Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Australian Aborigines, Australia

Australian Aborigines, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Australian Aborigines Australia 1987 Bryant, Edward. "Down in the Dreamtime " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 280-281. "'The Dreamtime?' What am I in, a Peter Weir movie? she thought. 'As in the myth?'

'No myth,' said her companion. 'We are now where reality was, is, and will be. We are in the origin of all things.'

'Right,' I am dreaming, Cordelia thought. I'm dreaming--or I'm dead and this is the last thing my brain cells are creating before everything flares and goes black.

'All things in the shadow world were created here first,' said Warreen. 'Birds, creatures, grass, the ways of doing things, the taboos that must be observed.'

Cordelia looked around her. There was little to see. 'These are the originals?' she asked. 'I've only seen the copies before?'

He nodded vigorously.

'I don't see any dune buggies,' she said a bit petulantly, feeling the heat. 'I don't see any airliners or vending machines full of ice-cold Diet Pepsi.'

He answered her seriously. 'Those are only variations. Here is where everything begins.' " [More, not in DB, pg. 282-298.]

Australian Aborigines Australia 1987 Bryant, Edward. "Down in the Dreamtime " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 281-282. [In Dreamtime.] "She turned and saw a brownish-gray kangaroo hopping along, easily pacing them. 'I'm hungry enough to eat one of those,' she said.

The kangaroo stared at her from huge chocolate eyes. 'I should hope not,' it said.

Cordelia closed her mouth with a click. She stared back.

Warreen smiled at the kangaroo and said courteously, 'Good afternoon, Mirram. Will we shortly find shade and water?'

'Yes,' said the kangaroo. 'Sadly, the hospitality is being hoarded by a cousin of the Gurangtch.'

'At least,' said Warreen, 'it is not a bunyip.'

'That is true,' agreed the kangaroo.

'Will I find weapons?'

'Beneath the tree,' said the kangaroo.

'Good,' Warreen said with relief. 'I wouldn't relish wrestling a monster with only my hands and teeth.'

'I wish you well,' said the kangaroo. 'And you,' it said to Cordelia, 'be at peace.' The creature turned at right angles to their path and bounded into the desert...

'Talking kangaroos?' said Cordelia. "

Australian Aborigines Australia 1987 Bryant, Edward. "Down in the Dreamtime " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 286. [In Dreamtime, looking at the stars.] "'Nurunderi is up there, said Warreen, pointing at the sky, 'along with his two young wives, placed there by Nepelle, the ruler of the heavens, after the women ate the forbidden food.'

'Apples?' said Cordelia.

'Fish. Tukkeri--a delicacy given only to the men.' His hand moved, the fingers pointing again. 'There, farther on--you can make out the Seven Sisters. And there is Karambal, their pursuer. You call him Aldebaran.' "

Australian Aborigines Australia 1987 Bryant, Edward. "Down in the Dreamtime " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 286. [In Dreamtime, looking at the stars.] "Cordelia said. 'I have a lot of questions.'

Warreen paused. 'Not about the stars.'

'Not about the stars.'

'What, then?'

'All of this.' She sat up and spread her arms to the night. 'How am I here?'

'I brought you.'

'I know. How?'

Warreen hesitated for a long time. Then he said, 'I am of Aranda blood, but was not raised within the tribe. Do you know of the urban aborigines?'

'Like in The Last Wave,' Cordelia said. 'I saw The Fringe Dwellers too. There aren't really tribal aborigines in the cities, right? Just sort of like individuals?'

Warreen laughed. 'You compare almost everything to the cinema. That is likening everything to the shadow world. Do you know anything of reality?'

'I think so.' In this place she wasn't so sure, but she wasn't about to admit it. "

Australian Aborigines Australia 1987 Bryant, Edward. "Down in the Dreamtime " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 286-287. "'My parents sought work in Melbourne,' Warreen said. 'I was born in the outback, but cannot recall any of that. I was a boy in the city.' He laughed bitterly. 'My walkabout seemed destined to lead me only among drunken diggers chundering in the gutter... When I was an infant, I nearly died of a fever. Nothing the wirinun--the medicine man--could do helped. My parents, despairing, were ready to take me to the white doctor. Then the fever broke. The wirinum shook his medicine stick over me, looked into my eyes, and told my parents I would live and do great things.' Warreen paused again. 'The other children in the town had taken ill with the same sort of fever. All of them died. My parents told me their bodies shriveled or twisted or turned into unspeakable things. But they all died. Only I survived. The other parents hated me and hated my parents for bearing me. So we left.'

