Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Japanese, galaxy

Japanese, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Japanese Ganymede 2300 Benford, Gregory. Against Infinity. New York: Timescape Books (1983); pg. 11, 70. Pg. 11: "The Colonel had gone through negotiations with Hiruko, the central authority on Ganymede. The bookkeeping between Sidon and Hiruko was complicated. "; Pg. 70: "They were from the territory near Nelson settlement and Fujimura Settlement... " [Other refs. to these places with Japanese names, especially Hiruko, others not in DB. No apparent refs. to Japanese ethnicity or culture, however.]
Japanese Georgia (country) 1999 Bear, Greg. Darwin's Radio. New York: Del Rey (1999); pg. 45. "A few old women sold Western cigarettes and perfume and Japanese watches from small booths around the perimeter... "
Japanese Georgia: Atlanta 2040 Bishop, Michael. Catacomb Years. New York: Berkley (1979); pg. 88. "He mail-ordered it from San Francisco four years ago when he learned that there was a very sick Japanese woman in the nursing section of the Hostel. That was just like Yuichan. He gave the robe to that poor woman... " [Many other refs. not in DB.]
Japanese God-Does-Battle 3562 Bear, Greg. Strength of Stones. New York: Warner Books (1991 revised ed.; copyright 1981, 1988); pg. 202. "Thule had been ruled by Jemmu Yoshimura, president of the Asian Jews, a tough little rabbi with scarcely any Japanese blood, but descended from a famous family. "
Japanese Guatemala 2025 Shepard, Lucius. "Fire Zone Emerald " in Future on Fire (Orson Scott Card, ed.) New York: Tor (1991; story copyright 1987); pg. 106. "Mathis went on. 'Gonna be like them ol' Jap movies. Little men with guns actin' all brave... 'til they see somethin' big and hairy comin' at 'em, munchin' treetops and spittin' fire. Then off they run, yellin', 'Tokyo is doomed!' ' "
Japanese Hawaii 1925 Sanders, William. "Billy Mitchell's Overt Act " in Alternate Generals (Harry Turtledove, ed.) New York: Baen (1998); pg. 173. [Story about the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Extensive refs., not in DB.]
Japanese Hawaii 1994 Simmons, Dan. Fires of Eden. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1994) [Book jacket.] "Real estate mogul Byron Trumbo is the owner of the Mauna Pele, a deluxe Hawaiian resort that until recently was the playground of the rich and famous. Yet instead of making money hand over fist, Trumbo has a bit of a problem: guests keep disappearing. Hoping to sell the resort to Japanese investors, he invites them to Mauna Pele to finalize the deal--but strange and fantastic events complicate the weekend. " [Other refs. throughout novel, not in DB.]
Japanese Hawaii 2025 Cool, Tom. Infectress. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 45. "...filet mignon of Japanese kobe beef. "
Japanese Hawaii 2082 Haldeman, Joe. Buying Time. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1989); pg. 51. "The walls, panelled in warm grey silk, were graced by antique Japanese watercolors. "
Japanese Hong Kong 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 74. [Chapter 19] At the Victoria port he found a confused mass of ships of all nations: English, French, American, and Dutch, men-of-war and trading vessels, Japanese and Chinese junks...
Japanese Idaho 1985 Dick, Philip K. In Milton Lumky Territory. Pleasantville, NY: Dragon Press (1985); pg. 12. Pg. 12, 68, 97, 118, 123, 165, 168, 170-171, etc. [Mostly of the uses of 'Japanese' are referring to Japanese typewriters, or Japanese brands of typewriters.]
Japanese Idaho 2198 Bell, M. Shayne. Nicoji. New York: Baen (1991); pg. 28. "We worked for Westinghouse Farms. In the spring, we'd tried to get on with Hitachi, but the Supreme Court had struck down Idaho's intrastate labor laws and Hitachi had brought in cheap contract labor from California and didn't hire local help. All the corporate farms were watchiing Hitachi's profit margin... "
