Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to literature, United Kingdom: London

literature, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
literature United Kingdom: London 2075 Ryman, Geoff. The Child Garden; or A Low Comedy. New York: St. Martin's Press (1989); pg. 54. "'Do you think,' Rolfa asked, 'that you could possibly call me Pooh?'

The word Pooh meant something very specific and unpleasant to Milena. It certainly did not mean teddy bear.

'Why on earth would you want me to call you that?' Milena asked.

'Pooh,' repeated Rolfa. 'Pooh. You must have heard of Pooh. He's a bear. He's in a book?'

A GE novel? Milena had sudden visions of an entire Polar literature. 'Is it new?' she asked.

'No, no,' said Rolfa and stood up. 'Here.' She showed Milena a drawing of Pooh.

'He's not part of the culture,' said Milena, meaning there was no virus of him. She reads, thought Milena in admiration, unheard-of-books.

'You could call me Pooh. And I could call you Christopher Robin.'

'Why?' said Milena warily. "

literature United Kingdom: London 2075 Ryman, Geoff. The Child Garden; or A Low Comedy. New York: St. Martin's Press (1989); pg. 54. "'Here, look. That's Christopher Robin.'

There was a drawing of a small neat person with a page-boy bob and short and sandals and loose blouse and a large umbrella. There was no doubt. Milena did indeed look exactly like Christopher Robin.

'Not,' said Milena.

'I was going to call you Eeyore,' said Rolfa. 'He's grumpy too.'

'I'll tell you what,' said Milena, 'If I call you Pooh' -- it really was very unpleasant -- 'do you promise, promise not to call me Christopher Robin?' "; Pg. 68: "He was holding Rolfa's copy of Winnie the Pooh. "; Pg. 92: A doll named Piglet.

