Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Judaism, New York: New York City

Judaism, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Judaism New York: New York City 1986 Cover, Arthur Byron. "Jesus Was an Ace " in Wild Cards V: Down and Dirty (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 104. "That place looks good' she said, pointing across the street. 'Rudy's Kosher Sushi.' "
Judaism New York: New York City 1986 Hubbard, L. Ron. Mission Earth Vol. 6: Death Quest. Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (1986); pg. 18. "The proprietor himself waited on me. He was a very well informed Jew. He knew what all the fashions were, from one end of the world to the other... " [Also pg. 221.]
Judaism New York: New York City 1993 Brust, Steven. Agyar. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 60. "He looked like a New York Jew, with long, curly dark hair, faintly Semitic features and brown eyes. Her name was Melissa and his was Tom. "
Judaism New York: New York City 1994 Morrow, James. Towing Jehovah. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1994); pg. 21. "...the New York subway system offered a foretaste of the Kingdom: Asians rubbing shoulders with Africans, Hispanics with Arabs, Gentiles with Jews... "
Judaism New York: New York City 1994 Morrow, James. Towing Jehovah. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1994); pg. 42. "...Neil had spent two years across the river at Yeshiva University, studying Jewish history and toying with the idea of becoming a rabbi. " [One of main characters is Jewish. There are many other refs. to Judaism, not in DB.]
Judaism New York: New York City 2000 Silverberg, Robert. The Stochastic Man. New York: Harper & Row (1975); pg. 20. "The barrio had hired the Israelis to train their troops in '94, following the ratification of the anti-black 'mutual defense' alliance put together by the Puerto Ricans and what was left of the city's Jewish population. "
Judaism New York: New York City 2000 Silverberg, Robert. The Stochastic Man. New York: Harper & Row (1975); pg. 28. "'He's a Jew,' said Mardikian with a little dry laugh. 'Lombroso is an old Jewish name, he tells me. We have a terrific team--Lombroso, Ephrikian, Missakian, Mardikian, and Nichols. You're our token WASP.' "
Judaism New York: New York City 2000 Silverberg, Robert. The Stochastic Man. New York: Harper & Row (1975); pg. 34. Pg. 34: "In this way we found the usual assortment of blacks, Puerto Ricans, Chinese, Italians, Irish, Jews, etc., to run the Human Resources Agency... "; Pg. 38: "...his cherished collection of medieval Judaica--silver headpieces, breastplates, and pointers for the scrolls of the Law, embroidered Torah curtains out of the synagogues of Tunisia or Iran, filigreed Sabbath lamps, candlesticks, spice boxes, candelabra. In this musky cloistered sanctuary Lombroso reigned over the municipal revenues like a prince of Zion: woe betide the foolish Gentile who disdained his counsel. "; Pg. 49: "...and a swarthy Spanish Jew. " [Many other refs. not in DB, incl. pg. 81, 122-123, 127-128, etc.]
Judaism New York: New York City 2000 Silverberg, Robert. The Stochastic Man. New York: Harper & Row (1975); pg. 57. "...told his or her favorite scabrous Republican / gay / black / Puerto / Jew / Irish / Italian / doctor / lawyer / rabbi / priest / female politician / Mafioso... "
Judaism New York: New York City 2000 Silverberg, Robert. The Stochastic Man. New York: Harper & Row (1975); pg. 121. "'What is he going to say about Israel?'

'Just a few light quips. But the Jewish people here are extremely sensitive to such remarks, and the reaction wasn't--isn't going to be--good. New York's Jews, you know, traditionally mistrust Irish politicians. Especially Irish mayors, but they weren't even all that fond of the Kennedys before the assassination.' "

Judaism New York: New York City 2000 Silverberg, Robert. The Stochastic Man. New York: Harper & Row (1975); pg. 139. "Naturally Quinn's performance made every network that night, and the next day City Hall was inundated by angry telegrams. Mardikian phoned me to say the place was being picketed by B'nai B'rith, the United Jewish Appeal, the Jewish Defense League, and the whole House of David starting team. I went over there, slinking goyishly through the mob of outraged Hebrews and wanting to apologize to the entire cosmos for having by my silence permitted all this to happen... "
Judaism New York: New York City 2015 Pohl, Frederik. The Years of the City. New York: Timescape (1984); pg. 41. "'...Everyone can watch. At the same time, AM radio stations are assigned to provide simultaneous translation in Spanish, Japanese, Yiddish, Chinese, Italian, and whatever other languages have a large enough constituency in the city to justify their use...' "
Judaism New York: New York City 2015 Pohl, Frederik. The Years of the City. New York: Timescape (1984); pg. 70. "'What does Jocelyn Feigerman have to do with this?' Brandon demanded.

