Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Islam, New Mexico

Islam, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Islam New York 2000 Friedman, Michael Jan. X-Men: Shadows of the Past. New York: BP Books (2000); pg. 154. "'It wasn't my fault,' insisted Mohammed, the gangly attendant who had noticed that Jeffrey Saunders was missing. 'I just looked over at the court and the boy was gone.'

Stoyanovich felt numb. In all her years at Westminster House, she had never lost a client. Not once.

'You hear what I'm saying?' asked Mohammed, his voice rising an octave. 'It wasn't my fault.' "

Islam New York 2000 Roman, Steven A. X-Men/Doctor Doom: The Chaos Engine. New York: BP Books (2000); pg. 160. "On the other side of the Atlantic Ocean, in the Islamic Republic of Mauritania, the noonday sun was relentlessly beating down on the harbor city of Nouadhibou?It was not a large city, as major ports-of-call go--the population was only around 60,000 inhabitants... "
Islam New York 2020 Vonnegut Jr., Kurt. Player Piano. New York: Delacorte Press (1952); pg. 16. "The Shah of Bratpuhr, spiritual leader of 6,000,000 members of the Kolhouri sect, wizened and wise and dark as cocoa, encrusted with gold brocade and constellations of twinkling gems, sank deep into the royal-blue cushions of the limousine--like a priceless brooch in its gift box... The shah had left his military and spiritual fastness in the mountains to see what he could learn in the most powerful nation on earth for the good of his people. " [More refs. about the fictional Kolhouri sect and culture, which is apparently Islamic, not in DB. Islam is not mentioned by name, however.]
Islam New York 2075 Kress, Nancy. Beggars in Spain. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1993); pg. 297. "Religious holidays in Sanctuary varied from family to family; some kept Christmas, Ramadan, Easter, Yom Kippur, or Divali; many kept nothing at all. "
Islam New York: New York City 1953 Clarke, Arthur C. Childhood's End. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1981; c. 1953); pg. 20. "'...The Wainrights fear, too, that we know the truth about the origins of their faiths. How long, they wonder, have we been observing humanity? Have we watched Mohammed begin the Hegira, or Moses giving the Jews their laws? Do we know all that is false in the stories they believe?' "
Islam New York: New York City 1986 Hubbard, L. Ron. Mission Earth Vol. 2: Black Genesis. Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (1986); pg. 307. "'Oh, that youngster,' said Vantagio. 'It's in confidence. His father is a very important man, a Moslem. Married an American movie actress. That's the son. He's going to go to college and his father insisted he live here. We couldn't say no. Would have caused endless diplomatic repercussions had we refused.'

'Oh,' said the turbaned one. 'I can clear up that puzzle for you. You have to understand the Mohammedan religion. You see,' he continued learnedly, 'in the Middle East, it is tradition that the children, including the boys, are raised in, and have to live in, the harem. And this whorehouse is probably as close as his father could come to a harem in the United States. Quite naturally, really.' "

Islam New York: New York City 1987 Leigh, Stephen. "The Hue of a Mind " in Wild Cards V: Down and Dirty (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 263. "She was Kahina, the Seeress: Allah's dreams had shown her Hartmann, the Satan who danced puppets from his clawed hands. The visions had shown her Gimle and Sra Morgenstern. Allah's visions had led her back to the desert mosque the day after she'd slit her brother's throat, there to be given by one of the faithful the thing that would give her revenge and bring Hartmann down: Allah's gift.

Today was the day of the new moon. Misha took that as an omen that there would be a vision. She had prayed to Allah for well over an hour this morning, the gift He had bestowed upon her cradled in her arms. " [Many other refs. throughout story, pg. 263-304. Other refs. not in DB. This Muslim character from Syria is the story's main character.]

Islam New York: New York City 1987 Leigh, Stephen. "The Hue of a Mind " in Wild Cards V: Down and Dirty (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 273. "'We . . . the Qur'an teaches that God directly affects the world. He rewards the good and punishes the wicked. I don't find that horrible. Do you believe in God?' "
Islam New York: New York City 1988 Martin, George R. R. & John J. Miller. Wild Cards VII: Dead Man's Hand. New York: Bantam Books (1990); pg. 132. "...I thought the Nur's people all hated jokers.'

