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Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

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literature, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
literature world 2040 Alexander, Eitan. "Beneath the Planet of the Compulsives " in Circa 2000: Gay Fiction at the Millennium (Robert Drake & Terry Wolverton, eds). Los Angeles, CA: Alyson Pub. (2000); pg. 1. [Epigraph by Voltaire]
literature world 2040 Clarke, Arthur C. Childhood's End. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1981; c. 1953); pg. 121. Shaw's Back to Methuselah
literature world 2040 Zelazny, Roger. "Home is the Hangman " in Unicorn Variations. New York: Timescape (1983; story c. 1975); pg. 114. Pg. 114: "And there was always Godel for a theoretical cordon sanitaire, with his demonstration of the true but mechanically unprovable proposition. " [More on Godel, pg. 117, 138]; Pg. 117: Teilhard de Chardin; Pg. 118: Karl Mannheim; Pg. 131: Mencken's The Cult of Hope; Pg. 136: Marvin Minsky; Pg. 138: Turing; Mencken; Huxley; Wilberforce
literature world 2040 Zelazny, Roger. "Home is the Hangman " in Unicorn Variations. New York: Timescape (1983; story c. 1975); pg. 138. "But here, in one of Mencken's hangouts, I could not recall some of the things he had said about controversy, such as 'Did Huxley convert Wilberforce?' and 'Did Luther convert Leo X?' "
literature world 2046 Bear, Greg. Eternity. New York: Warner Books (1988); pg. 33. "...they would call Tapi. The name came from Tapi Salinger, a twenty-second century novelist they both admired. "
literature world 2046 Bear, Greg. Eternity. New York: Warner Books (1988); pg. 80. "'We're going to get twenty or thirty village leaders and political science students from Christchurch and fly them to Axis Thoreau...' "
literature world 2048 Bear, Greg. Queen of Angels. New York: Warner Books (1994; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 160. "'The psyche can neither be taught nor led astray by the self-criticism of the conscious mind.'

--Ernest Neumann, The Origins of Consciousness "

literature world 2050 Bova, Ben. "Acts of God " in Sam Gunn Forever. New York: Avon (1998; c. 1995); pg. 11. "...plot hatching inside Sam's shifty, twisted, Machiavellian brain. "
literature world 2050 Bova, Ben. "Tourist Sam " in Sam Gunn Forever. New York: Avon (1998); pg. 192. "He was a combination of Huckleberry Finn and Long John Silver, with a bit of Chuck Yeager thrown in. " [Treasure Island]
literature world 2050 Carr, Carol. "Look, You Think You've Got Troubles " in A Pocketful of Stars (Damon Knight, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1971; c. 1969); pg. 204. "'So who needs funny? riddles have to be a laugh a minute all of a sudden? You think Oedipus giggled all the way home from seeing the Sphinx?' "
literature world 2050 del Rey, Lester. "Helon O'Loy " in Analog: Readers' Choice: Vol. 2 (Stanley Schmidt, ed.) New York: David Publications (1981; story copyright 1938); pg. 41. "She was beautiful, a dream in spun plastics and metals, something Keats might have seen dimly when he wrote his sonnet. If Helen of Troy had looked like that the Greeks must have been pikers when they launched only a thousand ships "
literature world 2050 Wolfe, Gene. "The Fifth Head of Cerberus " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1972); pg. 339. Pg. 339: "David has an illustrated Tales from the Odyssey... "; Pg. 341: "...Polyphemus the Cyclops and Odysseus... Homeric Greeks... "; Pg. 350: David Copperfield... Aunt Betsey Trotwood... "
literature world 2050 Zelazny, Roger. "Home is the Hangman " in Analog: Readers' Choice: Vol. 2 (Stanley Schmidt, ed.) New York: David Publications (1981; story copyright 1975); pg. 218. "It made me think of Mencken's The Cult of Hope. "
literature world 2060 Williams, Walter Jon. "Daddy's World " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 416. [Year estimated] "A few days later Don Quixote wandered into the world, a lean man who frequently fell off his lean horse in a clang of homemade armor. He was given to making wan comments in both English and his own language, which turned out to be Spanish.

'Can you teach me Spanish irregular verbs?' Jamie asked.

