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34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Kali worship, India: Calcutta

Kali worship, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Kali worship India: Calcutta 1977 Simmons, Dan. Song of Kali. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1985); pg. 69. [1] "'It was through the Beggarmasters that Sanjay received this chance to join the Kapalikas. The Kapalika Society was older than the goonda Brotherhood, older even than the city.

'They worship Kali, of course. For many years the worshiped openly at the Kalighat Temple, but their custom of sacrificing a boy child each Friday of the month caused the British to ban the Society in 1831. They went underground and thrived. The nationalist struggle through the last century brought many to seek to join them. But their initiation price was high--as Sanjay and I were soon to learn.

'For months, Sanjay had tried to make contact with them. For months he had been put off. Then... they offered him his chance. We had taken the Brotherhood Oath together and I had done my small share by running a few messages to various people and once I made a collection run when Sanjay was ill.' "

Kali worship India: Calcutta 1977 Simmons, Dan. Song of Kali. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1985); pg. 70. [2] "'It surprised me when Sanjay offered to let me join the Kapalikas with him. It surprised and frightened me. My village had a temple to Durga, the Goddess Mother, so even so fierce an aspect and incarnation of her as Kali was familiar to me. Yet I hesitated. Durga was maternal and Kali was reputed to be wanton. Durga was modest in her representations while Kali was naked--not nude, but brazenly naked--wearing only the darkness as her cloak. The darkness and a necklace of human skulls. To worship Kali beyond her holiday was to follow the Vamachara--the perverse left-handed Tantra. I remember once as a child an older cousin was showing around a printed card showing a woman, a goddess, in obscene coitus with two men. My uncle found us looking at it, took the card, and struck my cousin in the face. The next day an old Brahmin was brought in to lecture us on the danger of such Tantric nonsense...' "
Kali worship India: Calcutta 1977 Simmons, Dan. Song of Kali. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1985); pg. 70. [3] "'...He called it 'the error of the five M's'--madya, mamsa, matsya, mudra, maithun. These, of course, were the Pencha Makaras which the Kapalikas might well demand--alcohol, meat, fish, hand gestures, and coitus. To be truthful, coitus was much on my mind those days, but to first experience it as part of a worship service was a truly frightening thought.

'But I owed Sanjay much. Indeed, I began to realize that I might never be able to pay the debt I owed him. So I accompanied him on his first meeting with the Kapalikas.

'They met us in the evening in the empty marketplace near the Kalighat. I do not know what I expected--my image of Kapalikas grew out of the stories told to frighten unruly children--but the two men who waited there for us fit none of my imaginings and apprehensions. They were dressed like businessmen... and both were soft-spoken, refined in manner and dress, and courteous to both of us despite class and caste differences.' "

Kali worship India: Calcutta 1977 Simmons, Dan. Song of Kali. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1985); pg. 71. [4] "The ceremonies in progress were most dignified. It was the day of the new moon in celebration of Durga, and the head of an ox was on an iron spike before Kali's idol. Blood still dripped into the marble basin beneath it.

'As someone who had worshiped Durga faithfully since infancy, I had no trouble joining in the Kali/Durga litany. The few changes were easily learned, although several times I mistakenly invoked Parvati/Durga rather than Kali/Durga. The two gentlemen smiled. Only one passage was so substantially different that I had to learn it anew:

The world is pain
O terrible wife of Siva
You are chewing the flesh;
O terrible wife of Siva,
Your tongue is drinking the blood,
O dark Mother! O unclad Mother.
O beloved of Siva
The world is pain.
"
Kali worship India: Calcutta 1977 Simmons, Dan. Song of Kali. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1985); pg. 72. [5] "'Then large clay effigies were carried through the Kalighat in procession. Each was sprinkled with the blood of the sacrifice. Some were statues of Kali in her aspect of Chandi, The Terrible One; or as Chinnamasta, the 'she who is beheaded' of the ten Mahavidyas when Kali decapitated herself so as to drink of her own blood.