John Harvey's face changed. The lips drew closed, the corners of the mouth drew down, the eyebrows lifted. 'Oh, yeah,' he said after a moment. 'Saul said you might give us a hard time about that.'

'I asked you a question!'

Harvey said patiently,' She's your rabbi, Brandon. Why do you think we're doing this? It goes by clout, and she's got it.'

Brandon had time to get his thoughts together. He nodded. 'Right, I understand that, but what are you doing?'

'What? What's the matter, Brandon, don't you pay attention? It's this Universal Town Meeting thing--'

'But for what purpose? Are you figuring some public-relations thing like a telethon for outlawing abortion, or a real UTM. Why do you want remotes at the union headquarters?' "

Judaism New York: New York City 2076 Morehouse, Lyda. Archangel Protocol. New York: Penguin Putnam (2001); pg. 3. "Once again, the reclusive presidential candidate, Reverend-Senator Etienne Letourneau, took a firm position against 'liberal' (read: all but heathen) Rabbi-Senator Grey from New York. It took me two sentences to realize Letourneau's rant was an obvious ploy to put the fear of God into the opposition... " [Many other refs. to Rabbi-Senator Grey in novel. Grey is the main political opponent opposing candidate Letourneau, who turns out to be the novel's main bad guy. Other refs. to Rabbi-Senator Grey include pg. 101-103, 173-174, 263-264, 276-277, 283, 291-292, 30-301, 330-336, etc.]
Judaism New York: New York City 2076 Morehouse, Lyda. Archangel Protocol. New York: Penguin Putnam (2001); pg. 253. "'Mahaffry?' I smiled, 'Irish and Jewish?'

He returned my smile with a dimpled one of his own. 'It happens, but I'm not. I've got a different kind of 'family' connection to the [Jewish] Malachim, if you get my meaning.'

I shook my head.

'Girlfriend.' He smiled. 'I'm gay.'

'Oh.' It was rumored that Rebeckah sheltered gays, lesbians, and other sexual deviants unwilling to renounce their lifestyles, but I'd always thought the rumors false, a smear campaign to destroy the Malachim [Hasidic Jewish group] reputation further. "

Judaism New York: New York City 2076 Morehouse, Lyda. Archangel Protocol. New York: Penguin Putnam (2001); pg. 285. "'Deidre, you've met three archangels. A Christian.' He laid his hand on his chest to indicate himself. 'A Muslim, and a Jew. If one messiah was the only true messiah, how could that be?'

I remembered the funeral, and the ease with which my Christian angel had donned a yarmulke and spoken Hebrew. 'Michael, you're a Jew, too.' "

Judaism New York: New York City 2076 Morehouse, Lyda. Archangel Protocol. New York: Penguin Putnam (2001); pg. 331. "The angels leap up onto the stage as one. They made a strange sight: Muslim in turban and tux; Israeli Jew in full military uniform; and Asian New Age drag queen striding purposefully to where Grey waited... "
Judaism New York: New York City 4902 Asimov, Isaac. The Caves of Steel in The Robot Novels (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Doubleday (c. 1954); pg. 32. "'...Do you know what it's short for?'

'Jessica?'

'You'll never guess.'

'I can't think of anything else.'

She laughed and said archly, 'My full name is Jezebel.'

That was when his interest flared. He put his punch glass down and said, intently, 'No, really?'

'Honestly. I'm not kidding. Jezebel. It's my real-for-true name on all my records. My parents liked the sound of it.'

She was quite proud of it, even though there was never a less likely Jezebel in the world.

Baley said seriously, 'My name is Elijah, you know. My full name, I mean.'

It didn't register with her.

He said, 'Elijah was Jezebel's great enemy.'

'He was?'

'Why, sure. In the Bible.'

