Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Islam, Pakistan

Islam, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Islam Pakistan 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 206. "'...because unlike Hitler and Stalin, you and Chapekar are men of honor--you are of India, and you both serve God faithfully.'

'To say that Chapekar [leader of India, and a Hindu] and I both serve God is blasphemy to one or the other of us, or both,' said Wahabi [leader of Pakistan, a Muslim].

'God loves this land and has given the Indian people greatness,' said Achilles--so passionately that if Petra had not known better, she might have believed he had some kind of faith. 'Do you really think it is the will of God that both Pakistan and India remain in obscurity and weakness, because the people of India have not yet awakened to the will of Allah?' "

Islam Pakistan 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 206. "'I do not care what atheists and madmen say about the will of Allah.'...

'Nor do I,' said Achilles. 'But I can tell you this. If you and Chapekar signed an agreement, not of unity, but of nonaggression, you could divide Asia between you. And if the decades pass and there is peace between these two great Indian nations, then will the Hindu not be proud of the Muslim, and the Muslim proud of the Hindu? Will it not be possible then for Hindus to hear the teachings of the Quran, not as the book of their deadly enemy, but rather as the book of their fellow Indians, who share with India the leadership of Asia?...' "

Islam Pakistan 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 209. "'You must make the first gesture,' Achilles must have said [to the prime minister of India]. 'It's true that the Muslims [Pakistanis] might take advantage of it, might attack. But you have the largest army in the world...' "
Islam Pakistan 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 352. "'...Why do you think China made a quick peace with Pakistan? Because they knew they could not fight a war against the Muslim world with Indian revolt and sabotage a constant threat...' "
Islam Proton 2980 Anthony, Piers. Split Infinity. New York: Ballantine (1980); pg. 175. "The hammam was a public bath in the classic Arabian mode. A number of Citizens preferred this style, because the golden age of Arabian culture back on Earth had been remarkably affluent. Islam had had its Golden Age while Christianity had its Dark Ages. For the ruling classes, at any rate; the color of the age had never had much significance for the common man. Poverty was eternal.

Thus there were mosque-type architecture, and turban headdress, exotic dancing, and the hammam. This one was evidently shared by a number of Citizens. "

Islam Qom-Riyadh 3099 Simmons, Dan. Endymion. New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 52. "'The Hegemony would never have dreamed of getting involved with religion, of course. The very thought of mixing government and religious opinion was barbaric . . . something one found on Qom-Riyadh or somesuch Outback desert world...' "
Islam Qom-Riyadh 3099 Simmons, Dan. Endymion. New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 398. "'Prayer mats,' said A. Bettik as we moved back into the shade of the city street. Even the tallest buildings were not overly tall here--none as high as the minarets, which looked out form a park area with tropical trees. 'The population of Qom-Riyadh was almost one hundred percent Islamic,' he continued. 'The Pax [Catholic Church] was said to have found no inroads here, even with the promise of resurrection. The people wanted nothing to do with the Protectorate.' " [More material on this planet, not in DB.]
Islam Riverworld 1890 Farmer, Philip Jose. To Your Scattered Bodies Go. New York: Berkeley Medallion Books (1971); pg. 20. "Another man was pointing to his genitals and saying in Slovenian, 'They've made a Jew of me! A Jew! Do you think that . . .? No, it couldn't be!'

Burton grinned savagely and said, 'It doesn't occur to him that maybe They have made a Mohammedan out of him or an Australian aborigine or an ancient Egyptian, all of whom practiced circumcision.' "

Islam Riverworld 1890 Farmer, Philip Jose. To Your Scattered Bodies Go. New York: Berkeley Medallion Books (1971); pg. 40. "'You're Burton, the explorer and linguist? The discoverer of Lake Tanganyika? The one who made a pilgramage to Mecca while disguised as a Moslem? The translator of The Thousand and One Nights?'

'I have no desire to lie nor need to. I am he.'

Lev Ruach spat at Burton... 'You son of a bitch!' he cried. 'You foul Nazi bastard! I read about you! You were, in many ways, an admirable person, I suppose! But you were an anti-Semite!'

Burton was startled. He said,' My enemies spread that baseless and vicious rumor. But anybody acquainted with the facts and with me would know better. And now, I think you'd . . .

'I suppose you didn't write The Jew, The Gypsy, and El Islam?' Ruach said, sneering.

'I did,' Burton replied. His face was red... "

Islam Riverworld 1890 Farmer, Philip Jose. To Your Scattered Bodies Go. New York: Berkeley Medallion Books (1971); pg. 128. "Burton...

