Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to literature, United Kingdom

literature, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
literature United Kingdom 1891 Baxter, Stephen. The Time Ships. New York: HarperCollins (1995); pg. 302. Pg. 302: "'...Remarkably. I should have thought that a few weeks of this Robinson Crusoe stuff would pretty much have driven me batty with loneliness...' "; Pg. 512: "It was like a great ship from the past, its keel broken on the reef of time; and I was a castaway of like origin, a Crusoe from out of antiquity. "
literature United Kingdom 1900 Farmer, Philip Jose (written as Harry Manders). "The Problem of the Sore Bridge--Among Others " in Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Space. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) USA: Bluejay Books (1984); pg. 35-36. "Harry Manders... His earliest works were agented by E. W. Hornung, Arthur Conan Doyle's brother-in-law. "
literature United Kingdom 1940 Lupoff, Richard (writing as Ova Hamlet). "God of the Naked Unicorn " in Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Space. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) USA: Bluejay Books (1984); pg. 308. "At this very moment there rest in the clutches of this brilliant maniac [Moriarty] both Sherlock Holmes and Sir John Clayton, Lord Greystoke, the man known to the world at large as--Tarzan of the Apes!'

'Holmes and Greystoke? At one time? And very nearly yourself as well, Doc Savage?' I exclaimed. 'Who can this devil be...'

...Captain John Carter took up the narration. 'A woman of protean nature whose admirers have identified her variously as the Princess Dejah Thoris of Helium--as Joan Randall, daughter of the commissioner of the interplanetary police authority... Margo Lane... the Shadow... Jane Porter Clayton, Lady Greystoke--and as Miss Evangl Stewart of New York City's bohemian quarter Greenwich Village...' "

literature United Kingdom 1940 Lupoff, Richard (writing as Ova Hamlet). "God of the Naked Unicorn " in Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Space. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) USA: Bluejay Books (1984); pg. 306-307. "D'Artagnan... The heading of the scroll read Personages United in League as Protectors. The names subtended therefrom were indeed numerous, including not only all of those in the room... but also many others, of which a random selection included such familiar and unfamiliar appellations as Jules de Grandon, Anthony Rogers, Sir Dennis Nayland Smith, Jimmy Dale, Arsene Lupin, Kimball Kinnison, Nicholas Carter, Stephen Costigan, and entire columns more.

...'And mine,' the Shadow stated with a sinister chuckle, 'are the playboy Lamont Cranston, the chauffeur Moe Shrevnitz, the communications wizard Burbank, and the near-suicide Harry Vincent!'...

'Each of these,' Doc Savage concluded, 'serves his time in the kitchen, the armory, or elsewhere in the Fortress and other farflung outposts of the League between assignments in personal service to his respective employer.'

... Clark Savage, Jr... Cardinal Richelieu... Dr. Fu Manchu... " [Other refs. not in DB.]

literature United Kingdom 1967 Russ, Joanna. The Female Man. New York: G. K. Hall (1977; 1975); pg. 134. Pg. -1: Frontispiece: Quote from R. D. Laing, The Politics of Experience, Penguin Books, Ltd., London, 1967.; Pg. 134: John Stuart Mill's The Subjegation of Women; Pg. 135: "Faust is male. "; Pg. 171: "Like Garbo playing Anna Karenina, decorated all over "; Pg. 191: "Anything pursued to its logical end is revelation; as Blake says. "
literature United Kingdom 1969 Aldiss, Brian. "Nothing in Life is Ever Enough " in Supertoys Last All Summer Long. New York: St. Martin's Griffin (2001; c. 1999); pg. 83. "Here I would lie for hours on end when not called upon to work, reading books I found in the library, old-fashioned books: romances by Dumas and Jules Verne, novels by Thomas Hardy and Dostoevsky, and the plays of Shakespeare -- one of which in particular took my fancy, since it was set on an island. "
literature United Kingdom 1976 Asimov, Isaac. "The Ultimate Crime " in Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Space. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) USA: Bluejay Books (1984; copyright 1976); pg. 343. "'...The whole Holmesian technique of detective was invented by Edgar Allan Poe; and his detective, Auguste Dupin, is the original Sherlock. However, Poe only wrote three stories about Dupin and it was Holmes who really caught the imagination of the world. "
literature United Kingdom 1976 Asimov, Isaac. "The Ultimate Crime " in Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Space. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) USA: Bluejay Books (1984; copyright 1976); pg. 339-340. "'The Baker Street Irregulars,' said Roger Halsted, 'is an organization of Sherlock Holmes enthusiasts. If you don't know that, you don't know anything.'