literature United Kingdom: London 2075 Ryman, Geoff. The Child Garden; or A Low Comedy. New York: St. Martin's Press (1989); pg. 99. Pg. 99: T. S. Eliot; T. E. Lawrence; Brontes; Pg. 214: Moby Dick; Pg. 222: Milton's Paradise Lost; Haydn's The Creation; Pg. 225: The Last of the Mohicans; Pg. 238: Aeneid; Pg. 316: Desdemonia in Otello; Pg. 351: Don Quixote
literature United Kingdom: London 2546 Huxley, Aldous. Brave New World. New York: HarperCollins (1999; c. 1932, 1946); pg. 24. Pg. 24: George Bernard Shaw
literature United Kingdom: London 2546 Huxley, Aldous. Brave New World. New York: HarperCollins (1999; c. 1932, 1946); pg. 237. "The Imitation of Christ; The Varieties of Religious Experience by William James
literature USA 1881 Sanders, William. "Custer Under the Baobab " in Drakas! (S. M. Sterling, ed.) New York: Baen (2000); pg. 11. "Bondservants, the Drakia insisted on calling them, claiming that slavery was extinct and even illegal now. But that was sheer sophistry; the poor devils were slaves, whatever the official terminology, as much as any character of Harriet Beecher Stowe's. "
literature USA 1932 Wilson, Robert Charles. A Hidden Place. New York: Bantam (1989; c. 1986); pg. 28. Pg. 28: "...Public Library and slipping three fat volumes into the night depostory: a Hemingway novel, a book on astronomy, and something by a German named Carl Gustav Jung. "; Pg. 56: Treasure Island
literature USA 1940 Hubbard, L. Ron. Fear. Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (1991; c. 1940); pg. 8. Pg. 8: "..attic floor with indifference; Swift, Tennyson, Carroll, Verne, Dumas, Gibbon, Colonel Ingram, Shakespeare, Homer, Khayyam and the unknown creators of myth and legend of all lands had been his advisers and companions and playmates... "; Pg. 22: "...you said that demons and devils were the manufacture of Machiavellian witch doctors and that men could only be herded by the fear of those things... "
literature USA 1946 Martin, George R. R. "Prologue " in Wild Cards (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1986); pg. 2. "Michael Rennie, now, he looked right in that silvery-blue spacesuit of his, but Tachyon looked like a cross between one of the Three Musketeers and some kind of circus performer. "
literature USA 1949 Jackson, Shirley. "My Life with R. H. Macy " in The Lottery and Other Stories. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (1998; first published 1949); pg. 58. "...and showed me a little book called The Stage-Struck Seal, which it seemed I would be selling. " [Same book mentioned pg. 59]; Pg. 59: "'Where would I find a copy of Ann Rutherford Gwynn's He Came Like Thunder?' "
literature USA 1949 Jackson, Shirley. "Seven Types of Ambiguity " in The Lottery and Other Stories. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (1998; first published 1949); pg. 211. Pg. 212: Jane Eyre, Brontes, Seven Types of Ambiguity, Meredith; Pg. 214: Brontes, Thackeray, Dickens, Meredith mentioned.
literature USA 1949 Jackson, Shirley. "The Villager " in The Lottery and Other Stories. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (1998; first published 1949); pg. 49. Pg. 49: "putting her copy of the Villager down on the counter next to her pocketbook and The Chaterhouse of Parma, which she had read enthusiastically up to page fifty and only carried now for effect. "; Pg. 56: "She took her pocketbook, The Charterhouse of Parma, and the Villager, and closed the door. "
literature USA 1949 Jackson, Shirley. The Lottery and Other Stories. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (1998; first published 1949); pg. 143. Pg. 143: Lengthy quote from Joseph Glanvil's Sadducismus Triumphatus, beginning with "The Confession of Margaret Jackson, relict of Tho. Stuart in Shaws... " and ending with "And declares, That this Man who disappeared was the Devil. "; Pg. 227: Quote from same source, beginning with "We are never liable to b so betray'd and abused, till, by our vile Dispositions and Tendencies, we have forfeited the tutelary... " down to "...make them very suitable. " [Also, note that in this anthology of 27 Shirley Jackson stories literature and writing appear to be a major thematic concern, although there are relatively few actual writers and works of literature mentioned by name.]
literature USA 1950 Dietz, William C. Where the Ships Die. New York: Berkley (1996); pg. 177. [Epigraph by Katherine Anne Porter, American writer, Circa 1950.]
literature USA 1954 Dick, Philip K. "Upon the Dull Earth " in The Preserving Machine. New York: Ace Books (1969; c. 1954); pg. 31. Odyssey; Homer; Ulysses
literature USA 1954 Knight, Damon. "Special Delivery " in The Best of Damon Knight. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1976; c. 1954); pg. 88. Pg. 88: Der Untergang des Abendlandes; Pg. 94: The Man Who Came to Dinner
literature USA 1957 Jones, Raymond F. "The Gardener " in The Non-Statistical Man. New York: Belmont Books (1964; copyright 1957); pg. 104. "He began a recital of the long list of classics, science texts, and Donald Duck comics through which he'd gone with the patient help and guidance of his father. "
literature USA 1959 Bison, Terry. Fire on the Mountain. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 71. Pg. 71: "On an end table several books sat upright between harp bookends: the Holy Bible; Palgrave's Golden Treasury; Walker's Sea to Shining Sea; Emerson's lament for a Lost America; Gone With the Wind; and one title that caught Yasmin's eye, John Brown's Body. "; Pg. 139: "...and I looked behind me and I saw the Negro boy standing robed in the blanket like Hamlet's ghost, with my two pistols! "
literature USA 1963 Grimwood, Ken. Replay. New York: Arbor House (1986); pg. 97. Pg. 97: "...locked himself in his office, and read. Sophocles, Shakespeare, Proust, Faulker . . . all the works he'd meant to absorb before but had never had the time to read. "; Pg. 120: "Tom Wolfe's Kandy-Colored Tangerine Flake Streamline Baby had just been published... "; Pg. 198: Los Angeles Times [Many other newspapers named. L.A. Times also mentioned pg. 229.]
literature USA 1964 Knight, Damon. The Man in the Tree. New York: Berkley Books (1984); pg. 111. Pg. 111: Lady Chatterley's Lover; Pg. 130: The Cask of Amontillado; Pg. 165: Rebecca West, Harriet Hume; The Birds Fall Down; Pg. 170: Joyce's Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man; Pg. 183: Hemingway; Pg. 196: The Pound Era by Hugh Kenner
literature USA 1966 Geary, Patricia. Strange Toys. New York: Bantam (1989; c. 1987); pg. 6. Pg. 6: "Jane Eyre had made a great impression on me. "; Pg. 10: Nancy Drew (also pg. 18, 54); pg. 18: World Book Encyclopedia; The Wind in the Willows; Peter Pan; Nancy Drew; Pg. 58: "...out to dinner and a play, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof... "; Pg. 60: Hemingway's The Sun also Rises; Pg. 104: Edgar Allen Poe; Pg. 109: Stuart Little; Pg. 116: 'The Most Dangerous Game'; Pg. 166: Proust; Pg. 206: Raymond Chandler novels; Pg. 232: Keats
literature USA 1967 Grimwood, Ken. Replay. New York: Arbor House (1986); pg. 72. "...reading a hardcover copy of Airport...

