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34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to literature - Shakespeare, Colorado: Boulder

literature - Shakespeare, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
literature - Shakespeare Cuba 1942 Simmons, Dan. The Crook Factory. New York: Avon Books (1999); pg. 255. "...but I also told him about a very brave friend of mine named Chink Smith who quoted a bit of Shakespeare to me. I liked it so much that I had him write it out. It came from The Second Part of Henry the Fourth, and I've learned it and kept it with me since then, wearing it like an invisible Saint Christopher's medal.

' 'By my troth, I care not; a man can die but once; we owe God a death . . . and let it go which way it will, he that dies this year is quit for the next.'

'You are quit for the next, Santiago Lopez. And you were a brave man, no matter what age you were when you paid God his debt.'

Hemingway stepped back. The old gravedigger cleared his throat. 'No senor,' he said in Spanish. 'There must be words from the Bible before we put the earth over this child.'

'Must there?' said Hemingway, his voice almost amused. 'Will not Senor Shakespeare suffice?'

'No, senor,' said the old man. 'The Bible is necessary.' "

literature - Shakespeare Darwath 1998 Hambly, Barbara. Icefalcon's Quest. New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 271. "Rudy, he recalled, had told a tale once, of a king stranded for twenty years on a desert island inhabited by two magical spirits and of the man who came to find him and fall in love with his daughter. 'Cool, punk,' Gil had said. 'I didn't know you'd ever read The Tempest.' 'What tempest?' Rudy had replied, startled. 'I'm talking about Forbidden Planet.' "
literature - Shakespeare Deep Space 9 2370 ab Hugh, Dafydd. Fallen Heroes (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1994); pg. 53. "'Lay on, Macduff,' whispered O'Brien, 'and damn'd be him that first cries, 'Hold, enough.' '

But in fact, a different quotation ran through his brain, from King Lear, the one Keiko disliked the most. It stuck in O'Brien's memory for days:

As flies to wanton boys, are we to the gods;
They kill us for their sport.
"
literature - Shakespeare Deep Space 9 2370 Pedersen, Ted. Space Camp (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1997); pg. 79. "Jake had also programmed the mischievous Puck from Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream into his poem. But the creature who materialized out of the trees did not come from Jake's imagination... he kind of looked like Puck--except for the big Ferengi-shaped ears... The Ferengi-Puck creature danced across the grass... "
literature - Shakespeare Ecuador 1986 Vonnegut, Kurt. Galapagos. New York: Delacorte Press (1985); pg. 190. ". . . 'Tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish'd.

--William Shakespeare (1564-1616) " [Other quotes, pg. 282, 289.]

literature - Shakespeare Europe 1470 C.E. Gentle, Mary. A Secret History. New York: Avon Books (1999); pg. 379. "'John de Vere. The Earl of Oxford.' " [Multiple other refs. to de Vere, a.k.a. William Shakespeare, between pages 379 and 410, not in DB.]
literature - Shakespeare Europe 1897 Stoker, Bram. Dracula. New York: Bantam (1981; c. 1897); pg. 287. "'I don't take any stock at all in such matters. 'Rats and mice and such small deer,' as Shakespeare has it, 'chickenfeed of the larder' they might be called...' "
literature - Shakespeare galaxy 1996 Emerson, Jane. City of Diamond. New York: DAW (1996); pg. 412. [Epigraphs] Pg. 412: "What is wedlock forced but a hell,
An age of discord and continual strife?

SHAKESPEARE, Henry VI, Part One ";

Pg. 544: "Bell, book and candle shall not drive me back
When gold and silver beck me to come on.

SHAKESPEARE, King John ";

Pg. 603: "Angels are bright still, though the brightest fell

SHAKESPEARE, Macbeth


Macbeth: What is the night?
Lady Macbeth: Almost at odds with morning, which is which.

SHAKESPEARE, Macbeth ";

Pg. 621: "Men's judgments are a parcel of their fortunes.