It dawned in Cordelia's mind like a star, rising. 'The wild card virus.' "

Australian Aborigines Australia 1987 Bryant, Edward. "Down in the Dreamtime " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 287. "'As a man, I found I could enter the Dreamtime at will. I could explore the land of my ancestors. I could even take others with me.'

'Then this truly is the Dreamtime. It isn't some kind of shared illusion.'

He turned on his side and looked at her. Warreen's eyes were only about eighteen inches from hers. His gaze was something she could feel in the pit of her stomach. 'There is nothing more real.'

'The thing that happened to me on the airplane. The Eer-moonans?'

'There are others from the shadow world who can enter the Dreamtime. One is Murga-muggai, whose totem is the trap-door spider. But there is something . . . wrong with her. You would call her psychotic. To me she is an Evil One, even though she claims kinship with the People.' "

Australian Aborigines Australia 1987 Bryant, Edward. "Down in the Dreamtime " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 290. "'We find it hard to organize effectively in the manner of the Maori in New Zealand. They are great clans. We [Australian aborigines] are small tribes.' He smiled humorlessly. 'You might say the Maori resemble your aces. We are like the jokers.' "
Australian Aborigines Australia 1987 Bryant, Edward. "Down in the Dreamtime " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 291. "'I've seen pictures,' said Cordelia. 'This is Ayers Rock.'

'It is Uluru,' said Wyungare.

They stared up at the gigantic reddish sandstone monolith. 'It's the biggest single rock in the world,' said Cordelia. 'Thirteen hundred feet up to the top and several miles across.'

'It is the place of magic.'

'The markings on the side,' she said. 'They look like the cross section of a brain.'

'Only to you. To me they are the markings on the chest of a warrior.'

Cordelia looked around. 'There should be hundreds of tourists here.'

'In the shadow world there are. Here they would be fodder for Murga-muggai.'

Cordelia was incredulous. 'She eats people?'

'She eats anyone.' " [More.]

Australian Aborigines Australia 1987 Bryant, Edward. "Down in the Dreamtime " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 298. "'It has always been the custom,' he said slowly, 'for European men to use their aboriginal mistresses and then abandon them.'

Cordelia looked him in the eye. 'I am not a European man,' she said.

Wyungare smiled. " [Other refs. to aboriginals, pg. 280-298.]

Australian Aborigines Australia 2011 Baxter, Stephen. Manifold: Time. New York: Ballantine (2000); pg. 179. "Here in Red creek, three hundred children lived in administered squalor... The Brother talked instead of economics-of-scale joint administration of the School and the rest of the gin reservation.

Gin. The word referred to Aborigines. It seemed to be a word of casual abuse. Likewise the Brother referred to the children here, of course, as Blues... Terra Nullius--the name of Australia's governing party--meant 'empty land.' It referred tot he old fiction that Australia was unoccupied when Captain Cook planted the flag here, that the Aborigines had no rights to the lands they had inhabited for millennia. It was a good name for the policies the government followed ruthlessly. "

Australian Aborigines Australia 2011 Baxter, Stephen. Manifold: Time. New York: Ballantine (2000); pg. 180. "The native Australians had suffered a couple of centuries of persistent discrimination, with the dispossession of land, the separation of children from parents for indenture as servants and laborers, and so on. There had been a brief summer of hope, in the 1970s and after, when liberal, if flawed, protective legislation had been passed. It had all evaporated when the economy downturned at the start of the new century and the soil erosion began to hit.

Today, black children made up 3 percent of the youth in Australia, but 60 percent of those in prison. International human rights groups and Aboriginal organizations talked of torture and beatings And so on.

