 14. Pg. 14: Macbeth; Pg. 15: Hamlet; Pg. 23: Shakespeare [Plays and films are a major thematic focus of this story.]
literature - Shakespeare world 2050 Bova, Ben. "Nursery Sam " in Sam Gunn Forever. New York: Avon (1998; c. 1995); pg. 138. "Like Polonius said: rich, not gaudy. "
literature - Shakespeare world 2050 Bova, Ben. Moonwar. New York: Avon Books (1998); pg. 21. Pg. 21: King Lear
literature - Shakespeare world 2050 Carr, Carol. "Look, You Think You've Got Troubles " in A Pocketful of Stars (Damon Knight, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1971; c. 1969); pg. 197. "I look at my wife and I see Lady Macbeth. Once I caught her whistling as she pushed the button for her bath. I fixed her with a look like an icicle tipped with arsenic. "
literature - Shakespeare world 2198 Marusek, David. "The Wedding Album " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 11. "The next item was entitled A Midsummer's Night Dream. Now the young Anne was compelled to speak. 'You can't delete that one. You were great in that, don't you remember. Everyone loved you. It was the best night of your life.

'Don't presume to tell me what was the best night of my life,' Anne said. 'Unlock A Midsummer's Night Dream.' She smiled at the young Anne. 'Delete file.' The menu then blinked out. "

literature - Shakespeare world 2199 Clarke, Arthur C. & Gentry Lee. Rama II. New York: Bantam (1989); pg. 295. "'Shakespeare was my God,' Richard continued after a moment. 'When I was nine or ten, I would stop in the park along the Avon--the one beside all the theaters, with the statues of Hamlet, Falstaff, Lady Macbeth, and Prince Hal--and spend the afternoon hours making up additional stories about my favorite characters...' " [More, pg. 295-297, etc.]
literature - Shakespeare world 2200 Arnason, Eleanor. A Woman of the Iron People. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1991); pg. 159. "Well, yes. That made sense. That was one meaning of 'play.' But it had other meanings, too. I thought of Hamlet and the triple play, though I wasn't entirely sure what the triple play was. And swordplay. Hamlet and Laertes, for example. "
literature - Shakespeare world 2200 Arnason, Eleanor. A Woman of the Iron People. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1991); pg. 286. "'Shakespeare. Twelfth Night. 'She sat like Patience on a monument, smiling at grief.' I don't remember the act or scene, but it's Viola speaking to the duke. About herself, of course, though the duke does not know it.' "
literature - Shakespeare world 2200 Arnason, Eleanor. A Woman of the Iron People. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1991); pg. 457. "'God is great.' She laughed. 'That's what I kept thinking. Allah akbar.'

' 'O brave new world, that has such people in it,' ' said Eddie.

Agopian said, 'Miranda in The Tempest. Has anyone ever told you that Shakespeare is better in Russian?'

Eddie made the gesture that mean 'no.'

I said, 'I've always heard that he was best in German.'

'That line reminds me of Shakespeare,' Eddie said. 'I know it from Aldous Huxley. His novel Brave New World.' "

literature - Shakespeare world 2286 McIntyre, Vonda N. Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home. New York: Pocket Books (1986); pg. 64. "Behind him, McCoy looked at the ceiling in supplication. ' 'Angels and ministers of grace, defend us.' '

'Hamlet,' Spock said. 'Act one, scene four.'

'Mr. Spock,' Jim said with some asperity... "

literature - Shakespeare world 2305 Panshin, Alexei. "Arpad " in Farewell To Yesterday's Tomorrow. New York: Berkley Publishing Corp. (1975; c. 1971); pg. 93. [Year estimated.] "I relish the thought of dying at sixty. I want to find out what I'm able to do with plastics... I don't want to hang on. Shakespeare and Napoleon, who did their own separate work in plastics, both died on the eve of fifty-three as bare young men. " [Also mentioned pg. 95.]
literature - Shakespeare world 2364 Betancourt, John Gregory. Infection (Star Trek: TNG / Double Helix: Book 1 of 6). New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 88. "If he was acting, he deserved a commendation for it. She hadn't seen a better job since the time she saw Sir Edmund Deere in Hamlet on Earth. "
literature - Shakespeare world 2437 Bester, Alfred. The Stars My Destination. New York: Berkley Publishing (1975; c. 1956); pg. 154. [Shakespeare.] "'Just repetitious, Yeo. All your romances star the same way. 'There's no need to manhandle that girl . . .' And then -- Dolly Quaker, Jean Webster, Gwynn Roget, Marion--'