SHAKESPEARE, Antony and Cleopatra "

literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2030 Hogan, James P. Entoverse. New York: Ballantine (1991); pg. 355. "He looked down and saw that he was wearing a long, loose, togalike garment with sandals. 'What's this?' he hissed inwardly at VISAR. 'I look like a part in Julius Caesar.' "
literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2100 Bear, Greg. Anvil of Stars. New York: Warner Books (1992); pg. 290. "'...we have read Macbeth...' "
literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2200 Silverberg, Robert. Starborne. New York: Bantam (1997; co. 1996); pg. 26. Pg. 26: "'...But the center of Elizabeth's being is poetry. 'I think it's Shakespeare,' Heinz says. ";

Pg. 47: "'Is that Shakespeare?' he asks.

'The Rubaiyat,' she says. 'Do you know it?...' ";

Pg. 144: Hamlet; Pg. 167: "Sophocles and Shakespeare and Strindberg "

literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2268 Gilden, Mel. The Starship Trap (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1993); pg. 185. "'It all looks familiar, doesn't it?' Payton commented.

'Henry the Fifth,' Spock said.

'What?' Kirk and Payton said together.

'Henry the Fifth, by your Earth playwright Shakespeare. I quote:

' . . . Can this cockpit hold
The vasty fields of France? Or may we cram
Within this wooden O the very casques
That did affright the air at Agincourt?'

Kirk said, 'The Aleph of Shakespeare's wooden O? I suppose so, if we allow for poetry. "

literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2285 McIntyre, Vonda N. Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan. New York: Pocket Books (1982); pg. 36. "Chekov looked around the room... He recognized few of the titles of the books on a shelf nearby: King Lear? That sounded like imperialist propaganda to him. Bible?... "
literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2293 Dillard, J. M. Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country. New York: Pocket Books (1992); pg. 77. "...Gorkon raised his crystal goblet, filled to the rim with smoking blue ale. 'I give you a toast: the undiscovered country . . .'

Spock glanced sharply at the chancellor. He was familiar with the reference, which he thought more appropriate to a wake than to a diplomatic dinner. Indeed, to whose death did Gorkon refer?

'. . . the future,' Gorkon finished merrily, aware of the stir he had caused.

Those at the table echoed him and raised their glasses. 'The undiscovered country.'

Spock lifted his own goblet and took a perfunctory sip. The chancellor had insisted that Spock be served Romulan ale in order to make a proper toast. Aware of Klingon custom, Spock acquiesced in this instance, for the sake of intragalactic relations... " [A reference from Hamlet.]

literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2293 Dillard, J. M. Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country. New York: Pocket Books (1992); pg. 77. [After Gorkon has toasted to 'the undiscovered country.'] "'Hamlet,' Spock stated reflexively. 'Act three, scene one.'

Gorkon smiled, delighted. ' 'But that the dread of something after death, the undiscovered country from whose bourn no traveler returns, puzzles the will, and makes us rather bear those ills we have than fly to others that we know not of?' Ah, Captain Spock, you have never experienced Shakespeare until you have read him in the original Klingon.'

'I do not understand,' Spock said. 'The quote clearly refers to he fear of death.'

Gorkon leaned forward, enthusiastic about his subject. 'But do you not see that it is also a metaphor concerning fear of the unknown? Our people have been in what amounts to a state of undeclared war with your Federation for nearly seven decades--and why? Because war, battle is all we know. Because peace is something new, different, frightening to us. But we must be willing to embrace the future and move forward...' "

literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2293 Dillard, J. M. Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country. New York: Pocket Books (1992); pg. 78. "' 'To be or not to be,' ' Chang quoted. 'That is the question which preoccupies our people, Captain Kirk.' He glanced quickly in Gorkon's direction, as if acknowledging a source of contention with the chancellor. 'We need breathing room.'