Modern Australia as a good place for a school like this. And the people who staffed it. "

Australian Aborigines Australia 2061 Turner, George. Drowning Towers. New York: William Morrow (1987); pg. 5. "There was, for instance, his claim to Viking ancestry, based solely on his name, Andra Andrasson, though a strong Aboriginal strain coloured him unmistakably; the dark skin made it necessary for him to use a heavy Caucasian makeup for most roles and as a consequence he often went unrecognized in the public street. "
Australian Aborigines Australia 2100 Lawson, Chris. "Written in Blood " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 210-211. "We [Muslims in Australia] were insulted, shouted at, and spat on by men and women who then stepped into their exclusive clubs and talked about how uncivilized we were. Once it had been the Aborigines, then it had been the Italian and Greek immigrants; a generation later it was the Asians... "
Australian Aborigines Australia 2287 Bonanno, Margaret Wander. Probe (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1992); pg. 76. "'that the Erisian Ascendancy cultures, so-called, shared some significant traits with certain Earth human cultures, though the Earth cultures were obviously far simpler. In some of his earliest papers on his discovery, Dr. Antonin Erisi himself pointed out a parallel with the Australian aborigines. They believed that when their totemic ancestors walked the countryside, they weren't only mapping it geographically, but musically, laying down trails of song with their footprints, so that if a thousand years later someone learned the songs, he could find his way unerringly across a land he'd never seen...' "
Australian Aborigines Australia 2625 Bova, Ben & A. J. Austin. To Fear the Light. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 197. [1] "There were bonfires everywhere, and around each a different dance was in progress. here and there were knots of tribesmen sharing tales or trading small belongings and crafts. And among it all, engaged in every manner of Aborigine play-about imaginable, were the children. In and around the hundreds of scattered gunyahs and wurlies erected by their parents, they ran, jumped, and shouted gleefully among the bonfires and makeshift dwellings. "
Australian Aborigines Australia 2625 Bova, Ben & A. J. Austin. To Fear the Light. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 197. [2] "Would these people ever have survived without Billy? she wondered. In the basic sense, they would certainly have 'survived' as far as their lives were concerned, but would their culture have endured? The values Billy held, the values he was so shocked to see disappearing among many of the Arunta, were still strong in at least some members of nearly every tribe. And in a few truly special cases, there remained a handful of tiny clans--particularly in the most remote regions of the Great Sandy and Nullarbor Plain--that still lived almost untouched by Earth's evolving culture.

But what Billy was doing--No, she corrected herself, what we are doing--was to bring them together, to let them all know that memories of the Dreamtime endured among them all, no matter the tribe, and that the Song Lines still connected all Aborigine across the great physical distance separating them. "

Australian Aborigines Australia 2625 Bova, Ben & A. J. Austin. To Fear the Light. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 198. [3] "Weeks from now, when all that remained of this corroboree would be scattered piles of ashes where the bonfire had once blazed, the message would be carried back to their homes, their peoples, that it does not matter how many Aborigine abandoned their heritage. Because that heritage would outlast their mortal lives, and be waiting for them when they all met again in the Dreamtime.

Cathay didn't know why--there had been no sound, not hint of movement that caught her eye--but she looked to one side, and was startled to see a goanna lying on the ground next to her. The lizard was good-sized, nearly a half meter in length, and it was clear that it had been recently killed. So intently did she gaze at the goanna that when the Aborigine standing a few meters behind it became apparent to her it seemed as though he had suddenly popped into existence out of the very air around him. "

Australian Aborigines Australia 2625 Bova, Ben & A. J. Austin. To Fear the Light. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 198. [4] "Her heartbeat, which had quickened considerably at the surprise, slowed, and she rose and nodded in greeting. She felt no fear of these people.

Like most Aborigine, he was thin, almost gaunt, and exhibited a full head of thick hair. The man was old and yellow-eyed, the whiteness of his hair matching the thin beard that traced the line of his jaw and chin. He wore nothing but a headband a thin red strip of cloth around his waist with thinner strips bundled decoratively in a dangling mass below his navel that afforded him little coverage. He was armed: In one hand he carried a spear and woomera, while a boomerang was tucked into one side of the waist belt. It was clear that he had been part of the celebration, as he had decorated his body with smears of white ashes that ran like stripes down his chest and legs. His expressive face had been framed in spears of white and red. " [More in this chapter, not in DB.]

