Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

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Atlantean, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Atlantean Roman Empire 500 C.E. Garfinkle, Richard. Celestial Matters. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 17. Pg. 17: "At the wedding feats I indulged like a sybarite in the wonders of... chickens potted with Atlantean tubers, wine aged in cedar casks... "; Pg. 30: "Egyptian barges... Indian frigates, Atlantean longships, and so many others. "; Pg. 76: "She unrolled it and pointed to a small town on a river two-thirds of the way down the eat coast of North Atlantea.

"I spent a lot of time in Atlantea as a child,' I said... "; Pg. 85: "The cave was a demicylinder, like an eastern Atlantean longhouse. "; Pg. 97: "The Atlantean tribes that knew of him said never to trust Coyote, but seeing no other option... " [Other refs., not in DB.]

Atlantean Roman Empire 620 C.E. Douglas, L. Warren. The Veil of Years. New York: Baen (2001); pg. 233. "Theseus's Athenians rose up in arms against the last Minos, the king of Atlantean Crete, and burned his labyrinthine palace, destroying the great golden bull mask he wore, and slaying the man who wore it. "
Atlantean Texas 1996 Leon, Mark. The Unified Field. New York: Avon Books (1996); pg. 40. "'...obscure references in one of the Platonic dialogues.'

'The Critias,' Alan said. 'Most scholars place it among Plato's final works. The myth of Atlantis figures into Plato's discussion of the ideal society.'

...'suppose Atlantis does exist outside of myth...' " [Much more, pg. 39-40, 72-75, 81, 95, 102-103, 119, etc.]