...'When I was an adolescent I read Sherlock Holmes stories with a certain primitive enjoyment, but I'm not an adolescent anymore. The same, I perceive, cannot be said for everyone.'...

'Actually, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was not, in my opinion, an exceedingly good mystery writer. Agatha Christie is far better.'

'That's a matter of opinion,' said Rubin, who as a mystery writer himself, was far less opinionated and didactic in that one field than in all the other... 'Christie had the advantage of reading Doyle and learning from him. Don't forget, too, that Christie's early works were pretty awful. then, too... Agatha Christie never got over her... xenophobic prejudices... she was openly anti-Semitic...' " [More discussion of Christie versus Doyle. Many other references to Holmes in this story; other not in DB.]

literature United Kingdom 1984 Adams, Douglas. So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish. New York: Harmony Books (1984); pg. 22. "'Fenny . . .?'

'You know what I got her for Christmas?'

'Well, no.'

'Black's Medical Dictionary.'

'Nice present.'

'I thought so. Thousands of diseases in it, all in alphabetical order.' "

literature United Kingdom 1984 Wellen, Edward. "Voiceover " in Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Space. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) USA: Bluejay Books (1984); pg. 226. "...the Encyclopedia Britannica, Bunyan's The Holy War, Boccaccio's Decameron, Flaubert's Letters, Murger's Scenes de la vie de Boheme, The Origin of Tree Worship, Practical Handbook of Bee Culture... "
literature United Kingdom 1988 Adams, Douglas. The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul. New York: Simon and Schuster (1988); pg. 117. "It was a large book called Run Like the Devil. In fact, it was extremely large and a little dog-eared... " [More about this book, pg. 162-163:] "'...The theory is that the reason he [Howard Bell] sells so many millions of copies is that nobody ever does read the. If everyone who bought them actually read them they'd never bother to by the next one and his career would be over.' "
literature United Kingdom 1994 Holdstock, Robert. The Hollowing. New York: Roc (1994); pg. -2. [Frontispieces] Pg. -2: Quote from Sir Gawain and the Green Knight; Pg. zero: Quote from The Inheritors by William Golding; Pg. 98: Odysseus; Pg. 159: "Longfellow... his account of Hiawatha "
literature United Kingdom 1995 Aldiss, Brian. "Dark Society " in Supertoys Last All Summer Long. New York: St. Martin's Griffin (2001; c. 1995); pg. 153. Pg. 153: Epigraph: Quote by Sir Thomas Browne, 1690.; Pg. 164: Seamus Heaney;

Pg. 171: "'This is Hell, nor are we out of it . . .', as Shakespeare immortally puts it.'

'Marlow!' screamed Cleat...

'Tut, of course, Marlow... Marlow. Must remember. Good old Christopher Marlowe.' ";

Pg. 179: "Sophocles, recovered from his hemlock "

literature United Kingdom 1996 Bova, Ben. "Legendary Heroes " in Twice Seven. New York: Avon Books (1998; c. 1996); pg. 113. Pg. 113: "My name is Orion, that much I knew. And I serve Beowulf, hero of the Geats, who had sailed to far-off Daneland to kill the monster that had turned timbered Heorot, the hall of the stag, from King Hrothgar's great pride to his great sorrow. "; Pg. 119: "'...At Troy I helped Odysseos and his Achaians to triumph...' " [Many other refs., not in DB.]
literature United Kingdom 1996 Knight, Damon. Humpty Dumpty: An Oval. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 75. Pg. 75: "When I came back, my neighbor was reading a Clive Barker novel, the two fat people were reading Die Zeit... "; Pg. 86: The Mushroom Boy; Pg. 89: Stevenson's A Child's Garden of Verses; Pg. 91: Robert Graves; Pascal; Pg. 103: Pascal; Pg. 111: "The Water-Babies by Charles Kingsley "
literature United Kingdom 1999 Willis, Connie. "Adaptation " in Miracle and Other Christmas Stories. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 123. "'Heap on more wood! The wind is chill;
But let it whistle as it will,
We'll keep our Christmas merry still.'