'Si, naturalmente,' said Don Quixote. 'But I will have to teach you some other Spanish as well.' He looked particularly mournful. 'Let's start with corazon. It means 'heart.' Mi corazon,' he said with a sigh, 'is breaking for love of Dulcinea.' " [Extensive reference to Don Quixote, part of a computer program, beginning here, and also pg. 416-422.]

literature world 2061 Clarke, Arthur C. 2061: Odyssey Three. New York: Ballantine (1987); pg. 7. Pg. 7: 17 lines from Odysseus/Ulysses are quoted.; Pg. 104: "Wilhelm Smuts' The Voortrekkers was conceded to be a masterpiece of (ironically) English literature... "
literature world 2063 Dillard, J. M. Star Trek: First Contact. New York: Pocket Books (1996). Based on the movie; story by Rick Berman, Brannon Braga & Ronald D. Moore. Screenplay by Braga & Moore.; pg. 210. [Aboard the Enterprise] "Just as he was now destroying his crew.

'See you around, Ahab,' she said gently behind him; he heard her footsteps headed for the door.

Lily had known. Had known from the very beginning, when she first called him by that name in the minutes after their first encounter. Had it shown, even then, in his eyes?

Before she could reach the door, he recited, still staring out in the starlit darkness: ' 'He piled upon the whale's white hump the sum of all the rage and hate felt by his whole face. . . . If his chest had been a cannon, he would've shot his heart upon it.' '

With an ironic smile, he turned to see her gazing at him in puzzlement. 'What?'

'Moby Dick,' he replied.

She gave in a small, embarrassed grin. 'Actually, I never read it.' "

literature world 2063 Dillard, J. M. Star Trek: First Contact. New York: Pocket Books (1996). Based on the movie; story by Rick Berman, Brannon Braga & Ronald D. Moore. Screenplay by Braga & Moore.; pg. 211. "'Ahab spent years hunting the white whale that crippled him,' Picard explained. 'A quest for vengeance. And in the end, the whale destroyed him--and his ship.'

'I guess that Ahab didn't know when to quit.'

For a long moment, he looked into her eyes . . . and found there trust.

Then he drew a breath of pure resolve and walked onto the bridge. Immediately, Crusher and the others turned to him, their faces anxious, somber, concerned.

'Prepare to evacuate the Enterprise,' he said. "

literature world 2080 Dick, Philip K. The Crack in Space. New York: Ace Books (1966); pg. 166. Pg. 166 and elsewhere: Encyclopedia Britannica
literature world 2100 Dick, Philip K. "Beyond Lies the Wub " in The Best of Philip K. Dick. New York: Ballantine (1977; story c. 1952); pg. 6. [Year estimated.] "'So you see,' the wub said, 'we have a common myth. Your mind contains many familiar myth symbols. Ishtar, Odysseus--'

...'Go on,' he said...

'I find in your Odysseus a figure common to the mythology of most self-conscious races. As I interpret it, Odysseus wanders as an individual aware of himself as such. This is the idea of separation, of separation from family and country. the process of individuation.'

'but Odysseus returns to his home... Finally he goes home.' " [More, pg. 9.]