'We followed the procession outside and down to the banks of the Hooghly River, through which, of course, the waters of the Holy Ganges flow. There the idols were cast into the water in the sure faith that they would rise again. We chanted with the crows:

Kali, Kali balo bhai
Kali bai are gate nai

O brethren take the name of Kali
There is no refuge except in her.
"
Kali worship India: Calcutta 1977 Simmons, Dan. Song of Kali. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1985); pg. 72. [6] "'I was moved to tears. The ceremony was so much more grand and beautiful than the simple village offerings in Anguda. The two gentlemen approved. So, evidently, did the Kalighat jagrata, for we were invited to a true meeting of the Kapalikas on the first day of next month's full moon.' " [Much more throughout novel.]
Kali worship India: Calcutta 1977 Simmons, Dan. Song of Kali. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1985); pg. 256. "'But we have no hard evidence yet that the thuggees, goondas, or the so-called Kapalikas are involved. It is also complicated by the fact that various criminal elements often call upon a corrupt, Tantric form of mysticism, frequently invoking local deities--in this case, Kali--in order to impress their initiates or to frighten the common people.' "
Kali worship Singapore 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 224. "They loved it. A tall foreign blonde on a pedestal, wrapped in gold and green, some kind of demented Kali juggernaut thing . . . "
Kali worship United Kingdom: London 1990 Byatt, A.S. Possession. New York: Random House (1991; c. 1990); pg. 55. "....and a Feminist Revue: 'Come and see the Sorceries, the Vamps, the daughters of Kali and the Fatae Morganae. We make your blood run cold and make you laugh on the Sinister side of your face at Women's Wit and Wickedness.' "
Kali worship USA 2195 Atwood, Margaret. The Handmaid's Tale. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin (1986); pg. 300. "Tomorrow afternoon, Professor Gopal Chatterjee, of the Department of Western Philosophy, University of Baroda, India, will speak on 'Krishna and Kali Elements in the State Religion of the Early Gilead Period'... " ['Gilead' refers to the U.S. after transformed into a monotheocracy in late 20th century.]
Kali worship Washington, D.C. 1995 Hand, Elizabeth. Waking the Moon. New York: HarperPrism (1995); pg. 59. Pg. 59: "...a sheen of blood staining her cheeks and lip and chin: Artemis, Durga, Cybele, Hecate, Inachus, Kali, Hel . . .

The Great Mother, lover and slayer of Her faithful son. ";

Pg. "...shuddered and kicked and fought some nightmarish vision of Hecate or Kali or Circe. "; Pg. 274: "As Ishtar, Au-Set, Isis, Artemis or Cybele, as the thuggees' Kali or Wilde's Salome... "; Pg. 310: "...Lammas. But that festival had more names than Angelica had hairs on her head. In India it was called Kalipuja, by the worshipers at the Temple at Dakshineswarand and in Calcutta--the city whose name is actually Kali-Ghatt, 'the steps of Kali.' In Finland it had been the day of Kalma...' " [Also pg. 242, 254, 274, other]

Kali worship world 1973 Ellison, Harlan. "Cold Friend " in Galaxy: Thirty Years of Innovative Science Fiction (Frederik Pohl, ed.) Chicago, IL: Playboy Press (1980; 1st pub Galaxy, Oct. 1973); pg. 334. "Later that day I turned back an attack by a German Stuka... an attack by a Samurai warrior... and attacks by a Hun, a Visigoth, a Vandal, a Vietcong..., a deranged and drugged disciple of Kali with a knotted rope, a Venetian swordsman with a left-hand dagger... "
Kali worship world 1975 Shea, Robert & Robert Anton Wilson. Illuminatus, Vol. III: Leviathan. New York: Dell (1975); pg. 29. Pg. 29: "'...the head of the John Dillinger Died for You Society, has written an analysis of Gunga Din, pointing out the real meaning of the thuggee, the evil goddess Kali, the pit of serpents, the elephant medicine, the blowing of the bugle from the top of the temple, and so forth. Gunga Din celebrates the imposition of law and order in an area terrorized by the criminal followers of a goddess who breeds evil and chaos...' "; Pg. 149: "'Then what is real?' George demanded. 'Mary, Queen of the May, or Kali, Murderers, or Eris, who synthesizes both?' "
Kali worship world 1975 Shea, Robert & Robert Anton Wilson. Illuminatus, Vol. III: Leviathan. New York: Dell (1975); pg. 194. "The Illuminati associate this with Iris, and also with other goddesses from Isis to Ishtar and from Kwannon to Kali--with the Female Principle, yin, in general. "
Kali worship world 1993 Clarke, Arthur C. The Hammer of God. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. -5. [Frontispiece] "All the events set in the past happened at the times and places stated: all those set in the future are possible.