--SIR WALTER SCOTT "

literature United Kingdom 1999 Willis, Connie. "Adaptation " in Miracle and Other Christmas Stories. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 130. Pg. 130: Dickens's Little Dorrit; Trollope's Barchester Towers; Marmion by Sir Walter Scott; "tale of Sir David Lindesey "; Pg. 132-133: A Little Princess (also pg. 137, 142, 153, many more); Pg. 133: Anne of Green Gables; Little Women; Pg. 138: Ivanhoe; The Mystery of Edwin Drood; Pg. 151: Sir Walter Scott, 'Twas the Night Before Christmas'
literature United Kingdom 2015 Willis, Connie. "Cat's Paw " in Miracle and Other Christmas Stories. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 158. "He had already affected Lord Peter Wimsey's monocle and Hercule Poirot's treatment of his 'assistant,' and he had met me at the station... " [Also here: Dorothy Sayers, Paul Alexis, Edgar Allan Poe's The Murders in the Rue Morgue (also pg. 159). Many allusions to 19th century British literature throughout story, most not in DB.]
literature United Kingdom 2015 Willis, Connie. "Cat's Paw " in Miracle and Other Christmas Stories. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 163. "'...D'Artagnan is a conscious being, fully capable of making personal decisions. He's scored 95 on IQ tests. He named himself after one of the Three Musketeers. It's his favorite book.'

'Good Lord, he can read, too?' I said.

'She shook her head. 'Only a few words. I read it aloud to him.'

D'Artagnan nodded his huge head. 'Queen,' he said.

'Yes, he loves the part about the Three Musketeers coming to the queen's aid.' " [Many refs. to this orangutan throughout story.]