'I suppose you didn't write The Jew, The Gypsy, and El Islam?' Ruach said, sneering.

'I did,' Burton replied. His face was red... "

Islam Riverworld 1890 Farmer, Philip Jose. To Your Scattered Bodies Go. New York: Berkeley Medallion Books (1971); pg. 13-14. [The main character wonders where he is after dying.] "It was then that Burton was sure that this Resurrection Day was not the one which any religion had stated would occur. Burton had not believed in the God portrayed by the Christians, Moslems, Hindus, or any faith... He was sure that when he died, the world would cease to exist.

Waking up after death, in ths valley by this river, he had been powerless to defend himself against the doubts that existed in every man exposed to an early religious conditioning and to an adult society which preached its convictions at every chance.

Now, seeing the alien approach, he was sure that there was some other explanation for this even than a supernatural one. There was a physical, a scientific, reason for his being here; he did not have to resort to Judeo-Christian-Moslem myths for cause. "

Islam Riverworld 2008 Farmer, Philip Jose. To Your Scattered Bodies Go. New York: Berkeley Medallion Books (1971); pg. 88. "Burton had decided to name the boat, when it was built, The Hadji. It would be going on a pilgrimage, though its goal was not Mecca. He intended to sail it up The River as far as it would go. " [Other references to Islam in book, not all in DB.]
Islam Roman Empire 620 C.E. Douglas, L. Warren. The Veil of Years. New York: Baen (2001); pg. 10. "...he shouted 'Boy! A Saracen [Muslim] ship beyond the fog! Fetch my daughter Pierrette. Hurry!'

Giles set off up the red, crumbling rocks of the Eagle's Beak, to alert the mage Anselm. It was anyone's guess who would reach his objective first--the old man on the steep, short trail, the able boy with the longer route ahead . . or the Saracen vessel edging through the fog.

Cletus shouted to those he passed in the streets. 'Warn the knight Reikhard! A Saracen is offshore!' He did not stop running. He prayed he would find Pierrette in time--and that all his friends would see him with her.

'There are the Mussulmen!' he would say. The sorceress would cast fire. Muslim sailors would scream and burn. He imagined Pierrette saying, 'Cletus, my champion; wade forth and slay them.'

...A mile beyond the town he saw her descending the trail. 'Pierrette, come!' he gasped. 'Saracens!' " [Many other refs., not in DB, incl. pg. 10-15, 206.]

Islam Romania 1436 C.E. Simmons, Dan. Children of the Night. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1992); pg. 74. "Perhaps he had not planned to do it as we rode to Gallipoli to meet the Sultan, for Father was also seized by the Sultan's men only minutes after we had reached the city gates. But Father later swore an oath on the Bible and Koran not to oppose the Sultan's will, and our continued role as hostages was part of that oath... I remember the shock of the Sultan's people when the Ceremony of the Chalice was explained to them, but they accepted it as just another barbarism of the Christian faith. " [More.]
Islam Russia 1942 Lindskold, Jane. "The Big Lie " in Drakas! (S. M. Sterling, ed.) New York: Baen (2000); pg. 145. "...I was given extra training on all sorts of distance rifles: ours, the Fritz's, the Ivan's, the Abdul's, anyone and everyone's. " [These slang terms are used repeatedly in story. 'Fritz' refers to Germans, Ivans are Russians, and Abduls are Arabs and/or Muslims, perhaps central Asian Muslims.]
Islam Russia 1942 Lindskold, Jane. "The Big Lie " in Drakas! (S. M. Sterling, ed.) New York: Baen (2000); pg. 157. "The Fritz in their grey uniforms stared in confusion. The smarter ones joined the ragheads in the general move toward cover.

'See the mosque?' hissed the voice behind me. 'Aim at the one who is coming out. 'Now! Fire!'

I did, noting through the scope that the man he had ordered me to shoot was a handsome young buck in local attire... As the handsome Abdul's head exploded, I heard a satisfied chuckle from behind me... 'Collaborators,' he whispered as if I needed any more explanation than the gun in my back for doing what I was doing.

'Now the Germanski,' he said. 'They will come from two buildings to the right of the mosque.' " ['Abdul' is used here as a slang term for a Muslim. This story takes place in the Caucasus region in southern Russia or Georgia, where the predominant population is Caucasian Muslims. Many other refs., not in DB.]