Atlantean Texas: Dallas 1998 Wood, Crystal. Cut Him Out in Little Stars. Denton, TX: Tattersall Publishing (revised and reprinted 1998; c. 1994); pg. 228. "'...I expected Dallas to be a real city, but I rather thought the rest of Texas was an imaginary place, like Atlantis or Avalon or some such...' "
Atlantean United Kingdom 700 C.E. Vance, Jack. Lyonesse: Madouc. Lancaster, PA: Underwood-Miller (1989); pg. 2. "The Elder Isles had known the coming and going of many peoples: Pharesmians, blue-eyed Evadnioi, Pelasgians and their maenad priestesses... There were dozens of cults and religions, diverse except that, in every case, a caste of priests interceded between laity and divinity. At Ys, steps cut into the stone led down into the ocean to the Temple of Atlante; each month in the dark of the moon priests descended the steps by midnight, to emerge at dawn wearing garlands of sea flowers. " [More.]
Atlantean United Kingdom: England 500 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Mists of Avalon. New York: Ballantine (1984; c. 1982); pg. 75. "...or when she sat on the terrace of the sea and guided her daughter's hands in her first clumsy attempts to spin, was the other Uther, the Uther she had known at the ring of stones outside time and ordinary place; the priest of Atlantis, with whom she had shared the Mysteries. That Uther she knew she would love as her own life, that she could never fear him or dread him... it seemed, at times, that far away in the clouds Igraine could see the forgotten cities of Lyonnesse and Atlantis. " [More about Uther. No other mention of Atlantis by name here.]
Atlantean United Kingdom: England 500 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Mists of Avalon. New York: Ballantine (1984; c. 1982); pg. 113. "Behind her rose the grey stone walls of the ancient Temple of the Sun, built by the Shining Ones who had come there from Atlantis, centuries before. " [More about this temple.]
Atlantean United Kingdom: England 500 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Mists of Avalon. New York: Ballantine (1984; c. 1982); pg. 831. "'...And the Druid would say that all men perish, and one day they will be, with all their wisdom and their glories, like unto Atlantis, sunken beneath the waves. the gods alone endure.' "
Atlantean United Kingdom: England 1955 Lewis, C.S. The Magician's Nephew (Narnia #6). New York: Macmillan (1970; c. 1955); pg. 19. "'...My first task was of course to study the box itself. It was very ancient. And I knew enough even then to know that it wasn't Greek, or Old Egyptian, or Babylonian, or Hittite, or Chinese. It was older than any of those nations. Ah--that was a great day when I at last found out the truth. The box was Atlantean; it came from the lost island of Atlantis. That meant it was centuries older than any of the stone-age things they dig up in Europe. And it wasn't a rough, crude thing like them either. For in the very dawn of time Atlantis was already a great city with palaces and temples and learned men.' " [More, pg. 20.]
Atlantean USA 1978 Maggin, Elliot S. Superman: Last Son of Krypton. New York: Warner Books (1978); pg. 118. "'I'll be on the bridge of the ship called The New Atlantis at nine-thirty tonight. Can you get in touch with him by then?' "
Atlantean USA 1997 Lobdell, Scott & Elliot S. Maggin. Generation X. New York: Berkley (1997); pg. 157. [This joking conversation takes place in Boston, discussing Senator Jake Garn, the LDS senator from Utah.] "'You didn't see any hailstorms or panic in the streets, did you? See, the shuttle mission--I think it was Atlantis--this shuttle mission around the time of the comet with the Congressman aboard, remember that? Come on, you remember.' "
Atlantean USA 1997 Sawyer, Robert J. Illegal Alien. New York: Ace Books (1997); pg. 7. "No American or Russian Shuttle was currently in orbit; Atlantis was the next one scheduled to fly... "
Atlantean USA 1999 Cerasini, Marc. Godzilla 2000. New York: Random House (1997); pg. 48. Pg. 48: "'...The shuttle Atlantis will carry the nuclear warheads into orbit--' " Pg. 276: "The crew of Mir greeted the arrival of the space shuttle Atlantis with Christmas cake and cookies... " [more, pg. 276, 281-283]
Atlantean Washington, D.C. 1999 Anderson, Jack. Millennium. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 80. "He stared at the headlines which were pinned to a cork-covered wall in his office. SPACE ALIENS RESPONSIBLE FOR ATLANTIS SHUTTLE DISASTER, said one. "
Atlantean world -12000 B.C.E. Niven, Larry & Jerry Pournelle. The Burning City. New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 110. "When Whandall was an infant, Morth of Atlantis had brought water to the Lords. He must have been paid well. Now he kept a shop in what the Lords called the benighted section... "; Pg. 111: "Whandall asked, 'You're from Atlantis?' " [Many refs. to Atlantis and Atlanteans and Atlantean religion in book. This is one of the central fictional cultures in the book. Other refs. not in DB.]
Atlantean world -3005 B.C.E. Gaskell, Jane. The Serpent. New York: St. Martin's Press (1977; c. 1963); pg. 7. "The almost unbelievable age of the Diary is indisputable. Also, most convincingly, its accounts of everyday life at the time of Atlantis almost exactly correspond with legend and the calculations of Atlantis experts. Quite a number of separate details in this book are now known as ancient myths. They are mainly ancient Celtic or South American myths--and Britain is believed to be a remnant of Atlantis, after it had grown ugly in the sight of Heaven and the princess who had found out the secrets of the Great Dikes helped to destroy it.

I can't go here into the proofs or otherwise that Atlantis and Mu did exist and that there was a time when the earth had no moon... and circle round and round, searching for the land the Atlantis-believers tell us they know must be there because of the racial-memory instinct in all animals... " [More, pg. 7-8.]

