Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Jainism, India

Jainism, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Jainism India -445 B.C.E. Vidal, Gore. Creation. New York: Random House (1981); pg. 149. "I suddenly realized why the twenty-four so-called saviors of the Jains are called makers of the river-crossing. Jains see this world as a rushing river. We are born on one bank, which is the life of the world. But then if we submit ourselves to the crossing-maker, we can pass over to the other side, to relief from pain, even from final release. This spiritual ferryboat is the emblem of purification. "
Jainism India -445 B.C.E. Vidal, Gore. Creation. New York: Random House (1981); pg. 170. "I got the point. 'You mean the Jains?'

'And the Buddhists. And those who follow Gosala. You must have noticed that the so-called Mahavira and the so-called Buddha are not Aryans. Worst of all, both come from the republics.'... I thought of Gosala and his string, of Mahavira and his perfect remoteness from the world about him. 'I cannot think that these . . . ascetics have the slightest interest in the rise or fall of kingdoms.'

'So they pretend. But had it not been for the Jains, Varanasi would be our city tonight.' "

Jainism India -445 B.C.E. Vidal, Gore. Creation. New York: Random House (1981); pg. 140-141. "The man stopped in front of me and raised his broom, as if in salute. Then he said something that I did not understand, but Carak did. 'He's mad,' said Caraka. 'And he is a Jain. That's one of our most ancient sects.'

'Are all Jains mad?'

'Quite the contrary. But this one says that he is the maker of the river crossing, and he's not. He can't be. There have only been twenty-three crossing-makers since the beginning of time.'

None of this made the slightest sense to me. 'What is a crossing-maker?' I asked. 'And why is this man naked? And what is that broom for?'

Without permission, the man carefully swept a place for himself on the ground at my feet. Then he sat cross-legged; and murmured prayers.

Caraka was so embarrassed by his countryman that at first he refused to tell me anything... "

Jainism India 1973 Sagan, Carl. Cosmic Connection: An Extraterrestrial Perspective. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2000; c. 1973); pg. 8. "A reverence for all life is implemented in a few of the religions of the planet Earth--for example among the Jains of India. "
Jainism India 2100 Brunner, John. "The Vitanuls " (first published 1967) in Other Worlds, Other Gods: Adventures in Religious Science Fiction (Mayo Mohs, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1971); pg. 178. "'He can hardly be a Jain now,' Chance said, lacking anything else by way of comment. " [The exact year this story takes place is unspecified.]
Jainism India: Calcutta 1977 Simmons, Dan. Song of Kali. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1985); pg. 155. "We drove east onto Upper Circular Road and then swung onto Raja Dinendra Street, a winding road which paralleled a canal. The stagnant water reeked of sewage. Naked children splashed in the brown shallows.

'Look there,' ordered Chatterjee, pointing to our right. A large temple was painted in Technicolor glory. 'The Jain Temple. Very interesting.'

'The Jain priests will take no life,' said Amrita. 'When they leave the temple, they have servants sweep the walk so that they won't inadvertently step on an insect.'

'They wear surgical masks,' said Chatterjee, 'so that they will not accidentally swallow any living thing.' "

Jainism India: Calcutta 1977 Simmons, Dan. Song of Kali. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1985); pg. 156. "'They do not bathe,' added Krishna, 'out of respect for the bacteria which live on their bodies.'

I nodded, and silently speculated on whether Krishna himself honored this particular Jain code. Between the usual Calcutta street smells, the reek of raw sewage, and Krishna, I was beginning to feel a little overwhelmed.

'Their religion forbids them to eat anything which is living or was living,' Krishna said happily.

'Wait a minute,' I said. 'That rules out everything. What do they live on?'