literature United Kingdom 2015 Willis, Connie. "Cat's Paw " in Miracle and Other Christmas Stories. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 164. "'...She reads The Cat in the Hat and all the Curious George books, haven't you, Heidi?' "
literature United Kingdom 2015 Willis, Connie. "Cat's Paw " in Miracle and Other Christmas Stories. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 204. "Like D'Artagnan and the other Musketeers, who would have done anything to protect their queen. "
literature United Kingdom 2020 Aldiss, Brian. "Headless " in Supertoys Last All Summer Long. New York: St. Martin's Griffin (2001; c. 1994); pg. 68. "As so often in times of trouble, people turned toward their solicitors, the Archbishop of Canterbury and Gore Vidal for consolation -- not necessarily in that order. "
literature United Kingdom 2026 Moffett, Judith. Time, Like an Ever-Rolling Stream. New York: St. Martin's Press (1992); pg. xxxiii. "Remembering the pictures in my beat-up old copy of Jenny Shepherd's Tomten translation that Carrie gave me years ago... "
literature United Kingdom 2030 McAuley, Paul J. Fairyland. New York: Avon Books (1997; c 1995); pg. 3. "The jacket of his suit is tight across his shoulders; although the salesman assured him that its green tweed check complemented his red hair, Alex thinks it makes him look a little like Oscar Wilde. Who wouldn't be out of place in the lovingly restored heritage decor of the Ladies' Smoking Room... " [Other ref. to Wilde, pg. 6.]
literature United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 25. "...a chest of drawers full of salmon flies which had been tied by Merlyn himself... a nest of field mice all alive-o, two skulls, plenty of cut glass, Venetian glass, Bristol glass and a bottle of Mastic varnish, some satsuma china and some cloisonne, the fourteenth edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica (marred as it was by the sensationalism of the popular plates), two paint-boxes... " [an intentional anachronism]
literature United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 28. "He [Merlyn] then demanded pencil and paper in quick succession; got an unsharpened pencil and the Morning Post; sent them back; got a fountain pen with no ink in it and six reams of brown paper suitable for parcels; sent them back; flew into a passion in which he said by-our-lady quite often, and ended up with a carbon pencil and some cigarette papers which he said would have to do. " [the wizard summoning anachronisms]
literature United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 43. "You would have burned upon the water like Cleopatra in the poem. "
literature United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 46. "The small congregations of perch... had delicate circulations so that they blushed or grew pale as easily as a lady in a Victorian novel. "
literature United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 208. "All round the churchyard there were hundreds of old friends. They rose over the church wall all together, like the Punch and Judy ghosts of remembered days... "
literature United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 332. Pg. 332: "It is even difficult to imagine a boy who would do it, unless you realize from the start hat Lancelot was not romantic and debonair. Tennyson and the Pre-Raphaelites would have found it difficult to recognize this rather sullen and unsatisfactory child... "; Pg. 334: "...or the articulation of a pauldron, or whether cedarwood was better than ash for spears, as Chaucer seems to have believed. "
literature United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 647. "It is Jocasta, not Juliet, who dwells in the inner chamber. It is Gertrude, not the silly Ophelia, who sends Hamlet to his madness. "
literature United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 370. "They would have written to The Times about it, if there had been such a paper. "
literature United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 383. "Under the grotesque, magnificent shell with a face like Quasimodo's, there was shame and self-loathing... "
literature United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 384. "He believed, like the man in Lord Tennyson, that people could only have the strength of ten on account of their hearts being pure. " [More about Tennyson, pg. 559.]
literature United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 405. Pg. 405: Anna Karenina, Vronsky; Pg. 547: Edgar Allan Poe
literature United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 559. "Lancelot and Guenever were sitting at the solar window. An observer of the present day, who knew the Arthurian legend only from Tennyson and people of that sort, would have been startled to see that the famous lovers were past their prime. We, who have learned to base our interpretation of love on the conventional boy-and-girl romance of Romeo and Juliet, would be amazed if we could step back into the Middle Ages--when the poet of chivalry could write about Man that he had 'en ciel un dieu, par terre une deese.' Lovers were not recruited then among the juveniles and adolescents: they were seasoned people, who knew what they were about. In those days people loved each other for their lives, without the conveniences of the divorce court and the psychiatrist. "
literature United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 564. "As Malory pictures him, Arthur of England was the champion of a civilization which is misrepresented in the history books. The serf of chivalry was not a slave for whom there was no hope. On the contrary, he had at least three legitimate ways of rising... "
literature United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 647. "People write tragedies in which fatal blondes betray their paramours to ruin, in which Cressidas, Cleopatras, Delilahs, and sometimes even naughty daughters like Jessica bring their lovers or their parents to distress: but these are not the heart of tragedy. They are fripperies to the soul of man. What does it matter if Antony did fall upon his sword? It only killed him. It is the mother's not the lover's lust that rots the mind. It is that which condemns the tragic character to his walking death. It is Jocasta, not Juliet, who dwells in the inner chamber. It is Gertrude, not the silly Ophelia, who sends Hamlet to his madness. The heart of tragedy does not lie in stealing or taking away. Any feather-pated girl can steal a heart. It lies in giving, in putting on, in adding, in smothering without the pillows. Desdomena robbed of life or honour is nothing to a Mordred, robbed of himself--his soul stolen, overlaid, wizened, while the mother-character lives in triumph... "
literature United Kingdom: England 1774 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 133. Pg. 133: "'Ah yes. Selkirk.' Gabriel chuckled. 'Among the less remunerative but more celebrated exploits of the Duke and the Duches was the rescue of the marooned sailor Alexander Selkirk from the island of Juan Fernandez. 'Twas Selkirk's account that inspirted Daniel what's-his-name to write his book. Robinson Crusoe.'

'Defoe!' Ann chortled. 'Daniel Defoe. The book has become quite famous.'

