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34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

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literature, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
literature galaxy 2300 Clement, Hal. "Exchange Rate " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 484. [Year estimated] Pg. 479: "They had designed and grown the paraffin tanker some humorist with a background in historical trivia had named the Jellyseal... "; Pg. 484: "But Candlegrease was nevertheless being grown and modified outside in the Halfbaked environment, where the more serious planning errors should show up quickly. An overpowered and overweight runabout, named Annie from another ancient literary source, and intended to tow the carrier... "
literature galaxy 2300 Zelazny, Roger. "Angel, Dark Angel " in Unicorn Variations. New York: Timescape (1983; story c. 1967); pg. 188. John Locke; Dante and Virgil; Homer
literature galaxy 2350 Bear, Greg. Beyond Heaven's River. New York: Dell (1980); pg. 64. "'Sometimes I think you enjoy being a Methuselah.'

'A Rip van Winkle, you mean.' "

literature galaxy 2350 Bear, Greg. Beyond Heaven's River. New York: Dell (1980); pg. 81. Pg. 81: "' 'Once a philosopher, twice a pervert,' as Voltaire said.' "; Pg. 89: "'I have lived to see it,' Kawashita said. 'There are advantages to being a Rip van Winkle.' "; Pg. 108: "'Yoshio is very much like Rip van Winkle, but even more like the fisher-boy Urashima Taro--our way of placing names. Fifteen hundred years ago, Taro was fishing when he captured a turtle...' " [More.]
literature galaxy 2365 Lorrah, Jean. Metamorphosis (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1990); pg. 11. "Pulaski, Worf, and Geordi got into a heated debate over the book Data had given Worf: a copy of Moby Dick complete with nineteenth-century woodcut illustrations. Data knew the adventure/revenge format would appeal to the Klingon, and looked forward to discussing its literary merits with him. "
literature galaxy 2366 David, Peter. Q-in-Law (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1991); pg. 25. "'Spring, Number One,' Picard said with an expansive wave of his hands... 'Spring, when a young man's fancy lightly turns on thoughts of love, as Tennyson said.' "
literature galaxy 2366 Gilden, Mel. Boogeymen (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1991); pg. 144. [Author's note] Pg. -3: "The poem that Captain Picard recites to Wesley is by Victorian poet James Thomson (1834-1882). ";

Pg. 144: "Picard sighed and said, 'Mr. Crusher, I would like to quote a poem to you.'

'Yes, sir,' Wesley said, bewildered.

Picard recited:

'Once in a stately passion
I cried with desperate grief,
'O Lord, my heart is black with guile,
Of sinners I am chief.'
Then stooped my guardian angel
And whispered from behind,
'Vanity, my little man,
You're nothing of the kind.'

'Do you understand, Wesley? It is sometimes arrogant to claim all the guilt.' "

literature galaxy 2367 Duane, Diane. Dark Mirror (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1993); pg. 60. "He went to the shelf, scanned the volumes there for a moment, and finally reached for Anabasis, the 'Journey of the Ten Thousand': a good textbook for a man who wasn't sure where to go or what to do next. Those Greeks had not, either. Marooned in Asia after their battle with a huge Persian force...' " [More.]
literature galaxy 2367 Duane, Diane. Dark Mirror (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1993); pg. 185. "...the complete Shakespeare, and the ancient King James Bible... eclectic: the three original-edition Dixon Hill books, of course: Murder in Camera, The Knowing Look, and Under the Sun. Then two of the venerable old hardcover Everyman editions of Kipling, Barrack Room Ballads and Kim. One of the first Centauri Press editions, a reprint of Glocken's The Stars out of Joint; various others--a book of Restoration poets, Sun Tzu's The Art of War in the long-lost Cordwainer Smith translation, along with Rouse's prose Iliad and Odyssey, and Hamilton's peerless translations of Aristotle and the great comedies of Aristophanes. The Oxford University Press hardcover of Eddison's Eriks Saga, next to a weary, broken-spined trade paperback of Little, Big; and so many others... the Eyre and Spottiswoode edition of Colin Watson's droll and acute Snobbery and Violence... "
literature galaxy 2367 Duane, Diane. Dark Mirror (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1993); pg. 190. Pg. 190: The Revenger's Tragedy; Pg. 190-191: Iliad; Pg. 191: "Shakespeare was not wholly lost; Kipling, idiosyncratic as always, was still himself; so was Aristotle. But the closer the books came to modern times, the more corrupt their philosophies seemed... "
literature galaxy 2368 Bischoff, David. Grounded (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1993); pg. 40. Pg. 40: "...even Data found it all so interesting that he tried to 'suspend his disbelief,' as the English poet Samuel Coleridge put it, and pretend he was actually there... "; Pg. 166: "What was that cycle of William Blake poems? Yes, Songs of Innocence and Experience. "
literature galaxy 2368 David, Peter. Imzadi (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1992); pg. 138. "'Captain . . . you're giving me motives that are far too Machiavellian...' "
literature galaxy 2368 Wright, Susan. Sins of Commission (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1994); pg. 2. [All of chapter 1, pages 1-7, deals with a simulation on the holodeck based on the French play Cyrano de Bergerac. The play ties in thematically to the plot of this novel.] Pg. 2: "The difficulty was maintaining the integrity o the original while enhancing it with the new. In Picard's opinion, that's exactly what Barclay had done with this play, Cyrano de Bergerac. Even the clothing of the cast wasn't quite seventeenth century but a melange of synthetic fibers combined with classical restraints and ornamented by dark glowing jewels. Strand of sparkling gold and pearls were laced...