'No names, please!' a shocked voice interrupted. 'Does Romeo tell Juliet?' "

literature - Shakespeare world 2500 Philbrick, Rodman. "The Last Book in the Universe " in Tomorrowland: 10 Stories About the Future (Michael Cart, ed.) New York: Scholastic Press (1999); pg. 16. "'Caesar's disease!' the Ryter says with a sparkle in his eyes.

I go, 'Who?'

'Julius Caesar. He conquered the world a long time ago. His life inspired many stories and plays. His fame lasted for more than two thousand years, until people stopped reading.'

'And he was a spaz like me? You expect me to believe that?'

'Yes,' the old gooz said. 'I do' "

literature - Shakespeare world 2546 Huxley, Aldous. Brave New World. New York: HarperCollins (1999; c. 1932, 1946); pg. 34. King Lear
literature - Shakespeare world 3000 Williamson, Jack. Terraforming Earth. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 35. Pg. 35: "'...He said he'd been an actor; he liked to recite Shakespeare. Said he failed at that and found a richer role to play--' "; Pg. 179: "I remembered how he used to coax us to read Shakespeare's plays aloud because he loved the language and the drama, always wanting the villain parts, Shylock and the Moor and Macbeth, for himself. "
literature - Shakespeare world 4912 Asimov, Isaac. The Caves of Steel in The Robot Novels (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Doubleday (c. 1954); pg. 103. "Nowadays, yeast products were just the same from Shanghai to Tashkent and from Winnipeg to Buenos Aires; and English might not be the 'English' of Shakespeare or Churchill, but it was the final potpourri that was current over all the continents and, with some modification, on the Outer Worlds as well. "
literature - Shakespeare world 17050 Smith, Cordwainer. Norstrilia. Framingham, MA: NESFA Press (1994; c. 1964, 1968); pg. 41. "Old Earth. Manhome itself. Rod had tried to think of a whole planet inhabited by Hamlets, drenched with music and poetry, knee-deep in blood and drama. "
literature - Shakespeare world 1000004000 Anderson, Poul. Genesis. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 47. "Sometimes that past, even its fictions--Hamlet, Anne Elliot, Wilkins, Micawber, Vidal Benzaguin--felt closer to her than the world she lived in. "
literature - Shakespeare world 1000004000 Anderson, Poul. Genesis. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 158. "'I did read a good deal, especially on space missions. And especially poetry. Homer, Shakespeare, Tu Fu, Basho, Bellman, Burns, Omar Khayyam, Kipling, Millay, Haldeman--' "
literature - Sherlock Holmes British Columbia: Vancouver 2000 Faerber, Jay. "X-Men Movie Prequel: Wolverine " in X-Men: Beginnings, Vol. 1. New York: Marvel Comics (2000); pg. 18. "'Maybe. Thought that since you're Chinese, being here might trigger some memories.'

'Sorry to disappoint you, Sherlock, but nothing so far.' "