Islam Russia 1942 Lindskold, Jane. "The Big Lie " in Drakas! (S. M. Sterling, ed.) New York: Baen (2000); pg. 176. "They'd scavenged weapons and food from the remnants of the Fritz encampment. I tried not to listen too closely though they politely chattered in German and English for my benefit. Devotees of Islam often follow Jewish dietary laws, but from what I could gather, long-pork was on these ragheads' menu. " [They are Circassians; they are Muslim but not particularly devout.]
Islam Russia 1989 Wilson, Robert Charles. Gypsies. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 73. "...the Russians were battling rebellions Moslems on their southern borders. "
Islam Russia 2005 Bear, Greg. Eon. New York: Bluejay (1985); pg. 212. "The Soviets stood in silence as Chaplain Cook and Yitshak Jacob, acting as a rabbi, administered last rites and kaddish. A Soviet Uzbek Moslem stepped forward to offer his prayers. "
Islam Saudi Arabia 1980 Maggin, Elliot S. Superman: Miracle Monday. New York: Warner Books (1981); pg. 140. "'...as you can see, the two most serious cases of outbreak occurred this pas week in the cities of Shanghai and Medina, two locations all but totally cut off from Western contact...' "
Islam Saudi Arabia 1997 Watson, Ian. God's World. New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers (this ed. 1990; copyright 1979); pg. 28-29. "The year 1997... As the world spun on its course that Easter Day a whole series of manifestations came and went... completing the circuit of the globe in Mecca as a golden angel floating above the black-draped granite block of the Kaaba, calling out to circling pilgrims... The composite message of the avatars, given through the lips of quasi-Jesus, quasi-Buddha, quasi-Mohammed... "
Islam Saudi Arabia 1999 Banks, Iain. The Business. New York: Simon & Schuster (1999); pg. 122. "'It's brilliant!' Dwight exclaimed... 'Don't you think?'

...'Run it past me again?'

'There's this, like, thing that looks like a shinnel or something, right? In Mecca, right in the centre. Where the Muslims go on pilgrimage to, okay? It's like the thing they're going there to see; this rock, inside this big sort of black shrouded building thing, in the centre of this humongous square in Mecca.'

'The Kaaba.'

'Cool!' Dwight looked delighted. 'You know the name! Yeah, the Kaaba, man. That's it!... Well, the idea for the movie is that . . . oh, yeah, like, hold on, this rock that's in the Kaaba, right? It's supposed to have fallen from the sky, be a gift from God, from Allah, right? I mean, obviously nowadays everybody knows it's a meteorite, but it's still holly, like, still venerated, okay? or they think they know it's a meteorite... The idea for the movie is that... it's a... spaceship!' " [More of this idea, pg. 123-127.]

Islam Saudi Arabia 1999 Banks, Iain. The Business. New York: Simon & Schuster (1999); pg. 122. "'It's brilliant!' Dwight exclaimed... 'Don't you think?'

...'Run it past me again?'

'There's this, like, thing that looks like a shinnel or something, right? In Mecca, right in the centre. Where the Muslims go on pilgrimage to, okay? It's like the thing they're going there to see; this rock, inside this big sort of black shrouded building thing, in the centre of this humongous square in Mecca.'

'The Kaaba.'

'Cool!' Dwight looked delighted. 'You know the name! Yeah, the Kaaba, man. That's it!... Well, the idea for the movie is that . . . oh, yeah, like, hold on, this rock that's in the Kaaba, right? It's supposed to have fallen from the sky, be a gift from God, from Allah, right? I mean, obviously nowadays everybody knows it's a meteorite, but it's still holly, like, still venerated, okay? or they think they know it's a meteorite... The idea for the movie is that... it's a... spaceship!' " [More of this idea, pg. 123-127.]

Islam Saudi Arabia 2010 Anthony, Patricia. Cold Allies. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich (1993); pg. 141. "Just to you will I admit I have some whiskey.' The general grinned. 'Do not pass that information on to the Shi'a or the Saudis. Above all, do not tell those arrogant Saudis...' "
Islam Saudi Arabia 2010 Clarke, Arthur C. 2010: Odyssey Two. New York: Ballantine (1982); pg. 168. "Nor would he have visited so many factories... the White House, the Kremlin archives, the Vatican Library, the sacred Black Stone of the Ka'bah at Mecca . . . "
Islam Saudi Arabia 2026 Moffett, Judith. Time, Like an Ever-Rolling Stream. New York: St. Martin's Press (1992); pg. 252. "'...Wherever God was for the time being would be holy ground. Permanently holy ground would be what we call the Holy Land--Galilee, where Jesus lived, and the countries all around there. Jerusalem's called the Holy City, because the Temple was there, and the Ark of the Covenant was in the Temple, and God was in the Ark of the Covenant.'