The program was running--Picard could see the thief and Christian over to one side. he could have chosen to view the scene from a box or the top of the stairs, but instead he moved among the crowd of men who mingled on the bare floor of the theater. " [Much more.]

literature galaxy 2368 Wright, Susan. Sins of Commission (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1994); pg. 2. Pg. 2: "Barclay had become more than a genius when his brain was enhanced by the alien probe they encountered at the Argus Array. Picard considered it fortunate that Barclay had been involved in a production of Cyrano de Bergerac when the contact had been made. Picard agreed with most critics that the essence of Rostand's French verse had never been fully captured in English. Yet Barclay had translated it offhandedly one night, complete with the production notes and set design. When Beverly read it, she had insisted his version be performed right then and there. "; Pg. 5: Right in front of them, Cyrano began the 'Ballade of the Duel between Monsieur de Bergerac and an Idiot in the Theatre de Bourgogne.' " [More.]
literature galaxy 2368 Wright, Susan. Sins of Commission (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1994); pg. 67. "'Where is Lieutenant Chryso?' he asked Korn.

Korn straightened up. 'She's in shuttlecraft Voltaire, sir. I have only one more shuttle to go before yours.'

'Thank you. I'll wait for dispatch in the Voltaire.' " [Other refs. to the shuttle Voltaire, incl. pg. 68, 225.]

literature galaxy 2368 Wright, Susan. Sins of Commission (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1994); pg. 183. "'...You know Cyrano de Bergerac?'

'The French play? Yes.'

'Well, Cyrano didn't know the meaning of moderation--apparently just like the Sli. One physical attribute was of excessive proportion, and he made it a point to make every aspect of his life of equally heroic measure... he threw away a year's pay on one grand gesture. He loved a woman for fifteen years, and never breathed a word of his heart. It was all or nothing with Cyrano.'

'As I also recall,' Guinan put in dryly, 'Cyrano challenged an entire theater of people to a duel and sought out a fight with a hundred men at a time, dragging a friend along with him.'

Picard stopped his pacing. 'I'm not defending the Sli. I have reports here from Data, Dr. Crusher, and Counselor Troi that prove the Sli are a much more subtle danger than we first believed.' "

literature galaxy 2368 Wright, Susan. Sins of Commission (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1994); pg. 264. "The words echoed in Deanna's head. It was the speech from Cyrano de Bergerac. The captain was throwing herself into the words, acting them, feeling what he was saying. She followed his lead, copying his emotion and focusing it for the Sli. "
literature galaxy 2369 Krider, Dylan Otto. "What Went Through Data's Mind 0.68 Seconds Before the Satellite Hit " in Star Trek: Strange New Worlds (Dean Wesley Smith, ed.) New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 91. "Geordi and I had joined him on the holodeck for a chapter of The Three Musketeers, and Lt. Barclay had brought his own foil for the occasion. We came upon a band of thieves and Lt. Barclay had fought them off brilliantly, as the computer was programmed to allow him to do. Then in a triumphant gesture, Lt. Barclay drove the sword down onto his foot... "
literature galaxy 2370 ab Hugh, Dafydd. Balance of Power (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1995); pg. 80. [Apparent reference to Dumas' The Three Musketeers.] Pg. 80: "After a moment, iron fingers gripped the back of Wesley's neck; the short, powerful guard with the 'd'Artagnan' mustache forced the cadet to his knees, then pulled him back to his feet.