'Ahh.' Krishna smiled. 'Good question!' "

Jainism world -445 B.C.E. Vidal, Gore. Creation. New York: Random House (1981); pg. 319. "With the current and universal penchant for writing everything down--when, where, why did it begin? The actual words of Zoroaster, the Buddha, Mahavira, Gosala, Master K'ung will be preserved for future generations... "
Jainism world -445 B.C.E. Vidal, Gore. Creation. New York: Random House (1981); pg. 360. "I did describe for him Gosala, Mahavira, the Buddha, Pythagoras. He found only the Buddha interesting. "
Jainism world 2007 Knight, Damon. A Reasonable World. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 152. "There was a Hindu sect, the Jains, whose reverence for life was such that they would not even kill an ant. Would they take medicine for a tapeworm? Probably not. "
Janissaries Afghanistan 1960 Turtledove, Harry. "The Last Word " in Drakas! (S. M. Sterling, ed.) New York: Baen (2000); pg. 251. "'What's the point?' MacDonald asked bitterly. 'The Afghans gave them grief after the Great War. The Finns gave them grief after the Eurasian War. The Afghans are Draka Janissaries these days; the Finns, poor bastards, are mostly dead...' "
Janissaries Europe 1470 C.E. Gentle, Mary. A Secret History. New York: Avon Books (1999); pg. 303. -
Janissaries Europe 1476 C.E. Gentle, Mary. Lost Burgundy. New York: HarperCollins (2000); pg. 194. Pg. 194-195, 201, 337-338, 341, 422: Janissaries. [More elsewhere]
Janissaries Sudan 1883 Miller, John J. "Hewn in Pieces for the Lord " in Drakas! (S. M. Sterling, ed.) New York: Baen (2000); pg. 34. "Hicks held his empty goblet up for the Janissary orderly, standing somewhat at attention near the wine bucket, to re-fill. " [Other refs., not in DB.]
Janissaries world 1722 Keyes, J. Gregory. A Calculus of Angels. New York: Ballantine (1999); pg. 295. Pg. 295-296, 309-310, 314, 334-336, 340, 359, 367, 391, 396, more.
Janissaries world 1944 Allred, Lee. "The Greatest Danger " in Drakas! (S. M. Sterling, ed.) New York: Baen (2000); pg. 184. "Over six million serfs were in the Janissaries now. Far too many serfs had access to weapons for comfort these days. "
Janissaries world 1950 Barton, William. "Home is Where the Heart Is " in Drakas! (S. M. Sterling, ed.) New York: Baen (2000); pg. 240. "I found myself with a rag tyed [sic] around my face, laboring through a fearsome stench, throwing dead Jews in a ditch, covering them with white lime and black dirt, while ritual-scarred Janissaries watched, laughing, joking with one another, uncaring, amused, relaxed black men with deadly black guns. "
Janissaries world 1960 Turtledove, Harry. "The Last Word " in Drakas! (S. M. Sterling, ed.) New York: Baen (2000); pg. 252. "Janissary Sergeant Hans rubbed at the orange slave tattoo behind his left ear. It didn't itch, but he imagined it died. He held up a hand. The squad he led was glad to stop for a blow. They liked the look of the mountainous woods ahead no better than he did... a reminder that both his grandfathers had fought for the Reich and the Fuhrer against the Draka. They'd lost, and now he marched under the dragon that held chains and sword. He didn't worry about it. He just did what his officers told him, and handled the squad with a veteran's lack of fuss. " [Many other refs., not in DB.]
Janissaries world 1960 Turtledove, Harry. "The Last Word " in Drakas! (S. M. Sterling, ed.) New York: Baen (2000); pg. 253. "Corporal Soshangane was a Zulu; his folk had been under the Draka yoke longer than almost any other. From what he'd told Hans, he was a sixth-generation Janissary, and he thought very much like his masters. "
Janissaries world 1960 Turtledove, Harry. "The Last Word " in Drakas! (S. M. Sterling, ed.) New York: Baen (2000); pg. 254. "'We aren't gonna let those bastards go in all by themselves, are we?' Nobody said no. You didn't let your buddies down. The Janissaries fought by few rules, but that was one of them. "
Jansenism galaxy 22995 Benford, Gregory. Foundation's Fear. New York: HarperCollins (1997); pg. 115. "'Think I should delete run-ins with his [Voltaire's] father, too?'

'I'm not sure,' Nim said. 'What were they like?'

'Pretty hot. His father was a strict disciplinarian, sympathetic to the 'Jansenist' view.'