'Oh? I didn't know that. Now isn't that funny? I hope that doesn't mean you'll have to be my enemy in real life.' "

Judaism New York: New York City 4912 Asimov, Isaac. The Caves of Steel in The Robot Novels (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Doubleday (c. 1954); pg. 33. "'Trying to be Jezebel won't get you anywhere. If you must know the truth, the name doesn't mean what you think, anyway. The Jezebel of the Bible was a faithful wife and a good one according to her lights. She had no lovers that we know of, cut no high jinks, and took no moral liberties at all.'

Jessie stared angrily at him. 'That isn't so. I've heard the phrase, 'a painted Jezebel.' I know what that means.'

'Maybe you think you do, but listen...' "

Judaism New York: New York City 4912 Asimov, Isaac. The Caves of Steel in The Robot Novels (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Doubleday (c. 1954); pg. 34. "'...After Jezebel's husband, King Ahab died, her son, Jehoram, became king. One of the captains of his army, Jehu, rebelled against him and assassinated him. Jehu then rode to Jezreel where the old queen-mother, Jezebel, was residing. Jezebel heard of his coming and knew that he could only mean to kill her. In her pride and courage, she painted her face and dressed herself in her best clothes so that she could meet him as a haughty and defiant queen. He had her thrown from the window of the palace and killed, but she made a good end, according to my notions. And that's what people refer to when they speak of 'a painted Jezebel,' whether they know it or not.' "
Judaism New York: New York City 4912 Asimov, Isaac. The Caves of Steel in The Robot Novels (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Doubleday (c. 1954); pg. 34. "'The next evening Jessie said in a small voice, 'I've been reading the Bible, Lije.'

'What?' For a moment, Baley was honestly bewildered.

'The parts about Jezebel.'

'Oh! Jessie, I'm sorry if I hurt your feelings. I was being childish.'

'No. No... It's good to know the truth. I don't want to be fooled by not knowing. So I read about her. She was a wicked woman, Lije.'

'Well, her enemies wrote those chapters. We don't know her side.'

'She killed all the prophets of the Lord she could lay her hands on.'

'So they say she did... If you want her side, I could think of some arguments for you She valued the religion of her ancestors who had been in the land long before the Hebrews came. The Hebrews had their own God, and, what's more, it was an exclusive God. They weren't content to worship Him themselves; they wanted everyone in reach to worship Him as well.' "

Judaism New York: New York City 4912 Asimov, Isaac. The Caves of Steel in The Robot Novels (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Doubleday (c. 1954); pg. 34. "'Jezebel was a conservative, sticking to the old beliefs against the new ones. After all, if the new beliefs had a higher moral content, the old ones were more emotionally satisfying. The fact that she killed priests just marks her as a child of her times. It was the usual method of proselytization in those days. If you read I Kings, you must remember that Elijah (my namesake this time) had a contest with 850 prophets of Baal to see which could bring down fire from heaven. Elijah won and promptly ordered the crowd of onlookers to kill the 850 Baalites. And they did.' "
Judaism New York: New York City 4912 Asimov, Isaac. The Caves of Steel in The Robot Novels (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Doubleday (c. 1954); pg. 35. "'Jessie bit her lip. 'What about Naboth's vineyard, Lije. Here was this Naboth not bothering anybody, except that he refused to sell the King his vineyard. So Jezebel arranged to have people perjure themselves and say that Naboth had committed blasphemy or something.'

'He was supposed to have 'blasphemed God and the king,' ' said Baley.

''Yes. So they confiscated his property after they executed him.'

'That was wrong. Of course, in modern times, Naboth would have been handled quite easily. If the city wanted his property... the courts would have ordered him off, had him removed by force if necessary, and paid him whatever they considered a fair price. King Ahab didn't have that way out. Still, Jezebel's solution was wrong. The only excuse for her is that Ahab was sick and unhappy over the situation and she felt that her love for her husband came ahead of Naboth's welfare. I keep telling you, she was the model of a faithful wi--' "

Judaism New York: New York City 4912 Asimov, Isaac. The Caves of Steel in The Robot Novels (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Doubleday (c. 1954); pg. 36. "'Bently isn't a Bible name, is it?'

'No,' said Baley. 'I'm quite sure it isn't.'