Australian Aborigines Brazil 2015 McAuley, Paul J. "The Rift " in Vanishing Acts (Ellen Datlow, ed.) New York: Tor (2000); pg. 52. Pg. 52: "The Danes weren't Danish; they were an Australian family who spent their lives adventuring. They'd sailed a yacht around the world, trekked through the Himalayas, spent two years trying to save one of the last coral reefs off Belize. Ken, who had a bit of Aborigine blood and never let you forget it, and his wife Kerry, were both in their early forties, super-fit and very competent... "; Pg. 64: "The Danes... but Amy quite liked them, despite Ken's aggressive assertion of his one-eighth Aboriginal ancestry. " [Referring to some of main characters in story.]
Australian Aborigines Colorado 2000 Bishop, Michael. "A Gift from the GrayLanders " in Future on Fire (Orson Scott Card, ed.) New York: Tor (1991; story copyright 1985); pg. 78. "His older cousin saw him three-quarters naked and striped like an aborigine in the midst of a yellow-gray jungle unlike any terrain that David had expected to find only a floor below the family's TV room. "
Australian Aborigines France 2030 McAuley, Paul J. Fairyland. New York: Avon Books (1997; c 1995); pg. 149. "They are in a fairyland glade, at the end of the It's a Small World ride. Fairyland is the last in a chain of fake landscapes stretching from Australia (a gum tree with some kind of gray stuffed bear clinging to it standing in front of a painting of a clamshell building in a harbor, and black-skinned puppets carrying spears and boomerangs) to the USA... "
Australian Aborigines galaxy 2425 Bova, Ben & A. J. Austin. To Save the Sun. New York: Tor (1992); pg. 219. [1] "'Perhaps I should explain. I'm an Earther. I signed on with the Imperial force when the Empire began its resettlement on Luna.' He stopped, looked at her. 'Not everyone on Earth is against the Emperor's plan. I wanted to do what I could to help, if only in a small way, so I enlisted.' They resumed walking...

'But what did I do that--'

He silenced her with a raised hand. 'You know Earth, spoke well of her.' He stopped, a smile spreading across his face. 'And you spoke of my homeland as though you knew it.'

'Homeland . . . You're from Australia?'

'I am Aborigine. My people, the Arunta, are among the oldest civilizations on Earth, and the only people who remain unchanged.'

'Unchanged?' Adela looked at him dubiously, and without talking down to him said in a friendly tone of voice, 'You're an officer aboard one of the Empire's fastest starships, approaching a planet sixteen and a half light-years away from Australia. I'd say that qualifies as change.' "

Australian Aborigines galaxy 2425 Bova, Ben & A. J. Austin. To Save the Sun. New York: Tor (1992); pg. 219. [2] "The Lieutenant smiled again, the sound of his laughter as melodic as his words. 'You take the word too literally, Dr. Montgarde. I speak of not changin' here'--he lightly touched his forehead--'and here.' He placed the palm of his hand over his heart. 'While Earth grew, and her population went out, first to the solar system and then the stars, her people became different. Their values, their lives. Sometimes, I think their very souls changed. But it was different for us. In the outback, our lives continued as they always did. The family group was always central. The land. The sky. All a part of the Dream Lines and at the heart of who we are. Do you understand?' "
Australian Aborigines galaxy 2425 Bova, Ben & A. J. Austin. To Save the Sun. New York: Tor (1992); pg. 219. [3] "'I think so.' They reached the entrance of the officer's mess and stood to one side of the doorway as they spoke. There was little traffic in the corridor now; the two of them had taken their time and most of the officers were already inside.

'But then the world changed back,' he said, tilting his head. There was a distant look on his face, as though his eyes were watching the scene he described so very far away. 'Most of Earth's people left, and those who remained returned to many of the same old values the Aborigine tribes never abandoned.'

'I've studied Earth a great deal,' Adela said, 'but you're obviously much more than a simple tribesman.'