'Yeah, yeah, the abominations of Allah, don't ask my why they were working together...' "

Islam New York: New York City 1988 Martin, George R. R. & John J. Miller. Wild Cards VII: Dead Man's Hand. New York: Bantam Books (1990); pg. 170. Pg. 170: "...The day she arrived [from Syria], she was even wearing one of them black Moslem things, you know, whatchacalit, a chador. She switched to American clothes pretty quick but it didn't help much...' "; Pg. 176: "He went through the carton in a deserted corner of the lobby. There wasn't much: an English-language edition of the Koran, a street map of Manhattan...' " [Some other Muslim refs., but not by name, particularly to the Muslim character Kahina, not in DB.]
Islam New York: New York City 2000 Silverberg, Robert. The Stochastic Man. New York: Harper & Row (1975); pg. 60. "A new Roosevelt? A new Kennedy? I trembled. A new Charlemagne, a new Mohammed, maybe a new Genghis Khan. "
Islam New York: New York City 2000 Silverberg, Robert. The Stochastic Man. New York: Harper & Row (1975); pg. 69. "Transit, of course, wasn't Hindu--more a mixture of Buddhism and fascism, actually, a stew of Zen and Tantra and Platonism and Gestalt therapy... "
Islam New York: New York City 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 73. Pg. 73: "'Stay out as long as you like,' Norman said over his shoulder, heading for his bedroom and the prayermat laid out facing Mecca. "; Pg. 81: "'Allah be merciful,' Norman said softly... "; Pg. 118: "'Excerpts from the Koran in English, live reading, sure to be of interest to an intelligent person such as yourself!' "; Pg. 292: "...one of her own VP's was a Muslim and hence a non-drinker... "
Islam New York: New York City 2015 Pohl, Frederik. The Years of the City. New York: Timescape (1984); pg. 228. "'A man. Very strict. Very religious. Very likely to refuse to marry me if he finds out what I do in New York. And also very, very rich.'

The veil was the hardest to put on, but it completed the ensemble that made Doll just one more strictly religious Moslem women in a Moslem neighborhood. " [Some other refs. to these characters, not in DB. See also pg. 222-223.]

Islam New York: New York City 2076 Morehouse, Lyda. Archangel Protocol. New York: Penguin Putnam (2001); pg. 14. "When asked what Fitzpatrick had said to the Guard, he replied, 'Nothing, really. He was pointing out Muslim troublemakers in the crowd. We took him seriously, but I guess it was meant as a distraction.'

However, police confirmed that Muslim extremists were spotted in the crowd. According to sources on the scene, the police had, indeed, requested via LINK that Fitzpatrick verbally inform the Swiss Guard of the possible danger... "

Islam New York: New York City 2076 Morehouse, Lyda. Archangel Protocol. New York: Penguin Putnam (2001); pg. 53. "They media tried to label Mouse a subversive rebel, but they'd misunderstood his motivations. From what I had learned when Danny and I pursued him, this generosity was a tenet of the Muslim belief in almsgiving. Though if the rumors were true about Mouse's misspent youth, almsgiving was the only part of his religion he followed with any kind of seriousness. " [Mouse, an Egyptian Muslim, is one of the novel's main characters. Many other refs., to him, not in DB.]
Islam New York: New York City 2076 Morehouse, Lyda. Archangel Protocol. New York: Penguin Putnam (2001); pg. 78. Pg. 78: "The only thing I saw was dusty hard-copy tomes on Islam, the Baha'i movement, versions of the Koran, political history, and Malcolm X. Not one medical journal among them. " [This is the office of Jibril Freshta, an important character in the novel, and a Muslim. In fact, he is a Muslim angel. More about Jibril, not in DB.]; Pg. 79: "Strolling out of the kitchen, Michael leaned against the doorframe. ' 'There is no God, but Allah,' ' Michael translated, ' 'and Muhammed is the prophet of God.' ' ";