'Hi,' he said. 'Good book?'

...'Kind of trashy, but it's fun. It'd make a better movie, probably.'

Or several, Jeff thought. "

literature USA 1968 Knight, Damon. "Masks " in A Pocketful of Stars (Damon Knight, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1971; c. 1968); pg. 252. "Bound volumes of project reports, technical journals, reference books; no fiction, except for Fire and Storm by George Stewart and The Wizard of Oz in a worn blue binding. "
literature USA 1968 Knight, Damon. "Masks " in The Best of Damon Knight. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1976; c. 1968); pg. 277. "no fiction except for Fire and Storm by George Stewart and The Wizard of Oz in a worn blue binding. "
literature USA 1968 Silverberg, Robert. Dying Inside. New York: Ballantine (1976; c. 1972); pg. 49. "The books everybody was reading were Couples, Myra Breckinridge, The Confessions of Nat Turner, and The Money Game. "
literature USA 1969 Sturgeon, Theodore. "The Man Who Learned Loving " in Nebula Award Stories Five (James Blish, ed.) New York: Pocket Books (1972; 1st ed. 1970; story c. 1969); pg. 154. "This meeting was brought about by a bishop, for never in all these busy years did Mensch overlook his weekly duty at the church of his choice, nor his tithes, nor his donations of time for an occasional Vacation Bible School or picnic or bazaar And Mensch, on this pinnacle of wealth, power and respectability, was able to show the President the duplicate set of documents... " [Also pg. 156-157.]
literature USA 1970 Zelazny, Roger. Nine Princes of Amber in The Chronicles of Amber, vol. 1. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (c. 1970); pg. 6. "...I was garbed all in white, the color of Moby Dick and vanilla ice cream. " [There are doubtless many other literary refs., but no further refs. are in DB for this novel.]
literature USA 1971 Dick, Philip K. "Foster, You're Dead " in The Best of Philip K. Dick. New York: Ballantine (1977; story c. 1954); pg. 224. Pg. 224: Wind in the Willows
literature USA 1972 Carr, Terry. "Ozymandias " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 743. [Afterword] "I'd almost finished the story before I realized that it should be titled 'Ozymandias.' This story is a comment on modern achievements in much the same way that Shelley's poem was a refutation of the vainglorious boasts of pharaohs: 'My name is Ozymandias, king of kings. Look on my works, ye mighty, and despair.'