literature world 2100 Gloss, Molly. The Dazzle of Day. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 23-24. "Books, which are the plainest of human tools, must be housed in a manner to keep them carefully from the wet and warmth... vast library of microfiche and videos, and just a tiny library of bound volumes. There are, in the two rooms of this house, many hundreds of books that will remain behind, and a single crate of twenty-six books that will travel with me to the Miller. The size of the box, the bulk and weight that are permitted to me, have forced me to providence: I have kept Zardoya's translations of Whitman, but nothing of Calderon. Have put aside Le Grand Meaulnes, kept Les Miserables... had I put Song of the Lark in the stacks to be given away, or the box to be taken up? Adios, Mr. Moxley? Sigrid Lavransdatter? I sorted the books, reading and rereading the indexing in a fever of suspicion. By what measure had I included The Magic Mountain, but not Pajaros del Nuevo Mundo? "
literature world 2106 May, Julian. The Many Colored Land in The Many-Colored Land & The Golden Torc (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (copyright 1981); pg. 58. "...the travelers... As was to be expected, many of the applicants were narcissistic and addicted to fantasy. These people were apt to appear at the auberge in the guise of Tarzan or Crusoe or Pocahantas or Rima, or else costumed as throwbacks to every conceivable Old World era and culture... Some, like Richter, outfitted themselves for the journey with Spartan pragmatism. Others wanted to bring along 'desert island' treasures such as whole libraries of old-fashioned paged books, musical instruments... The more practical gathered together livestock, seeds, and tools for homesteading in the style of the Swiss Family Robinson. "
literature world 2114 Dick, Philip K. The Man Who Japed. New York: Ace Books (1956); pg. 8. Pg. 8: "'For awhile. Sugermann gives me ideas . . . I find his talk stimulating. Remember the packet we did on Goethe? The business about lens-grinding?... The optics angle made a good Morec--Goethe saw his real job. Prisms before poetry.' "; Pg. 26: Sir Walter Scott; Pg. 62: Decameron; Truman Capote; James Jones; Pg. 63-64: James Joyce; Pg. 64: Ulysses (also pg. 70)
literature world 2118 Card, Orson Scott. Ender's Shadow. New York: Tor (1999); pg. 139. "'You think he's plotting revolution?'

'All we know about this kid is that he survived on the streets of Rotterdam. It's a hellish place, from what I hear. The kids are vicious. They make Lord of the Flies look like Pollyanna.'

'When did you read Pollyanna?'

'It was a book?' "

literature world 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 23. "To: Locke%espinoza@polnet.gov
From: Chamrajnagar%%@ifcom.gov

Mr. Peter Wiggin,
Did you really think I would not have the resources to know who you are? You may be the author of the 'Locke Proposal,' giving you a reputation as a peacemaker, but you are also partly responsible for the world's present instability by your jingoist use of your sister's identity as Demosthenes. I have no illusions about your motives. " ['Locke' and 'Demosthenes' are the two online personas created by Peter and Valentine Wiggin in the first novel of this series, Ender's Game. Locke is named after the European rationalist writer, and Demosthenes after the famed Greek orator. Many refs. to these names, as Peter continues to communicate from behind these personas, throughout novel. Other refs. not in DB.]

literature world 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 183. "When I read the Iliad, I see the same things everyone else does--the poetry, of course, and the information about heroic bronze-age warfare. But I see something else, too. It might have been Helen whose face launched a thousand ships, but it was Briseis who almost wrecked them. She was a powerless captive, a slave, and yet Achilles almost tore the Greek alliance apart because he wanted her. " [More about Briseis' part in the Iliad, pg. 183-184.]
literature world 2135 Dick, Philip K. Our Friends From Frolix 8. New York: Ace Books (1970); pg. 161. "'Do you like Yeats?'

'Was he before Bob Dylan?'

'Yes.'

'Then I don't want to hear about him. as far as I'm concerned, poetry started with Dylan and has declined since.' "