'Certes, m'boy,' squeaked Munk, 'what have ye brought night?' " [Other refs. to D'Artagnan, pg. 82-86, 95, 133-134, etc.]

literature galaxy 2370 Dillard, J. M. & Kathleen O'Malley. Possession (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1996); pg. 258. "...flanked by two Galaxy-class starships. 'The Odyssey and the Constitution,' Data said... "
literature galaxy 2370 Johnson, Kij & Greg Cox. Dragon's Honor (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1996); pg. 27. Pg. 13: "'My God,' Beverly said, obviously amused, 'this sounds like something out of The Mikado.' "; Pg. 27: "'...What gorgeous robes.'

'Left over from my revival of The Mikado,' she explained. "

literature galaxy 2370 Thompson, W.R. Infiltrator (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1996); pg. 1. "'Cheerful tonight,' aren't you?' He reached out and stroked her cheek. ' 'So lovely fair, that what seem'd fair in all the world seem'd now mean.' I'll be back for you.'

'I know.' The quote from Milton--Adam's description of Eve, another type of firstborn--warmed her as it always did. She kissed him. 'Now get going.' " [More on Milton and Paradise Lost: pg. 186-189.]

literature galaxy 2370 Thompson, W.R. Infiltrator (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1996); pg. 278. "'In Paradise Lost, when Satan incited his followers to revolt, one angel refused to follow him, despite all threats and arguments. That quote was the congratulations he received for remaining loyal to the forces of good.'

Worf grunted in understanding, while Picard raised an eyebrow. 'Number One, you continually surprise me. I had now idea you were a Milton scholar.' " [More, pg. 277.]

literature galaxy 2371 Betancourt, John Gregory. Incident at Arbuk (Star Trek: Voyager). New York: Pocket Books (1995); pg. 97. Pg. 97-98: "Everyone had a different way of coping with it. Chakotay had tasted such responsibility as head of a Maquis ship; now he fell back on Native American rituals and an animal spirit-guide. Other captains she knew used yoga meditations, strenuous physical exercise, or highly focuses hobbies or outside interests to keep them sane. She had her holonovels. She set aside half an hour for them every time she felt the stress getting too great, and she'd certainly felt stress today.

She'd left off in the middle of Wuthering Heights. The bleak moors had been especially well done, she thought as she settled down in her chair. She closed her eyes for a second, slowing her breath, getting ready to plunge into Heathcliff's world.

Then the intercom hailed her. "

literature galaxy 2371 David, Peter. Triangle: Imzadi II (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 34. [Pg. 34: John Donne mentioned, and the full quote from "No man is an island " to "never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for the " is quoted by Deanna Troi. Done also mentioned pg. 52-53.]
literature galaxy 2371 Golden, Christie. The Murdered Sun (Star Trek: Voyager). New York: Pocket Books (1996); pg. 97. "The first thing that flashed into Tom Paris's mind as he, Chakotay, and Torres materialized on Veruna Four was the title of an old Earth poem: Paradise Lost. He'd never read the piece, knew nothing of what it was about, but the two words seemed to sum up the dreadful enormity of the catastrophe that was occurring, both in the space above the planet and on the surface itself. "
literature galaxy 2372 ab Hugh, Daffyd. Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: The Conquered (Book 1 of 3 in "Rebels " trilogy). New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 111. "Alas, as the Scottish poet Bobbie Burns wrote, a verse that came back to O'Brien again and again: " [More.]
literature galaxy 2372 ab Hugh, Daffyd. Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: The Courageous (Book 2 of 3 in "Rebels " trilogy). New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 64. "Quark paced round and round a circle, mumbling to himself something that sounded suspiciously like 'latinum, latinum everywhere, nor any strip to spend.' If Coleridge were alive today, he'd be spinning in his grave, thought the captain mirthlessly. "
literature galaxy 2372 ab Hugh, Dafydd. The Final Fury (Star Trek: Voyager/Invasion! #4). New York: Pocket Books (1996); pg. 40. Pg. 40: "Navdaq led them through long, dank, creepy halls, 'caverns measureless to man,' as Coleridge might describe it. Or in the words of Radolph Na, a twenty-second-century poet that Janeway was just beginning to read,