Japanese Idaho 2198 Bell, M. Shayne. Nicoji. New York: Baen (1991); pg. 61. "Sam used to claim he wished he'd been born Japanese or Mongolian so he could understand the universe and not have a crippled Western mind. "
Japanese Illinois 1928 Bradbury, Ray. Dandelion Wine. New York: Bantam (1982; c. 1957); pg. 217. "He reached down and picked up a little set of Japanese wind-crystals. 'Hang these in his upstairs window. They make a nice cool music!' "
Japanese India 1974 Cox, Greg. The Eugenics Wars: The Rise and Fall of Khan Noonien Singh: Volume One (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 151. "'I speak English, Arabic, Hindi, Punjabi, Mandarin, French, German, Spanish, and Japanese,' he stated matter-of-factly. "
Japanese India 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 321. "Petra knew the story of Subhas Chandra Bose, the Netaji of the Japanese-backed anti-British-rule Indian National Army during World War II. When he died in a plane crash on the way to Japan at the end of the war, the legend among the Indian people was that he was not really dead, but lived on, planning to return someday to lead the people to freedom... "
Japanese Indonesia: Bali 1995 Aldiss, Brian. "Becoming the Full Butterfly " in Supertoys Last All Summer Long. New York: St. Martin's Griffin (2001; c. 1995); pg. 206. "They would form scaffolding on high-rises in Osaka, Beijing, Budapest, Manila. " [Also pg. 207.]
Japanese Iowa 2030 Disch, Thomas M. On Wings of Song. New York: St. Martin's Press (1978); pg. 62. "There was even a corner in one of the dorms screened off with newspapers, like a Japanese house, where you could go... "
Japanese Italy 1974 Cox, Greg. The Eugenics Wars: The Rise and Fall of Khan Noonien Singh: Volume One (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 37. Pg. 37: "The Asian man looked vaguely familiar... battered tweed jacket over a Godzilla T-shirt. His long hair and sideburns made him resemble some long-lost Japanese cousin of the Partridge family. "; Pg. 53: "...had dug up everything there was to know about the youngish Japanese geneticist. "; Pg. 62: "Roberta watched the Japanese biochemist exit the lounge. "; Pg. 86: "The amiable Japanese researcher... " [This Japanese character is Walter Takagi, and is significant in part of the novel, but little is said about his ethnicity/nationality.]
Japanese Italy 1996 Knight, Damon. Humpty Dumpty: An Oval. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 38. Pg. 38: "It was a little karakuri, Japanese for 'gadget' "; Pg. 42: "After a moment it blinked and repeated the message in German, then in French and Japanese. "; Pg. 62: "...the Nips' revenge for Hiroshima... "
Japanese Italy 2096 Sterling, Bruce. Holy Fire. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 229. "...the Kio Amphitheater, an arched colossus in exquisite pastiche, built by an eccentric Nipponese billionaire... "
Japanese Japan 25 C.E. Lupoff, Richard A. "Jubilee " in Alternate Tyrants (Mike Resnick, ed.) New York: Tor (1997); pg. 165. "Aelius shook his head. 'Celadus will have my head if I'm late today of all days. Caesar Viventius himself flying in from Terra Nipponsis to welcome the crew back from their expedition to Mars...' " [Other refs. not in DB.]
Japanese Japan 400 C.E. Anderson, Poul. Genesis. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 58. "The peace and refinement of Heian Japan gave way to incessant struggle between clans and war lords. "
Japanese Japan 1000 C.E. Hand, Elizabeth. Catwoman. New York: Ballantine (2004). Based on screenplay by John Rogers, Mike Ferris, and John Brancato; pg. 179-191. [Pages 179-191 feature a story from Ophelia's book, set entirely in medieval Heian Japan, in which a young Japanese woman -- the daughter of a wicked inkmaker -- is helped by a young poet and a mystical cat. Extensive Japanese refs.]
Japanese Japan 1693 McIntyre, Vonda N. The Moon and the Sun. New York: Pocket Books (1997); pg. 334. [In the royal French court.] "'The Prince of Nippon.'