And one is certain.

Sooner or later, we will meet Kali. "

Kali worship world 2001 Aldiss, Brian. "Marvells of Utopia " in Supertoys Last All Summer Long. New York: St. Martin's Griffin (2001); pg. 191. "'You could add to that long list all the world's false gods and goddesses, the Greek gods, who gave their names to the constellations, the Baals and Isises and Roman soldier gods, the multi-armed Kali, Ganesh with the elephant's head...' "
Kali worship world 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 188. "'Accused of reviving thuggee--you know, Kali worship?--and the crowd stormed the court and set them free.' "
Kali worship world 2015 Leiber, Fritz. The Wanderer. New York: Walker & Co. (1964); pg. 244. "'That'd be great, sweetheart, but your Ma would say I was tempting Kali.' Doc said... "
Kali worship world 2110 Clarke, Arthur C. The Hammer of God. New York: Bantam (1993) [Book jacket:] "It is the year 2110 and new technology has altered the face of the world... Then, in one terrible instant, every human's life is changed irrevocably when an amateur astronomer points his telescope at just the right corner of the night sky. There he discoveries, hurtling toward Earth from the deepest, darkest regions of space, a chunk of rock that could mean the end of civilization as we know it.

Catastrophe of this scale had only touched our Earth once before, in the great prehistory of the planet. Scientist knew that it was only a matter of time before the fate that befell the dinosaurs would threaten mankind... Astronomers and astronauts christen the rock Kali, after the Indian goddess of death and destruction, and before long it is confirmed that she intends to live up to her name. " [Refs. to this asteroid throughout novel, not in DB. It is the central plot element.]

Kali worship world 2110 Clarke, Arthur C. The Hammer of God. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 78. "It was an asteroid, just beyond the orbit of Jupiter. Dr. Millar set the computer to calculate its approximate orbit, and was surprised to find that Myrna--as he decided to call it--came quite close to Earth. That made it slightly more interesting.

He was never able to get the name recognized. Before the IAU could approve it, additional observations had given a much more accurate orbit.

And then only one name was possible: Kali, the goddess of destruction. "

Kali worship world 2150 Zelazny, Roger. Lord of Light. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1967); pg. 26. Pg. 26: "Her bronze hair fell upon his hands. Her pale eyes pleaded with him. Caught about her throat was a necklace of ivory skulls, but slightly paler than her flesh. Her sari was the color of blood. Her hands rested upon his own...

'Goddess!' he hissed.

'You would not slay Kali . . . ? Durga . . . ?' she choked. "; Pg. 74: "And none could dispute the fact that Kali was queen of this Temple. Her tall, white-stone statue, within its gigantic shrine, dominated the inner courtyard. Her faint smile, perhaps contemptuous of the other gods and their worshipers, was, in it sway, as arresting as the chained grins of the skulls she wore for a necklace. She held daggers in her hands; and poised in mid-step she stood, as though deciding whether to dance before or slay those who came to her shrine. Her lips were full, her eyes were wide. Seen by torchlight, she seemed to move. " [Many other references to Kali and Kali worship in this book, most not in DB.]

Kali worship world 2150 Zelazny, Roger. Lord of Light. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1967); pg. 96. "'Not so, warrior. For are not all living things, in themselves, sacrifices to Death?'

'Indeed, you speak truly. What need has he for their good will or affection? Gifts are unnecessary, for he takes what he wants.'

'Like Kali,' acknowledged the priest...

'By Kali, I will!'