literature - Sherlock Holmes California 1989 Koontz, Dean R. Lightning. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1988); pg. 293. "'I'm not Sherlock Holmes. But the bumper stickers on your car say 'I Love Jesus' and 'Christ Has Risen.' And there's a Baptist convention in town, and you're all dressed in dark suits.' "
literature - Sherlock Holmes Darwath 1996 Hambly, Barbara. Mother of Winter. New York: Ballantine (1996); pg. 14. "Gil had gained quite a reputation among the Guards as a spinner of tales, passing along to them recycled Kipling and Dickens, Austen and Heinlein, Doyle and Heyer and Coles... "
literature - Sherlock Holmes Europe 1984 Farmer, Philip Jose. "A Scarletin Study " in Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Space. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) USA: Bluejay Books (1984); pg. 206. "'...Observe in the upper right-hand corner the strange figure of a man. The upper half is, obviously, Sherlock Holmes, with his deerstalker hat, cloak, pipe--though whether his meditative brierroot or disputatious clay can't be determined--and his magnifying glass in hand...' " [Other refs. to Holmes, not all in DB.]
literature - Sherlock Holmes galaxy 2084 Disch, Thomas M. "Things Lost " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 605. "'Elementary, my dear Watson. But tell me this--did she have brown eyes, like mine?' "
literature - Sherlock Holmes galaxy 2267 Marshak, Sondra & Myrna Culbreath. The Price of the Phoenix (Star Trek). New York: Bantam (1985; c. 1977); pg. 17. "'Quite right, Mr. Spock. The Sherlock Holmes maxim: Eliminate the impossible; whatever remains, however improbable, must be true. "
literature - Sherlock Holmes galaxy 2365 Friedman, Michael Jan. "Captain Jean-Luc Picard " in Dujonian's Hoard (Star Trek: TNG / The Captain's Table: Book 2 of 6). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 270. "On another occasion, in 2365, a Sherlock Holmes holonovel gave rise to Moriarty, a villainous holoconstruct who tried to take over the ship. It took all Picard's powers of persuasion to convince the Moriarty construct to release his hold on the Enterprise.

The Moriarty construct appeared again in 2369. This time, Picard and Commander Data created a separate holoreality and outwitted the resourceful Moriarty into inhabiting it, forever unaware that he had not escaped the holodeck after all. "

literature - Sherlock Holmes galaxy 2365 Lorrah, Jean. Metamorphosis (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1990); pg. 37. "Tragic love, Data knew from cold statistics, held great appeal to the human psyche. Why, he could not comprehend... And although he could recite word for word such classics as Romeo and Juliet, Data could not fathom the appeal of vicarious suffering... "
literature - Sherlock Holmes galaxy 2366 Friedman, Michael Jan. Fortune's Light (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1991); pg. 17. Pg. 17: "It had been some time since he [Data] had used a holodeck, he mused. Neither pastoral settings nor comedy nightclubs nor Sherlock Holmes's London held much fascination for him lately. "; Pg. 82: "But why? He wasn't Bobo Bogdonovich, any more than he was Sherlock Holmes or Henry IV or any of the other guises he had assumed in the holodecks. "
literature - Sherlock Holmes galaxy 2366 Smith, Dean Wesley & Kristine Kathryn Rusch. Vectors (Star Trek: TNG / Double Helix: Book 2 of 6). New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 68. "Her hardcopy books stood on a single shelf, including the first edition of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories that Data had given her upon her departure. It was a sentimental gift, and it had surprised her coming from Data. Apparently that surprise had shown on her face because he had tilted his head in that slightly robotic way he had, and asked, 'Is the giving of parting gifts not a human custom, especially when the recipient will be missed?'

'It is Data,' she had said...'

literature - Sherlock Holmes galaxy 2373 David, Peter. End Game in Star Trek: New Frontier (omnibus). New York: Pocket Books (1998; c. 1997); pg. 125. "'Ahhh. Lefler's law number eighty-three: Whenever you've eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.'

'Lefler... Nor are these 'laws' necessarily of your own devising. That which you just quoted is, in fact, the noted 'great dictum' formulated by writer Arthur Conan Doyle in the guise of his literary creation, Sherlock Holmes. Understand, it is not my desire to upset you with these observations...' "

literature - Sherlock Holmes galaxy 2373 Smith, Dean Wesley & Kristine Kathryn Rusch. The Mist (Star Trek: DS9 / The Captain's Table: Book 3 of 6). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 244. "An unexplained thrill ran down my arms as cobblestones kneaded our soles--Holmes, are you hiding there around the corner? Watson? Wet and foggy, yet cowled in city sounds and people's voices muffled behind shutters... "
literature - Sherlock Holmes galaxy 2374 Carey, Diane. Fire Ship (Star Trek: Voyager / The Captain's Table: Book 4 of 6). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 2. "An unexplained thrill ran down my arms as cobblestones kneaded our soles. Holmes, are you hiding there around the corner? Watson? Wet and foggy, yet cowled in city sounds... "
literature - Sherlock Holmes galaxy 2374 de Lancie, John & Peter David. I, Q (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 187. "'Who are they?'