The prince was a small and elegant man with straight black hair intricately arranged and lacquered. A dozen men in lacquered red armor accompanied him. He wore layers of silken kimono in autumn colors and patterns, very full white trousers, and a pair of curved swords...

'I bring greetings from Shogun Tsunayoshi in the name of Higashiyama-tennou the Emperor, the greatest monarch of the East, as you are the greatese monarch of the West.'

His attendants carried chests of black and red lacquer, painted with golden dragons. The chests contained fifty bolts of patterned silk, fifty kimono of exquisite color and pattern, and fifty jade figurines on silken cords, each jade creature so lifelike that... " [Etc.]

Japanese Japan 1774 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 185. Pg. 185: "No wonder the Japanese--isolated for now--would be so traumatized by Commodore Perry's cannon in the middle of the next century that they would devote the century after that to catching up, beginning with adoption of the Western blast furnace. " [Time-traveling character in 1773 thinks about the future.]; Pg. 287: "Without Commodore Perry's steamships threatening Tokyo with cannon, Japan might not be opened to the west. "
Japanese Japan 1866 Verne, Jules. Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1953; c. 1870); pg. 32. Pg. 32: "...from the beaches of Japan to the coasts of America... "; Pg. 97: "Now then, at the spot indicated on the world map, one of these seagoing rivers was rolling by, the Kuroshio of the Japanese, the Black Current: heated by perpendicular rays from the tropical sun... " [Other refs., not in DB.]
Japanese Japan 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 11. "From Hong Kong to Yokohama (Japan), by steamer: 6 days "
Japanese Japan 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 92. [Chapter 22] [1] Passepartout went timidly ashore on this so curious territory of the Sons of the Sun. He had nothing better to do than, taking chance for his guide, to wander aimlessly through the streets of Yokohama. He found himself at first in a thoroughly European quarter, the houses having low fronts, and being adorned with verandas, beneath which he caught glimpses of neat peristyles. This quarter occupied, with its streets, squares, docks, and warehouses, all the space between the "promontory of the Treaty " and the river. Here, as at Hong Kong and Calcutta, were mixed crowds of all races Americans and English, Chinamen and Dutchmen, mostly merchants ready to buy or sell anything. The Frenchman felt himself as much alone among them as if he had dropped down in the midst of Hottentots.
Japanese Japan 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 93. [Chapter 22] [2] He had, at least, one resource to call on the French and English consuls at Yokohama for assistance. But he shrank from telling the story of his adventures, intimately connected as it was with that of his master; and, before doing so, he determined to exhaust all other means of aid. As chance did not favour him in the European quarter, he penetrated that inhabited by the native Japanese, determined, if necessary, to push on to Yeddo.

The Japanese quarter of Yokohama is called Benten, after the goddess of the sea, who is worshipped on the islands round about.

Japanese Japan 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 93. [Chapter 22] [3] There Passepartout beheld beautiful fir and cedar groves, sacred gates of a singular architecture, bridges half hid in the midst of bamboos and reeds, temples shaded by immense cedar-trees, holy retreats where were sheltered Buddhist priests and sectaries of Confucius, and interminable streets, where a perfect harvest of rose-tinted and red-cheeked children, who looked as if they had been cut out of Japanese screens, and who were playing in the midst of short-legged poodles and yellowish cats, might have been gathered.

The streets were crowded with people. Priests were passing in processions, beating their dreary tambourines; police and custom-house officers with pointed hats encrusted with lac and carrying two sabres hung to their waists; soldiers, clad in blue cotton with white stripes, and bearing guns...

Japanese Japan 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 93. [Chapter 22] [4] ...the Mikado's guards, enveloped in silken doubles, hauberks and coats of mail; and numbers of military folk of all ranks--for the military profession is as much respected in Japan as it is despised in China--went hither and thither in groups and pairs. Passepartout saw, too, begging friars, long-robed pilgrims, and simple civilians, with their warped and jet-black hair, big heads, long busts, slender legs, short stature, and complexions varying from copper-colour to a dead white, but never yellow, like the Chinese, from whom the Japanese widely differ. He did not fail to observe the curious equipages--carriages and palanquins, barrows supplied with sails, and litters made of bamboo...
Japanese Japan 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 93. [Chapter 22] [5] ...nor the women-- whom he thought not especially handsome--who took little steps with their little feet, whereon they wore canvas shoes, straw sandals, and clogs of worked wood, and who displayed tight-looking eyes, flat chests, teeth fashionably blackened, and gowns crossed with silken scarfs, tied in an enormous knot behind an ornament which the modern Parisian ladies seem to have borrowed from the dames of Japan.