This time a new Ozymandias awakes to look on his own works, but the reaction is the same. "

literature USA 1972 DuBois, Brendan. Resurrection Day. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1999); pg. 80. Pg. 80: "'...wanted to see if I could live some of the history instead of just reading about it, and then maybe write about it if things came together. Become another Ernest Hemingway if I was lucky enough and talented enough.' "; Pg. 81: "...remembering a book he'd read back in high school, Steinbeck's Grapes of Wrath. All those Okies fleeing the dust bowl and heading west, and Steinbeck was there to tell their stories...' "
literature USA 1972 DuBois, Brendan. Resurrection Day. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1999); pg. 135. "...a slim book. 'Here. Barbara Tuchman wrote this, just before the Cuban War. Called The Guns of August In it, someone asks a German general how the First World War started and he said, 'Ah, if we only knew.'...' " [More.]
literature USA 1972 Knight, Damon. "On the Wheel " in One Side Laughing. New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; 1972); pg. 71. Time magazine [Indexed here, because there is nothing else in the story to index. But usually the names of magazines are not indexed.]
literature USA 1972 Nelson, Ray. "Time Travel for Pedestrians " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 140. Martin Esslin, The Theatre of the Absurd
literature USA 1973 Goldman, William. The Princess Bride. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich (1973); pg. 5. "When I was twenty-six, my first novel, The Temple of Gold, was published by Alfred A. Knopf. (Which is now part of Random House which is now part of R.C.A. which is just part of what's wrong with publishing in America today which is not part of this story.) " [More. Goldman makes many references to his own books and screenplays in the quasi-biographical 'introduction' to this novel.]
literature USA 1973 Goldman, William. The Princess Bride. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich (1973); pg. 8. "It was on the back of the thank-you note and what it said was, 'Idiot. Not even the immortal S. Morgenstern could feel more parental than I.'

S Morgenstern! The Princess Bride. She remembered!

Flashback.

1941. Autumn. I'm a little cranky because my radio won't get the football games...

Pneumonia today is not what it once was, especially when I had it. Ten days or so in the hospital and then home for the long recuperating period. I guess it was three more weeks in bed, a month maybe. No energy, no games even. I just was this lump going through a strength-gathering time, period.

Which is how you have to think of me when I came upon The Princess Bride.

It was my first night home. Drained; still one sick cookie. My father came in, I thought to say good night. He sat on the end of my bed. 'Chapter One. The Bride,' he said. " [Many refs. throughout novel to The Princess Bride, which doesn't actually exist. Author 'pretends' to abridge it.]

literature USA 1973 Goldman, William. The Princess Bride. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich (1973); pg. 11. Pg. 11: Sir Walter, Cooper, The Deerslayer, Leatherstocking; Pg. 12: Dumas; D'Artagnan; Hugo; The Hunchback of Notre Dame; The Temple of Gold; Pg. 13: Ira Levin's The Stepford Wives (also pg. 16, 31); Pg. 15: William Goldman's Boys and Girls Together (also pg. 41); Doubleday; Pg. 19: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich (other refs., incl. pg. 167); Pg. 30: Goldman's Soldier in the Rain; Pg. 36: Voltaire; Pg. 41: Oxford English Dictionary; Pg. 71: Moby-Dick; Pg. 91: Homer; Pg. 204: Edith Neisser: Brothers and Sisters and The Eldest Child, published by Harper; Pg. 206: "This isn't Curious George Uses the Potty. "; Pg. 308: "The Lady or the Tiger "
literature USA 1974 Simmons, Dan. The Crook Factory. New York: Avon Books (1999); pg. 430. "I really did not begin reading fiction until after World War II. I began with Homer and spent a decade just working my way to Charles Dickens and Dostoyevsky. I did not read a Hemingway book until 1974. I started The Sun Also Rises the week that Nixon resigned from office.

I see the weakness in Hemingway's self-conscious prose and in his even more self-conscious philosophical stances. At times, especially in the later books such as Across the River and Into the Woods, the critics are right: Hemingway's style becomes a parody of Hemingway's style.