...'To your morbid patrons--Yama and Kali,' said the priest. "

Kali worship world 2269 Snodgrass, Melinda. The Tears of the Singers (novel excerpt) in Star Trek: Adventures in Time and Space (Mary P. Taylor, ed.) New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 126. "'I'm sure if I compared notes with Kali, and ever managed to communicate with a Taygetian female, we wold all agree that it's the males of any species who cause the problems.' "
Kamba Africa 2129 Resnick, Mike. Kirinyaga: A Fable of Utopia. New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 14. "'In the beginning, Ngai lived alone atop the mountain called Kirinyaga. In the fullness of time He created three sons, who became the fathers of the Maasai, the Kamba, and the Kikuyu races, and to each son He offered a spear, a bow, and a digging stick... The Kamba chose the bow, and was sent to the dense forests to hunt for game. " [Book has many other references to Kamba/Makamba, most not in DB.]
Kamba Kenya 1850 Oliver, Chad. "King of the Hill " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 186. [Afterword] "When I was in Kenya a few years ago, I did a little demographic work with just one tribe. Back in 1850, the first explorer in the area (a missionary type named Krapf) estimated that there were about 70,000 Kamba. "
Kamba Kenya 1911 Oliver, Chad. "King of the Hill " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 186. [Afterword] "...Kenya... Back in 1850, the first explorer in the area... estimated that there were about 70,000 Kamba. A bit later, in 1911, the British took a census. There were 230,000 Kamba. "
Kamba Kenya 1972 Oliver, Chad. "King of the Hill " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 186. [Afterword] "When I was in Kenya a few years ago, I did a little demographic work with just one tribe. Back in 1850, the first explorer in the area... estimated that there were about 70,000 Kamba. A bit later, in 1911, the British took a census. There were 230,000 Kamba. As of right now, the figure is pushing 900,000. This, mind you, is on the same land area. You should see it. "
Kamba Kenya 2129 Resnick, Mike. Kirinyaga: A Fable of Utopia. New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 21. "'You must never underestimate the power of tradition... The Kikuyu turned their backs on their traditions once; the result is a mechanized, impoverished, overcrowded country that is no longer populated by Kikuyu, or Maasai, or Luo or Wakamba, but by a new, artificial tribe known only as Kenyans. "
Kamba Kenya 2131 Resnick, Mike. "Kirinyaga " (published 1988) in The Norton Book of Science Fiction (Ursula K. Le Guin & Brian Atterbery, editors). New York: W. W. Norton & Co. (1993); pg. 716. "In the beginning, Ngai lived alone atop the mountain called Kirinyaga... He created three sons, who became the fathers of the Masai, the Kamba, and the Kikuyu races... "; Pg. 723: "'The Kikuyu turned their backs on their traditions once; the result is a mechanized, overcrowded country that is no longer populated by Kikuyu, or Masai, or Luo, or Wakamba, but by a new, artificial tribe known only as Kenyans. We here on Kirinyaga are true Kikuyu, and will not make that mistake again.' " [Other refs. not in DB.]
Kamba world 2123 Resnick, Mike. Kirinyaga: A Fable of Utopia. New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 1. "Ngai is the creator of all things. He made the lion and the elephant, the vast savannah and the towering mountains, the Kikuyu and the Maasai and the Wakamba.

Thus, it was only reasonable for my father's father and his father's father to believe that Ngai was all-powerful. Then the Europeans came, and they killed all the animals, and they covered the savannahs with their factories and the mountains with their cities, and they assimilated the Maasai and the Wakamba, and one day all that was left of what Ngai had created was the Kikuyu. "

Kant California 1975 Dick, Philip K. "Man, Android and Machine " in The Dark-Haired Girl. Willimantic, CT: Mark V. Ziesing (1988; c. 1975); pg. 208. "I hope you realize the importance of this. Time is real, both as an experience in the Kantian sense, and real in the sense which the Soviet Dr. Nikolai Kozyrev expresses it: that time is an energy... "
Kant California 1975 Dick, Philip K. The Transmigration of Timothy Archer. New York: Timescape Books (1982); pg. 222. Pg. 222-223
Kant galaxy 2050 Anthony, Patricia. "Bluebonnets " in Eating Memories. Woburn, MA: First Books; Baltimore, MD: Old Earth Books (1997; c. 1989); pg. 74. "Mama and Mr. Parks will play chess and discuss Immanuel Kant or suspension architecture. "
Kant galaxy 2198 Panshin, Alexei. Rite of Passage. New York: Ace Books (1973; first ed. 1968); pg. 180. "'It seems to me that you approved of Kant's proposition that we should treat all humans as both ends and means.'