Passepartout wandered for several hours in the midst of this motley crowd, looking in at the windows of the rich and curious shops, the jewellery establishments glittering with quaint Japanese ornaments, the restaurants decked with streamers and banners, the tea-houses, where the odorous beverage was being drunk with saki, a liquor concocted from the fermentation of rice, and the comfortable smoking-houses, where they were puffing, not opium, which is almost unknown in Japan, but a very fine, stringy tobacco.

Japanese Japan 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 94. [Chapter 22] [6] He went on till he found himself in the fields, in the midst of vast rice plantations. There he saw dazzling camellias expanding themselves, with flowers which were giving forth their last colours and perfumes, not on bushes, but on trees, and within bamboo enclosures, cherry, plum, and apple trees, which the Japanese cultivate rather for their blossoms than their fruit, and which queerly-fashioned, grinning scarecrows protected from the sparrows, pigeons, ravens, and other voracious birds. On the branches of the cedars were perched large eagles; amid the foliage of the weeping willows were herons, solemnly standing on one leg; and on every hand were crows, ducks, hawks, wild birds, and a multitude of cranes, which the Japanese consider sacred, and which to their minds symbolise long life and prosperity.
Japanese Japan 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 94. [Chapter 22] [7] As he was strolling along, Passepartout espied some violets among the shrubs.

"Good! " said he; "I'll have some supper. "

But, on smelling them, he found that they were odourless.

"No chance there, " thought he.

The worthy fellow had certainly taken good care to eat as hearty a breakfast as possible before leaving the Carnatic; but, as he had been walking about all day, the demands of hunger were becoming importunate. He observed that the butchers stalls contained neither mutton, goat, nor pork; and, knowing also that it is a sacrilege to kill cattle, which are preserved solely for farming, he made up his mind that meat was far from plentiful in Yokohama...

Japanese Japan 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 94. [Chapter 22] [8] ...in default of butcher's meat, he could have wished for a quarter of wild boar or deer, a partridge, or some quails, some game or fish, which, with rice, the Japanese eat almost exclusively. But he found it necessary to keep up a stout heart, and to postpone the meal he craved till the following morning. Night came, and Passepartout re-entered the native quarter, where he wandered through the streets, lit by vari-coloured lanterns, looking on at the dancers, who were executing skilful steps and boundings, and the astrologers who stood in the open air with their telescopes. Then he came to the harbour, which was lit up by the resin torches of the fishermen, who were fishing from their boats.

The streets at last became quiet, and the patrol, the officers of which, in their splendid costumes, and surrounded by their suites... Each time a company passed, Passepartout chuckled...: "Good! another Japanese embassy departing for Europe! "

Japanese Japan 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 94. [Chapter 23] ...Night came, and Passepartout re-entered the native quarter, where he wandered through the streets, lit by vari-coloured lanterns, looking on at the dancers, who were executing skilful steps and boundings, and the astrologers who stood in the open air with their telescopes.
Japanese Japan 1880 Anthony, Patricia. "Dear Froggy " in Eating Memories. Woburn, MA: First Books; Baltimore, MD: Old Earth Books (1997; c. 1993); pg. 199. "The room reminded her of the spartan rooms of her beloved Kyoto, that strange land where paper walls blushed with brittle light...

'How lovely,' he said with a sigh. 'How magical the mind can be. This is quite like the Gardens of Perpetual Happiness which lie outside the palace of Emperor Mutsuhito.' " [Other refs. not in DB. Story takes place in England.]

Japanese Japan 1905 Gibson, William & Bruce Sterling. The Difference Engine. New York: Bantam (1991); pg. 269. "'What did you think of India, by the way?'

'It's a dreadful place, India,' Brian said readily, 'brim-full of queer marvels, but dreadful. There's only one folk in Asia with any sense, and that's the Japanese.' "

Japanese Japan 1905 Green, Roland J. "Written by the Wind: A Story of the Draka " in Drakas! (S. M. Sterling, ed.) New York: Baen (2000); pg. 89. Pg. 89: "Sasebo Naval Airship Base, Empire of Japan
0430, August 18, 1905

A hundred meters aft, one of Satsuma's engines came to life... "; Pg. 90: "Like the rest of the Imperial Japanese Navy's First Air Kokutai... Two crewmen... bowed to Jahn, then scrambled up the ladder... He did not believe that the Imperial Navy was really assigning ninja adepts to spy on the gaijin advisers they were letting watch them fight the Russians... " [Japanese refs. throughout story (pg. 189 to 121), others not in DB. Story takes place in the Japanese navy, with just two Draka observers (the main characters), as the Japanese successfully attack the Russian navy. Many refs. to Japanese culture and religion, esp. state Shinto and emperor veneration, as well.]