literature world 2140 Swanwick, Michael. "Scherzo with Tyrannosaur " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 344. [Time travel story] "'My real name is Philippe de Cherville. I swapped table assignments so I could meet my younger self. But then Melusine--my mother--started hitting on my. So I guess you can understand now'--he laughed embarrassedly--'why I didn't want to go the Oedipus route.' "
literature world 2150 Dick, Philip K. The Divine Invasion. New York: Timescape (1981); pg. 81. "However, Big Noodle knew all about Aquinas and Descartes and Kant and Russell and their criticisms... "
literature world 2166 Farmer, Philip Jose. "Riders of the Purple Wage " in The Hugo Winners: Volumes One and Two. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971; story copyright 1967); pg. 619. "The Dog of Flinders [sic]... Socrates, Ben Johnson, Cellini, Swedenborg, Li Po, and Hiawatha are roistering in the Mermaid Tavern. Through a window, Daedalus is seen on top of the battlements of Cnossus, shoving a rocket up the ass of his son, Icarus, to give him a jet-assisted takeoff for his famous flight. " [Refs. to literature throughout story, some may not be in DB.]
literature world 2166 Farmer, Philip Jose. "Riders of the Purple Wage " in The Hugo Winners: Volumes One and Two. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971; story copyright 1967); pg. 620. Pg. 620: "Lucky Micromoby Dick "; Pg. 622: "Omar Runic... Greig's Anitra... Homer's god-like Achaeans... Rex Luscus... "; Pg. 623: "Chib bleats at the phantom. 'Ba! Humbuggery!...' ...Born Julius Applebaum, he legally became Rousseau Red Hawk on his Naming Day. "; Pg. 627: Omar Runic; Pg. 629: "...sayeth the New Sphinx, Edipus having resolved the question of the Old Sphinx... Odyssey "
literature world 2166 Farmer, Philip Jose. "Riders of the Purple Wage " in The Hugo Winners: Volumes One and Two. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971; story copyright 1967); pg. 639. "...such notables as Nebuchadnezzar... Moses...Buddha... Sisyphus, taking a vacation from his stone-rolling; Androcles and his buddy, the Cowardly Lion of Oz; Baron von Richthofen, the Red Knight of Germany; Beowulf; Al Capone; Hiawatha; Ivan the Terrible; and hundreds of others. "
literature world 2166 Farmer, Philip Jose. "Riders of the Purple Wage " in The Hugo Winners: Volumes One and Two. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971; story copyright 1967); pg. 652. "Omar Runic, the poet, stands up from his chair. He is a tall thin red-bronze youth with an aquiline nose and very thick red lips. His kinky hair grows long and is cut into the shape of the Pequod, that fabled vessel which bore mad Captain Ahab and his mad crew and the sole survivor Ishmael after the white whale. The coiffure is formed with a bowsprit and hull and three masts and yardarms and even a boat hinging on davits. "
literature world 2166 Farmer, Philip Jose. "Riders of the Purple Wage " in The Hugo Winners: Volumes One and Two. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971; story copyright 1967); pg. 661. "...each of a great in the various arts. Michelangelo, Mozart, Balzac, Zeuxis, Beethoven, Li Po, Twain, Dostoyevsky, Farmisto, Mbuzi, Cupel, Krishnagurti, etc. "
literature world 2166 Farmer, Philip Jose. "Riders of the Purple Wage " in The Hugo Winners: Volumes One and Two. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971; story copyright 1967); pg. 665. "He places one hand on his naked left chest, on which is tattooed the face of Herman Melville, Homer occupying the other place of honor on his right breast... 'Call me Ahab, not Ishmael...' " [Pg. 665-669: Extensive passage which includes heroic verse mixing Homer, Melville's Moby Dick and the Bible. Includes lines such as: 'Melville wrote of me long before I was born']
literature world 2166 Farmer, Philip Jose. "Riders of the Purple Wage " in The Hugo Winners: Volumes One and Two. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971; story copyright 1967); pg. 675. "'...Now for the benefit of those among you who are unacquainted with an early 20th-century classic, Finnegans Wake, despite your government's wish for you to have a free lifelong education, the author, James Joyce, derived the title from an old vaudeville song... The song was about Tim Finnegan, an Irish hod carrier who fell off a ladder while drunk and was supposedly killed. During the Irish wake held for Finnegan, the corpse is accidentally splashed with whisky, Finegan, feeling the touch of the whiskey, the 'water of life,' sits up in his coffin and then climbs out to drink and dance with the mourners... "
literature world 2182 Cowper, Richard. "Out There Where the Big Ships Go " in The Best from Fantasy & Science Fiction: 24th Series (Edward L. Ferman, ed.) New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1982); pg. 119. "He sat down... then flipped open the back of the cabinet and ran his eye down the familiar index. Nelson, Camelot, Kennedy, Pasteur, Alan Quartermain, Huck Finn, Tarzan, Frodo, Titus Groan... "
literature world 2198 Conner, Miguel. The Queen of Darkness. New York: Warner Books (1998); pg. 4. [A major place in novel is called 'Xanadu', from Coleridge's poem. Pg. 4, 7-8, 10-12, etc.]
literature world 2200 Arnason, Eleanor. A Woman of the Iron People. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1991); pg. 186. "A trickster god like Anansi the Spider and coyote and B'rer Rabbit. "
literature world 2200 Arnason, Eleanor. A Woman of the Iron People. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1991); pg. 361. "Another room held a book which I turned on. The title appeared on the screen: A la Recherche du Temps Perdu par Marcel Prous. My French was close to nonexistent. I turned the book off and put it back where I had found it... "
literature world 2200 Arnason, Eleanor. A Woman of the Iron People. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1991); pg. 406. "'...I knew the names of all their favorite shows, and I had seen most of them at least once. War and Peace. crossing the Urals. Deep Ocean Adventure. The Potato Cosmonauts..' "
literature world 2200 Arnason, Eleanor. A Woman of the Iron People. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1991); pg. 457. "'God is great.' She laughed. 'That's what I kept thinking. Allah akbar.'