It is in the short stories that I best hear the voice of Ernest Hemingway. It is there in his short stories that I began to see the hawk in the dab of blue for a sky... " [More.]

literature USA 1976 Matheson, Richard. What Dreams May Come. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1978); pg. 213. "'The good life,' she said. 'I swear to God I feel like a character in some Neil Simon play, everything around me falling apart, everything inside me shriveling.' "
literature USA 1977 Ing, Dean. "Portions of this Program . . . " in Anasazi. New York: Tor (1987; c. 1977); pg. 8. Pg. 8: Epigraphs: Quotes by Louise Taichert, 1973, and Miriam Deshong, 1992.; Pg. 41: "'I was over there last week; they're working up a production of Medea....' "
literature USA 1978 Maggin, Elliot S. Superman: Last Son of Krypton. New York: Warner Books (1978); pg. 102. "'...How'd you find my headquarters?'

'Oh, that. Pygmalion.'

' 'Scuse me?'

'Pygmalion. My Fair Lady. It was the reason I became interested in philology. I read George Bernard Shaw's Pygmalion when I was a boy and was impressed with the man who was able to tell where people live by their regional accents. I always wanted to be able to do that.' "

literature USA 1978 Matheson, Richard. What Dreams May Come. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1978) [Frontispiece] "For in that sleep of death what dreams may come,
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
Must give us pause.

--Hamlet, Act III, Sc. 1 "

literature USA 1978 Rosenbaum, Karen. "Hit the Frolicking, Rippling Brooks " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1978); pg. 89. "It lasts forever, maybe three minutes. In a Flannery O'Connor short story it would be a symbol of the Holy Ghost. "
literature USA 1979 Ing, Dean. Soft Targets. New York: Tor (1996; c. 1979) [frontispiece] ". . . I found fear a mean, overrated motive; no deterrent and, though a stimulant, a poisonous stimulant whose every injection served to consume more of the system . . .'

--T.E. Lawrence
Seven Pillars of Wisdom "

literature USA 1980 Dick, Philip K. "Breakfast at Twilight " in The Best of Philip K. Dick. New York: Ballantine (1977; story c. 1954); pg. 195. "'I'll take a couple of these along. I haven't seen fiction in months. Most of it disappeared. burned back in '77.'

'Burned?'

Douglas helped himself. 'Shakespeare. Milton. Dryden. I'll take the old stuff. It's safer. None of the Steinbeck and Dos Passos. Even a police can get in trouble. If you stay here, you better get rid of that.' He tapped a volume of Dostoevski, The Brothers Karamazov.

'If we stay! What else can we do?' "

literature USA 1980 Maggin, Elliot S. Superman: Miracle Monday. New York: Warner Books (1981); pg. 32. Pg. 32: Oedipus; Pg. 93: "...a book by Carlos Castaneda... Nixon's autobiography... "; Pg. 131: "...reading a paperback edition of Ragtime by E. L. Doctorow. "; Pg. 190: Catch-22
literature USA 1980 Waldrop, Howard. "Ugly Chickens " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1980); pg. 490. Pg. 490: "Then comes the Faulkner part of the tale, straight out of As I Lay Dying.. "; Pg. 496: Thomas Wolfe
literature USA 1981 Crowley, John. Little, Big. New York: Bantam (1981); pg. 6. Pg. 6: "He had smelled few books other than his father's leather-bound classics; he could recite two hundred lines of Virgil more or less accurately; and he wrote in perfect Chancery hand. "; Pg. 79: Darwin's Descent of Man; Pg. 116: "He had heard of Casanova, but hadn't read him. "; Pg. 344: ...her old encyclopaedia (tenth Britannica), the sixth volume of Gregorovius on Medieval Rome... the Prophecies of Abbot Joachim da Fiore... "
literature USA 1981 Crowley, John. Little, Big. New York: Bantam (1981); pg. 31. "There were sets of sermons, volumes of George MacDonald, Andrew Jackson Davis, Swedenborg. There was a couple of yards of the Doctor's children's stories, pretty, shoddily bound, with repetitious titles... Upstate Houses and Their Histories... "
literature USA 1981 Zelazny, Roger. Unicorn Variations. New York: Timescape (1983); pg. 40. [Introduction by author to his story "Recital "] "I feel that ever now and then one should play around with the storytelling act itself to help maintain one's appreciation for narrative forms. Look where it got Joyce, Pirandello, Kafka and All Those Guys. My ambition along these lines is considerably smaller, however. That's why it's a very short story. "
literature USA 1982 Norden, Eric. "The Curse of Mhondoro Nkabele " in The Best from Fantasy & Science Fiction: 24th Series (Edward L. Ferman, ed.) New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1982); pg. 152. Pg. 152: "The initial reception of James Joyce's Ulysses is but one case in point . . . "; Pg. 168: "Ever Ellison has his Brutus... "; Pg. 176: Ralph Waldo Emerson; Pg. 177: Sherlock Holmes; Hegel
literature USA 1982 Simmons, Dan. "The River Styx Runs Upstream " in Prayers to Broken Stones. New York: Bantam (1992; c. 1982); pg. 17. [Pg. 17, story frontispiece] "What thou lovest well remains
the rest is dross
What thou lov'st well shall not be reft from thee
What thou lov'st well is thy true heritage . . .