Pg. 86: "'It seems rather coincidental, then, wouldn't you agree, Ms. McMannus, that you were with a known Muslim radical...?' "

Islam New York: New York City 2076 Morehouse, Lyda. Archangel Protocol. New York: Penguin Putnam (2001); pg. 94. Pg. 94: "'He has more dotted lines to antigovernment groups than . . . I don't know what. Angelucci has his fingers in all the radical groups: Hasidim, Muslims . . . possibly other heathens as well. Not to mention the liberal fringe like ACLU, human rights campaigners--which we know is a front for queers--and God knows what else. He and his pals, like Jibril Freshta, have been stirring the pot of dissension for the last year...' "; Pg. 149: "I dusted off my King James version of the Bible, my copy of the Torah, the Koran, and a whole slew of other religious books... "
Islam New York: New York City 2076 Morehouse, Lyda. Archangel Protocol. New York: Penguin Putnam (2001); pg. 150. "In the Koran, though the angels are clearly spiritual beings early on (we see them in The Crow 2:3 at creation speaking directly to God), in The Family of Imram 3:39, they act as messengers to Mirium for Allah. It has been postulated by more learned scholars than I that the Israelites were influenced in their thinking about the spiritual nature of angels when they intermixed with Arabic peoples (see Jeffrey Burton Russell's series about the history of Satan.) "
Islam New York: New York City 2076 Morehouse, Lyda. Archangel Protocol. New York: Penguin Putnam (2001); pg. 182. "The page's costume reminded me of the Muslim women in New York. Red satiny material draped across his face and down his shoulders, mingling with a wild assortment of colors and patterns of turquoise, gold and orange. "
Islam New York: New York City 2076 Morehouse, Lyda. Archangel Protocol. New York: Penguin Putnam (2001); pg. 223. "'True. Mouse could be working for Letourneau.'

'Why would a Muslim work for the New Right?' I asked. [The New Right are Evangelical Christians/Protestants]

'Mouse is a terrible Muslim,' Daniel reminded me. 'He's far too interested in worldly goods.'

I nodded. 'He told me Letourneau stood for things he believed in--especially the LINK expansion.'

'Makes sense. He wants to keep America out of Christendom, keep the LINK more chaotic, a hacker's paradise.' "

Islam New York: New York City 2076 Morehouse, Lyda. Archangel Protocol. New York: Penguin Putnam (2001); pg. 285. "'Deidre, you've met three archangels. A Christian.' He laid his hand on his chest to indicate himself. 'A Muslim, and a Jew. If one messiah was the only true messiah, how could that be?' " [Other refs. to Muslims, pg. 283, 331, more.]
Islam New York: New York City 2076 Morehouse, Lyda. Archangel Protocol. New York: Penguin Putnam (2001); pg. 331. "The angels leap up onto the stage as one. They made a strange sight: Muslim in turban and tux; Israeli Jew in full military uniform; and Asian New Age drag queen striding purposefully to where Grey waited... "
Islam New York: New York City: Manhattan 3414 Farmer, Philip Jose. Dayworld. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons (1985); pg. 277. "'You know that the government does not forbid us to observe the Sabbath? It won't let us have a synagogue, but it doesn't play favorites. No religion has a church or temple or mosque or synagogue.' "
Islam Newmanhome 2100 Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 102. "...at the mass funerals... There was a nasty--and completely unexptected--quarrel at the grave site. It concerned religion, of all things. The Moslems didn't want to have their dead buried with the unbelievers, and once the Moslems made that clear, some of the other sects began muttering, too. It took all of Captain Bu's bellowing to restore order. Then a rancorous emergency town meeting was called that night, people shouting each other through tears and gauze masks, before it was decided that future burials could be segregated by religion. "
Islam Newmanhome 2100 Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 105. "The funeral was worse than the one the day before. The town meeting had settled very little when it had authorized separate burials for Moslems. Kittamur Haradi was a Moslem, all right, but he was a Sunni. He didn't want his late wife buried with the Shi'ites. So a separate, smaller ditch was dug for the second Moslem sect. "
Islam Newmanhome 2103 Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 190. "The Great Transporters weren't the only more or less indepenent tribe (or nation, or religion--anyway, a separate enclave that these paltry few had insisted on subdividing themselves into). Allahabad and the Reformers were along the shore, due west of the old town... The Greats would not workon Sundays, the Reforms on Saturdays, the people from Allahabad on Fridays--these because their religions forbade it... "
Islam Newmanhome 2103 Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 127-128. "The Sunni Moslems and the Shi'ites hadn't stopped splintering when they broke into two groups; they schismed again over which way was East, and almost did it again over the calendar. (How could you set the time of the first sighting of the new moon that began Ramadan when there was no moon to sight?) "
Islam Newmanhome 2200 Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 192. "Mooni-bet and Alcar, respectively Moslem from Allahabad and Reformer from the quarrelsome, allegedly Protestant-Christian sect, harvested worms and beetles... "
Islam Newmanhome 2200 Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 193. "'Of course he does. that is right. The Four-Power Council will perhaps discuss your situation when they meet.'