'Permanently?'

'Permanently. And I think Mecca's a holy city, too, for Muslims. Aren't they all supposed to make a pilgrimage to Mecca?'

'I think so. They face Mecca when they pray, too.' "

Islam Saudi Arabia 2029 Clarke, Arthur C. The Hammer of God. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 83. "Chrislam was not yet officially a hundred years old, though its origins went back another two decades to the oil war of 1990. One of the unexpected results of that disastrous miscalculation was that large numbers of American servicemen and women had, for the first time in their lives, direct contact with Islam--and were deeply impressed. They realized that many of their prejudices, such as the popular images of man mullahs brandishing the Koran in one hand and submachine guns in the other, were ludicrous oversimplifications. And they were astonished to discover the advances that the Islamic world had made in astronomy and mathematics during the Dark Ages in Europe--a thousand years before the United States was born. "
Islam Saudi Arabia 2029 Clarke, Arthur C. The Hammer of God. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 84. "Delighted at this opportunity of obtaining new converts, Saudi authorities had set up information centers at the main Desert Storm military bases to provide Islamic teaching and explanations of the Koran. By the time the Gulf War was over, some thousands of Americans had acquired a new religion. Most of them--apparently ignorant of the atrocities perpetrated upon their ancestors by the Arab slave-traders--were African-Americans, but substantial numbers were white. "
Islam Saudi Arabia 2100 Lawson, Chris. "Written in Blood " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 204. "Da would brook no further discussion, so we set off for the Holy Lands. At eleven I was less than impressed. I expected to find Paradise filled with thousands of fountains and birds and orchards and blooms. Instead, we huddled in cloth tents with hundreds of thousands of sweaty pilgrims, most of whom spoke other languages, as we tramped across a cramped and dirty wasteland. I wondered why Allah had made his Holy Lands so dry and dusty, but I had the sense even then not to ask Da about it.

Near Damascus, we heard about bloodwriting. The pilgrims were all speaking about it. Half thought it blasphemous, the other half thought it a path to Heaven. Since Da was a biologist, the pilgrims in our troop asked him what he thought. He said he would have to go to the bloodwriters directly and find out. "

Islam Saudi Arabia 2100 Lawson, Chris. "Written in Blood " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 204. "The stall attendant wiped his mustache, and began his spiel. 'Since the Dawn of Time, the Word of Allah has been read by mullahs. . . .'

'Stop! said Da. 'The Qur'an was revealed to Mohammed fifteen centuries ago; the Dawn of Time predates it by several billion years. I want answers, not portentous falsehoods.'

Now the man was nervous. 'Perhaps you should see my uncle. He invented bloodwriting. I will fetch him.' Soon he returned with an older, infinitely more respectable man with gray whiskers in his mustache and hair.

'Please forgive my nephew,' said the man. 'He has watched too much American television and thinks the best way to impress is to use dramatic words, wild gestures, and where possible, a toll-free number.' "

Islam Saudi Arabia 2100 Lawson, Chris. "Written in Blood " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 205. "The old man smiled and raised a small ampoule of red liquid. He continued, 'This, my friend, is the virus. I have stripped its core and put the entire text of the Qur'an into its DNA. If you inject it, the virus will write the Qur'an into your myeloid precursor cells, and then your white blood cells will carry the Word of Allah inside them.'

I put my hand up to catch his attention. 'Why not red blood cells?' I asked. 'They carry all the oxygen.'

The old man looked at me as if he noticed me for the first time. 'Hello, little one. You are very smart. Red blood cells carry oxygen, but they have no DNA. They cannot carry the Word.'

It all seemed to complicated for an eleven-year-old girl. "

Islam Saudi Arabia 2100 Lawson, Chris. "Written in Blood " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 205. "My father was curious. DNA codes for amino acid sequences. How can you write the Qur'an in DNA?'

'DNA is just another alphabet,' said the man. He handed my father a card. 'Here is the crib sheet.'

My father studied the card for several minutes, and I saw his face change from skeptical to awed. He passed the card to me. It was filled with Arabic squiggles, which I could not understand. The only thing I knew about Arabic was that it was written right-to-left, the reverse of English.