Spock caught the reference, which he hoped was unintentional. The captain did as well, for he muttered, 'Earth, Germany, 1938.' "

literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2300 Zelazny, Roger. "Angel, Dark Angel " in Unicorn Variations. New York: Timescape (1983; story c. 1967); pg. 186. [Year estimated.] Pg. 186: "She replaced him, upon the reading stand in her library, and she left him there with Lear. " [Shakespeare]
literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2366 David, Peter. Q-in-Law (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1991); pg. 20. "'The son of the head of the Nistral family has fallen in love with, and asked for the hand of, the daughter of the head of the Graziunas family.'

'Oh!' said Crusher, smiling. 'How sweet. Like Romeo and Juliet.'

'Ah, yes,' said Data. 'The play by your William Shakespeare. A treatise on the subjects of parental neglect and teen suicide.'

'It was a bit more than that, Data,' said Picard, trying not to sound as annoyed as he felt with this cavalier dismissal of the Bard. 'That play contained some of the most famous and moving romantic passages in history...' "

literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2366 David, Peter. Q-in-Law (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1991); pg. 20. Pg. 20-21: "'...Why, in my youth, I took an acting class that recreated original stagings of Shakespeare. I was in a production of Romeo and Juliet.'

'I didn't know that, Captain,' said Crusher. 'Did you play Romeo?'

'Well . . . no,' said Picard, suddenly looking as if he wished he hadn't brought up the subject.

'Mercutio?' suggested Geordi. 'Or one of the fathers?'

'Not exactly.'

'The priest?' asked Troi.

'No, not Friar Laurence. The point is that--'

'Captain, whom did you play?' asked Riker.

Picard sighed and said, 'I portrayed the nurse.'

'The nurse?' said Crusher. 'Juliet's nurse?'

'It's a superb part,' Picard said.

'Oh, I'm sure you were wonderful, Captain,' the doctor said.

'In original productions, women's parts were always played by men,' Picard informed them. 'The point is that in his scenario, the houses are not feuding. The love between the two young people... is not cause for recriminations, war, or backbiting...' "

literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2366 David, Peter. Q-in-Law (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1991); pg. 21. Pg. 21: "'...So you see, Mr. Data, unlike the Shakespeare play, there will be no neglectful parents and no teenage suicides...' ";

Pg. 26: "'Did you do anything you regret in that pursuit, Captain?' asked Riker.

Picard's mouth twitched. 'I wore that blasted nurse's costume.'

'Ah.'

'Impetuous youth. You see, there weren't enough young men to go around, so we did indeed have a female playing Juliet. Beautiful young thing... I would've cut off my right arm to be near her. The part of Romeo was already taken by this annoyingly heroic-looking young man. Only the nurse had any other real scenes with her, and I was willing to go to whatever lengths to be close to her... Oh Lord. I wore a hot, sweaty nurse's costume for four weeks of performances, not to mention rehearsals, for a girl whose name I can't remember anymore.' "

literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2366 David, Peter. Q-in-Law (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1991); pg. 43. "Picard nodded. 'Excellent. Most excellent. Putting their children's concerns before their own. Most definitely not, Mr. Data, a Romeo and Juliet situation.'

'That is fortunate, Captain,' said Data neutrally. 'A mutual suicide on the part of the bride and groom would not be conducive to merrymaking.' "

literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2366 Friedman, Michael Jan. Fortune's Light (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1991); pg. 5. Pg. 5-6: "There was nothing 'merely' about Worf, for instance, standing guard over the tactical console like . . . like the ancient Colossus standing guard over Rhodes...

Boy--pretty poetic, Wes. Maybe that Shakespeare stuff is contagious.

But the players who really drew Wesley's interest were the ones at center stage, the ones who usually occupied the now-deserted command center.

Troi, with her . . . how would the Bard have put it? With her calm, Madonna-like beauty...

Picard... Even in his absence, he had a presence.