Atlantean world -3003 B.C.E. Gaskell, Jane. Atlan. New York: St. Martin's Press (1977; c. 1965); pg. 10. "Pretty soon we were flashing past the Capital's little outlying hilly farms... prettier than any I'd ever seen on what we called the Mainland, the continent we'd left when we came and took over this pretty Atlan. Lots of flowers, and those skinny little Atlan blondes in their flimsy draperies waiving and beaming from gardens and yards. Mostly these farms were still owned by native Atlanteans, or at least run by them for Northern masters from my Mainland... But owing to the native Atlanteans' hospitality and the way they fell over themselves to be duped into generous service of what they called the Brave New World, almost any Northerner here had his Atlantean harem, household, easy-come property. " [Many other refs. throughout novel, not in DB. The very title of the novel ('Atlan') comes from the name 'Atlantis.']
Atlantean world -3002 B.C.E. Gaskell, Jane. The City. New York: St. Martin's Press (1978; c. 1966); pg. 52. "I had been the General's bride, and he the new Emperor of North and South and Atlantis-across-the-Ocean. The City had been any City to a visiting conqueror, sheeted in flags, drifted in petals, misted in wine. " [Other refs., not in DB.]
Atlantean world -1400 B.C.E. Anderson, Poul. The Dancer from Atlantis. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971); pg. 179. "'We have taken your Atlantean and Knossian friends back to Crete..' "
Atlantean world -1400 B.C.E. Anderson, Poul. The Dancer from Atlantis. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971); pg. 87. "If you reconstructed the single original island, you got a picture oddly suggestive of the capital of Atlantis as described by Plato; and ancient walls were known to be buried under the lava and cinders. That settlement might be better preserved than Pompeii, what parts had not vanished in the catastrophe.

To be sure, Plato could simply have been embellishing his discourses in the Timaios and the Kritias with a fiction. He had put his lost continent in midocean, impossibly big and impossibly far back if it was to have fought Athens. Yet there was some reason to believe he drew on a tradition, that half-memory of the Minoan empire which flickered through classical legend. " [Many refs. to Atlantis throughout novel, as should be obvious from the novel's title.]

Atlantean world -1400 B.C.E. Anderson, Poul. The Dancer from Atlantis. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971); pg. 88. "Plato was logically forced to move his Atlantis beyond the Pillars of Hercules. The Mediterranean didn't have room for it. But take away the obviously invented hinterland. Shrink the city plan by one order of magnitude. The outline became not too different from that of Santorini. Change years to months. The date of Atlantis' death shifted to between 1500 to 1300 B.C.

And this bestrode the 1400 B.C.--give or take a few decades--that archeologists assigned to the destruction of Knossos, the fall of the Thalassocracy. "

Atlantean world -1400 B.C.E. Anderson, Poul. The Dancer from Atlantis. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971); pg. 66. "Later Dagonas became an important man because he's clever and knows many Keftiu arts. For my part, though I was only a lay sister on Atlantis, not a priestess, I taught them things about the worship of the Goddess and Asterion that pleased them. "
Atlantean world -1400 B.C.E. Anderson, Poul. The Dancer from Atlantis. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971); pg. 47. "...now that barbarians were swarming into the Aegean Sea and too arrogant to learn the speech once spoken in stately Knossos and on lost Atlantis--

Achaean ran through Reid. He had no more Greek than the average educated twentieth-century American, but there was enough to open for him the identity of the tongue he had learned... and knew that Achaean was an ancestor of Hellenic.

And that was where the name Atlantis came from. 'Land of the Pillar' translated into Gaia Atlantis. "

Atlantean world 25 C.E. Lupoff, Richard A. "Jubilee " in Alternate Tyrants (Mike Resnick, ed.) New York: Tor (1997); pg. 177-178. "'Don't laugh, Aelius.'

'You don't take that guff seriously, do you?'

'Well, I just don't know. The Etruscans went somewhere. Unless you think they went to Atlantis.'

'Oh, please..' Aelius snorted. 'One silly legend on top of another.'