'I can't read it,' I said to the man. He made a little spinning gesture with his finger, indicating that I should flip the card over. I flipped the card and saw the same crib sheet, only with Anglicized terms for each Arabic letter. Then he handed me another crib sheet, and said: 'This is the sheet for English text.' "

Islam Saudi Arabia 2100 Lawson, Chris. "Written in Blood " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 206. "My father asked, 'Do you have an English translation?'

'Your daughter is looking at the crib sheet for the English language,' the old man explained, 'and there are other texts one can write, but not the Qur'an.'

Thinking rapidly, Da said, 'But you could write the Qur'an in English?'

'If I wanted to pursue secular causes, I could do that,' the old man said. 'But I have all the secular things I need. I have copyrighted crib sheets for all the common alphabets, and I make a profit on them. For the Qur'an, however, translations are not acceptable. Only the original words of Mohammed can be trusted. It is one thing for dhimmis to translate it for their own curiosity, but if you are a true believer you must read the word of God in its unsullied form.' "

Islam Saudi Arabia 2100 Lawson, Chris. "Written in Blood " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 206. "Da stared at the man. The old man had just claimed that millions of Muslims were false believers because they could not read the original Qur'an. Da shook his head and let the matter go. There were plenty of imams who would agree with the old man.

'What is the success rate of the inoculation?'

'Ninety-five percent of my trial subjects had identifiable Qur'an text in their blood after two weeks, although I cannot guarantee that the entire text survived the insertion in all of those subjects. No peer-reviewed journal would accept the paper.' He handed my father a copy of an article from Modern Gene Techniques. 'Not because the science is poor, as you will see for yourself, but because Islam scares them.' "

Islam Saudi Arabia 2100 Lawson, Chris. "Written in Blood " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 204-205. "'Bloodwriting is a good word, and I owe my nephew a debt of gratitude for that. But the actual process is something altogether more mundane. I offer a virus, nothing more. I have taken a hypo-immunogenic strain of adeno-associated virus and added a special code to its DNA.'

Da said, 'The other pilgrims tell me that you can write the Qur'an into their blood.'

'That I can, sir,' said the old man. 'Long ago I leaned a trick that would get the adeno-associated virus to write its code into bone marrow stem cells. It made me a rich man. Now I use my gift for Allah's work. I consider it part of my zakat.'

Da suppressed a wry smile. Zakat, charitable donation, was one of the five pillar. This old man was so blinded by avarice that he believed selling his invention for small profit was enough to fulfill his obligation to God. "

Islam Saudi Arabia 2276 Clarke, Arthur C. Imperial Earth. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich (1976); pg. 239. Pg. 239: "After decades of often acrimonious discussion, the desolate 'Empty Quarter' of Saudi Arabia was chosen; it was the first time that anyone had ever found a use for it.

Wide tracks were roughly graded through the wilderness so that ten-thousand-ton hover-freighters could carry in components from the factories on the shore of the Red Sea. Later, these were supplemented by cargo ships... Some of the faithful objected to this symbol of an alien religion, but it was explained to them that this was only a temporary state of affairs. When the 'Eye of Allah' was completed, the offending sign would be utterly lost in the total array of seven hundred huge dishes, spaced uniformly over a circle eighty square kilometers in extent. "; Pg. 240: "At Al Hadidah, there were meteorites that had lain unrusting in the sand since the days of the Prophet. "

Islam Senegal 2015 Julian, Astrid. "Bringing Sissy Home " in L. Ron Hubbard Presents The Best of Writers of the Future (Algis Budrys, ed.) Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (2000; c. 1992); pg. 221. Pg. 221: "Like the Senegalese shove at you in every little bistro and dibiterie of the Medina, Dakar's 'African quarter' behind the Grand Mosque. "; Pg. 230: "I know from her telephone conversations that Charlotte plans to tour the Grand Mosque at fourteen:thirty. I can catch a bus. It's on the main line. " [More, pg. 234.]
Islam Serbia 2020 Maggin, Elliot S. Kingdom Come. New York: Time Warner (1998); pg. 208. "When Superman and Wonder woman came upon Von Bach, he was shipping up a barroom crowd in Montenegro to go down the road to visit a family of Serbian Muslims who were building a new house on the edge of a small town. The idea was to burn these people out of the trailer they were using as temporary housing. " [More.]
Islam Singapore 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 32. "'...And tomorrow a third group arrives. The Yung Soo Chim Islamic Bank of Singapore.' " [Also mentioned pg. 35, 39, 57, 84, 124, 171, 186, 190, 228.]
Islam Singapore 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 202. "A young newswoman in a chiffon Muslim chador gestured at a map of the Malay peninsula... A weather girl for warfare, Laura thought. "
Islam Solomon's Row 2075 Baker, Virginia. "Rachel's Wedding " in Writers of the Future: Volume V (Algis Budrys, ed.). Los Angeles: Bridge Publications (1989); pg. 86. [Liberal Jews on the asteroid discuss the arrival of Orthodox Jews.]