Like Julius Caesar, Wesley realized, in the play he'd just finished reading. Even after his assassination, Caesar had seemed to remain on stage, to be as much a participant in Rome's political maneuverings as any of his assassins. "

literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2366 Friedman, Michael Jan. Fortune's Light (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1991); pg. 82. "But why? He wasn't Bobo Bogdonovich, any more than he was Sherlock Holmes or Henry IV or any of the other guises he had assumed in the holodecks. "
literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2367 Duane, Diane. Dark Mirror (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1993); pg. 185. "...the complete Shakespeare, and the ancient King James Bible... "
literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2367 Duane, Diane. Dark Mirror (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1993); pg. 188. [Pg. 188-189 filled with a lengthy passage from Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice, focused on Portia's speech, as Picard reads the book.];

Pg. 190: Titus Andronicus; Macbeth; Lear; Pg. 191: "Shakespeare was not wholly lost; Kipling, idiosyncratic as always, was still himself; so was Aristotle. But the closer the books came to modern times, the more corrupt their philosophies seemed... "

literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2368 Bischoff, David. Grounded (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1993); pg. 82. Pg. 82: "'Charmed! Absolutely charmed. I hope I'll be seeing you around the ship. What was it that Miranda said in The Tempest? 'Ah, brave new world, that hast such beauties in it!' '

'I believe that Shakespearean quote read, 'O brave new world, that hast such people in it,' ' Data corrected. ";

Pg. 98: "'...Bugs in the vines, rats in the cellar--they resonated through the whole thing.' He tapped his drink thoughtfully. 'Have you ever read the play Hamlet, Deanna?'

'Yes; are you speaking of the 'Something is rotten in Denmark' speech? The poisoning of a king poisoned the whole land.'

'Something like that, yes. In Shakespeare's day, a king was a living extension of his land . . . and if you poisoned the land, presumably the king was poisoned as well.' "

literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2368 David, Peter. Imzadi (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1992); pg. 259. "'I'm watching the stars,' Riker smiled thinly. 'Did you know, some people believe that whatever happens to us is decided by the stars. That we have no control over our fates. I think Shakespeare even wrote that 'the fault is in the stars.' '

'Actually, Admiral, that is incorrect.'

'You're going to tell me that it's ridiculous to believe that interstellar phenomenon could possibly have any sort of effect on the affairs of men?'

'No, sir. That's so self-evident it's not even worth pointing out. No, I was simply going to tell you that your endeavor to quote Shakespeare was not only imprecise, but in fact wildly wrong.'

'How wildly?' "

literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2368 David, Peter. Imzadi (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1992); pg. 259. "'If you're quoting the passage I believe--namely Julius Caesar, act one, scene two--then you have reversed it. The proper line is, 'Men at times are masters of their fates: The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, but in ourselves, that we are underlings.' '

'Really? Huh.' Riker thought about that a moment. 'Hell of a thing to screw up. Who said it?'

'Shakespeare, sir. You were correct about that.'

'No, I mean, who in the play?'

'Cassius, in conversation with Brutus. Two of the conspirators who assassinate Julius Caesar.' " [More here, and pg. 341.]

literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2369 Friedman, Michael Jan. Relics (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1992); pg. 115. "He slapped Data on the back. 'Lay on, Macduff.'

The android looked at him. It took his positronic brain a moment to find the reference. And even after it had, he didn't quite grasp the connection.

'Macduff was a character in William Shakespeare's Macbeth,' he noted. 'What does that have to do with--'

'It's only an expression, lad, only an expression...' "

literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2370 ab Hugh, Dafydd. Balance of Power (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1995); pg. 129. "' 'Misery acquaints a man with strange bedfellows,' Number One.'

'Shakespeare?'

'The Tempest, Act two, scene two.' "

literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2370 ab Hugh, Dafydd. Balance of Power (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1995); pg. 136. "'Why does your father talk like that?'

'Like what?'

'Like the duke and the dauphin.' Wesley was thinking of the ancient epic novel Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain.

... "let me guess,' he said. 'He learned to speak standard English by watching bad Shakespearean holoplays.'