Cold cupped hands
Squeeze
Squirt like Paq seeds into deep night. . . .
";

Pg. 220: "...and arcing over the entire valley, forming a glittering gold dome, a godlike version of Kubla Khan's Xanadu, was an inverted, convex power-grid antenna. "

literature galaxy 2372 ab Hugh, Dafydd. The Final Fury (Star Trek: Voyager/Invasion! #4). New York: Pocket Books (1996); pg. 88. "The beginning of a stately, old, human poem by Samuel Taylor Coleridge kept running through Captain Janeway's head; she couldn't stop it:

In Xanadu did Kubla Khan
A stately pleasure-dome decree:
Where Alph, the sacred river, ran,
Through caverns measureless to man
Down to a sunless sea.
"

literature galaxy 2372 Cox, Greg. The Black Shore (Star Trek: Voyager). New York: Pocket Books (1997); pg. 278. Pg. 108: Extended discussion about Fletcher Christian, captain of the Bounty, as portrayed in 'Mutiny on the Bounty'; Pg. 278: "Captains log, stardate 491750.9. Perhaps instead of worrying about a Mutiny on the Bounty, I should have been rereading The Odyssey instead, especially the verses about Circe's enchanted island. In the end, however, my crew valiantly refused to succumb to the dangerous temptations of Ryolanov, and I find myself departing this sector with renewed faith and confidence in our ability to cope with whatever the Delta Quadrant throws at us. We may be each of us a long way from home, but we're in very good company indeed. "
literature galaxy 2373 Golden, Christie. Marooned (Star Trek: Voyager). New York: Pocket Books (1997); pg. 40. "'We'd never even have thought to look for this if you hadn't remembered your Alice in Wonderland story,' said Torres.

'Next time we're stumped, I'll make sure I consult Winnie the Pooh.'Torres looked puzzled but Kim was too busy laughing... "

literature galaxy 2373 Robinson, Peg. "The First " in Star Trek: Strange New Worlds (Dean Wesley Smith, ed.) New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 136. "He frowned, and crossed the main room of his living quarters, pulling an old book down off the shelf. It was a vanity . . . he'd bought it when he graduated from the academy, from a little bookseller's shop in London. It was old, and battered, but it was real paper. He'd always loved books, and their burden of bright words and brighter ideas. But this book he'd bought for the ancient author, recorder of British imperialism that somehow seemed to echo the more egalitarian Federation's wide-scattered wonders, and for the magic token of the man he'd read once owned similar books: Captain James Kirk. Admiral Kirk. The mythmaker. The polymath, with his energy, and his passion, his luck and his charisma . . . and his books. Shakespeare, Dickens, Melville . . . Kipling.

Kipling. The author of Empire. A man who had loved Empire, but loved it with fewer illusions than many. A man who had whispered as often of caution, and humility, and obligation... " [More, not in DB.]

literature galaxy 2373 Robinson, Peg. "The First " in Star Trek: Strange New Worlds (Dean Wesley Smith, ed.) New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 137. "Picard ruffled through the pages [of the Kipling book], seeing the stories--all old, and familiar. The poems--many committed to memory years since. He found the one he wanted.

God of our fathers, known of old,
Lord of our far-flung battle-line,
Beneath whose awful Hand we hold
Dominion over palm and pine--
Lord God of Hosts, be with us yet,
Lest we forget--lest we forget!

The tumult and the shouting dies;
The Captains and the Kings depart;
Still stands Thine ancient sacrifice,
An humble and a contrite heart.
Lord God of Hosts, be with us yet,
Lest we forget--lest we forget!