--Ezra Pound
Canto LXXXI ";

Pg. 23: "Father didn't make up stories, but he used to read to us from a big book he called Pound's Cantos. I didn't understand most of what he read, but the words felt good and I loved the sounds of words he said were Greek. "; Pg. 25: "Father's classes had fewer and fewer students and finally he took a sabbatical to write his book on Ezra Pound. "; Pg. 29: "Father quit teaching after Simon's death. He never went back after the sabbatical, and his notes for the Pound book sat stacked in the basement with last year's newspapers. "; Pg. 30: "He had read his Plutarch. "

literature USA 1982 Willis, Connie. "Lost and Found " in Fire Watch. New York: Bluejay (1984; story copyright 1982); pg. 73. "'It looks like a rough draft of a book or something,' Finney said. 'Like a manuscript. What do you think?'

'I don't need to think,' Mrs. Andover said. 'I know what it is. It's the manuscript copy of Lawrence's book The Seven Pillars of Wisdom. He wrote it after he became famous as Lawrence of Arabia, before he--succumbed to his unhappiness. It was lost in Reading Railway Station in 1919.' " [More about this book.]

literature USA 1983 Knight, Damon. "Forever " in One Side Laughing. New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; 1981); pg. 227. "...the best-selling novels were Mark Twain's Life in an Iceberg, The Borderland by Robert Louis Stevenson, and The Society of Ink-Tasters by Arthur Conan Doyle. "
literature USA 1985 Anderson, Jack. Control. New York: Kensington Publishing Corp. (1988); pg. 86. Pg. 86: four lines of a poem by W. S. Gilbert; Pg. 87: Pygmalion; Pg. 139: Thoreau
literature USA 1985 Bear, Greg. "Dead Run " in Tangents. New York: Warner Books (1989; story c. 1985); pg. 159. "'You. Why are you going to Hell?'

...'I don't know!' she said, flinging her hands up. 'I was a librarian. When all those horrible people tried to take books out of my library, I fought them. I tried to reason with them . . . They wanted to remove Salinger and Twain and Baum . . .' "