'This is Mr. Sherlock Holmes,' I said, indicating Picard, and pointing to Data, 'I said, 'And his 'big mouth,' associate is Doctor Watson.'

'Actually,' Data said, 'I am usually Sherl--'

'Not now, Watson.' "

literature - Sherlock Holmes galaxy 2375 Smith, Dean Wesley. A Hard Rain (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (2002); pg. 210. "Dix smiled. 'Mr. Data, didn't Sherlock Holmes once say to Watson, 'The most difficult crime to track is the one that is purposeless.'?'

'He did, boss,' Mrs. Data said. 'In The Adventures of the Naval Treaty.' " [sic]

literature - Sherlock Holmes galaxy 2376 Greenberger, Robert. Doors into Chaos (Star Trek: TNG / Gateways: Book 3 of 7). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 242. "'So who are they?'

'That, my dear Watson,' the android said with a smirk, remains a mystery.'

La Forge inwardly groaned, not feeling like playing the able assistant to fiction's greatest detective personified by Data. It was fine for the holodeck adventures they shared, but on a mission it could prove distracting. "

literature - Sherlock Holmes galaxy 2400 Anderson, Poul and Gordon R. Dickson. "The Adventure of the Misplaced Hound " in Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Space. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) USA: Bluejay Books (1984); pg. 89. "Naturally, the literature given these--Englishman--must have included the works of A. Conan Doyle, and he could see where the romantic Hoka nature would have gone wild over Sherlock Holmes. So they had to interpret everything literally; but who had they picked to be Holmes. "
literature - Sherlock Holmes Israel 1996 Sawyer, Robert J. Frameshift. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1997); pg. 297. "brandishing a magnifying glass worthy of Sherlock Holmes. "
literature - Sherlock Holmes Maryland 2026 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Chronoliths. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 88. "I had kept my mystery novels segregated on a shelf in my room, primly unwilling to let Conan Doyle or James Lee Burke mingle with the likes of V. C. Andrews and Catherine Coulter. "
literature - Sherlock Holmes New York: New York City 1988 Martin, George R. R. & John J. Miller. Wild Cards VII: Dead Man's Hand. New York: Bantam Books (1990); pg. 283. "The entrance hall was lined with portraits of famous drug addicts of the past, including Edgar Allen Poe, Sherlock Holmes, Elvis Presley, and Tom Marion Douglas. "
literature - Sherlock Holmes Ontario 1992 Huff, Tanya. Blood Trail. New York: DAW Books (1992); pg. 95. "Vicki sat back on her heels and stared south in to the wood. Brilliant deduction, Sherlock. "
literature - Sherlock Holmes Ontario: Toronto 1991 Huff, Tanya. Blood Price. New York: DAW Books (1991); pg. 15. "'Dead on, Sherlock.' "
literature - Sherlock Holmes Tennyson 2200 Anthony, Patricia. Conscience of the Beagle. New York: Ace Books (1995; co. 1993); pg. 46. "'It's--that sad-eyed face. A hound's face.' I can't really explain. What he reminds me most of is Toby, the dog in the Sherlock Holmes stories, even though that dog, as I remember, was a mixed breed. The first time I looked into Beagle's eyes I knew that he was a single-minded predatorial thing. "
literature - Sherlock Holmes United Kingdom 1364 C.E. Dickson, Gordon R. The Dragon, the Earl, and the Troll. New York: Ace Books (1994); pg. 251. "He tried again.

ME TO HOME OF [GOTO] SHERLOCK HOLMES

In his mind he concentrated on imaging the room that had been described so well and so often in the stories about Sherlock Holmes--

And he was there.

It was the room as he had always pictured it. There were the nineteenth-century overstuffed armchairs. There was the mantelpiece with the curved stemmed pipe and ample bowl, thickly carboned inside; and the wall above it with the bullet holes spelling out S M.

Sherlock Holmes himself was nowhere in sight. A shorter, heavier man than Jim had ever imagined Holmes to be was standing with his back to Jim, facing a writing table.