'All right, then. I don't want any Bible names.' "

Judaism New York: New York City: Harlem 1920 Barnes, Steven. Far Beyond the Stars (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 90. "The [Harlem] neighborhood started falling apart during the First World War--by 1920 most Jews were moving to newer neighborhoods in the West Side and in the Bronx, Brooklyn and Queens. Between 1920 and 1930 the Negro population of Harlem skyrocketed to over 200,000... "
Judaism New York: New York City: Manhattan 3414 Farmer, Philip Jose. Dayworld. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons (1985); pg. 214. "The government had no public official policy against Jews. It professed toleration of all religions, but it did push a subtle form of persecution of Jews. It was unlawful for parents to arrange marriages of their children or use any form of coercion to ensure that the children married within the faith. Since it was also forbidden for any group to claim superiority to any other group for religious reasons, the Jews were not allowed to state in words or in writing that they were 'the chosen of God.' That would be antisocial and nonegalitarian. Orthodox males also had to delete from their morning prayer their thanks to God that they were not born as women... All of the sacred or revered writings of the Jews were legally available only in recordings. These had been censored, though not heavily, and interspersed frequently with comments by the officials of the Bureau of Religious Freedom. "
Judaism New York: Westchester County 1985 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 23: "Shadowman ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Jan. 1985); pg. 4. Harry: "Wanna hear me swear in Yiddish?! "; Piotr: Checkmate, Harry. "; Harry: "Oy vey is mieir?!? "
Judaism New York: Westchester County 1986 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 45: "We Were Only Foolin' ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Nov. 1986); pg. 24. Kitty: "Who was he, then, that we gather to mourn him? Who am I? A four-eyed, flat-chested, brat, chick, brain, hebe, stuck-up Xavier's snob freak! Don't like the words? I could use nicer. I've heard worse. Who here hasn't So often, so casually, that maybe we've forgotten the power they have to hurt. " ['Hebe' is an ethnic slur applied to Jews. Kitty Pryde, one of the main characters of this story, is Jewish, but her ethnic background is mentioned only here.]
Judaism New Zealand 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 265. "...and a sort of mechanical Messias. Some of these cross-referred; in particular, there was the story about the same Teresa who cropped up in the New Zealand limerick, which told how they sent for a Jewish telepath to ask what happened, when they discovered that thanks to the liquid helium she was in a state of suspended animation, and he explained with a puzzled look that he could only detect one thought in her head-- "Messias has not yet come.' "
Judaism Newmanhome 2100 Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 105. "And then the community's chief working rabbi (there were only two) got the segregationist fever, declaring that Jewish burials should be in a place of their own, where a star of David could be erected. "
Judaism North America 1881 Turtledove, Harry. How Few Remain. New York: Ballantine (1997); pg. 464. "The statesman was too openly successful, too openly clever a Jew to suit Jackson's stern Christianity. "
Judaism North America 1914 Turtledove, Harry. The Great War: American Front (alternate history novel). New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 84. "Paul Mantarakis [had]... heard there were a few Orthodox priests in uniform, but he'd never seen one. Protestant ministers, yes. Catholic priests, yes. Rabbis, even--yes. but none of his own. "
Judaism North America 2000 Knight, Damon. Rule Golden in Three Novels. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (c. 1954); pg. 58. "Following this, a wave of millennial enthusiasm swept the continent; Christians and Jews everywhere feasted, fasted, prayed and in other ways celebrated the imminent Second (or First) Coming of Christ. Evangelistic and fundamentalist sects garnered souls by the million. "
Judaism Norway 2075 Anderson, Glenn L. The Millennium File. Bountiful, Utah: Horizon Publishers (1986); pg. 76. "What if the Israelites, captured so long ago by the Assyrians, carried away into the lands of north, had managed to maintain a cohesive society? Like the children of Israel enslaved by Pharaoh. And what if, like the children of Israel, they had managed to engineer a mass exodus under divine guidance? Let's say they fled northward again, clear into the upper reaches of what centuries later would be called Scandinavia. And then, still pursued by their relentless overlords, they fled even further, into the frozen islands off the Norwegian coast. Into hiding.

Into the Corridors.