Japanese Japan 1908 Bensen, Donald R. And Having Writ.... Indianapolis, IN: Bobbs-Merrill Co. (1978); pg. 138. Pg. 138: "'...foreign consulates. Germany, Austria-Hungary, Japan, Servia, Russia--lots more...' "; Pg. 189: "'...We had one with the Japanese a few years ago, and it was most distressing, most; it very nearly meant the end of that monarchy...' "
Japanese Japan 1937 Dunn, J. R. "Long Knives " in Writers of the Future: Volume III (Algis Budrys, ed.). Los Angeles: Bridge Publications (1987); pg. 155. Pg. 155: "Throw the Israelis on top of that, and it all came damn near to being intolerable. But it could be worse. He could be in Japan or Russia, where it was a running battle with the old regimes. "; Pg. 161: "The Bureau wasn't afraid of any kind of terrorism htere, or the kind of attacks that were common in Japan and Russia. "; Pg. 164: "'Desertions. Somebody split from the Tokyo office yesterday.' "; Pg. 182: "'Mussolini, I guess. Horthy, the clique in Japan, have got two weeks to make their arrangements...' "
Japanese Japan 1940 Burton, Levar. Aftermath. New York: Warner Books (1997); pg. 34. "And the sun did rise in the west instead of the east: the rising sun of the empire of Japan. Once again the sacred [Hopi] tablets had predicted the future. "
Japanese Japan 1945 Kato, Ken. Yamato II: The Way of the Warrior, Part 2. New York: Warner Books (1992); pg. 74. "'But Japan lost the World War.'

'Do you know that within a few hours of the exploding of the first genshi bomb, a meeting was held in which it was agreed among men of impeccable samurai lineage that the WordWar would be switched from a military to an economic front. In the decades that followed, Japanese rules adopted what seemed to Amerikans to be democracy. But that was done deliberately to make Old Japan appear more acceptable to her commercial customers. What happened when Old Japan became the dominant world power is history that we both know, Mister Straker. Democracy has always been an obsession confined largely to the Freemason caste of Old Europe and Old America. It is true to say that neither Yamato, nor Old Japan, ever gave any thought to democracy.' "

Japanese Japan 1945 Knight, Damon. "Extempore " in The Best of Damon Knight. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1976; c. 1956); pg. 154. "'When will Germany surrender?'

'Uh, 1945,'...

'When will Japan surrender?'

'Same year. September...' "

Japanese Japan 1945 Powers, Tim. Last Call. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1992); pg. 25. "...1945... decision to drop the atomic bomb on Japan. The spotter plane for the bomb-carrying Enola Gay was named the Straight Flush. "
Japanese Japan 1946 Huxley, Aldous. Brave New World. New York: HarperCollins (1999; c. 1932, 1946); pg. xii. [Forward by Huxley.] "Assuming, then, that we are capable of learning as much from Hiroshima as our forefathers learned from Magdeburg... "
Japanese Japan 1947 Bishop, Michael. No Enemy But Time. New York: Timescape (1982); pg. 83. "My pistol shot had signaled a shift in the balance of power almost the way the explosion of an atomic device over Hiroshima had signaled a similar alteration between the Allies and the Japanese. At leat, however, I had fired a warning... "
Japanese Japan 1953 Clarke, Arthur C. Childhood's End. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1981; c. 1953); pg. 15. "...those mighty ships have come to rest so precisely over New York, London, Paris, Moscow, Rome, Cape Town, Tokyo, Canberra. . . . "
Japanese Japan 1960 Clarke, Arthur C. "Guardian Angel " in The Sentinel. New York: Berkley Books (1983; c. 1950); pg. 29. "...mighty ships have come to rest so precisely over New York, London, Moscow, Canberra, Rome, Capetown, Tokyo... "
Japanese Japan 1963 Grimwood, Ken. Replay. New York: Arbor House (1986); pg. 101. "...two-month drive through France and Italy; next year he planned a trip for them to Japan and the newly accessible vastness of China. "
Japanese Japan 1963 Nimersheim, Jack. "The Rising Sun at Dusk " in Alternate Tyrants (Mike Resnick, ed.) New York: Tor (1997); pg. 35. [Introduction.] "Here [the author] examines a defeated Japan being crushed beneath the heel of General Douglas MacArthur, a man who was certainly capable of such tyranny " [although that's now how things actually happened.] Excerpt from story: "General-san governs Japan. In deference to tradition, he tolerates its emperors. But Hirohito and his heirs shall survive as mere icons, impotent figureheads stripped of their temporal authority and traditional divinity. They will occupy space in the royal residence. Nothing more. All true power now flows through the American dictator. " [Refs. to Japanese throughout story, others not in DB.]
Japanese Japan 1967 Vonnegut, Kurt. Slaughterhouse-Five. New York: Random House (1999; c. 1969); pg. 12. Hiroshima [Also pg. 237-240, 244.]
Japanese Japan 1968 Hughes, Ted. The Iron Man. London: Faber and Faber (1985; c. 1968); pg. 43. "At the same time a ship sailed from China, loaded with great iron girders, and another ship sailed from Japan loaded with fuel oil. "
Japanese Japan 1970 Anderson, Poul. The Dancer from Atlantis. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971); pg. 6. Pg. 6: "'The forecasters do. The whole way to Yokohama, if we're lucky. Will you and your wife be in Japan long?'