'Ah, that.' Again he laughed. There was a long, cushioned seating area that ran for ten meters on each side of the mess entrance and he indicated they should sit. "

Australian Aborigines galaxy 2425 Bova, Ben & A. J. Austin. To Save the Sun. New York: Tor (1992); pg. 220. [4] "'Many of my people are educated; many are not. It's an individual decision. But understand something: Even those who go away from the tribe for very long periods of time return to the outback unchanged. After my graduation from the University at Canberra, I returned home and it was as if I'd never left. My belongin's and city put away, I was in the bush hunting turkey and roo with my brothers within an hour after my arrival. Even though my brothers could barely read and write, it was as if there were no differences among us in the outback. In our home.'

'I would love to see your home one day.'

He looked at her, his head cocked to one side, and nodded. 'Yes, I think you'd like it.' "

Australian Aborigines galaxy 2425 Bova, Ben & A. J. Austin. To Save the Sun. New York: Tor (1992); pg. 220. [5] "He looked away suddenly... at once serious. 'We have a legend that tells us of those who protect us. It is said that they're responsible for keepin' my people whole, and that they'll be with us in the Dream Time, to keep us as one in the time of fire. We called them the Sky Heroes.'

Adela was fascinated by his tale and motioned... to continue.

'It is well known, even among many of my people, what will happen to the Sun--we have the broadcasts from the nets--but it is foretold that the Sky Heroes will protect our way of life.'

'Is this a...' She hesitated, not wanting to offend him. 'Is this a religion, a matter of faith?'

He turned to her again, his face less serious. 'For many Aborigine, yes. For others, it's only legend and campfire stories for the young. For me?' He smiled & shrugged his shoulders. 'Who knows where legend stops and fact begins, ay? But ask yourself somethin': Who's goin' to stop the Sun from dying? Who's goin' to stop the great fire?' "

Australian Aborigines galaxy 2425 Bova, Ben & A. J. Austin. To Save the Sun. New York: Tor (1992); pg. 221. [6] "'I'm afraid I don't follow you.'

He took one of her hands in his. The skin of his hands was rough and calloused, but his touch was warm, strong. 'You are. Your scientists, your star captains, your mighty ships. Come to Earth to help us remain whole.'

Adela nodded in understanding. 'We are the Sky Heroes,' she said softly, feeling not a little embarrassment. 'Thank you for sharing this with me.'

Again he shrugged, and released her hand. 'To be honest, I needed to share it with someone. You see, many of those in my settlement--who believe the old legends--feel that I've gone to join the Sky Heroes, that I've become one of them. Most know I'm on a starship, that it's nothin' more than an extension of the same technology that gives us refrigerators, electric lights and communication. But the others-- It's a big responsibility for me.'

Yes, she thought. It is a very big responsibility. "

Australian Aborigines galaxy 2500 Leigh, Stephen. Dark Water's Embrace. New York: Avon (1998); pg. 328. [Appendix: The Background and Lineage of Mictlan's Matriarchs and Patriarchs] "Antonio Santos: Despite the name, an Australian whose paternal great-grandparents had emigrated from Spain. Antonio claimed that one of his maternal grandparents was an aborigine. "
Australian Aborigines galaxy 2625 Bova, Ben & A. J. Austin. To Fear the Light. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 109. "'You're lookin' a bit waterlogged,' Billy said, smiling as she walked waist-deep toward the shore, then turned back to tend the small fire he'd built. 'I've about got the water hot enough if you're ready for some kapati.'

She retrieved her clothes and dressed unhurriedly, feeling little false modesty about covering herself after her swim. With anyone else he might have been uneasy, or at least a bit self-conscious about stripping to bathe in the sunshine, but around Billy everything seemed--what? More relaxed? More easygoing? There was a tranquility about the Aborigine--and about this special, secret place that he was willing to share with her--that somehow transcended stuffy rules and protocol. Here with him, in this place, she could be herself.

No worries, she said to herself, remembering the phrase he liked to use whenever he thought that everything was all right, that all would be for the best. " [Other refs. to this character, not in DB.]