...a runaway civilization struggling for survival against the arctic wasteland. Weeks into months, months into years, years into decades. And, like the desert wanderings of the children of Israel, the prolonged hardships eventually brought about a kid of purification among the refugees. "

Judaism Nueva Terra 2150 Rosenberg, Joel. Hero. New York: Penguin Books (1990); pg. 22. "'Dov, be still,' Avram said.

Dov ignored him. He wasn't open to reason about people pointing guns at Shimon.

Dov lightly, reverently, like a rabbi lifting the silver pointer to read a spread Torah scroll, tapped Shimon on the shoulder, then pointed when Shimon looked up. " [Judaism permeates this entire novel, which is about Jewish characters from a Jewish planet, and is written by a Jewish author. Essentially every page has Jewish names and characters, although the words 'Jewish' or 'Judaism' are rarely mentioned. Refs. throughout, most not in DB unless mention Judaism or Jews by name.]

Judaism Ohio 1986 Anderson, Jack. Control. New York: Kensington Publishing Corp. (1988); pg. 160. "'I flew out to Dayton three weeks ago, and we sat down with the members of the Dayton Ministerial Association. We offered the ministers two hours every Sunday morning, free. We will broadcast from their churches on a rotating basis, on a schedule that they set up. A rabbi asked if we could do something for his people, so we gave the Jewish congregations a Saturday hour. They are not going to want to broadcast services apparently, but some films and lectures on Jewish history and culture...' "
Judaism Ohio 1996 Schimel, Lawrence. "A Stable Relationship " in Alternate Tyrants (Mike Resnick, ed.) New York: Tor (1997); pg. 199. "So I tolerated the jokes and, in fact, when Mike [Resnick] won the Hugo for best novella in 1995, bought him as a gift A Goy's Guide to Yiddish so he would at least spell the shtick correctly. (It was a special edition that included the wordlist on disk, to add to one's spell-check dictionary.) "
Judaism Ohio 1996 Schimel, Lawrence. "A Stable Relationship " in Alternate Tyrants (Mike Resnick, ed.) New York: Tor (1997); pg. 199-200. "To give him an excuse to use it [A Goy's Guide to Yiddish], we wrote two novels together featuring the exploits of a band of Jewish superheroes fighting bad guys and performing mitzvahs. They all had biblical code names that tied into their superpowers. Elijah was invisible and only Solomon, who could read minds, ever knew where he was by pinpointing the location of Elijah's thoughts. Samson was the brawn of the group, a big Russian-immigrant juggernaut who spoke little English, but boy, could he plow through the opposition. Moses was the aquamancer, and in his mundane life ran a bagel store called Manna from Heaven, above which The Jewboys had their secret hideout and corporate offices. It was a fun series whose purpose was nothing more than just that and it sold well, especially around Purim and Chanukah. "
Judaism Oklahoma 1943 Bishop, Michael. Brittle Innings. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 84. Pg. 84: "'...Mister JayMac assigned that attic room to Clerval last year, his first on the club, and I'd've figured him about as ready to take on a roomy as Hitler to show up at a kosher gig in Miami...' "; Pg. 277: "'S Hank Clerval, the best first baseman in the CVL.' He said this with such respect that CVL almost seemed a vowelless code for Clerval, like YHWH is for Jehovah. "
Judaism Ontario 1992 Huff, Tanya. Blood Trail. New York: DAW Books (1992); pg. 36. "Every time she faced the elder Mr. Glassman, she found herself standing at parade rest for no reason she could discern... Although he'd been hardly more than a child at the time, he'd managed to not only survive the death camps of the Holocaust but bring his younger brother Joseph safely through the horror as well. "
Judaism Ontario 2002 Sawyer, Robert J. Hominids. New York: Tor (2002); pg. 291. "'Well,' replied Mary, 'not everyone on Earth--on this Earth, that is--believes in an afterlife.'

'Do the majority?'

'Well . . . yes, I guess so.'

'Do you?'

Mary frowned, thinking. 'Yes, I suppose I do.'

'Based on what evidence?' asked Ponter...