Now it dawned on Maggie that this family connection was why Robinson Crusoe was permitted in the Sunniside library. "; Pg. 170: "She put aside the book she was reading, which he could see now was Robinson Crusoe... "; [Also pg. 96, 221.]

literature United Kingdom: England 1790 Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein. New York: Bantam (1991; c. 1818); pg. 2. Pg. 2: "I imagined that I also might obtain a niche in the temple where the names of Homer and Shakespeare are consecrated. "; Pg. 7: "...but I shall kill no albatross; therefore do not be alarmed for my safety or if I should come back to you as worn and woeful as the 'Ancient Mariner.' You will smile at my allusion, but I will disclose a secret. I have often attributed my attachment to, my passionate enthusiasm for, the dangerous mysteries of ocean to that production of the most imaginative of modern poets. " [Coleridge. More.]; Pg. 22-24: Henry Clerval (more refs. elsewhere); Pg. 24: Cornelius Agrippa (elsewhere); Pg. 25: Paracelsus and Albertus Magnus (more refs. elsewhere); Pg. 45: The Vicar of Wakefield; Pg. 104: Volney's Ruins of Empire; Pg. 112: "Paradise Lost, a volume of Plutarch's Lives, and the Sorrows of Werter. " (more about these)
literature United Kingdom: England 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 1. Pg. 1: Byron
literature United Kingdom: England 1880 Anthony, Patricia. "Dear Froggy " in Eating Memories. Woburn, MA: First Books; Baltimore, MD: Old Earth Books (1997; c. 1993); pg. 199. "'But it is in a scientist's nature to question, even though he plumb the horrifying depths of his soul and discover his own Mr. Hyde.'

Of course this was her own Mr. Hyde, she told herself. "

literature United Kingdom: England 1880 Anthony, Patricia. "Dear Froggy " in Eating Memories. Woburn, MA: First Books; Baltimore, MD: Old Earth Books (1997; c. 1993); pg. 220. "Clutching her gift to Froggy, a slender copy of Keats which she had salvaged from Lionel's ravagings... "
literature United Kingdom: England 1940 Ondaatje, Michael. The English Patient. London, UK: Bloomsbury (1996; c. 1992); pg. 187. Pg. 187: Raymond, or Life and Death by Sir Oliver Hodge; Pg. 186: Pierre, or the Ambiguities
literature United Kingdom: England 1940 Ondaatje, Michael. The English Patient. London, UK: Bloomsbury (1996; c. 1992); pg. 211. "He was humming the song Hardy had been singing in the jeep on the way to the site--

They're changing guard at Buckingham Palace--
Christopher Robin went down with Alice.
"

literature United Kingdom: England 1955 Lewis, C.S. The Magician's Nephew (Narnia #6). New York: Macmillan (1970; c. 1955); pg. 1. Pg. 1: "In those days Mr. Sherlock Holmes was still living in Baker Street and the Bastables were looking for treasure in the Lewisham Road. "; Pg. 4: "'Or he might have been a pirate, like the man at the beginning of Treasure Island, and be always hiding from his old shipmates.' "
literature United Kingdom: England 1972 Blish, James & Judith Ann Lawrence. "Getting Along " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 555. [The story "Getting Along " is comprised of letters which parody the writing of famous genre writers. The writers parodied are not identified in the body of the story, but are identified on page 555 in the introduction:

1. John Cleland
2. Bram Stoker
3. Mary Shelley
4. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
5. John Colier/Lord Dunsany
6. A. Merritt
7. H. G. Wells
8. Victor Appleton
9. H. P. Lovecraft. "

literature United Kingdom: England 1982 Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Mists of Avalon. New York: Ballantine (1984; c. 1982); pg. iii. "'. . . Morgan le Fay was not married, but put to school in a nunnery, where she became a great mistress of magic.'

--Malory, Morte d'Arthur "