Australian Aborigines galaxy 2625 Bova, Ben & A. J. Austin. To Fear the Light. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 112. "The Aborigine shook his head in understanding. 'Nah, I had someone once, before leaving Earth. But she and I had different goals and parted long before I met you. I had a lot of good mates on Darson, and even fell in love once, but it ended decades ago.' " [This Aborigine character is Australian, although he seems more like a European Australian than a traditional Australian Aborigine, at least in these passages.]
Australian Aborigines Louisiana 1987 Geary, Patricia. Strange Toys. New York: Bantam (1989; c. 1987); pg. 133. "...how is it possible for so many people to have the same vision? The thing envisioned must exist. The aborigines, for instance--that dream-time exists. Plus, I've seen some of that stuff myself; Sammy could do it. You could argue that I was a kid and didn't know what I saw, that my state of mind was weak and all that jazz. But that kind of reasoning, if you ask me, gets you exactly nowhere. "
Australian Aborigines New York: New York City 1987 Bryant, Edward. "The Second Coming of Buddy Holly " in Wild Cards V: Down and Dirty (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 188. "Cordelia replaced the figure, setting it in front of the small, framed black-and-white photo of a young aboriginal man. He scowled seriously out of the portrait. 'Wyungare,' she whispered. Her lips formed a kiss. "
Australian Aborigines New York: New York City 1987 Bryant, Edward. "The Second Coming of Buddy Holly " in Wild Cards V: Down and Dirty (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 202. "Holley turned the object over and over, examining it closely. 'Doesn't look American southwest--Polynesian? Australia, maybe?'

'Pretty good,' said Cordelia. 'Aboriginal.'

'What tribe? I know the Aranda pretty well, even the Wikmunkan and the Murngin, but this just ain't familiar.'

'It was made by a young urban aborigine,' said Cordelia. She hesitated a moment. It both excited and hurt her to think of Wyungare. And how, she wondered, was the central Australian revolution, such as it was, going? She'd been too busy with the benefit to watch much news. 'He gave it to me as a going-away gift.'

'Let me guess,' said Holley. 'The sandstone's from Uluru?' Cordelia nodded. Uluru, true name of what the Europeans called Ayers Rock. 'And the reptile's your totem, of course.' He held the object up to the light before passing it back over. 'There's considerable power here. Not just a token.' " [More.]

Australian Aborigines New York: New York City 1987 Zelazny, Roger. "Concerto for Siren and Serotonin " in Wild Cards V: Down and Dirty (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 177. "'Hell, yes. I've even done huilca. You ever try pituri? Now that's some good sh--. Routine's a little mess, though. Learned it from an abo...' " [An Aborigine]
Australian Aborigines Ontario 2002 Sawyer, Robert J. Hominids. New York: Tor (2002); pg. 128. "She then checked the corresponding bit of mitochondrial DNA in 1,600 modern humans: Native Canadians, Polynesians, Australians, Africans, Asians, and Europeans. Every one of those 1,600 people had at least 371 nucleotides out of those 379 the same; the maximum deviation was just eight nucleotides. "
Australian Aborigines Riverworld 1890 Farmer, Philip Jose. To Your Scattered Bodies Go. New York: Berkeley Medallion Books (1971); pg. 20. "Another man was pointing to his genitals and saying in Slovenian, 'They've made a Jew of me! A Jew! Do you think that . . .? No, it couldn't be!'

Burton grinned savagely and said, 'It doesn't occur to him that maybe They have made a Mohammedan out of him or an Australian aborigine or an ancient Egyptian, all of whom practiced circumcision.' "