"'Jacob, you cannot le them stay.'

'I cannot send them out.'

'Send them to the Arab Utopia.' This from Sara... 'The Moslems are also orthodox. They will surely know what to do with them.'

Laughter ran through the room, sprung from the children of crueler times. "

Islam South Africa 1997 Resnick, Laura. "Amandla! " in Alternate Tyrants (Mike Resnick, ed.) New York: Tor (1997); pg. 108. "...South Africans in the struggle for freedom was much easier than the task of uniting them in freedom. Ours is a country of Christians, Jews, and Muslims... "
Islam Soviet Union 1990 Anderson, Jack. Zero Time. New York: Kensington Publishing (1990); pg. 410. "Nearly one-fifth of the population of the U.S.S.R. was Muslim, but of these a much smaller percentage were militant fundamentalists. "
Islam Soviet Union 1995 Ing, Dean. Systemic Shock. New York: Tor (original 1981; 1st Tor edition 1992); pg. 33-34. "...The RUS [Russian Untion of Soviets] had been forced to cut aid, and to yield more autonomy to the Islamic peoples of her southern flanks from Lake Baikal to the Black Sea. One sign of her troubles, as the RUS well knew, as the damnable tariqat. Tariqat's, Moslem secret societies, were flourishing in the 1980's while Russian-speaking USSR bureaucrats sweated to modernize Azerbaijan, Uzbekistan, sprawling Kazakhstan, reluctant Afghanistan. The tariqat was a far older tradition than Marxism, more staunchly rooted, in some ways harsher in its discipline. And Allah met His payrolls; desparing RUS bureaucrats joked that their earthly rewards could not match baklavah in the sky. NO wonder that the RUS became alarmed as tariquats flourishing in the Islamic RUS republics. The tariqat was a way to reject Russianization, and RUS moslems embraced it. Moscow knew her underbelly was soft on Islam, and worried about ties between its tariqats and the AIR next door. "
Islam Soviet Union 1996 Ing, Dean. Systemic Shock. New York: Tor (original 1981; 1st Tor edition 1992); pg. 28. "The President wanted strong ties with the RUS [Russian Union of Soviet States], even after its loss of control over its food-producing Islamic states. "
Islam Soviet Union 2015 Sterling, Bruce. "We See Things Differently " (published 1989) in The Norton Book of Science Fiction (Ursula K. Le Guin & Brian Atterbery, editors). New York: W. W. Norton & Co. (1993); pg. 779. "The struggle continues in the Muslim lands of what was once the Soviet Union. There the Believers ride in Holy Jihad, freeing their ancient lands form the talons of Marxist atheism. Secretly, we send them carbines, rockets, mortars, and nameless men. I shall be one of htem; whne I meet death, my grave will be nameless also. But nothing is nameless to God. "
Islam Soviet Union 2020 Watson, Ian. The Flies of Memory. New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers (1990); pg. 185. "Mukulin's world view was so cockeyed. So was the world view of hundreds of millions of supposedly normal people! Rationality hadn't made much headway. That logic was losing on all fronts was Valeri's fear [Valeri is a Marxist Communist]. Despite the official atheism the state was now in retreat before a crew of querulous Christians and maddening Moslems, noisier than ever with each new concession. What was worse, science itself was courting superstition and ceasing to be true science... "
Islam Spain 711 C.E. Gentle, Mary. A Secret History. New York: Avon Books (1999); pg. 141. Pg. 141: "According to conventional histories, the Germanic Visigothic tribes did not settle in North Africa. Rather the reverse--with the Muslim Arab invasion of Visigothic Spain, in AD 711. "; Pg. 150: "...Spain is divided between a Christian Visigoth knightly aristocracy, and the Arabic dynasties that follow their own invasion in AD 711. Both the numerically inferior Muslim and Visigoth aristocratic classes ruled over a great mass of Iberian and Moorish peasantry. Therefore, Maximillian says, since there were 'Visigoths' of this kind left until well into the late fifteenth century, there might also have been mediaeval rumours that either these Christian Visigoths or the 'heathen Saracen' (Muslims) retained some 'engines and devices' of Roman technology. " [Other refs., not in DB, e.g. 247.]
Islam Spain 1963 Bishop, Michael. No Enemy But Time. New York: Timescape (1982); pg. 37. "Spoken to her face, the word bruja--witch--made Encarnacion cringe. This calumny, she well knew, derived from her singular appearance and her neighbors' astute surmise that her ancestors were Moriscos-that is, Christianized Moors--of uncertain steadfastness in their new faith. Disciples of Mahomet, the moors had come to Iberia from northern Africa. Yes, but what special allegiance had bound them before their conversion to Islam? "
Islam Spain 2000 Bellamy, Edward. Looking Backward. New York: Random House (1951; c. 1887); pg. 111. "Looking up to the latticed galleries, one caught a gleam now and then from the eye of some beauty of the royal harem, looking down upon the assembled flower of Moorish chivalry... a thousand scimitars [sic] were bared, and the cry, 'Allah il Allah!' shook the hall and awoke me, to find it broad daylight, and the room tingling with the electric music of the 'Turkish Reveille.' "
Islam Spain 2027 Robinson, Kim Stanley. The Gold Coast. New York: Tor (1995; c. 1988); pg. 235. "And move to the Byzantines. Seven times Jim answers with that. Then: 'The Arabs. Saracen Arabs, from Spain. Bloody times.' Four generations under the Arabs. Then it's back to the Byzantines, to the times when the church before them was functioning, holding services...' "
Islam Sri Lanka 1987 Simons, Walton. "The Teardrop of India " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 230. "Later in the day a busload of extras, mostly Sinhalese with a few Tamils and Muslims, was scheduled to arrive. "
Islam Sri Lanka 1987 Simons, Walton. "The Teardrop of India " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 253. "'Each religion had its own belief about the footprint,' he said. 'We believe it was made by Buddha. The Hindus say it was made by Shiva. Moslems argue that it is where Adam stood for a thousand years, atoning for the loss of paradise.'