literature United Kingdom: England 1982 Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Mists of Avalon. New York: Ballantine (1984; c. 1982); pg. v. [Acknowledgments.] Pg. v: "I should probably cite, first, my late grandfather... who first gave me a battered old copy of the Sidney Lanier edition of the Tales of King Arthur, which I read so often that I virtually memorized the whole thing before I was ten years old. My imagination was also stirred by varied sources such as the illustrated weekly Tales of Prince Valiant... James Frazer's The Golden Bough... "; Pg. vi: Christine Hartley's The Western Mystery Tradition and Dion Fortune's Avalon of the Heart; Margaret Murray; Crystal Well; Starhawk's The Spiral Dance
literature United Kingdom: England 1987 Adams, Douglas. Dirk Gentley's Holistic Detective Agency. New York: Simon and Schuster (1987); pg. 36-44. Pg. 14: "It's the Coleridge Dinner... Coleridge was a member of the college, you know... Coleridge. Samuel Taylor. Poet. I expect you've heard of him. This is his Dinner. Well, not literally, of course. It would be cold by now. "; [Pg. 36-44: Much about Coleridge, and the entire poem "Kubla Khan " is quoted. The poem is broken up and included as part of the narrative. The chapter describes a person reading the poem as part of the annual Coleridge Dinner, held at St Cedd's College in honor of the poet, who is said (in this novel) to have been a student there. See also pg. 87, and other refs. to Coleridge in novel.]; Pg. 147: "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner ";Pg. 241: 6 lines quoted again from "Kubla Khan. " [More about Samuel Taylor Coleridge pg. 223-225, elsewhere. Coleridge himself may be an actual character in the novel, through time travel, or meeting his ghost or something.]
literature United Kingdom: England 1987 Adams, Douglas. Dirk Gentley's Holistic Detective Agency. New York: Simon and Schuster (1987); pg. 146. Keats
literature United Kingdom: England 2100 Burgess, Anthony. A Clockwork Orange. New York: W. W. Norton & Co. (1963; c. 1962); pg. 6. Pg. 5: Elementary Crystallography; Pg. 6: The Miracle of the Snowflake; The Rhombohedral System
literature United Kingdom: England 2100 Burgess, Anthony. A Clockwork Orange. New York: W. W. Norton & Co. (1963; c. 1962); pg. 23. Pg. 23: "...while he fillied with the author of A Clockwork Orange, making his litso all purple and dripping away like some very special sort of juicy fruit. "; Pg. 154: "On the table was a typewriter and a lot of like tumbled papers, and i remembered that this veck was a writer veck. A Clockwork Orange, that had been it. It was a funny that stuck in my mind. I must not let on, though, for I needed help and kindness now. "; Pg. 155: "I had to be very careful, brothers. I said: 'I have heard of A Clockwork Orange. I have not read it, but I have heard of it. " [Also, pg. 158.]
literature United Kingdom: London 1875 Blaylock, James P. Homunculus. New York: Ace Books (1986); pg. 24. Pg. 24: "...who sat reading a copy of the Peloponnesian Wars... "; Pg. 45: Ashbless' Account of London Philosophers; Pg. 119: Squires' Complications; Pg. 170: Euglena's Chemical Cures
literature United Kingdom: London 1888 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "A Study in Scarlet " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1888); pg. 20. "Sherlock Holmes--his limits... Knowledge of sensational Literature.--Immense. He appears to know every detail of every horror perpetrated in the century. "
literature United Kingdom: London 1888 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "A Study in Scarlet " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1888); pg. 25. "It is simple enough as you explain it, " I said, smiling. "You remind me of Edgar Allan Poe's Dupin. I had no idea that such individuals did exist outside of stories. "

Sherlock Holmes rose and lit his pipe. "No doubt you think that you are complimenting me in comparing me to Dupin, " he observed. "Now, in my opinion, Dupin was a very inferior fellow. That trick of his of breaking in on his friends' thoughts with an apropos remark after a quarter of an hour's silence is really very showy and superficial. He had some analytical genius, no doubt; but he was by no means such a phenomenon as Poe appeared to imagine. "

"Have you read Gaboriau's works? " I asked. "Does Lecoq come up to your idea of a detective? "

literature United Kingdom: London 1888 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "A Study in Scarlet " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1888); pg. 25. Sherlock Holmes sniffed sardonically. "Lecoq was a miserable bungler, " he said, in an angry voice; "he had only one thing to recommend him, and that was his energy. That book made me positively ill. The question was how to identify an unknown prisoner. I could have done it in twenty-four hours. Lecoq took six months or so. It might be made a textbook for detectives to teach them what to avoid. "

I felt rather indignant at having two characters whom I had admired treated in this cavalier style. I walked over to the window and stood looking out into the busy street. "This fellow may be very clever, " I said to myself, "but he is certainly very conceited. " [More.]

literature United Kingdom: London 1888 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "A Study in Scarlet " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1888); pg. 48. "...This is a queer old book I picked up at a stall yesterday--De Jure inter Gentes--published in Latin at Liege in the Lowlands, in 1642. Charles's head was still firm on his shoulders when this little brown-backed volume was struck off. "