'Well, they say that . . .' She trailed off. Why did she believe it? She was a scientist, a rationalist, a logical thinker. But, of course, her religious indoctrination had occurred long before she'd been trained in biology. Finally, she shrugged a little, knowing her answer would be inadequate. 'It's in the Bible... The Bible, repeated Mary. 'Scriptures... Holy text... A revered book of moral teachings. The first part of it is shared by my people--called Christians--and by another major religion, the Jews. The second part is only believed in by Christians.' " [More, pg. 291-292.]

Judaism Ontario 2002 Sawyer, Robert J. Hominids. New York: Tor (2002); pg. 295. Pg. 295: "Yes, the Nazi leaders were pure evil, but how many of the rank and file, following orders to exterminate Jews, had managed to sleep at night by believing the freshly dead were now in paradise? "; Pg. 311: "He faked the voice of an old Jewish yenta. 'So, vhat have you two kids been talking about?' "
Judaism Ontario: Toronto 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 172. "Hollus wavered into existence a short time later. 'I have been thinking about the people who blew up the abortion clinic,' he said. 'You said they were religious fundamentalists.'

'Well, one presumes so, yes. They haven't been caught yet.'

'No smoking gun,' said Hollus.

I smiled. 'Exactly.'

'But if they are, as you suspect, religious people, why is that relevant?'

'Blowing up an abortion clinic is an attempt to protest a perceived moral outrage.'

'And . . .?' said Hollus.

'Well, on Earth, the concept of God is inextricably linked to issues of morality.'

Hollus listened.

'In fact, three of our principal religions share the same Ten Commandments, supposedly handed down by God.' "

Judaism Ontario: Toronto 2011 Sawyer, Robert J. The Terminal Experiment. New York: HarperCollins (1995); pg. 43. "Incongruously, dinner was always at Sonny Gotlieb's a deli at Bathurst and Lawrence, in the heart of Toronto's Jewish district. Peter couldn't stand Pakistani cuisine... and Sarkar had to eat where he could get food that adhered to Islamic dietary laws--something which most kosher fare managed to do admirably. And so the two of them sat in their usual booth, surrounded by zaydes and bubbehs chatting away in Yiddish, Hebrew, and Russian. "
Judaism Ontario: Toronto 2011 Sawyer, Robert J. The Terminal Experiment. New York: HarperCollins (1995); pg. 197. "'...I want to learn about Buddhism and Judaism and Seventh Day Adventists...' "
Judaism Palestine 1930 Batchelor, John Calvin. The Birth of the People's Republic of Antarctica. New York: Dial Press (1983); pg. 178. "He was the youngest son of a sergeant major... and of an orphaned Jewess raised by nuns in Palestine, where she converted to Christianity... Longfaeroe's upbringing was as confession-laden as mine. As the 'bairn' of an intractable clan and an independent Jewess, Longfaeroe made his way by contrary trial and error to university, where he took a degree in divinity.
Judaism Pennsylvania 2049 Rucker, Rudy. Freeware. New York: Avon (1998; c. 1997); pg. 51. "...and Benny was a tiny Jewish guy from Philadelphia. "
Judaism Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 133. "I guess I'm licked, and I guess I was wrong all along to be so unyielding, but damn it all anyhow. For the first time in my life I can sympathize with all those hateful, heavy fathers cracking down on a son who had decided he was gay or a daughter in love with a black/Jew/Parsee/whatever. Unfortunately, being able to see the resemblance doesn't help me break free of it. "
Judaism Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 174. "...too bad Friends have always been so overwhelmingly Anglo-Saxon, apart from our smattering of Jewish converts. "
Judaism Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 263. "'And also,' said Joel, 'I'm interested in Quakers, sort of. If you feel like explaining to me why the Quakers ditched the mission, I'll tell you--are you interested in what being Jewish is like, for example?'

Danny laughed. 'I already know a whole lot about being Jewish--we've got tons of Jews in Swarthmore! Every year we celebrate Christmas and Hanukkah. Quakers don't have to be Christians anymore! You could be a Quaker, easy as I could be a Sixer.' "

Judaism Phaze 2980 Anthony, Piers. Split Infinity. New York: Ballantine (1980); pg. 316. Pg. 316-320: about golems.
Judaism Poland 1939 Simmons, Dan. Carrion Comfort. New York: Warner Books (1990; c. 1989); pg. 111. "'There was talk then of our family traveling to our Uncle Moshe's farm near Cracow. Already there were severe food shortages in Lodz. We usually spent our summers on the farm and the idea of being there with the rest of our family was an attractive one. Through Uncle Moshe we heard from his daughter Rebecca who had married an American Jew and was planning to go to Palestine to farm. For years she had urged other young members of the family to join her. I, for one, would have gladly gone to the farm. I had already been expelled, as had the other Jews, from my school in Lodz. Uncle Moshe had once taught at Warsaw University and I knew that he would have been happy to tutor me. New laws restricted Father's practice only to Jews--most of whom lived in distant, poorer parts of the city. There were few reasons to stay, many to go.