The words 'Dr. Watson, I presume?' sprang almost irresistibly to Jim's lips; but he forced them back. Just in time, too, as it turned out. For as he opened his mouth to speak, the figure before him walked backward from the desk... " [More, pg. 252-263, 383.]

literature - Sherlock Holmes United Kingdom 1895 Asimov, Isaac. "The Ultimate Crime " in Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Space. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) USA: Bluejay Books (1984; copyright 1976); pg. 341. "'Sherlockian activities... You see, the thing is that Conan Doyle wrote numerous Sherlock Holmes stories as quickly as he could because he hated them--'

'He did? In that case, why--'

'Why did he write them? Money, that's why. From the very first story, 'A Study in Scarlet,' the world caught on fire with Sherlock Holmes. He became a world-renowned figure and there is no telling how many people the world over thought he really lived. Innumerable letters were addressed to him at his address in 221B Baker Street, and thousands came to him with problems to be solved.' "

literature - Sherlock Holmes United Kingdom 1900 Farmer, Philip Jose (written as Harry Manders). "The Problem of the Sore Bridge--Among Others " in Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Space. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) USA: Bluejay Books (1984); pg. 35-36. "Harry Manders... His earliest works were agented by E. W. Hornung, Arthur Conan Doyle's brother-in-law. " [Other refs. to Doyle throughout story, not in DB.]
literature - Sherlock Holmes United Kingdom 1908 Bensen, Donald R. And Having Writ.... Indianapolis, IN: Bobbs-Merrill Co. (1978); pg. 138. "'...who's known to be in with some gangs. So when they piece this all together, won't they have a nice Conan Doyle plot all laid out for them? Turncoat Oxford solicits help from foreign agents anxious to get U.S. secrets...' "
literature - Sherlock Holmes United Kingdom 1940 Lupoff, Richard (writing as Ova Hamlet). "God of the Naked Unicorn " in Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Space. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) USA: Bluejay Books (1984); pg. 286. [Year indeterminate.] Pg. 286: "...return to our lodgings in Baker Street... I had returned to 221B to find my home occupied by a stranger. Upon application to the ever faithful Mrs. Hudson I had been told... "; Pg. 300: "'You are none other than John H. Watson, M.D., are you not?' " [Other Sherlock Holmes refs. throughout story, not in DB.]
literature - Sherlock Holmes United Kingdom 1940 Lupoff, Richard (writing as Ova Hamlet). "God of the Naked Unicorn " in Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Space. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) USA: Bluejay Books (1984); pg. 308. "At this very moment there rest in the clutches of this brilliant maniac [Moriarty] both Sherlock Holmes and Sir John Clayton, Lord Greystoke, the man known to the world at large as--Tarzan of the Apes!'

'Holmes and Greystoke? At one time? And very nearly yourself as well, Doc Savage?' I exclaimed. 'Who can this devil be...'

literature - Sherlock Holmes United Kingdom 1976 Asimov, Isaac. "The Ultimate Crime " in Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Space. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) USA: Bluejay Books (1984; copyright 1976); pg. 342. "'...I once met a Holmes fan--he may even have been a Baker Street Irregular--who told me he was working on a paper that would prove that both Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson were fervent Catholics and I said, 'Well, wasn't Doyle himself a Catholic?' which he was, of course. My friend turned a very cold eye on me and said, 'What has that to do with it?' ' "
literature - Sherlock Holmes United Kingdom 1976 Asimov, Isaac. "The Ultimate Crime " in Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Space. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) USA: Bluejay Books (1984; copyright 1976); pg. 343. "'...The whole Holmesian technique of detective was invented by Edgar Allan Poe; and his detective, Auguste Dupin, is the original Sherlock. However, Poe only wrote three stories about Dupin and it was Holmes who really caught the imagination of the world.

'In fact, my own feeling is that Sherlock Holmes performed the remarkable feat of being the first human being, either real or fictional, ever to become a world idol entirely because of his character as a reasoning being. It was not his military victories, his political charisma, his spiritual leadership--but simply his cold brain power. There was nothing mystical about Holmes. He gathered facts and deduced them...' "



literature - Sherlock Holmes, continued

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