'I didn't attack it.'

'Well, how can you talk this way about the Colons?'

I said, 'Well, really, what makes you think that the Mudeaters are people?' "

Kant galaxy 3131 Simmons, Dan. The Rise of Endymion. New York: Bantam (1998 mass market edition; first ed. 1997); pg. 533. "I tried to remember my philosophy readings at Taliesin, recalled our discussions of Berkeley, Hume, and Kant, and chuckled. "
Kant Mars 1994 Dick, Philip K. Martian Time-Slip. New York: Ballantine (1981; c. 1964); pg. 152. "At the Immanuel Kant he halted to ask directions. Several pupils, in their teens, stood aside for him.

'The Tiberius,' it told him in heavily accented English, 'can be found down that way.' It pointed with absolute authority; it did not have any doubts, and Jack hurried at once down that particular hall. "

Kant New York: New York City 1988 Martin, George R. R. & John J. Miller. Wild Cards VII: Dead Man's Hand. New York: Bantam Books (1990); pg. 11. "Maseryk played the good cop, Kant played the bad cop... Kant was a hairless scaled joker with nictitating membranes and pointed teeth. " [Other refs. to this character named Kant.]
Kant Tennessee 2054 Dick, Philip K. & Ray Nelson. The Ganymede Takeover. New York: Ace Books (1967); pg. 33. "...it was so obviously phony; as for instance whose pictures appeared on it? President Johnson? Stalin? No; the Gany had dipped into history and come up with full-face steel-engraved portraits of such freaks as Kant and Socrates and Hume and old-time non-heroes like that. "
Kant USA 1993 Simmons, Dan. The Hollow Man. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 126. "...into real theology, real philosophy. Soul Dad had read and studied Berkely and Hume and Kant and Heidegger. Soul Dad had reconciled Aquinas... "
Kant USA 1995 Kress, Nancy. "Fault Lines " in Isaac Asimov's Detectives (Gardner Dozois and Sheila Williams, eds.) New York: Ace Books (1998; c. 1995); pg. 186. [Epigraph] "'If the truth shall kill them, let them die.'

--Immanuel Kant "

Kant USA 1998 Dick, Philip K. Time Out of Joint. New York: Random House (2002; c. 1959); pg. 188. "And I am going to try again, he said to himself. I want to see that factory; not the photograph or the model, but the thing itself. The Ding an sich, as Kant said. 'It's too bad you're not interested in philosophy,' he said to Vic. "
Kant USA 1999 Kessel, John. Good News from Outer Space. New York: Tor (1990; c. 1989); pg. 117. "He was the Kant of cynicism, the Picasso of appearance. Nuke the Hawaiian separatists! "
Kant world 1959 Asimov, Isaac. "Rejection Slips " in Nine Tomorrows. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1959); pg. 234. "Dear Asimov, all mental laws
Prove orthodoxy has its flaws.
Consider that eclectic cause
In Kant's philosophy that gnaws
With ceaseless anti-logic jaws
At all outworn and useless saws
That stick in modern mutant craws.
So here's your tale (with faint applause).
The words above show ample cause. "
Kant world 1973 Sagan, Carl. Cosmic Connection: An Extraterrestrial Perspective. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2000; c. 1973); pg. 82. "Immanuel Kant imagined a race of amorous quasi-humans on Venus. "
Kant world 1975 Shea, Robert & Robert Anton Wilson. Illuminatus, Vol. III: Leviathan. New York: Dell (1975); pg. 192. "'He's perfect,' Weishaupt wrote in the De Molay cipher from Mount Vernon. 'Unlike Kant, who makes sense only in German, this man doesn't make sense in any language.' "
Kant world 1999 Koman, Victor. Jehovah Contract. New York: Franklin Watts (1984); pg. 204. "If I could have injected the books into a vein, I would have been mainlining religious philosophy. The current stack of books included Kant, Spinoza, Nietzsche, C. S. Lewis, Ayn Rand, an d Thomas Paine. "
Kant world 2000 Barad, Judith & Ed Robertson The Ethics of Star Trek. New York: HarperCollins (2000) [Non-fiction. Page numbers from book's index.] Pg. 210-16, 220-29, 231-33, 237, 250-51, 266-67, 274, 276, 278, 280-83, 286, 317, 327, 329-30, 332, 335-37, 339-40, 342, 349-51, 353-56
Kant world 2150 Dick, Philip K. The Divine Invasion. New York: Timescape (1981); pg. 81. "However, Big Noodle knew all about Aquinas and Descartes and Kant and Russell and their criticisms... "
Karachai Pern 3015 McCaffrey, Anne. Dragonsdawn. New York: Ballantine (1988); pg. 226. Pg. 226: "...when Thread fell over the mountains southeast on Karachi and brushed Longwood, on Ierne Island... "; Pg. 244: "...needed to shore up mine pits at busy Karachi Camp and Drake's Lake. " [May be other refs. to Karachi.]
Karankawa North America 1905 Gibson, William & Bruce Sterling. The Difference Engine. New York: Bantam (1991); pg. 42. "...his way menaced by the Comanche and Karankawa, by Mexican raiding-parties... "
Karankawa Texas: Galveston 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 7. "'Cabeza de Vaca called it that. His galleon was shipwrecked here in 1528. He was almost eaten by cannibals. Karankawa Indians.'