' 'O brave new world, that has such people in it,' ' said Eddie.

Agopian said, 'Miranda in The Tempest. Has anyone ever told you that Shakespeare is better in Russian?'

Eddie made the gesture that mean 'no.'

I said, 'I've always heard that he was best in German.'

'That line reminds me of Shakespeare,' Eddie said. 'I know it from Aldous Huxley. His novel Brave New World.' "

literature world 2237 Butler, Octavia E. Dawn. New York: Warner Books (1997; c. 1987); pg. 107. "And Kahguyaht gave her a few brittle, yellowed books--treasures she had not imagined: A spy novel, a Civil War novel, an ethnology textbook, a study of religion, a book about cancer and one about human genetics, a book about an ape being taught sign language and one about the space race of the 1960s. "
literature world 2286 McIntyre, Vonda N. Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home. New York: Pocket Books (1986); pg. 64. "Behind him, McCoy looked at the ceiling in supplication. ' 'Angels and ministers of grace, defend us.' '

'Hamlet,' Spock said. 'Act one, scene four.'

'Mr. Spock,' Jim said with some asperity, 'none of us has doubts about your memory. Engage computer. Prepare for warp-speed.'

Sulu collected the Bounty for transition. 'Ready, sir.'

'Shields, Mr. Chekov.'

'Shields up, admiral.'

'May fortune favor the foolish,' Jim said softly.

'Virgil,' Spock said. 'The Aeneid. But the quote--'

'Never mind, Spock!' Jim exclaimed. 'Engage computers! Mr. Sulu, warp-speed!' "

literature world 2293 Dillard, J. M. Star Trek: Generations. New York: Pocket Books (1994); pg. 11. "'Spock looked down at the book and allowed the merest ghost of a smile to pass over his features. 'Horatio Hornblower. Thank you, Captain.'

'To remember me by,' Jim said.

McCoy lifted a brow. 'Don't you think Don Juan would have been a little more appropriate?'

'Watch your tongue, Doctor, or I'll keep your present,' Kirk retorted. "

literature world 2322 Strickland, Brad & Barbara Strickland. Starfall (Star Trek: TNG: Starfleet Academy). New York: Pocket Books (1995); pg. 61. Pg. 61: "He had already decided to do his essay on the work of John Devlin, a twentieth-century poet and writer. Devlin's books Where Youth and Laughter Go and When Duty Whispers Low had changed a lot of Jean-Luc's ideas regarding the glory of war. Devlin, he decided, would have approved of Starfleet's gradual evolution from a military service to one devoted to the gaining of scientific knowledge. " [More on Devlin, e.g., pg. 66.]; Pg. 74: "The Ponce de Leon was a byword in Starfleet for a ship in a hopeless position. " [More.]
literature world 2365 Taylor, Jeri. Pathways (Star Trek: Voyager). New York: Pocket Books (1999; c. 1998); pg. 216. "Only later, after the incident in the Vega system, did he trace back the events and begin to understand why joining the ski team had been such a heady experience for him. He was playing out a drama as ancient as Oedipus. "
literature world 2400 Anderson, Poul. Genesis. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 107. [Frontispiece]

"Was it her I ought to have loved . . .?
--Piet Hein "

literature world 2437 Bester, Alfred. The Stars My Destination. New York: Berkley Publishing (1975; c. 1956); pg. 116. [Epigraph for Part 2.]

"With a heart of furious fancies
Whereof I am commander,
With a burning spear and a horse of air,
To the wilderness I wander.
With a knight of ghosts and shadows
I summoned am to tourney,
Ten leagues beyond the wide world's end--
Methinks it is no journey.