'Well, what do you think then?' "

Atlantean world 95 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. Lady of Avalon. New York: Viking Penguin (1997); pg. 1. "Time passed, and masters of an ancient wisdom crossed the sea, fleeing the destruction of Atlantis, their own sacred isle. "
Atlantean world 1867 Verne, Jules. Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1953; c. 1870); pg. 277. "ATLANTIS

What lightning flashed through my mind! Atlantis, that ancient land of Meropis mentioned by the historian Theopompus; Plato's Atlantis; the continent whose very existence has been denied by such philosophers and scientists as Origen, Porphyry, Iamblichus, d'Anville, Malte-Brun, and Humboldt, who entered its disappearance in the ledger of myths and folk tales; the country whose reality has nevertheless been accepted by such other thinkers as Posidonius, Pliny, Ammianus Marcellinus, Tertullian, Engel, Scherer, Tournefort, Buffon, and d'Avezac; I had this land right under my eyes, furnishing its own unimpeachable evidence of the catastrophe that had overtaken it! So this was the submerged region that had existed outside Europe, Asia, and Libya, beyond the Pillars of Hercules, home of those powerful Atlantean people against whom ancient Greece had waged its earliest wars! " [More, not in DB.]

Atlantean world 1975 Shea, Robert & Robert Anton Wilson. Illuminatus, Vol. III: Leviathan. New York: Dell (1975); pg. 43. "'...Traveling across the Sea of Valusia, you come eventually to the underground port of Agharti, which was the first Illuminati refuge after the Atlantean catastrophe...' "
Atlantean world 1975 Shea, Robert & Robert Anton Wilson. Illuminatus, Vol. III: Leviathan. New York: Dell (1975); pg. 60. "'Oh, yes, you saw When Atlantis Ruled the Earth, didn't you?' said Malaclypse. '...we'd find that they go back to Atlantean origins and preserve to some extent the genes of Gruad's foes. I'm inclined to believe that hairy people, in whom the genes of Atlanteans other than Gruad predominate, are inherently predisposed to anti-Illuminati activities...' "
Atlantean world 1975 Shea, Robert & Robert Anton Wilson. Illuminatus, Vol. III: Leviathan. New York: Dell (1975); pg. 12-13. "Hagbard Celine, meanwhile, is rushing toward sunken Atlantis to seize some long-buried art works... In the battle between the Leif Erikson and the spider-ships, Hagbard is aided by a dolphin named Howard, leader of the AA (Atlantean Adepts), a delphine secret society... In exchange for the Atlantean statues, Drake switches his allegiance... " [Other refs. not in DB.]
Atlantean world 1979 Adams, Douglas. The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. New York: Harmony Books (1979); pg. 109. "'I only know what Zaphod's told me,' she whispered. 'Apparently Magrathea is some kind of legend from way back which no one seriously believes in. Bit like Atlantis on Earth, except that the legends say the Magratheans used to manufacture planets.' "
Atlantean world 1985 Hubbard, L. Ron. Mission Earth Vol. 1: The Invaders Plan. Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (1985); pg. 171. "'All right,' said Heller. 'Is there an 'Atalanta'? A country or something?'

I thought about it. I had to go over and get a reference book out of the pile, a thing they call an 'encyclopedia.' I read it aloud.

Atlantis, also called Atalantis and Atalantica, legendary island in the Atlantic Ocean beyond the Straits of Gibraltar. Its civilization was thought to be very advanced. It was supposed to have been overwhelmed by the seas. " [More., pg. 171-172.]

Atlantean world 1995 Foster, Alan Dean. The Dig. New York: Warner Books (1995); pg. 48. "'...I've been assured that the explosives onboard the Atlantis aren't powerful enough to break up the asteroid.' " [Referring to the space shuttle. Many other refs., not in DB.]
Atlantean world 1995 Wolverton, Dave. "Wheatfields Beyond " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 18. "Many astronomers believed the asteroid would impact the moon, while others argued that its mass was too great and it would simply blow on past.