There was more, but he didn't need it. The message was there... Picard closed the book... He didn't think he believed in a God . . . not as such. Not in any form Kipling, in his Victorian, British, Christian-conditioned certainties, would have recognized as God. But Picard did understand prayer. Or, at least, he understood this prayer. "

literature galaxy 2373 Robinson, Peg. "The First " in Star Trek: Strange New Worlds (Dean Wesley Smith, ed.) New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 138. "Lily had taught him that: Lily, far in the past. Primitive by today's standards. He could hear her voice, still. 'Ahab,' 'You broke your little ship.' " [A reference to the scene in Star Trek: First Contact when Lily makes a reference to Melville's Moby Dick.]
literature galaxy 2373 Smith, Dean Wesley & Kristine Kathryn Rusch. The Mist (Star Trek: DS9 / The Captain's Table: Book 3 of 6). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 247. "The age-darkened bar laughed with carved Canterbury Tales-type figures. "
literature galaxy 2374 Carey, Diane. . . . Sacrifice of Angels (Star Trek: DS9 / The Dominion War: Book 4 of 4). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 55. [Frontispiece] "Out-worn heart, in a time out-worn,
Come clear of the nets of wrong and right;
Laugh, heart, again in the grey twilight,
Sigh, heart, again in the dew of the morn.

--William Butler Yeats,
Into the Twilight "

literature galaxy 2374 Carey, Diane. Fire Ship (Star Trek: Voyager / The Captain's Table: Book 4 of 6). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 4. "The age-darkened bar laughed with carved Canterbury Tales-type figures. "
literature galaxy 2374 Cox, Greg. Q-Space (Star Trek: TNG / The Q Continuum: Book 1 of 3). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 45. Pg. 45: "The music of Carmen, the original French Radio recordings, played softly in the background. He sat pensively at his desk as Escamillo sang his Toreador's Song, the infectious melody decidingly at odds with his own somber musings. Picard's weary eyes scanned the dog-eared, leatherbound volumes that filled his bookshelves, everything from Shakespeare to Dickens to the collected poetry of Phineas Tarbolde of Canopus Prime; precious though they were to him, none of the books in his library seemed to offer any definitive solution to the problem of establishing the veracity of an erratic superbeing. At least, he reflected, Dante could be confident that Virgil was telling him the whole truth about the Divine Comedy; the possibility of deceit was not an issue. ";

Pg. 173: Baron Diabolis in Chapter 23 of The Quest for the Golden Throne

literature galaxy 2374 Cox, Greg. Q-Space (Star Trek: TNG / The Q Continuum: Book 1 of 3). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 266. "...transcendent realm surpassing the Xanadu of Kublai Khan or fabled Sha Ka Ree of Vulcan myth and legend... "
literature galaxy 2374 David, Peter. The Quiet Place (ST: New Frontier). New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 253. "'...she was acting in a production of a play by a 20th Century Russian writer named Anton Chekhov...' "
literature galaxy 2374 de Lancie, John & Peter David. I, Q (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 19. Pg. 19: "So . . . back to the holodeck. Picard and Data were relaxing on a small yacht, which was named the Hornblower for some reason that I'm sure was important to Picard, but makes little difference to this narrative. The sea was quite calm, because Picard, master of al he surveys, wanted it that way... " [Other refs. to the Hornblower, not in DB.]; Pg. 115: "This Pollyannaish sentiment was getting huge nods of approval. What idiots! "
literature galaxy 2374 Forstchen, William R. Forgotten War (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 28. "' 'Bring me a map and let me see, how much is left to conquer all the universe,' ' she whispered.

'What was that?' Will asked.

'It's Marlowe, from his play Tamburlaine the Great, though the word was 'world,' not 'universe.' It was one of Murat's favorite quotes...' "

literature galaxy 2374 Friedman, Michael Jan. Planet X. New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 234. "First came Onizuka, Commander Riker's vessel. Then came the Pike, commanded by Counselor Troi. And finally the Voltaire, with Worf and his people aboard. "
literature galaxy 2374 Golden, Christie. Seven of Nine (Star Trek: Voyager). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 61. Pg. 61: "'Ravens or some other black bird, huh?'

'Correct.'