--Tom-a-Bedlam "

literature world 2500 Paterson, Katherine. "The Last Dog " in Tomorrowland: 10 Stories About the Future (Michael Cart, ed.) New York: Scholastic Press (1999); pg. 122. "While his podfellows played virtual games, he'd wandered into a subsection of the historical virtuals called 'ancient fictions.' Things happened in these fictions -- well, more densely than they did in the virtuals. The people he met there -- it was hard to describe -- but somehow they were more actual than dome dwellers. They had strange names like Huck Finn and M. C. Higgins the Great. They were even a little scary. It was their insides. Their insides were very loud. But even though the people in the ancient fictions frightened him a bit, he couldn't get enough of them. "
literature world 2500 Paterson, Katherine. "The Last Dog " in Tomorrowland: 10 Stories About the Future (Michael Cart, ed.) New York: Scholastic Press (1999); pg. 127. Pg. 127: "Dogs had been abundant once. They filled the ancient fictions. They even had names there -- Lassie, Toto, Sounder. But now dogs were extinct... "; Pg. 133: "...her mournful eyes was so dear to him that he did what Travis Coates had done to Old Yeller. He hugged her. "
literature world 2500 Philbrick, Rodman. "The Last Book in the Universe " in Tomorrowland: 10 Stories About the Future (Michael Cart, ed.) New York: Scholastic Press (1999); pg. 13. "That's when I see there are stacks of paper under the crate, and he's been sitting there in front of them, hoping I wouldn't notice. 'What's this?' I go.

'Nothing of value,' he says. 'Just a book, if you want to know.'

I scowl at him and snarl, 'Liar! Books are in libraries. Or they used to be.'

He starts to say something and then he stops, like I've given him something important to think about. 'Hmmm,' he goes. 'You're aware that books used to be in libraries. That was before you were born, so how did you know?'

I shrug and go, 'I heard is all. When I was a kid. About how things used to be before the badtimes.' "

literature world 2500 Philbrick, Rodman. "The Last Book in the Universe " in Tomorrowland: 10 Stories About the Future (Michael Cart, ed.) New York: Scholastic Press (1999); pg. 14. "'...But what are you doing?'

'Writing a book,' he says. 'The story of my life. The story of everybody's life, and the way things were when there were books.'

'Nobody reads books anymore,' I tell him.

He nods sadly. 'I know. But someday that may change. And if and when it does, they'll want to know what happened, and why. They'll want stories that don't come out of a mindprobe needle. They'll want to read books again, someday.' " [More on this subject. The disappearance of reading is the central theme of the story. In the author's note it is explained that the story is set in a world where there are no books.]

literature world 2546 Huxley, Aldous. Brave New World. New York: HarperCollins (1999; c. 1932, 1946); pg. 34. "...and where was Odysseus, where was Job, where were Jupiter and Gotama and Jesus?... King Lear and the Thoughts of Pascal. "
literature world 2977 Stableford, Brian. "Mortimer Gray's History of Death " in Immortals (Jack Dann & Gardner Dozois, eds.) New York: Ace Books (1998; c. 1995); pg. 203. Pg. 203: "...particularly in respect of the Christian world of the Medieval period and the Renaissance. It had much to say about art and literature, and the images contained therein... on the topics of momento mori and artes moriendi. It had long analyses of Dante's Divine Comedy, the paintings of Hieronymus Borsch, Milton's Paradise Lost, and graveyard poetry. " [More.]; Pg. 224: "Malthusian crisis "
literature world 3000 Egan, Greg. "Border Guards " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 333. [Year estimated] "'...I spent 200 years married to a man who wrote a play called We Who Have Known the Dead--which was every bit as pretentious and self-pitying as you'd guess from the title.' "
literature world 3000 Strugatsky, Arkady & Boris Strugatsky. Tale of the Troika in Roadside Picnic and Tale of the Troika. New York: MacMillan Publishing Co. (1977); pg. 242. Animal Life; "It would take him a long time to get through Bream. And when he did, we would give him the thirty-volume Dickens, and then, God willing, we would take on the ninety-volume Tolstoy--with all the prefaces, articles, notes, and commentaries. "
literature world 3001 Clarke, Arthur C. 3001: The Final Odyssey. New York: Ballantine (1997); pg. 82. "'Then why are you interested in my century?'