'Hah! Shows how much hu-mans know. Father refined his speech by copying a few, negligible points of grammar from your overrated Shakespeare. But he learned originally from a far subtler source: those wonderful pirate holoplay histories they used to produce out of Peter Blood studios...' "

literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2370 David, Peter. Q-Squared (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1994); pg. 5. "Picard put down the book of Shakespeare sonnets he'd been skimming and leaned back in his chair... "
literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2370 Friedman, Michael Jan. All Good Things . . . (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1994); pg. 87. "As never before, he was grateful for the sanctumlike nature of it . . . the steady, predictable peacefulness. Everything was right where he expected it to be, from his antique Shakespearean folio to his model of the Stargazer . . . from his Naikous statue... "
literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2370 Thompson, W.R. Infiltrator (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1996); pg. 139. "A book appeared in the replicator, but not the Dixon Hill novel that Picard had requested. Instead the book bore a large red title: Francis Bacon: The True Bard of Avon.

Picard was not amused. Over the centuries, many people had tried to claim that the plays associated with William Shakespeare had been written by someone else. The mere thought of this angered him.

'Computer,' he said, and repeated his request for the Dixon Hill novel. Another copy of The True Bard of Avon appeared.

'Computer,' Picard said, 'Where did this book come from?'

'It is a gift from Lieutenant Worf,' the machine answered.

Picard sighed. Worf would never play a joke on anyone... 'Picard to Worf. I'd like to see you in my quarters.'

Worf appeared moments later. He scowled as Picard handed him the book. 'Yes, sir?' he said...

'The computer claims it is a gift from you,' Picard said.

'That is not true... Shakespeare had the soul of a Klingon. I would never . . .' "

literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2371 David, Peter. Triangle: Imzadi II (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 60. "'But Father . . . you've had me read so many books on the Klingon way . . . and I've seen nothing on love and its link with war and death.'

After considering that for a moment, Worf said, 'I suggest you read the works of Shakespeare . . . preferably in the original Klingon. You will find Romeo and Juliet, in particular, most instructive. Warring houses, murder, suicide . . . I tell you, Alexander . . . it makes you proud to be a Klingon.' "

literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2371 David, Peter. Triangle: Imzadi II (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 78. Pg. 78: "He was going to take action after ages of vacillation. He would no longer be Hamlet when it came to his personal life. ";

Pg. 80: "'Don't you worry about it, Geordi. When you play Hamlet long enough, sooner or later someone who is willing to make a decision is going to get the girl.'

'Didn't the girl die in Hamlet?'

'It was a Shakespearean tragedy. Naturally everyone dies. People only lived if it was a comedy. He wasn't much for blending comedy with drama. He was more of an all-or-nothing kind of guy. I can sympathize, I suppose...' "

literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2372 Carey, Diane. Ship of the Line (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1997); pg. 64. "...Riker found himself admiring both that deep Shakespearean eloquence and how Picard could ease off on it when he needed to. "
literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2373 David, Peter. Fire on High (ST: New Frontier). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 35. "The only one who seemed relatively normal was Lefler.

Shelby glanced over her duty log... She took one look at her, saw that the intended passenger from Momidium was Lefler's mother, who had been dead for a decade, and moaned softly to herself. Et tu, Lefler, she thought. " [A variation on 'Et tu, Brute' from Julius Caesar by Shakespeare.]

literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2373 Robinson, Peg. "The First " in Star Trek: Strange New Worlds (Dean Wesley Smith, ed.) New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 136. "...and his books. Shakespeare, Dickens, Melville... "
literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2374 Cox, Greg. Q-Space (Star Trek: TNG / The Q Continuum: Book 1 of 3). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 45. "Picard's weary eyes scanned the dog-eared, leatherbound volumes that filled his bookshelves, everything from Shakespeare to Dickens... "
literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2374 Cox, Greg. Q-Space (Star Trek: TNG / The Q Continuum: Book 1 of 3). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 166. "'The cloud-capped towers, the gorgeous palaces, the solemn temples, the great globe itself,' he recited, recalling his precious Shakespeare. 'Yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve; and like this insubstantial pageant faded, leave not a rack behind. We are such stuff as dreams are made on.'