Kim cocked his head and thought. 'Edgar Allen Poe. Nevermore. The Two Corbies. Sing a Song of Sixpence. The Ugly Duckling. No, wait, he turned into a swan. Umm . . . .' " [More.];

Pg. 106: "But she [Seven] had always been, to Janeway's mind, like Pygmalion's statue--cold, without the spark of warmth to make her fully human, fully alive. Her beauty wasn't fully realized. "

literature galaxy 2374 Vornholt, John. Gemworld: Book One (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 115. "With all the ropes hanging from it, the starship looked like a metallic Moby Dick--a monster dwarfing everything in sight. "
literature galaxy 2375 David, Peter. Excalibur: Renaissance (ST: New Frontier). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 24. "'And the worst is that new place, the one you want to book us at . . . what's it called? Oh, right--'El Dorado.' What sort of incredibly stupid name is that?'

'Well, aside from the literary reference, I tend to suspect that the hotel's founder, Laurence Dorado . . . L. Dorado . . . didn't think it such a foolish name at all.' "

literature galaxy 2375 David, Peter. Excalibur: Renaissance (ST: New Frontier). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 167. "'Ahhh, yes. Ye dinna want me t'be calling ye 'lassie.' Muh apologies.'

'Why don't you want him to call you that?' asked Nik.

'It's stupid. It's . . .' She sighed. 'When I was a kid, my father read me a book called Lassie Come-Home. It was about a collie, and the family couldn't afford to keep her, so they found her another home...' " [More.]

literature galaxy 2375 DeCandido, Keith R. A. Diplomatic Implausibility (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 70. "Smiling, Riker quoted, ' 'Better to reign in hell than serve in heaven.' '

Klag frowned. 'What?'

Riker had uttered the quote in English. He repeated in Klingon, substituting Sto-Vo-Kor for heaven and Gre'thor for hell. The translation didn't entirely hold up, as those two realms in Klingon mythology were not precise analogues to the human concepts. 'It's from a human poet named John Milton. Basically, it means that is' better to be the ruler of a bad place than to be a subordinate in paradise.'

Klag nodded. 'Ah, I see. Obviously, you disagree with the poet.'

'I didn't used to. Time was I lived my life by it. But that was before I signed onto the Enterprise...' "

literature galaxy 2375 Lang, Jeffrey. Immortal Coil (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (2002); pg. 236. "Were they to have been father and daughter? Husband and wife? Master and apprentice? Pygmalion and Galatea? "
literature galaxy 2375 Mack, David. "The Star Trek: New Frontier Minipedia " in Excalibur: Restoration (ST: New Frontier). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 368. "El Dorado
Terran literary/historical reference: A legendary 'City of Gold' in South America on Earth, spoken of by the Aztecs to the Spanish explorers who arrived in the 15h century.

In the 24th century, El Dorado is a well-known luxury hotel on Risa... "

literature galaxy 2375 Mack, David. "The Star Trek: New Frontier Minipedia " in Excalibur: Restoration (ST: New Frontier). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 381. "Lassie
Fictional canine character of a 20th-century Terran book, movie and television series. Lassie was a collie dog. "
literature galaxy 2375 Pellegrino, Charles & George Zebrowski. Dyson Sphere (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. -3. [Frontispiece] "God is in the details.

--Freeman Dyson "

[Also, quote by Stephen Jay Gould]

literature galaxy 2375 Pellegrino, Charles & George Zebrowski. Dyson Sphere (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 129. "As the Klingon climb into the cockpit of the Feynman, something on 'those islands' beckoned to Picard like the Sirens of Greek mythology. The still air brought strangeness, and he thought of how death had been prophesied to Odysseus--'It shall come to you out of the sea, death in his gentlest guise.' "
literature galaxy 2375 Robinson, Andrew J. A Stitch in Time (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 85. "The days of preparation for the Competition were exhilarating. They started when Nine approached me as I sat alone in our quarters reading the first part of Cylon Pareg's Eternal Stranger, a saga spanning several generations of a Cardassian family during the early and middle Union. Spellbound by its magic, I tried to avoid the interruption until... "
literature galaxy 2375 Robinson, Andrew J. A Stitch in Time (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 161. "What is it?' I asked.

'It's a recitation mask. Hebitian poets wore it at festivals that celebrated Oralius.'

'Was he . . . their leader?' I asked.