'What's that? A sports team?'

'I asked. He said, 'A Catholic version of a Protestant.' I don't think they were teams. Something about sin being everywhere, pleasure's disgusting--usual primitive religion, Dark Ages stuff.' " [Voltaire, or a simulation of him, is a major character in this novel.]

Jansenism Mars 2059 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Red Mars. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 418. " 'No wonder Marxism is dead.'

'Well, sir actually a lot of people on Mars call themselves Marxists.'

'Sh--! They might as well call themselves Zoroastrians, or Jansenists, or Hegelians.'

'Marxists are Hegalian, sir.' "

Japanese Africa 2002 McDonald, Ian. Evolution's Shore. New York: Bantam (1997; c. 1995); pg. 23. Pg. 23: "Japanese microbuses with baggage-laden racks... "; Pg. 33: Japanese [language]; Pg. 131: "Made in Japan. " [Also, pg. 191, 203, 224, 369, 390.]
Japanese Alabama 1993 Ellison, Harlan. Mefisto in Onyx. Shingletown, CA: Mark. V. Ziesing Books (1993); pg. 89. "'There's an old Japanese saying--I got lots of these, Henry m'man--I read a whole lot--and what it says is, 'Do not fall into the error of the artisan who boasts of twenty years experience in his craft while in fact he has only had only one year of experience--twenty times.' "
Japanese Argo 2179 Sawyer, Robert J. Golden Fleece. New York: Time Warner (1990); pg. 55. Pg. 55: "The viewscreen changed... to a two shot of Ideko and Chang, a line of text at the bottom of the display identifying them. Chang was at least twice the size of the Japanese reporter. "; Pg. 61: "'The little Japanese man asked many other questions, but I tried to respect your privacy.' " [Some other refs. to this Japanese character, not in DB.]
Japanese Argo 2179 Sawyer, Robert J. Golden Fleece. New York: Time Warner (1990); pg. 107. "They all shouted along with Chang, most in English, the standard language of the Starcology, others in their native tongues: Algonquin, Esperanto, French, Greek, Hebrew, Italian, Japanese, Kurdish, Mandarin, Russian, Swahili, Ukrainian, Urdu, a dozen others. "
Japanese Arizona 1940 Robinson, Kim Stanley. The Gold Coast. New York: Tor (1995; c. 1988); pg. 262. "After Pearl Harbor the two thousand Orange County citizens of Japanese origin were gathered up and relocated in a shabby desert camp in Poston, Arizona. " [More.]
Japanese Arizona 2011 Willis, Connie. "The Last of the Winnebagos " in Impossible Things. New York: Bantam (1994; story copyright 1988); pg. 11. Pg. 11: "A family piled out, Japanese tourists, a woman with short black hair, a man in shorts, two kids. One of the kids had a ferret on a leash. "; Pg. 21: "Or maybe it was the fault of the Japanese, though I doubted that. He was, after all, in a tourist business. "; Pg. 32: "I'll tell you what happened to them, I thought. Almost all of them were killed in the first wave, and people blamed the government and the Japanese and the ozone layer... " [Also pg. 51.]
Japanese Armenia 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 14. "...the buildings [in Maralik, Turkey]--designed to survive the next earthquake, as the old buildings had not--were squat. Not ugly--there was grace in them, given the eclectic styles that were somehow blended here, Turkish and Russian, Spanish and Riviera, and, most incredibly, Japanese. "
Japanese Australia 2025 Egan, Greg. "Cocoon " in Isaac Asimov's Detectives (Gardner Dozois and Sheila Williams, eds.) New York: Ace Books (1998; c. 1994); pg. 41. "Lansing was Director of the Lane Cove complex: forty-three years old, with a Ph.D. in molecular biology from Cambridge, and an M.B.A. from an equally reputable Japanese virtual university. "
Japanese Belgium 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 48. Pg. 47: "...by early the next day, there were eight other extraterrestrials... on Earth, all of them Forhilnors... "; pg. 48: "And, thankfully, one more had made himself available in Brussels to speak with media from all over the world. He seemed to be fluent in English, French, Japanese, Chinese..., Hindi, German, Spanish, Dutch, Italian, Hebrew, and more... "
Japanese Brazil 1990 Dick, Philip K. The Man in the High Castle. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons (1962); pg. 16. "...the Japs were still burning off the jungles in the interior of Brazil, erecting eight-floor clay apartment houses for ex-headhunters. "
Japanese Brazil 2030 Bell, M. Shayne. "Jacob's Ladder " in Writers of the Future: Volume III (Algis Budrys, ed.). Los Angeles: Bridge Publications (1987); pg. 22. Pg. 22: "'They have good brakes,' I said.