Australian Aborigines Riverworld 2008 Farmer, Philip Jose. To Your Scattered Bodies Go. New York: Berkeley Medallion Books (1971); pg. 97. "Occasionally, they put in at areas which held peoples from other times and places. One was a twenty-mile stretch containing Australian aborigines who had ver seen a European while on Earth. "
Australian Aborigines USA 1987 Bryant, Edward. "The Second Coming of Buddy Holly " in Wild Cards V: Down and Dirty (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 203-204. "'Most of what I know about this [shamanism], I learned from my aboriginal friend...' "
Australian Aborigines USA 1991 Tepper, Sheri S. Beauty. New York: Doubleday (1991); pg. 85. "Janice says God intended men to wear trousers and women to wear dresses. I look at pictures of Greeks and Scots and aborigines and Jesus, and I can't figure out how she knows that! "
Australian Aborigines world 1972 Anderson, Poul. There Will Be Time. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1972); pg. 159. "Imagine: finding, and afterward forging mutuality between a Confucian teacher, a boomerang-wielding kangaroo hunter, a Polish schoolboy, a medieval Mesopotamian peasant, a West African ironsmith, a Mexican vaquero, an Eskimo girl... "
Australian Aborigines world 1989 Heddle, Jennifer. "The Stranger Inside " in X-Men: Legends (Stan Lee, ed.) New York: Berkley Boulevard (2000); pg. 192. "Gateway, of course, took it all in with impassivity. He has seen similar sunsets hundreds of times and will most likely see hundreds more. I wonder if the truly has become accustomed to the sight or if his placid countenance masks a continuing reverence. I suspect and hope it's the latter. " [Other refs. in this story to Gateway, the Aboriginal character. His ethnicity is not mentioned by name, however.]
Australian Aborigines world 2096 Sterling, Bruce. Holy Fire. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 108. "'Does the polity have any enemies?'

'Of course! Many! Countless hordes! A vast spectrum of refuseniks and dissidents! Amish. Anarchists. Andaman Islanders. Australian aborigines. A certain number of tribal Afghanis. Certain American Indians. And that's just in the A's!' "

Australian Aborigines world 2110 May, Julian. The Many Colored Land in The Many-Colored Land & The Golden Torc (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (copyright 1981); pg. 139-140. "Other time-travelers were reacting to their imprisonment according to their individual psychology... In a shady spot sat an Australoid black man in a crisp white shirt, riding breeches, and elastic-sided boots... "
Australian Aborigines world 3417 Farmer, Philip Jose. Dayworld Breakup. New York: Tor (1990); pg. 28. "Caucasian, Mongolian, Negro, Amerindian, and Australian aborigine have melted together and become one more or less brown race. "
Avar Gaia 2046 Bear, Greg. Eternity. New York: Warner Books (1988); pg. 152. "The Alanoi and Avars had finally held their ground east of the Kaspian, and the Hunnoi north and east of them. For three thousand years, these territories had been in flux, but had kept their basic shapes "
Avar Middle East 650 C.E. Silverberg, Robert. "A Hero of the Empire " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 358. "...the usual sorry huddle of naked merchandise waiting to be sold. As usual, they were a mix of all races, though with a distinct Asian and African cast: Ethiops... flat-faced fair-skinned Circassians and Avars and other sinewy northern folk... "
Azanian Mali 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 283. Pg. 283: "'Ah!' Selous said. 'Azanian Civil Action Corps. Yes, I'm a doctor. Relief camp.'

'We call it Azania now. And you, you're American?' ";

Pg. 284: "'I know a little. What I heard from the other hostages. The last two nights--those were Azanian air raids. My people. Our commandos, too, maybe. I think they hit some fuel dumps--the sky burned all night!'

'Azanian,' Laura said aloud. So that was it. What she'd just lived through. An armed clash between Mali and Azania. It seemed obscure and improbable. Not that an African war was unlikely, they happened all the time. ";

Pg. 286: "'...I think they are taking us to their test site. To make a statement, yes? Me, because I am Azanian, and we Azanians are the people they need to impress at the moment...' " [Other refs., not in DB.]

Azanian Mars 2048 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Red Mars. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 274. "The miners were real Azanians this time, but Azanians who called themselves Afrikaaners, and spoke Afrikaaner among themselves; white men who welcomed John with geavy doses of God, volk, and trek. They had named the canyons they worked in Neuw Orange Free State and Neuw Pretoria. "
Azanian world 2114 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Green Mars. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 444. "On Earth the wars in Nigeria and Azania had caused bitter worldwide economic conflict between Armscor and Subarashii. "
Azanian world 2179 Sawyer, Robert J. Golden Fleece. New York: Time Warner (1990); pg. 95. "...documents of human rights, including the Magna Carta, the Constitution of the United States... the Azanian Bill of Rights and Equalities... "
Azerbaijani Africa 2008 McDonald, Ian. Evolution's Shore. New York: Bantam (1997; c. 1995); pg. 121. Pg. 121: "'Who are they?'