Quacks, new-agers, and fanatics of every ilk decided it was a sign, that the asteroid would bring the end of the earth or begin the Millennium or raise Atlantis. "

Atlantean world 1996 bes shahar, eluki. "It's a Wonderful Life " in The Ultimate X-Men (Stan Lee, ed.) New York: Berkley (1996); pg. 14. "Even worlds where humanity was the only known sentient species--no Atlanteans, nor Kree, no Skrulls, not even Galactus to threaten sleep. "
Atlantean world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 27. "His first and most imitated fabrication was a work of pseudo-archaeology, Atlantis: The Antediluvian World (1882), in which he argued 'that the description of this island given by Plato is not, as has been long supposed, fable, but veritable history,' and that it was 'the region where man first rose from a state of barbarism to civilization, . . . from whose overflowings the shores of the Gulf of Mexico, the Mississippi River, the Amazon, the Pacific coast of South America, the Mediterranean, the west coast of Europe and Africa, the Baltic, the Black Sea, and the Caspian were populated by civilized nations.' In short, all recorded history is in error, except for Plato and the Book of Genesis. (Even in 1882, Donnelly knew that the best way to pitch a flaky theory is to connect it with a tenet of fundamentalist faith. If you can believe in Noah's ark, why not Atlantis?' " [More here, and elsewhere, e.g., pg. 47, 53, 138-139, etc.]
Atlantean world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 53. "...the pilgrims to Roswell, New Mexico, that Oz of UFO believers; the buffs of Atlantis and Mu; the followers of L. Ron Hubbard... All these cults owe their origins, more or less directly, to the specific fabulations of SF writers. "
Atlantean world 2000 Roman, Steven A. X-Men/Doctor Doom: The Chaos Engine. New York: BP Books (2000); pg. 36. "First, there was Dorma, the Minister of Defense. A blue-skinned, red-haired amazon clad in green-and-gold battle armor that revealed far more of her body than it concealed, she was the former queen of Atlantis, hailing from the same parallel Earth on which von Doom had found Lancer. As a denizen of the ocean, Dorma could not survive long above water, so a clear plastic mask covered her nose and mouth, constantly recycling the sea water contained in her lungs. Her strength was as impressive as her temper was short--each fearful to behold, especially in the heat of battle... "
Atlantean world 2000 Roman, Steven A. X-Men/Doctor Doom: The Chaos Engine. New York: BP Books (2000); pg. 292. "'Prince Namor of Atlantis,' came the next announcement.

Again, applause, though this time its tone was somewhat muted. Namor--the hybrid son of an Atlantean princess and a human sea captain, known far and wide as 'The Savage Sub-Mariner' ever since his first recorded appearance during the darkest days of World War II--had never entirely gained the trust of the human race, nor did he really care to. " [More.]

Atlantean world 2001 Castro, Adam-Troy. Spider-Man: Revenge of the Sinister Six. New York: BP Books (2001); pg. 50. "In a world where major population centers are subject to almost weekly assault by terrorists, extraterrestrials, demons, sorcerers, Atlantean hordes, and giant robots... "
Atlantean world 2036 Besher, Alexander. Mir: A Novel of Virtual Reality. New York: Simon & Schuster (1998); pg. 247. "'...They'd rush in to commercialize the Void. There would soon be billboards in Shambhala, shopping malls in Atlantis, retirement homes in Mu...' "
Atlantean world 2050 Stephenson, Neal. The Diamond Age. New York: Bantam (1995); pg. 101. "...could not come from any of the engineering works associated with major phyles--Nippon, New Atlantis, Hindustan, the First Distributed Republic being prime suspects...' "
Atlantean world 2050 Stephenson, Neal. The Diamond Age. New York: Bantam (1995); pg. 339. "'Because New Atlantis is one of the three first-tier phyles.'