'Because it marks the transition between barbarism and civilization.'

'Thank you. Just call me Conan.'

'Conan? The only one I know is the man who created Sherlock Holmes.' "

literature world 3001 Clarke, Arthur C. 3001: The Final Odyssey. New York: Ballantine (1997); pg. 196. "'In wildness is the preservation of the world.'

--Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) "

literature world 17213 Smith, Cordwainer. "Mother Hitton's Littul Kittons " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1961); pg. 99. "This was a very expensive hotel and very old-fashioned. It even made books out of paper, with genuine bindings. Benjacomin crossed the room. He saw that they had the Galactic Encyclopedia in two hundred volumes. He took down the volume headed 'Hi-Hi.' He opened it from the rear, looking for the name 'Hitton' and there it was. 'Hitton, Benjamin -- pioneer of old North Australia. Said to be originator of part of the defense system. Lived AD 10719-17213.' That was all. Benjacomin moved among the books. The words 'kittons' in that peculiar spelling did not occur anywhere, neither in the encyclopedia nor in any other list maintained by the library. "
literature world 1000004000 Anderson, Poul. Genesis. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 46. Pg. 46: "Their gazes met and held steady, but somehow hers went through him, beyond this room and this moment. ' 'A sea change,' ' she murmured, ' 'into something rich and strange.' '

...Omar's question drew her back out of reverie. 'What do you mean?'

'Oh, that,' she said, carefully careless. 'Only a quotation.'

'Your style of talking has certainly changed. Scholarly, is that the word? I suppose working with Terra Central did it.'

'Not really. I read a great deal.' Laurinda formed a new smile. 'Anachronistic habit, agreed.' ";

Pg. 47: "The works and songs of the past redeemed it. Sometimes that past, even its fictions--Hamlet, Anne Elliot, Wilkins, Micawber, Vidal Benzaguin--felt closer to her than the world she lived in. "

literature world 1000004000 Anderson, Poul. Genesis. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 158. "'Do you know Jane Austen?'

'Who? No, I don't believe I do.'

'An early nineteenth-century writer. She led a quiet life, never went far from home, died young, but she explored people in ways that nobody else ever did.'

'I'd like to read her. Maybe I'll get a chance here.' He wished to show that he was no--'technoramus' was the word he invented on the spot. 'I did read a good deal, especially on space missions. And especially poetry. Homer, Shakespeare, Tu Fu, Basho, Bellman, Burns, Omar Khayyam, Kipling, Millay, Haldeman--' He threw up his hands and laughed. 'Never mind. That's just the first several names I could grab out of the jumble for purposes of bragging.' "

literature Xanth 1993 Anthony, Piers. Demons Don't Dream. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 274. "Then there was the tale of Michael Velli and the Crow Bar. Michael set out with devious cunning and no ethics to ruin the crows' favorite hangout: a bar where they could drink themselves silly on corn squeezings. He did this by informing each crow separately that the bar was closed. When, after another hour of narration, he had told each of about three hundred crows this, the bar was indeed closed for lack of patronage. Michael was very pleased with his connivance. "
literature - Dickens California 1896 Matheson, Richard. Bid Time Return. New York: Viking Press (1975); pg. 107. "It was impossible to guess his age because of his beard. Charles Dickens, I remember thinking dazedly. I knew it couldn't be him, but there was such a strong resemblance. "
literature - Dickens California 1938 Delacorte, Peter. Time On My Hands. New York: Scribner (1997); pg. 104. "On the wall across from that were three shelves of Books. Chaucer, Shakespeare, Marlowe, Milton, Fielding, lots of British drama, Thackeray, Dickens. "
literature - Dickens California 1995 Powers, Tim. Earthquake Weather. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 53. "The disquieting thing was that he had read Dickens' A Tale of Two Cities before; and though that had been a long time ago, he had eventually become aware that this book he was reading in the airplane seat... was a different text.

The variances hadn't been obvious at first, for he'd only been able to read the book fitfully, especially the Parisian scenes; he had still been shaky from his encounter the day before... " [More.]



literature - Dickens, continued

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