'My goodness, Picard,' Q remarked. 'are you moved to poetry?' "

literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2374 Cox, Greg. Q-Strike (Star Trek: TNG / The Q Continuum: Book 3 of 3). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 229. Pg. 239: "The holodeck controls... He scrolled through the various options...Denubian Alps. No. Fly Fishing. No. Henry V. No. Klingon Calisthenics.... ";

Pg. 230: "...he spotted something that might suit his present purposes.

The Tempest. From Picard's beloved Bard, no less. Magic, trickery, and deferred revenge, plus an entire enchanted isle on which to elude O. It was as close to perfect as he was going to find, particularly under the circumstances. Now if he could just call up the program before O arrived on the scene . . .! " [Many refs. to The Tempest, pg. 231-243. Includes refs. to Prospero, Caliban, etc.]

literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2374 Cox, Greg. Q-Zone (Star Trek: TNG / The Q Continuum: Book 2 of 3). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 23. "Just who or what was O? Falstaff to the young Q's Prince Hal, Picard speculated, falling back as ever on his beloved Shakespeare, or something a good deal more sinister? "
literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2374 de Lancie, John & Peter David. I, Q (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 28. Pg. 28: "Her perpetual suspicion of me is a trait that I have chosen... to find endearing. There are times she is as cuddly as Lady Macbeth! "; Pg. 54: "Picard nodded in what actually seemed to be an understanding. 'We are such stuff as dreams are made of,' he intoned, and then looked at me and said, 'Shakespeare.' "
literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2374 de Lancie, John & Peter David. I, Q (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 143. "In circumstances such as these, discretion is the better part of valor.

Everyone thinks Shakespeare made that up but who is Shakespeare? Certainly not the drunken sot I knew who couldn't spell his name the same way twice and willed his second-best bed to his wife in a document that is simplistic to the extreme. Truth be told, I made it up. Along with a bunch of the other ditties like, 'To thine own self be true,'; 'a rose by any other name;' 'all the world's a stage'; and 'let them eat cake,' which that unwashed, uppity ingrate rejected on the assertion that the word 'cake' should be changed to 'fried dough'! What a jerk! I brought a plague upon his house and gave the line to someone else. Someone who had a head on her shoulders, for a while at least, and who understood its meaning and poetry. Don't talk to me about Shakespeare! "

literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2375 David, Peter. Excalibur: Renaissance (ST: New Frontier). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 114. "'Shakespeare's Tavern' was one of the restaurants Robin had not yet had a chance to sample, and she was pleased that Nik had suggested it be the one they go to. The place was made up to look like an old English-style tavern, right down to waiters wearing Elizabethan togs and waitresses costumed as tavern wenches. There were decorations on all the walls, including texts from both the human and 'original Klingon' folios. There were even gleaming swords of the period mounted on the walls. " [More.]
literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2375 David, Peter. Excalibur: Renaissance (ST: New Frontier). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 115. Pg. 114-115: "Most amusing of all were two actors who were assuming the role of Shakespeare, stalking the tavern while spouting off lengthy samples of the Bard's work. The reason there were two actors was that one was human, while the other was Klingon. Or at least an actor dressed up as a Klingon, for the owners had not managed to actually locate a Klingon who was willing to go along with the charade. The fact was that the true origin of Shakespeare's plays had become something of an issue between Klingon and Terran historians, both claiming that the other race had swiped the Master's work--and planet of origin--without so much as a by-your-leave.