'...The wealth of New Atlantis is great, yes. But its population is just a few percent. The successful New Atlantis man is busy and has just a bit of time for scripted fantasies. He has much money, you understand, but little opportunity to spend it...' "

Atlantean world 2050 Stephenson, Neal. The Diamond Age. New York: Bantam (1995); pg. 252, 336. Pg. 252: "...ride off in the direction of the New Atlantis Clave. "; Pg. 336: "New Atlantis played an important role in supporting casinos and bordellos, both the old-fashioned variety and the newer scripted-fantasy emporia, where you could be the star in a little play you wrote yourself... this was the Coastal Republic... Every tribe in the world seemed to have its own skyscraper here. Some, like New Atlantis, were not actively recruiting and simply used the size and magnificence of their buildings as a monument to themselves. "
Atlantean world 2050 Wolfe, Gene. "The Fifth Head of Cerberus " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1972); pg. 340. "I nevertheless gloss upon the Etruscans, Atlantis, and the tenacity and expansionist tendencies of a hypothetical technological culture occupying Gondwanaland... "
Atlantean world 2160 Clarke, Arthur C. The Fountains of Paradise. New York: Ballantine (1980; 1st ed. 1978); pg. 180. "...Personal Interest File.

Most men updated their PIP on New Year's Day or their birthday. Morgan's list contained fifty items; he had heard of people with hundreds. They must spend all their waking hours battling with the flood of information, unless they were al like those notorious pranksters who enjoyed setting up news alerts on their consoles for such classic improbabilities as:

Eggs, Dinosaur, hatching of
Circle, squaring of
Atlantis, re-emergence of
Christ, Second Coming of
Loch Ness monster, capture of

or, finally

World, end of "

Atlantean world 2198 Conner, Miguel. The Queen of Darkness. New York: Warner Books (1998); pg. 72. Pg. 72: A city called "New Atlantis ". Also pg. 273.
Atlantean world 2367 Friedman, Michael Jan. "Captain Jean-Luc Picard " in Dujonian's Hoard (Star Trek: TNG / The Captain's Table: Book 2 of 6). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 267. "Jean-Luc even briefly toyed with the ideas of leaving Starfleet to accept directorship of the Atlantis Project... "
attendance - regular Kentucky 1999 Kessel, John. Good News from Outer Space. New York: Tor (1990; c. 1989); pg. 91. "First he read a feature on the sharp increase in attendance at Kentucky churches as people anticipated the coming Millennium. Conservative theologians expected a corresponding dropoff after the first of the year, but the radicals said there wouldn't be a first of the year. "
attendance - regular USA 1985 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 133. "...the religious networks, where, with sustained and general excitement, the Message [from extraterrestrials] was being discussed. Attendance in churches had soared all over America. The Message, Ellie believed, was a kind of mirror in which each person sees his or her own beliefs challenged or confirmed. "
attendance - regular USA 2011 Sawyer, Robert J. The Terminal Experiment. New York: HarperCollins (1995); pg. 215. "NET NEWS DIGEST
Gallup's ongoing 'Religion in America' survey showed church attendance this week was up 13.75% over the same week last year. "
attendance - regular world 2100 Heinlein, Robert A. Starship Troopers. New York: Ace Books (1987; 1st ed. 1959); pg. 56, 59. [In basic training for soldiers.] Pg. 56: "'...Your evening meal will be bread and water... You will serve ten hours extra duty on Sunday, the time to be adjusted to permit you to attend divine services if you so elect.' "; Pg. 59: "'Yes, sir. Published and logged, every Sunday morning.'...

Just before church call every Sunday morning they lined us up and read aloud the disciplinary articles out of the Laws and Regulations of the Military Forces... "

Aum Shinrikyo Japan 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 141. [1] "In its ideal form (say, as a Carthusian monk) such a philosophy may promote a saintly existence, but in practice it often leads to a vindictive resentment of those outside one's own small fold and to daydreams of millenarian revenge, when the legions of the anti-Christ will be incinerated by one's ally on high. Recently, this malignant form of millennialist, quasi-religions SF [science fiction] reached its apotheosis in the outrages perpetrated by Japan's Aum Shinrikyo cult, when members released the nerve gas sarin in Tokyo's subways on March 20, 1995.