'Japanese brakes,' Marcio said.

...Now, the Japanese brakes had to be good enough to ease three of us down to Macapa: five hundred miles. "

Pg. 30: "'Well, at least the Japanese brakes work,' Sandra said. "

Japanese Brazil 2040 Bell, M. Shayne. "Jacob's Ladder " in L. Ron Hubbard Presents The Best of Writers of the Future (Algis Budrys, ed.) Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (2000; c. 1987); pg. 52. "We'd been coming up in the second to the last car for newsmen--neither of Salt Lake's papers had the pull of CBS, Newsweek, or the New York Times. We crammed into the car with reporters from Vancouver, Lima, and Sapporo--impatient, of course. " [Sapporo: the largest city of Hokkaido.]
Japanese Brazil 2040 Bell, M. Shayne. "Jacob's Ladder " in L. Ron Hubbard Presents The Best of Writers of the Future (Algis Budrys, ed.) Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (2000; c. 1987); pg. 53. "'They have good brakes,' I said.

'Japanese breaks,' Marcio said. " [Also pg. 59.]

Japanese Brazil 2045 Wilson, Robert Charles. Memory Wire. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 38. "It was inevitable from the moment the Valverde regime called on the Pacific Rim nations for military aid. They had come more than willingly. The Japanese, the Koreans, the Americans. "
Japanese Brazil 2045 Wilson, Robert Charles. Memory Wire. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 47. Pg. 47: "So it had been an Army town. That explained all the signs she had seen in English and in cursive Japanese: Bar & Grill, Live Sex Acts, manga outlets... "; Pg. 50: "...big Japanese cars... "
Japanese Brazil 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 82. "At the crest of one of Araquara's many hills there was a sorvete shop run by a Japanese-Brazilian family. The family had been in business there for centuries, as their sign proclaimed, and Bean was both amused and moved by this, in light of what Carlotta had said. For this family, making flavored frozen deserts to eat from a cone or cup was the great cause that gave them continuity through the ages... " [More.]
Japanese Brazil 2250 Asimov, Isaac & Robert Silverberg. The Positronic Man. New York: Doubleday (1992); pg. 218. "'...it was, even so, possible for a Frenchman to become English or a Japanese to become a Brazilian, simply by going through a set of legal procedures. There was nothing genetically Brazilian about the Japanese, but he became Brazilian all the same, once the law had recognized him as such. The same can be done for me. I want to become a naturalized human the same way people once became naturalized as citizens of countries not their own... the Japanese who became Brazilians still had skin of the Japanese color and eyelids of the Japanese type and all of the other special racial characteristics that Oriental people have... But under Brazilian law they were Brazilians even so. And under human law I will be human, even though I still have the Three Laws structure built into me.' "
Japanese Brunei 2035 Sterling, Bruce. "Green Days in Brunei " in Future on Fire (Orson Scott Card, ed.) New York: Tor (1991; story copyright 1985); pg. 351. "'Jamming equipment,' said Brooke with a wink. 'The sultanate set it up years ago. Islamic, Malaysian, Japanese--you'd be surprised how violently people insist on being listened to.' "
Japanese California 1971 Dick, Philip K. Valis. New York: Bantam (1981); pg. 53. "'And Yurugu is Form II. But you believe that Form II doesn't exist.'

'Nommo had to slay her,' Fat said.