'Azeris. Ex-Soviets. It does not matter. They all do it...' ";

Pg. 124: "'...black-marketeering in stolen goods by one particular unit of Azerbaijani soldiers under the flag of the United Nations.' " [Other refs., e.g., pg. 131, 137, 200, etc.]

Azerbaijani Armenia 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 108. "The mother is trying to find a way to tell her that the father was killed by an Azerbaijani terrorist bomb--a secondary bomb that went off to kill people trying to rescue survivors of the first, smaller, blast... Petra sat there watching this play, knowing exactly how cynical it was. Use a child, play on the yearning for family, tie it to nobility and heroism, making the villains the ancestral enemy... "
Azerbaijani Armenia 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 24. "The disappearance of Petra Arkanian from her home in Armenia was worldwide news. The headlines were full of accusations hurled by Armenia against Turkey, Azerbaijan, and every other Turkish-speaking nation... There was the tearful interviews with her mother, the only witness, who was sure the kidnappers were Azerbaijani. 'I know the language, I know the accent, and that's who took my little girl!' " [Later, it turns out it was Russian agents posing as Azerbaijanis.]
Azerbaijani Azerbaijan 1990 Anderson, Jack. Zero Time. New York: Kensington Publishing (1990); pg. 76. "Not that there was nothing for him to do in Baku. Azerbaijan at the time was in the grip of one of its periodic pogroms, during which the numerically superior Azerbaijanis, who were mostly Shiite Muslims, slaughtered the minority Christian Armenians. The violence was concentrated in Sumgait, one of many mixed-population cities in Azerbaijan; the area was administered from Baku... "
Azerbaijani Azerbaijan 1990 Anderson, Jack. Zero Time. New York: Kensington Publishing (1990); pg. 77. "...the young man was not a member of the Azerbaijani Popular Front, an organization advocating Azerbaijani independence from the Soviet Union... "
Azerbaijani Azerbaijan 1990 Anderson, Jack. Zero Time. New York: Kensington Publishing (1990); pg. 125. "'You do not suspect those bloody Azerbaijani nationalists? They might want a bomb to blow up some Armenians...' "
Azerbaijani Azerbaijan 2100 Gloss, Molly. The Dazzle of Day. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 16. "He went on telling me about the weather--hailstorms in Azerbaijan, drought throughout Africa... "
Azerbaijani Azerbaijan 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 39. "'No, this is just planning stuff. Strategy for a war between Russia and Turkmenistan. Russia and an alliance between Turkmenistan, Kazakhstan, Azerbaijan, and Turkey...' "
Azerbaijani Azerbaijan 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 25. "'Taking [Petra] out of school openly,' said Nikolai, 'would be an announcement of Armenia's military intentions. It might provoke preemptive actions by surrounding Turkey or Azerbaijan.' "
Azerbaijani France 2010 Anthony, Patricia. Cold Allies. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich (1993); pg. 126. "A man looked down. He was an Azerbaijani, Wasef saw. Old enough to have been trained by the Red Army. "
Azerbaijani Georgia (country) 2005 Aldiss, Brian. Somewhere East of Life. New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers (1994); pg. 98. Irving read out the convoluted Georgian script to Burnell.

"It says, 'My eyes were removed by Azeri torturers. I must support my children, my wife being dead. Please help me.' "

Azerbaijani Solar System 2010 Clarke, Arthur C. 2010: Odyssey Two. New York: Ballantine (1982); pg. 232. "'Thank you, Woody,' said Tanya, as she handed him a bulb of his favorite Azerbaijan Shemakha. "
Azerbaijani Ukraine 2010 Anthony, Patricia. Cold Allies. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich (1993); pg. 3. "There in the southern town of Brebonki the ANA [Arab National Army] lay hidden: Iranians, Iraqis, along with the more familiar killers--Uzbeks, Azerbaijanis, and Muslim Cossacks. "
Azerbaijani world 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 35. "She didn't understand Russian either, except for a few loan words in Armenian, and Azerbaijani had loan words like that, too... "
Aztec Arizona 1995 Ing, Dean. The Big Lifters. New York: Tor (1988); pg. 98. Pg. 98, 101, 105-107: Aztec Peak


Aztec, continued

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