'Oh? Well, the Indians must have had some name for the place.'

'Nobody knows it,' David said. 'They were all wiped out by smallpox. True Galvestonians, I guess--bad luck.' He thought it over. 'A very weird tribe, the Karankawas. They used to smear themselves with rancid alligator grease--they were famous for the stench.'

'I've never heard of them,' Margaret Day said.

'They were very primitive... They used to eat dirt! They'd bury a fresh deer kill for three or four days, until it softened up, and--' "

Kardecian Spiritualism Brazil 1997 Watson, Ian. God's World. New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers (this ed. 1990; copyright 1979); pg. 18. "'...My other two grandparents were Finnish and Brazilian; he was an engineer and she was a Kardecist spiritualist... "
Kardecian Spiritualism Brazil 2010 Anthony, Patricia. Cradle of Splendor. New York: Ace Books (1996); pg. 129. "'Yes.' He caught himself. 'I'm not sure. But I have been told the president's friend is a medium.'

'She laughed... 'Henrique Freitas? That lily-white Kardeckian Spiritist? Our Father No Salt-No Meat-No Fun? Freitas, he take out cancers with his fingers. He straighten bones with his hands. No, little one. Doctor Singh comes through Freitas, and he don't have time for now low spirits...' "

Kardecian Spiritualism Brazil 2020 Anthony, Patricia. "Anomaly " in Eating Memories. Woburn, MA: First Books; Baltimore, MD: Old Earth Books (1997; c. 1988); pg. 56. "'Tonya's pregnant. What happens when Gilberto's born?'...

'Maybe nothing,' Stengler said. 'It's my theory that this soul comes from an alternate universe. After all, if no life was left on Earth, where would those souls go who needed further incarnations? That problem would have to be addressed, and nothing in Kardeckian Theory allows for it.'

Moss was regarding Stengler thoughtfully. 'I'm not a Kardeckian. I'm just a physicist who got in this through the quantum theory back door. Things don't fit as neatly for me as they do for Burton. I'm not sure what reality is... And, considering the dichotomy inherent in clairvoyance, I'm not sure how time works, either.'

'So... He might really be remembering a future life. A life where, in fifty-three years, the sky darkens and it snows in the jungle.' "