'But we stayed. It was planned that we would visit Uncle Moshe in June... How naive we were.' "

Judaism Poland 1940 Simmons, Dan. Carrion Comfort. New York: Warner Books (1990; c. 1989); pg. 111. "'In March of 1940 the Gestapo drove us from our homes and created a Jewish ghetto in the city. By my birthday in April 5, the ghetto was completely sealed off. Travel for Jews was absolutely forbidden.

'Again the Germans set up a council--the Judenrat--and this time my father was chosen to serve on it. one of the Elders, Chaim Rumkowski, used to come to our flat--one room in which eight of us slept--and spend the night talking to my father about the administration of the ghetto... In the autumn of 1941 the Germans began bringing many thousands of western Jews into our ghetto. Some had been shipped from as far away as Luxembourg. Many were German Jews who looked down on the rest of us. I remember a fight I got into with an elder boy, a Jew from Frankfurt...' " [Many other refs., not in DB, esp. pg. 111-131, 154-160, etc. One of the main characters is Jewish and parts of the novel take place in Jerusalem and in a WWII-era Jewish ghetto in Poland.]

Judaism Poland 1940 Turtledove, Harry. Worldwar: In the Balance. New York: Ballantine (1994); pg. 188. "Having gained a secular education--indispensable in medicine--Russie believed in Darwin alongside Genesis. They coexisted uneasily in his mind, one dominant when he thought, the other when he felt. In the ghetto, God gained the upper hand, for prayer seemed likelier to do some good than anything merely rational. And when the Lizards came, prayer was answered.

But Russie suddenly wondered what part God had had in creating the Lizards and whatever other thinking races there might be. If He had shaped them all, what was man that He should notice him especially? " [More].

Judaism Poland 1941 Turtledove, Harry. Worldwar: Tilting the Balance. New York: Del Rey (1995); pg. 238. "He'd had so much bitter experience with anti-Semitic Poles that he'd come to think the whole nation hated its Jews. " [Other refs., not in DB.]
Judaism Poland: Lodz 1935 Simmons, Dan. Carrion Comfort. New York: Warner Books (1990; c. 1989); pg. 110. "'I was born in 1925, in Poland,' said Saul. 'in the city of Lodz. My family was relatively well-to-do. My father was a doctor. We were Jews but not Orthodox Jews. My mother had considered converting to Catholicism when she was younger. My father considered himself a doctor first, a Pole second, a European citizen third, and a Jew fourth. Perhaps he did not rate his Jewishness even that high.

'When I was a boy, Lodz was as good a place as any for a Jew to be. A third of the six hundred thousand residents were Jews. Many important citizens, businessmen, and artisans were Jews. Several of my mother's friends were active in the arts. Her uncle played in the municipal symphony for years. By the time I was ten years old, much of that had changed. Local political parties had been elected after promising to eliminate Jews from the city. As if possessed of the anti-Semitic contagion raging in our neighbor, Germany, the country was turning against us...' "

Judaism Poland: Lodz 1939 Simmons, Dan. Carrion Comfort. New York: Warner Books (1990; c. 1989); pg. 110. "'...My father... never tired of pointing out that European Jews had become used to waves of pogroms followed by generations of progress. 'We are all human beings,' he used to say, 'despite temporary differences which divide us.' I am sure that my father went to his death believing this... I was fourteen when the Germans entered our city. It was the September of 1939. At first it was not so bad. They arranged that a Jewish Council be set up to advise in the governing of this new outpost of the Reich. My father explained to me that it showed that anyone could be dealt with through civilized negotiations. He did not believe in devils. Despite my mother's protests, my father offered to serve on the Council. It was not to be. Thirty-one prominent Jews had already been appointed. A month later, in early November, the Germans deported the Council members to a camp and burned our synagogue.' "
Judaism Portugal 1550 C.E. Piercy, Marge. He, She and It. New York: Alfred A. Knopf (1991); pg. 27. "The Jews of England were expelled to penury and wandering. The Jews of Portugal were ripped from their homes. How can he save the Jews of Prague?
Judaism Portugal 1600 Anthony, Patricia. God's Fires. New York: Ace Books (1997); pg. 121. [Year is estimated.] "'...Get out. Go to Palestine. Be among your own people--'