'A couple of months. We'll fly back.'

...'Well, a business trip for me. I'm an architect... Considering the strong Japanese influence in homebuilding nowadays... I figured I'd sniff around after, well, all right, inspiration at the source. In provincial villages especially.' "; Pg. 7: "Tomorrow Pam might feel happier. He could hope for that, and hope Japan would turn out to be a fairytale as advertised, and beyond-- " [More, pg. 8.]

Japanese Japan 1973 Knight, Damon. The Man in the Tree. New York: Berkley Books (1984); pg. 149. Japan (also pg. 215.)
Japanese Japan 1980 Maggin, Elliot S. Superman: Miracle Monday. New York: Warner Books (1981); pg. 74. "...a holocaust whose like has gone unseen since the leveling of Nagasaki. "
Japanese Japan 1980 Maggin, Elliot S. Superman: Miracle Monday. New York: Warner Books (1981); pg. 154. "News offices in America and then in Western Europe, the soviet Union, Africa, China, India--ultimately all around the world... "
Japanese Japan 1983 Anderson, Jack. Millennium. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 26. "SUFFICE IT TO EXPLAIN THAT WE BEGAN OUR COLLECTION EFFORTS AFTER THE CITY OF HIROSHIMA WAS DESTROYED. "
Japanese Japan 1984 Heinlein, Robert A. Job: A Comedy of Justice. New York: Ballantine (1984); pg. 48. -
Japanese Japan 1984 Knight, Damon. "O " in One Side Laughing. New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; 1982); pg. 29. Osaka
Japanese Japan 1984 Tiptree, Jr., James. "Her Smoke Rises Up Forever " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1974); pg. 434. "Are the dead of Carthage and Hiroshima and Cuzco burning yet? "
Japanese Japan 1985 Bear, Greg. Blood Music. New York: Arbor House (2002; c. 1985); pg. 167. Pg. 167: Infrared pictures taken by Landsats and spy satellites, processed and interpreted by countries like Japan and Great Britain, shoed incipient changes even in the forests and waterways of North America.; Pg. 175: Sea of Japan
Japanese Japan 1987 Shiner, Lewis. "Zero Hour " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 303. "...landing at Narita Airport... all around him the neon ideograms of the Ginza blazed into red and blue and yellow life... He bought a Japanese Times, Tokyo's biggest English-language paper. 'Aces Invade Japan,' the headline said... The crowds... If they could tell he was half-Japanese, they didn't care; the other half was black American, kokujin. In Japan, as in too many parts of the world, the whiter the skin the better. " [Story takes place in Japan, pg. 303-332. Other Japanese refs. not in DB.]
Japanese Japan 1987 Shiner, Lewis. "Zero Hour " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 312. "'...And even if any did, you might never heard about them. We're talking about a culture here that makes self-effacement into a religion. Nobody wants to stand out. So if we're up against some kind of ace, it's possible nobody's even heard of him.' "


Japanese, continued

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