Aum Supreme Truth (as it calls itself in English) was the inspiration of a half-blind, self-made guru, Shoko Asahara, who parlayed a shopfront operation peddling yoga lessons and herbal remedies into a multimillion dollar cult with plans for taking over Japan and then the rest of the world. "

Aum Shinrikyo Japan 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 142. [2] Pg. 141-142: "Though Aum's plans were thwarted, it did manage in only a few years to build its own secret factories for the manufacture of arms and biological weapons. Before they deployed sarin, there were earlier failed experiments with botulinus and anthrax, as well as long-term aspirations to obtain nuclear capabilities. Because Aum recruited intensively from Japan's best universities, its ambitions came close to being realizable. Aum had the technological know-how, the economic resources, and a sincere desire to bring about the end of the world, or as much of it, at least, as Aum could lay waste to.

Why would Aum want to pursue such a course? To say that Aum's rank and file were under the influence of a demented, embittered, charismatic guru begs the question. The upper echelons of the organization fully shared Asahara's vision and his zeal for achieving Apocalypse now. "

Aum Shinrikyo Japan 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 142. [3] "Even after the original attack, when the entire leadership was in jail, cultists continued to attempt further mass murders in the Tokyo subways. It was no longer a means to an end; it was the goal.

Aum's minions were the children of Godzilla. They had grown up watching cartoons like Space Battleship Yamato, in which half-human cyborgs wreak awe-inspiring devastation on whole cities. They'd graduated to the gegika, book-length comics featuring gung-ho tales of rape and murder against Bladerunner-esque backdrops. "

Aum Shinrikyo Japan 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 142. [4] "It was in the gegikas and in the Japanese Twilight Zone (a magazine specializing in New Age wonders, including a photo spread of the guru himself 'levitating' in lotus position) that Aum advertised Asahara's books, such as Secrets of Developing Your Supernatural Powers and Declaring Myself the Christ. The ads for the earlier, more modestly titled book declared, 'Spiritual training that doesn't lead to supernatural powers is hogwash! The venerable Master will show you the secrets of his amazing mystic powers. See the future, read people's minds, make your wishes come true, X-ray vision, levitation, trips to the fourth dimension, hear the voice of God and more. It will change your life!' "
Aum Shinrikyo Japan 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 142. [5] "Once Aum got hold of a recruit, he or she was subjected to the entire repertory of cult brainwashing techniques: social isolation, starvation, sleep deprivation, and drugs. 'Monks' and 'nuns' proved their commitment by deeding over all their worldly goods to Aum. To synchronize their brain waves with those of the guru, they were fitted with 'electrode caps' called the PSI, or Perfect Salvation Initiation: snug batter-powered hoods that delivered six-volt shocks to their scalps at regular intervals. At its height, Aum had little factories dotted across Japan staffed with thousands of workers in PSI helmets busily assembling machine guns, manufacturing nerve gas, baking cookies impressed with the Aum insignia, and sewing ceremonial robes. Welcome to the fourth dimension. "
Aum Shinrikyo Japan 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 143. [6] "Aum's theology was a syncretistic mishmash of Hinduism, Tibetan Buddhism, and its own special variety of Christian millennialism, in which Aum and Asahara would reign supreme after the Day of Judgment. Only the upper echelon knew that that day was to be hastened by Aum's own genocidal initiatives, but as in Nazi Germany, the rank and file had good reason to suspect that their leaders were preparing a Final Solution. Asahara's writings, like Mein Kampf, resonate with apocalyptic menace.

Science fiction does not have a copyright on Armageddon and the Apocalypse. Those notions have been in perennial bloom since the time of Ezekial and St. John. Indeed, Aum's whole arsenal of wonders--from UFO's ('UFOs often appear on Earth these days,' Asahara explained in a 1990 lecture. 'It will become one of the main factors of Armageddon whether we can benefit from UFOs or not.') to ESP... "