As a result, in Shakespeare's Tavern, the human and faux Klingon would occasionally face-off against one another and emote in their respective languages. Robin hated to admit it, but the faux Klingon seemed to show far more passion for the Klingon text than the human did for the English. "

literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2375 David, Peter. Excalibur: Restoration (ST: New Frontier). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 43. "After tracing 'knock-knock' jokes back to a sequence in the Shakespeare drama habitually referred to (by superstitious humans, apparently, who considered the show jinxed) as 'the Scottish play,' Soleta had tried out a series of knock-knock jokes... "
literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2375 David, Peter. Excalibur: Restoration (ST: New Frontier). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 288. "'...were having dinner... in a restaurant here called the Shakespeare Tavern...' "
literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2375 Durgin, Doranna. Tooth and Claw (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 125. [Data is intentionally testing out archaic phrases and allusions.] "'...like the ancient maps of Earth's oceanic trouble spots. Here be monsters.'

A phrase that was pretty darn appropriate for the situation right here on Fandre.

Here be monsters. "

literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2375 Mack, David. "The Star Trek: New Frontier Minipedia " in Excalibur: Restoration (ST: New Frontier). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 357. Pg. 357: "Alas, poor Yorick!
Famous quotation from William Shakespeare's play, Hamlet. Spoken facetiously by Hamlet when a grave-digger hands him an unearthed skull. Yorick was the court jester during Hamlet's boyhood. The full quotation is, 'Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him, Horatio!' ";

Pg. 359: "Bard, The
Nickname for William Shakespeare, a late 16th-century Earth playwright. ";

Pg. 364: "Capulets
One of the two fictional feuding families in William Shakespeare's play, Romeo and Juliet. The Capulets' daughter, Juliet, falls in love with Romeo, son of their rivals, the Montagues. ";

Pg. 387: "Montagues
One of the two fictional, feuding families in William Shakespeare's play, Romeo and Juliet. The Montagues' son, Romeo, falls in love with Juliet, daughter of their rivals, the Capulets. "

literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2375 Mack, David. "The Star Trek: New Frontier Minipedia " in Excalibur: Restoration (ST: New Frontier). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 382. Pg. 382: "Shakespeare's Tavern
Elizabethan-style tavern on Risa. Waitstaff wear period costumes, and the decor includes such touches as manuscripts of Shakespearean plays in both English and the 'original Klingon.' ";

Pg. 407: "Yorick
Fictional character: the late lamented court jester of Shakespeare's play, Hamlet. "

literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2375 Smith, Dean Wesley. A Hard Rain (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (2002); pg. 82. "Dix glanced at the titles of a few of the books. All great classics, in fine first editions. Dickens, Shakespeare, and Melville were just a few authors Dix recognized as he glanced around. "
literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2378 Dillard, J. M. Star Trek: Nemesis. New York: Pocket Books (2002); pg. 47. "Data carefully picked up the head, and the two identical faces studied each other. 'Fascinating . . .' Data said. He held it in both arms, stretched a slight distance from him that he might better scrutinize it. The gesture and posture were so reminiscent of a scene from Shakespeare that Picard opened his mouth to recite, Alas, poor Yorick . . . "
literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2500 Gardner, James Alan. Expendable. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 82. Pg. 81-82: "...Chee shouted through the wall, ' 'And from the tents, the armorers, accomplishing the knights, with busy hammers closing rivets up, give dreadful note of preparation.' What's that from, Ramos?'

'Shakespeare . . . Henry V,' I replied, glad that I happened to remember; but I hoped Chee wouldn't quote from Timon of Athens. I had skipped Timon in the Academy Shakespeare course; Jelca had actually said yes to going on a date, and it put me in such a dither, I couldn't concentrate for three days. " [More about Henry V, pg. 313.]

literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2700 Emerson, Jane. City of Diamond. New York: DAW (1996); pg. 104. "A rather rough sketch of a man's face followed. And beneath this:

The Diamond Repertory Players
present

Henry IV
A Play in 5 Acts
by William Shakespeare
Now through Christmas at the Starhall Theater
Old version, subtitles provided, full refreshment bar