'Whoever it was, they had a big foot,' Paula said. 'That print was three feet long.' "

Islam Sri Lanka 2160 Clarke, Arthur C. The Fountains of Paradise. New York: Ballantine (1980; 1st ed. 1978); pg. 87. "'The footprint,' he said. 'The Muslims believed it was Adam's; he stood here after he was expelled from Paradise. The Hindus attributed it to Siva or Saman. But to the Buddhists, of course, it was the imprint of the Enlightened One.' "
Islam Sudan 1883 Miller, John J. "Hewn in Pieces for the Lord " in Drakas! (S. M. Sterling, ed.) New York: Baen (2000); pg. 62. "Gordon was impressed by what he saw. The Mahdis' men were usually called dervishes by outsiders. Dervish, which actually means 'poor' in Arabic, was a term more properly applied to a class of Moslem friars who'd taken vows of poverty. Commonly called whirling dervishes, there were actually any number of dervish types--dancing, howling, singing--who sought to achieve mystic union with the divine through the constant repetition of simple physical acts until they fell into a trance. These friars were also fierce fighters, loyal until death, although such authentic dervishes made up only a portion of the Mahdi's army.

'Actually,' Rimbaud explained to Gordon as they made their way through the camp, 'the Mahdists call themselves 'ansar.' '

' 'Helpers,' ' Gordon said. 'As the people of Medina who gave aid to Mohammed during his exile called themselves.' " [Many other refs. to Islam throughout story, not in DB.]

Islam Sudan 1883 Miller, John J. "Hewn in Pieces for the Lord " in Drakas! (S. M. Sterling, ed.) New York: Baen (2000); pg. 74. "'Praise be to Allah!'

The Mahdi stood at the entrance to the room... 'We thought we had lost you so soon after first knowing you--but praise be to Allah--and your own great strength--that neither the blade nor the poison on it could end your life!' "

Islam Sudan 1920 Wilson, Robert Charles. Darwinia. New York: Tor (1998); pg. 72. "Britain's remaining military power had been concentrated on shoring up her possessions in India and South Africa... Egypt and Sudan were lost to the Moslem rebels. "
Islam Sudan 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 289. "The Sudan was run by a radical Muslim lunatic who consulted dervishes while factories washed away and airports cracked and burst. "
Islam Syria 1880 Farmer, Philip Jose. To Your Scattered Bodies Go. New York: Berkeley Medallion Books (1971); pg. 129. "It is a fact that I went out and drummed up eighteen Moslems to testify in behalf of the Jews... It is a fact that when I recalled from my consular post, because of the lies of the Christian missionaries... and of the Jewish usurers, thousands of Christians, Moslems, and Jews rallied to my aid, though it was too late then...' "
Islam Syria 1986 Leigh, Stephen. "The Tint of Hatred " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 6. "December 1, 1986, Syria:

...A small woman, swathed in the chador, the black Islamic garb, poured tea into two small cups. Except for a row of bright blue beads on the headpiece, she wore no ornamentation. She passed one of the cups to the other person in the room, a raven-haired man of medium height...