'In a spiritual sense... At the festival, the poet would put the mask on before he'd recite. In this way, he was no longer Elim or Tolan or any of 'us.' He was a conduit . . . a connector who with the help of his poetry brought the higher power of Oralius down to those of us who were there . . . who wanted this. . .' " [More.]

literature galaxy 2375 Smith, Dean Wesley. A Hard Rain (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (2002); pg. 82. Pg. 82: "Dix glanced at the titles of a few of the books. All great classics, in fine first editions. Dickens, Shakespeare, and Melville were just a few authors Dix recognized as he glanced around. There were also classic mystery and romance as well. Too bad he didn't have a year or two to just curl up in this wonderful room and read. "; Pg. 91: "...the shot was wide and high, ripping through the spine of an old volume of Wuthering Heights. "
literature galaxy 2375 Weddle, David and Jeffrey Lang. Abyss (Star Trek: DS9/Section 31 #3). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 287. "He was thinking bout the term 'mothball.' Many, many years ago, he had looked the word up in one of the older editions of the Oxford Dictionary of Terran Languages... "
literature galaxy 2376 David, Peter. "Death After Life " in What Lay Beyond (ST: New Frontier). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 208. "'And I heard about the Hundred Acre Woods, Mac, but I'm not going in search of Winnie-the-Pooh. This, all of this . . . it's not real. It's what we said before, a sort of . . . of mutual delusion. But it's not real . . .' "
literature galaxy 2376 David, Peter. Cold Wars (ST: New Frontier / Gateways: Book 6 of 7). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 341. "'When I went to school years ago . . . there was a poem I memorized . . . by an Earthman named Shelley:

'I met a traveler from an antique land
Who said: Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert . . . Near them, on the sand,
Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown,
And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
The hand that mocked them, and the heart that felt

'And on the pedestal these words appear:
'My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:
Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!'
Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare
The lone and level sands stretch far away.'

For only a moment there was silence, and then Zak Kebron rumbled, 'Thank you, Captain. Cheered everyone right up.' "

literature galaxy 2376 DeCandido, Keith R.A. "Horn and Ivory " in What Lay Beyond (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 140. "Two gates for ghostly dreams there are: One gateway of honest horn, and one of ivory. Issuing by the ivory gate are dreams of glimmering illusion, fantasies, but those that come through solid polished horn may be borne out, if mortals only know them.

--Homer, The Odyssey "

literature galaxy 2377 David, Peter. Being Human (ST: New Frontier). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 3. "...reading a text about his new favorite obsession: ancient mythologies. This particular text had been produced by a twentieth-century scholar, Joseph Campbell... and George considered the text far more sweeping and interesting than, say, Bullfinch's Mythology. " [More.]
literature galaxy 2378 Dillard, J. M. Star Trek: Nemesis. New York: Pocket Books (2002); pg. 191. "'Captain, the Hemingway has arrived to tow us to spacedock.' "
literature galaxy 2400 Anderson, Poul and Gordon R. Dickson. "The Adventure of the Misplaced Hound " in Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Space. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) USA: Bluejay Books (1984); pg. 85. [Year estimated.] Pg. 85 "'Bring me the big map of Toka, Rajat Singh,' said Alex.

'At once, sahib,' the servant bowed again and disappeared. Geoffrey looked his surprise.

'He's been reading Kipling,' said Alex apologetically. It did not seem to clear away his guest's puzzlement. "; Pg. 86: "'Well... the Hokas are unique. Only in the last few years have we really begun to probe their psychology. They're highly intelligent... and fantastically literal-minded. They have difficulty distinguishing fact from fiction, and since fiction is so much more colorful, they don't usually bother. Oh, my servant back at the office doesn't consciously believe he's a mysterious East Indian; but his subconscious has gone overboard for the role...' " [Many other refs. throughout story, not in DB.]

literature galaxy 2450 Kato, Ken. Yamato II: The Way of the Warrior, Part 2. New York: Warner Books (1992); pg. 1. "...interSectoral treaty in 2442. No one could have any knowledge of secret technical advances made in Xanadu since that time, and since Ganesh Ramakrishnan had left America... " [Other refs. to Xanadu, pg. 11, 69, 77.]


literature, continued

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