literature USA 1985 Zelazny, Roger. Trumps of Doom. New York: Arbor House (1985); pg. 24. Pg. 24: "For a long while. I did something then that I had sort of promised myself I would not. Hadn't Faust thought a beautiful moment worth a soul? "; Pg. 135: "I guess that my thoughts at funerals are typical. Like Bloom in Ulysses, I usually think the most mundane things about the deceased and the current goings-on. The rest of the time my mind wanders. "; Pg. 170: "'Not now,' he replied. 'Later. You don't read War and Peace on your coffee break.' "
literature USA 1986 Anderson, Jack. Control. New York: Kensington Publishing Corp. (1988); pg. 23. "'...He had taken along a paperback copy of The Hunt for Red October, and he had finished it half an hour ago...' "
literature USA 1986 Anderson, Jack. Control. New York: Kensington Publishing Corp. (1988); pg. 26. "The summer afterward, she had appeared for a week in Connecticut at the Westport Country Playhouse in The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds. This was followed by a two-week appearance at the Guthrie Theater in Minneapolis as Mary Magdalene in Jesus Christ Superstar, followed by a three-month tour of the midwest as Petra in A Little Night Music. "
literature USA 1986 Anderson, Jack. Control. New York: Kensington Publishing Corp. (1988); pg. 27. Pg. 27: Damn Yankees; Pg. 35: Night Trails (more, pg. 36-42, 85, etc.)
literature USA 1986 Anderson, Jack. Control. New York: Kensington Publishing Corp. (1988); pg. 29. Pg. 23: People; Pg. 29: "At the end of 1984, Catlett Communications Enterprises, Incorporated had owned the Pittsburgh Star, the Cleveland Post-Advertiser, the Buffalo Register, the Philadelphia Courier, the Washington Register-Herald, the New York Sentinel-American, the American Terrier, and sixty-eight of the small suburban sheets that Thad called 'neighborhoods.' "; Pg. 30: Freideutsche Zeitung; Wirstschaftstage; Wall Street Journal; Zwar; Le Droit; Sentinel-American; Pg. 41: Newsweek; Pg. 45: Washington Post; Pg. 47: Pittsburgh Star [Many other refs. to newspapers in novel, not in DB. The main character is an investigative reporter.]
literature USA 1986 Atwood, Margaret. The Handmaid's Tale. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin (1986); pg. -3. [Frontispiece.] "But as to myself, having been wearied out for many years with offering vain, idle, visionary thoughts, and at length utterly despairing of success, I fortunately fell upon this proposal . . .

--Jonathan Swift, A Modest Proposal "

literature USA 1986 Brooks, Terry. Magic Kingdom for Sale - Sold!. New York: Ballantine (1986); pg. 11. Pg. 11 and pg. 288: Don Quixote
literature USA 1986 Wolfe, Gene. Soldier of the Mist. New York: Tor (1986); pg. xiv. [Foreword.] "If the average well-read American were asked to name five famous Greeks, he would probably answer, 'Homer, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, and Pericles.' Critics of Latro's account would do well to recall that Homer had been dead for four hundred years at the time Latro wrote, and that no one had heard of Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, or Pericles. " [Latro is the novel's narrator. Entire novel takes place in ancient Greece. There may be other refs. to ancient Greek literature, but no other refs. indexed in DB.]
literature USA 1987 Willis, Connie. "Ado " in Impossible Things. New York: Bantam (1994; story copyright 1988); pg. 113. [Author's introduction.] "I wrote 'Ado' when political correctness was still just a gleam in some activist's eye, and the only thing the Fundamentalists were trying to do was keep The Catcher in the Rye from being taught in high school. In the years since, productions of The Taming of the Shrew have been picketed by feminists, a federal judge has upheld the banning of The Wizard of Oz and 'Cinderella' from Tennessee public schools, and the Nancy Drew books have been removed from the Boulder Public Library on the grounds that they are sexist and racist... "
literature USA 1988 Bourne, Mark. "Boss " in Alternate Tyrants (Mike Resnick, ed.) New York: Tor (1997); pg. 30. "You ever heard of this fella? This Noam Chomsky? Or this one, Bob Woodward? Or Harlan Ellison? No? Yes sir, the Helms Act shut them up real permanent, you betcha. (He chuckles.) yeah. Real permanent.

I push them away and ask, Don't you have a copy of the Banned list? The waitress has returned and asks if we'd like anything else. Schuyler scoops the illicit material into his coat. "



literature, continued

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