'It will be colder for the next several days, Najib,' she said... 'You'll be more comfortable at least.'

Najib shrugged... His lips tightened; his dark, intense gaze snared her. 'It's Allah's presence that gleams,' he said... 'You've never heard me complain, Misha, even in the heat of summer. Do you think me a woman, wailing my futile misery to the sky?'

Above the veils, Misha's eyes narrowed. 'I am Kahina, the Seer, Najib,' she answered, allowing a hint of defiance into her voice. 'I know many hidden things. I know that when the heat ripples over the stones, my brother Najib wishes that he were not Nur al-Allah, the Light of Allah.' "

Islam Syria 1986 Leigh, Stephen. "The Tint of Hatred " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 6-7. "Najib's sudden backhanded cuff caught his sister across the side of her face. Her head snapped sideways. Scalding hot tea burned her hand and wrist: the cup shattered on the rugs as she sprawled at his feet... She knew she dared say no more. On her knees she gathered up the shards of the teacup in silence...

'Sayyid came to me this morning,' Najib said... He was complaining again. He says you are not a proper wife.'

'Sayyid is a fatted pig,' Misha answered...

Najib scowled, making the sound of disgust. 'Pah! Sayyid leads my army. It is his strategy that will sweep the kafir back into the sea. Allah has given him the body of a god and the mind of a conqueror, and he is obedient to me. That's why I gave him to you. The Qur'an says it: 'Men have authority over women because Allah made the one superior to the other. Good women are obedient.' You make a mockery of Nur al-Allah's gift.' "

Islam Syria 1986 Leigh, Stephen. "The Tint of Hatred " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 7. "'Nur al-Allah shouldn't gave given away that which completes him.' Now her eyes came up, challenging him as her tiny hands closed over the pottery shards. 'We were together in the womb, Brother. That's the way Allah made us. He touched you with His light and His voice, and He gave me the gift of His sight. You are His mouth, the prophet; I am your vision of the future. Don't be so foolish as to blind yourself. Your pride will defeat you.'

'Then listen to the words of Allah and be humble. Be glad that Sayyid does not insist on purdah for you--he knows you're Kahina, so he doesn't force your seclusion. Our father should never have sent you to Damascus to be educated; the infection of the unbelievers is insidious. Misha, make Sayyid content because that will content me. My will is Allah's will.'

'Only sometimes, Brother . . .' " [More, pg. 7-9.]

Islam Syria 1986 Leigh, Stephen. "The Tint of Hatred " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 64-65. "'...That's just the kind of emotional fodder that reactionaries such as fundamentalist preacher Leo Barnett, or a fanatic 'prophet' such as Nur al-Allah, would use for their own purposes.' "
Islam Syria 1986 Leigh, Stephen. "The Tint of Hatred " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 136. "'Wallah, woman! What is it?' Sayyid was hewn from a heroic mold, fully ten foot tall and muscled like a god. In response he was inspiring: a dark, Egyptian giant, a myth given life. Sayyid was the weapon in Nur al-Allah's hands; terrorists such as al-Muezzin were the hidden blades. When Sayyid stood before the faithful, towering over all, they could see in Nur al-Allah's general the visible symbol of Allah's protection. " [Other refs., pg. 137-138.]
Islam Syria 1986 Leigh, Stephen. "The Tint of Hatred " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 137-138. "In Sayyid's keen mind were the strategies that had defeated the better-armed and supplied Israeli troops in the Golan Heights, when the world had thought Nur al-Allah and his followers hopelessly outnumbered. He had orchestrated the rioting in Damascus when al-Assad's ruling Ba'th Party had tried to move away from Qu'ranic law, allowing the Nur sect to forge an alliance with the Sunni and Alawite sects. He craftily advised Nur al-Allah to send the faithful into Beirut when the Christian Druze leaders had threatened to overthrow the reigning Islamic party. When the Swarm Mother had sent her deadly offspring to Earth the year before, it was Sayyid who had protected Nur al-Allah and the faithful. In his mind was victory. For the jihad Allah had given Sayyid hikma, divine wisdom. "


Islam, continued

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