'That's what the Japanese myth stipulates, in a sense,' Dr. Stone said. 'Their cosmogonical myth. The female twin does giving birth to fire; then she descends under the ground. The male twin goes after her to restore her but finds her decomposing and giving birth to monsters. She pursues him and he seals her up in the ground.' "

Japanese California 1971 Matheson, Richard. Bid Time Return. New York: Viking Press (1975); pg. 12. "I'll find a place, go out to eat; maybe a Japanese restaurant. "
Japanese California 1985 Bear, Greg. Blood Music. New York: Arbor House (1985); pg. 125. "Behind a big double wood door with Japanese sounding-names on it was a waiting room... "
Japanese California 1991 Blaylock, James P. The Paper Grail. New York: Ace Books (1991); pg. 2. Book jacket: "Howard Barton came to Mendocino in search of a folded scrap of paper. Not just any old scrap of paper, but one bearing what might be a sketch by the legendary Japanese artist, Hoku-sai. Howard, unfortunately, is not the only one who wants the sketch . . . "; Pg. 2: "He had come north to pick up a single piece of artwork--what he understood to be a nineteenth-century Japanese woodcut sketch, perhaps by Hoku-sai. " [Many Japanese refs. throughout novel, not in DB.]
Japanese California 1996 Bear, Greg. The Forge of God. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 276. "'...They think it's a toy, a Japanese toy box for my cousin...' "
Japanese California 2005 Gibson, William. Virtual Light. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 62. "The driver, who knew that all Japanese were wealthy, sullenly counted the torn, filthy bills, then tossed the three five-dollar coins into a cracked Nissan County thermos-mug... "
Japanese California 2025 Stephenson, Neal. Snow Crash. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 19. "Hiro Protagonist... Hiro owns a couple of nice Nipponese swords, but he always wears them, and the whole idea of stealing fantastically dangerous weapons presents the would-be pep with inherent dangers and contradictions... Hiro has capuccino skin and spiky, truncated dreadlocks... Beneath this image, it is possible to see Hiro's eyes, which look Asian. They are from his mother, who is Korean by way of Nippon. The rest of him looks mor like his father, who was African by way of Texas by way of the Army... a long sword known in Nippon as a katana and a short sword known as a wakizashi--Hiro's father looted these from Japan after World War II went atomic... " [Many other refs. to Japanese in book, not in DB. The protagonist is Japanese-American.]
Japanese California 2047 Bear, Greg. Queen of Angels. New York: Warner Books (1994; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 90. "...California's southern coastline... Chinese and Korean colonies come too late to buy extravagant land; old rich Japanese and the last Levantine families of the oil century that had sold their land for yet more fortunes to the builders of monuments... "
Japanese California 2150 Dick, Philip K. The Divine Invasion. New York: Timescape (1981); pg. 201. "'Is there a particular place you want to have dinner?'

'Sachiko's,' Linda said. 'Japanese food.' "