"Who is the printer? "

"Philippe de Croy, whoever he may have been. On the flyleaf, in very faded ink, is written 'Ex libris Guliolmi Whyte.' I wonder who William Whyte was. Some pragmatical seventeenth-century lawyer, I suppose. His writing has a legal twist about it. Here comes our man, I think. "

literature United Kingdom: London 1890 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "The Sign of Four " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1890); pg. 147. "...I am going out now. I have some few references to make. Let me recommend this book--one of the most remarkable ever penned. It is Winwood Reade's Martyrdom of Man. I shall be back in an hour. "
literature United Kingdom: London 1890 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "The Sign of Four " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1890); pg. 147. "...I am going out now. I have some few references to make. Let me recommend this book--one of the most remarkable ever penned. It is Winwood Reade's Martyrdom of Man. I shall be back in an hour. "
literature United Kingdom: London 1989 Campbell, Ramsey. Ancient Images. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1989); pg. 32. Pg. 32: "Latest Alan Ayckbourn play... "; Pg. 51: Conan Doyle; "The Lofty Place " by F. X. Faversham; Pg. 124: Agatha Christie; Robin Hood
literature United Kingdom: London 1989 Ryman, Geoff. The Child Garden; or A Low Comedy. New York: St. Martin's Press (1989); pg. -5. [Frontispiece] "That the future is a faded song, a Royal Rose or a lavender spray
Of wistful regret for those who are not yet here to regret . . .

--T. S. Eliot, Four Quartets "

literature United Kingdom: London 1990 Byatt, A.S. Possession. New York: Random House (1991; c. 1990); pg. 4. Pg. 4: "The London Library was Roland's favourite place... Here Carlyle had come, here George Eliot had progressed through the bookshelves. "; pg. 20: "...a heap of books, two of which could be seen to be the Divina Commedia and Faust... others... Quixote and Lyell's Geology... "; Pg. 27: Balzac; Robert Louis Stevenson; George Eliot; Pg. 28: "He had known them all, two whole generations, Wordsworth, Coleridge, De Quincey, Lamb; Mme de Stael, Goethe, Schiller; Carlyle, G.H. Lewes, Tennyson, Clough, Bagehot. "; Pg. 29: "...Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare and Milton. "; Charlotte Bronte; Lady Byron; Pg. 126: John Donne; Pg. 266: Virginia Woolf; Pg. 273: Moby Dick; Pg. 224: Keats; Tennyson; Eliza Daunton; Pg. 525: Edgar Allan Poe; Melville; Hawthorne [Extensive literary refs. throughout the novel. The novel is about two literary scholars, who study two poets, who in turn wrote with extensive allusions to literature. Other literary refs. not in DB.]
literature United Kingdom: London 1995 Ryman, Geoff. 253. New York: St. Martin's Press (1998); pg. 54. Pg. 54: "Famous pupils include John Milton, Samuel Pepys, Field-Marshal Montgomery and G. K. Chesterton. "; Pg. 117: Duncton Wood, a novel about moles; Pg. 173: Musketeers; Pg. 238: Samuel Beckett's Godot; Pg. 269: Beowulf; Pg. 290: Chaucer; Pg. 340: "She is Anne Frank, the famous diarist, but she doesn't know that. She has wandered Europe for the last 50 years... Anne thinks she is still on the train to Auschwitz, and that she is trying to make people happy one last time. " [Some other refs., not in DB.]
literature United Kingdom: London 2075 Ryman, Geoff. The Child Garden; or A Low Comedy. New York: St. Martin's Press (1989); pg. 9. Pg. 9: "T S Elio and Vivien! "; Pg. 28: The Mikado; Madam Butterfly; Pg. 34: Beowulf; Pg. 36: George Bernard Shaw, Falstaff; Pg. 64: "Shakespeare. T. S. Eliot. Jane Austen "; [Many refs. throughout novel to literature and authors. This is a focus of the novel. The novel takes place in a future London where viruses educate people automatically, so everybody has mental access to the world's literature, learning, etc. The main character, however, is a person who lacks the ability to absorb information this way. Most refs. not in DB.]


literature, continued

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