Naturally, I made a note of the theater. You know how I am about historicals, partic. with live actors. I'm not sure what they mean by 'old version,' but I can't wait to see what they do to it with their accents. "

literature - Shakespeare galaxy 2786 Clarke, Arthur C. The Songs of Distant Earth. New York: Ballantine (1986); pg. 116. "The superb twenty-fifth century recreation of the Odyssey... the great Shakespearean tragedies in Feinberg's miraculous Lingua translation... "
literature - Shakespeare galaxy 3131 Simmons, Dan. The Rise of Endymion. New York: Bantam (1998 mass market edition; first ed. 1997); pg. 631. "I thought of Romeo and Juliet, Caesar and Cleopatra, Abelard and Heloise, George Wu and Howard Sung. All star-crossed lovers. Suicide and poison... "
literature - Shakespeare galaxy 3419 Panshin, Alexei. The Thurb Revolution. New York: Ace Books (1978; c. 1968); pg. 169. Pg. 169: Shakespeare's Henry the Fifth mentioned, along with a quote.
literature - Shakespeare galaxy 4000 Benford, Gregory. Furious Gulf. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 17. [Actual year unknown.] Shakespeare
literature - Shakespeare galaxy 4004 Drew, Wayland. The Master of Norriya in The Erthring Cycle (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (c. 1986); pg. 577. "'You know about the Abbreviators, those whose job it was to place abstracts and summaries and synopses into the memory of SKULD. It was for the convenience of everyone, they said. No one had time to read, they said, at least not all that excessive verbiage. Two pages became the measure. In their hands, everything became two pages long. The Bible, The Tempest, The Republic, Paradise Lost. There they were, neatly capsulized in the memory of SKULD, waiting to be printed out on two pages. So, of course, for the thousands of novices who read nothing else, those summaries became the work. "
literature - Shakespeare galaxy 7000 Allen, Roger MacBride. Inferno. New York: Ace Books (1994); pg. 16. Pg. 1: "The robot Prospero stepped out of the low dark building into the night... " [This robot, one of novel's main characters, is named after Shakespeare's character. There are likely other literary refs. in novel, not all in DB.]; Pg. 16: "It could be said of Fredda Leving that she had an odd collection of brain-children. Among other robots, she had built Caliban and Prospero and Donald, naming each after a character created by a certain old Earth playwright, a naming scheme she used only on her most prized creations. " [Caliban is another main character in the novel.]
literature - Shakespeare Georgia: Atlanta 2041 Bishop, Michael. Catacomb Years. New York: Berkley (1979); pg. 159. "* The ancient Japanese caste of the samurai despised poetry as an effeminate activity. Sometimes I view it that way too, especially when I am writing it. A samurai would also despise the sort of introspection I practice in this notebook.

* Maybe not. The great shogun Iyeyasu (1542-1616) attempted a reformation of the habits of the samurai; he encouraged them to develop their appreciation of the arts. Iyeyasu died in the same year that William Shakespeare died.
" [More, pg. 159-161.]
literature - Shakespeare Idaho 1942 Turtledove, Harry. Worldwar: Upsetting the Balance. New York: Del Rey (1996); pg. 124. "O God! I could be bounded in a nutshell and count myself a king of infinite space, were it not that I have bad dreams.

What the devil was that from? Macbeth? Hamlet? King Lear? Jens Larssen was damned if he could remember, but it was something out of Shakespeare, sure as hell. The lines came floating up into his conscious mind the moment he reached the top of Lewiston Hill. "

literature - Shakespeare Illinois 2001 Bradbury, Ray. From the Dust Returned. New York: HarperCollins (2001); pg. 37. Pg. 37: "'You did not come, child. You were found. Left at the door in a basket with Shakespeare for footprop and Poe's Usher as pillow...' "; Pg. 100: Hamlet; The Turn of the Screw [Also pg. 151.]


literature - Shakespeare, continued

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