Kardecian Spiritualism California 1995 Powers, Tim. Earthquake Weather. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 20. "...flipping through the pages of her battered copy of Kardec's Selected Prayers. Among the other books she had tossed onto the couch were Reichenbach's Letters on Od and Magnetism... "
Kardecian Spiritualism Georgia: Atlanta 2020 Anthony, Patricia. "Anomaly " in Eating Memories. Woburn, MA: First Books; Baltimore, MD: Old Earth Books (1997; c. 1988); pg. 49. Pg. 49: "Burton Stengler, professor of applied mediumship from the Kardeckian Institute in Atlanta, watched doggedly, his eyes narrowing in disgust. "; Pg. 48: "'Do you imagine I practice Past Life Therapy because of something Hindu in my DNA?' "
Karen Thailand 2038 Jones, Gwyneth. White Queen. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 68. Pg. 67: "'One in a country near the Cameroon, I've forgotten the name. One in Burma . . . I mean Karen, up beyond Chiangmai, one in Alaska...' "; Pg. 68: "The old man in the kimono was the visitors' go-between. He was a Mr. Kaoru, retired businessman living on a private estate in the tiny State of Karen (not to be confused with Karen state, next door in Federal Burma). He had been acting as host to... "; Pg. 248: "They had cleaned up Karen city... The lucky (or unfortunate) Karens were acting as the world's guinea pigs. " [Other refs., e.g., pg. 140.]
Kazakh Gaia 2046 Bear, Greg. Eternity. New York: Warner Books (1988); pg. 151. Pg. 151: "...gave them all the fuel they needed, and maps of the Kazakh, Kirghiz and Uzbeki territories of Nordic Rhus. "; Pg. 153: "waiting for the Nordic Rhus Uzbek and Kazakh watchtowers to sense them. "
Kazakh Kazakhstan 1999 Banks, Iain. The Business. New York: Simon & Schuster (1999); pg. 331. -
Kazakh Kazakhstan 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 39. "'No, this is just planning stuff. Strategy for a war between Russia and Turkmenistan. Russia and an alliance between Turkmenistan, Kazakhstan, Azerbaijan, and Turkey...' "
Kazakh Ukraine 1942 Anderson, Poul. The Boat of a Million Years. New York: Tor (1989); pg. 275. "'...The war threw me together with people from the whole Soviet Ukraine, not Cossacks [Kazakhs], ordinary Little Russians, little people driven to such despair that they fought side by side with the Communistts... After all.. it's in our tradition to resist invaders and rise against tyrants...' "
Kazakh Washington, D.C. 1999 Anderson, Jack. Millennium. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 136. "'Another possibility is that he was a foreign national. Thalidomide would mean British. Chernobyl baby or a Kazakhstani. Or one of the Chinese experiments.'

THALID - UK, RAD - CHERN, KAZAK, EXP - CHINA. "

Kazakh world 1642 Anderson, Poul. The Boat of a Million Years. New York: Tor (1989); pg. 275. "Pyotr frowned. 'I've read about those Cossack rebellions.'

Katya winced. Three centuries fell from her, and she stood again in her village when men--neighbors, friends, two sons of hers--galloped in after riding with Chmielnicki and shouted their boasts. Every Catholic or Uniate priest they or the serfs caught, they hanged in front of his altar alongside a pig and a Jew. 'Barbaric times,' she said. 'The Germans have no such excuse.' "

Kazakh world 1942 Anderson, Poul. The Boat of a Million Years. New York: Tor (1989); pg. 275. "...he asked shyly, 'Are you from hereabouts, Katya Borisovna?'

'No. Far to the southwest,' she answered.

'I thought so. You speak excellent Russian, but the accent-- Though it isn't quite Little Russian, either, I think.'

'You've a sharp ear.' Impulse seized her. Why not? It was no secret. 'I'm a Kazak.'

He started. Water spluttered from his lips. He wipe them, a clumsy, shaken gesture, and said, 'A Cossack? But you, you're well educated yourself, I can hear that, and--'

She laughed. 'Come, now. We're not a race of horse barbarians.'

'I know--'

'Our schooling is actually better than average. Or used to be... Before the Revolution, most of us were farmers, fishers, merchants, traders who went far into Siberia. We did have our special institutions, yes, our special ways... Our kind of freedom.' "

[Book has other references to Kazakhs, not in DB.]

Kazakh world 1970 Zelazny, Roger. Nine Princes of Amber in The Chronicles of Amber, vol. 1. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (c. 1970); pg. 76. "I saw the rockets leap up form the stained hard places, Peenemnd, Vandenberg, Kennedy, Kyzyl Kum in Kazakhstan, and I touched with my hands the walls of China. "


Kazakh, continued

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