Japanese California: Hollywood 1955 Bradbury, Ray. A Graveyard for Lunatics. New York: Alfred A. Knopf (1990); pg. 90. "'Okay, son,' he said, finally. 'Your old dad has missed you. but a young man between blankets has no ears. Old Japanese proverb. I knew you'd come back someday.' "
Japanese California: Hollywood 1997 Bradbury, Ray. "If MGM Is Killed, Who Gets the Lion? " in Driving Blind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 16. "'When the Japs fly over or the subs surface out beyond Culver City, the people painting that building and re-lettering the signs hope that the Japs will think Clark Gable and Spencer Tracy are running around Hughes Aircraft...' "
Japanese California: Los Angeles 1974 Ellison, Harlan. "A Boy and His Dog " in Nebula Award Stories Five (James Blish, ed.) New York: Pocket Books (1972; 1st ed. 1970; story c. 1969); pg. 20. "Over fifty years ago, in Los Angeles, before the Third War... there was a man named Buesing who lived in Cerritos. He raised dogs as watchmen and sentries and attackers. Dobermans, Danes, Schnauzers and Japanese Akitas. "
Japanese California: Los Angeles 1983 Powers, Tim. Expiration Date. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 100. "...kimonos and tuxedos and fedoras... In the early eighties, savvy Japanese had been scouring Melrose for old leather jackets and jukeboxes... "
Japanese California: Los Angeles 1986 Bear, Greg. The Serpent Mage. New York: Ace Books (1987; 1st ed. 1986); pg. 118. "The unofficially-named Noguchi wing of the Los Angeles County Morgue had been added three years ago... " [Noguchi is the coroner who performed the autopsy on Marilyn Monroe.]
Japanese California: Los Angeles 1993 DeChance, John. MagicNet. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1993); pg. 110. "...a Japanese subcompact, dark blue with a gray interior. " [Also pg. 133.]
Japanese California: Los Angeles 1996 Powers, Tim. Expiration Date. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 13. Pg. 13: "And on Broadway.. the names of the shops were often in Japanese or Korean, though the rest of the lettering was generally in Spanish... "; Pg. 14: "His neighbor's houses, which he had always scornfully thought looked like 1950's-style Japanese restaurants... "
Japanese California: Los Angeles 1999 Koman, Victor. Jehovah Contract. New York: Franklin Watts (1984); pg. 86. "The wall across from the door had a low, Japanese sort of table near it. "
Japanese California: Los Angeles 2005 Gibson, William. Virtual Light. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 23. Pg. 23: "Just a second she was there, long enough for Rydell to think he'd seen that she either wore silver horns or some kind of upturned hat... and that she might've been Japanese, which struck him right then as the weirdest thing about any of it. "; Pg. 38: "But when the elevator doors opened, this Japanese girl fell out.

'Where party?' [she said.]

'What folks gonna ask you,' Chevette said.

'Floor nine! Big party!'

...She'd managed to get the Japanese girl horizontal on a long green couch, where she was snoring now, and safe enough unless somebody sat on her. "; Pg. 41: "Her Japanese doll dances past, bangs swinging, no recognition in her eyes as she sees Chevette. "; Pg. 42: "More Japanese here now, she notices, all of them serious suites; their wives or secretaries or whatever are all wearing pearls. " [Many other refs. not in DB. Major portion of book takes place in Japan.]

Japanese California: Los Angeles 2020 Gibson, William. "The Winter Market " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1986); pg. 581. Pg. 581: "I was wearing Japanese shoes, new and expensive, glove-leather Ginza monkey boots with rubber-capped toes. "; Pg. 582: "Rubin, in some way that no one quite understands, is a master, a teacher, what the Japanese call a sensei. What he's the master of, really, is garbage, kipple, refuse, the sea of cast-off goods our century floats on. Gomo no sensei. Master of junk. " [Many other refs., not in DB. See also pg. 583, 587, 589, 591-592, 596-597.]
Japanese California: Los Angeles 2023 Platt, Charles. The Silicon Man. Houston, TX: Tafford Pub. (1993); pg. 24. "...wallscreens blaring sales messages in Japanese, English, Korean, and Chinese. " [Many other refs., not in DB.]
Japanese California: Los Angeles 2047 Bear, Greg. Queen of Angels. New York: Warner Books (1994; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 57. "Ceramics wooden furniture custom equipment arrays, all the very best. A Japanese made home manager with at least ten dedicated French and Ukrainian arbeiters... "
Japanese California: Orange County 1940 Robinson, Kim Stanley. The Gold Coast. New York: Tor (1995; c. 1988); pg. 262. "After Pearl Harbor the two thousand Orange County citizens of Japanese origin were gathered up and relocated in a shabby desert camp in Poston, Arizona. " [More.]
Japanese California: Orange County 2027 Robinson, Kim Stanley. The Gold Coast. New York: Tor (1995; c. 1988); pg. 355. Pg. 355: "...a Japanese plastic bonsai garden with some real, and truly fine, rocks in it. "; Pg. 358: "Japanese space music "
Japanese California: Orange County 2065 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Pacific Edge. New York: Tor (1990); pg. 22. "...and Japanese paper lanterns were hung in the courtyard's three big windows. "
Japanese California: San Francisco 1945 Powers, Tim. Earthquake Weather. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 139. "'It was during World War Two,' he said. 'The government was afraid they'd draw the attention of Japanese submarines.' "


Japanese, continued

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