'Jews?' She pulled free. 'I am no Jew!'

At the sound of her rage, her burro became unsettled and trampled his straw.

'I don't know how to be Jew.' She rubbed her arm where he had grasped her. 'How do Jews act? How do they talk? What are their holy days, the prayers?'

'Surely you remember a little some--'

'I remember a book that was not the Bible. I remember that my father sometimes wore a tasseled stole. I remember that we hid things when visitors came.' She gave a dry laugh. 'Do you think that is enough?' " [Some other refs. not in DB.]

Judaism Portugal 1600 Anthony, Patricia. God's Fires. New York: Ace Books (1997); pg. 168. [Year is estimated.] "'...And he trades in things, all on paper. Loans money on expeditions, just like a Jew...' "; Pg. 186: "'You accuse Father Manoel Pessoa of fornication with whom?'

'That Jew witch.'

'A name please.'

'Berenice Jew Witch Pinheiro. Her of the evil eye. O, pretty enough, like Lucifer is pretty...' "

Judaism Portugal 1600 Anthony, Patricia. God's Fires. New York: Ace Books (1997); pg. 211. [Year is estimated.] "Berenice Pinheiro had the dark exotic beauty of a Moor or a Judiazer; and she sat meekly, head lowered, peering at the tribunal through her lashes. She was poorly clothed, but neat enough, with one lone extravagance--and not one of vanity: the gold crucifix she wore around her neck. "
Judaism Quebec 1979 Ing, Dean. Soft Targets. New York: Tor (1996; c. 1979); pg. 21. "Pelletier drew a blank with the Quebecois, another with known elements of Meyer Cohane's people in the Jewish Defense League. "
Judaism Quebec: Montreal 1995 Sawyer, Robert J. Frameshift. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1997); pg. 81. "Pierre didn't really know much about Judaism, although there were lots of English-speaking Jews in Montreal. "
Judaism Riverworld 1890 Farmer, Philip Jose. To Your Scattered Bodies Go. New York: Berkeley Medallion Books (1971); pg. 20. "A man, both fists clenched and raised to shoulder height, was shouting in Yiddish, 'My beard! My beard!'

Another man was pointing to his genitals and saying in Slovenian, 'They've made a Jew of me! A Jew! Do you think that . . .? No, it couldn't be!' "

Judaism Riverworld 1890 Farmer, Philip Jose. To Your Scattered Bodies Go. New York: Berkeley Medallion Books (1971); pg. 40. "'You're Burton, the explorer and linguist? The discoverer of Lake Tanganyika? The one who made a pilgrimage to Mecca while disguised as a Moslem? The translator of The Thousand and One Nights?'

'I have no desire to lie nor need to. I am he.'

Lev Ruach spat at Burton... 'You son of a bitch!' he cried. 'You foul Nazi bastard! I read about you! You were, in many ways, an admirable person, I suppose! But you were an anti-Semite!'

Burton was startled. He said,' My enemies spread that baseless and vicious rumor. But anybody acquainted with the facts and with me would know better. And now, I think you'd . . .

'I suppose you didn't write The Jew, The Gypsy, and El Islam?' Ruach said, sneering.

'I did,' Burton replied. His face was red... " [Other refs. not in DB.]



Judaism, continued

Search Adherents.com

Custom Search
comments powered by Disqus
Collection and organization of data © 23 April 2007 by Adherents.com.   Site created by custom apps written in C++.  
Research supported by East Haven University.
Books * Videos * Music * Posters

We are always striving to increase the accuracy and usefulness of our website. We are happy to hear from you. Please submit questions, suggestions, comments, corrections, etc. to: webmaster@adherents.com.