Aum Shinrikyo Japan 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 143. [7] "But Aum does have a specific SF connection in the work of Isaac Asimov, whose Foundation series provided a crucial element of the Aum mythology. In Aum's version, Asahara takes on the role of Asimov's Hari Seldon, a genius who discovers the laws of 'psychohistory,' which predicts, infallibly, that 'interstellar wars will be endless. Interstellar trade will decay; population will decline; worlds will lose touch with the main body of the Galaxy.' The answer to this threat is a secret society of subsidiary geniuses to act as guardians of civilization's flame during the destined dark ages. "
Aum Shinrikyo Japan 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 143. [8] "'The similarities [of Asimov's Foundation] to Aum and its guru's quest were remarkable,' note David Kaplan and Andrew Marshall, in an authoritative history of the cult. 'In an interview, Murai [one of Aum's inner circle] would state matter-of-factly that Aum was using the Foundation as the blueprint for the cult's long-term plans. He gave the impression of 'a graduate student who had read too many science fiction novels,' remembered one reporter. But it was real enough to the cult. Shoko Asahara, the blind and bearded guru from Japan, had become Hari Seldon; and Aum Supreme Truth was the Foundation.' " [More, pg. 144, 149-150. 160: Asahara.]
Aum Shinrikyo world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 53. "...the Heaven's Gate and Aum Shinrikyo cults. All these cults owe their origins, more or less directly, to the specific fabulations of SF writers. "
Australian Aborigines Australia 1770 Chiang, Ted. "Story of Your Life " in Starlight 2 (Patrick Nielsen Hayden, ed.). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 266. "In 1770, Captain Cook's ship Endeavour ran aground on the coast of Queensland, Australia. While some of his men made repairs, Cook led an exploration party and met the aboriginal people. One of the sailors pointed to the animals that hoped around with their young riding in pouches and asked an aborigine what they were called. The aborigine replied, 'Kanguru.' From then on Cook and his sailors referred to the animals by this word. It wasn't until later that they learned it meant 'What did you say?'

I tell that story in my introductory course every year. It's almost certainly untrue, and I explain that afterwards, but it's a classic anecdote. "

Australian Aborigines Australia 1800 McAuley, Paul J. "The Rift " in Vanishing Acts (Ellen Datlow, ed.) New York: Tor (2000); pg. 73. "'It was the first great extinction,' Ken said. 'They were killed just like my people were killed when the Europeans came to Australia. They were hunted for sport because it was easier to think of them as animals than accept that people come in many forms. Homo sapiens has done a lot of harm in its time, but that was the beginning of it all.' "
Australian Aborigines Australia 1870 Baxter, Stephen. Anti-ice. New York: HarperCollins (1993); pg. 47. "The story of anti-ice (Holden said) began with obscure legends of the aboriginal Australians. According to these savage fellows, at the time the Little Moon first appeared in the Europeans heavens (around 1720), 'fire locked in ice' fell from the Australian sky. This fire was tinged with yellow and red, and any man who cupped his hands around the ice would liberate the daemonic fire, to his ultimate doom. "
Australian Aborigines Australia 1870 Baxter, Stephen. Anti-ice. New York: HarperCollins (1993); pg. 284. "All this happened in the eighteenth century, the savants say; and so at the same time as the Australian aboriginals were watching another fragment of the comet streak across their skies to Antarctica, the Little Moon settled into the skies of Earth. "
Australian Aborigines Australia 1987 Bryant, Edward. "Down in the Dreamtime " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 280. "'Where are we?' said Cordelia. The sky was dotted with small cumulus, but none of the cloud-shadows ever seemed to shade her...

'The world,' said Warreen.

'It's not my world'

'The desert, then.'

'I know it's the desert,' said Cordelia. '...But what desert is it?'

'It is the land of Baiame,' said Warreen. 'This is the great Nullarbor Plain.'

'Are you sure?' Cordelia scrubbed sweat from her forehead with a strip of fabric... 'I looked at the map on the plane all the way up from Melbourne. The distances don't make sense. Shouldn't this be the Simpson Desert?'

'Distances are different in the Dreamtime,' Warreen said simply. "



Australian Aborigines, continued

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