'And when will that be?'

'Oh, they meet all the time,' she informed him. 'Except holidays, I mean, they meet on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays. But when they will come to your case I do not know...'... She lowered her voice to a whisper as she spoke, looking around as though she were discussing something naughty. 'I do not understand about that, but all is in the hands of Allah.' "

Islam Newmanhome 2200 Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 194. "'Mooni-bet? Tell me one other thing, if you will. That very bright thing in the sky--'

'The Universe, yes.' she said, nodding encouragingly.

'That's what I mean. Why do you call it the universe?'

'It's its name, isn't it? The muezzins call it that,' she told him. 'I don't know why. I thought the universe was all around us, but they say that is no longer true.'

He blinked at her. 'No longer true?'

The girl shook her head. 'I don't know what that means, only it is what we bow to in devotions. They say old Earth is there, along with everything else.' She paused, then added helpfully, 'My father said when he was a boy it was much brighter, I don't know what that means either, only' She broke off, then turned away. Over her shoulder she whispered, 'They're coming back! Don't talk to me anymore, please!'

'Why not?' he demanded. 'Can't we talk while we work?'

'We don't she whispered, looking agonizedly toward the returning workers. "

Islam Newmanhome 2200 Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 195. "'I don't even know where Reesa is--'

'She is housed with the Moslems in Allahabad, since they are not on overload just now,' Miriam informed him. "

Islam Newmanhome 2200 Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 196. "The four sects did work together on common needs. The chambers of the Four-Powers Council were common and kept separate from the living quarters of the sects. so were the food-producing caves, or most of them--Allahabad insisted on growing its chickens and gerbils separately, for dietary reasons, and the People's Republic chose not to share grain and bean fields of the others... But for most of their lives the sects stayed firmly apart. Great Transporters married Great Transporters, Moslems Moslems. "
Islam Newmanhome 2200 Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 197. "Of course, their ways of keeping the population down differed from community to community... The Reformers and the Moslems practiced nonprocreative sex--frequently homosex. "
Islam Newmanhome 2200 Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 198. "The four communities rubbed abrasively against each other in plenty of other ways. The Great Transporters hated to see unbelievers profane their Sabbath. The Moslems lost their tempers when they saw anyone drinking alcohol... "
Islam Newmanhome 2200 Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 223. "'...And the others--well, the Peeps are the ones who talked the council into trying to use the fuel for microwave power, and there's talk in Allahabad that colonizing another planet's a good enough idea...'

...'Viktor. Did you know... That means the whole colony has more people than they're allowed. So last week in Allahabad they froze three people for profaning shrines... " [Many other refs. to the Muslims of Allahabad, one of the four major groups on Newmanhome for a long period of time, esp. pg. 190-240. Most refs. not in DB.]

Islam Newmanhome 2200 Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 235. "Inside each tunnel was row on row of capsules. Each one held a human body--convicted 'criminals' mostly--with crosses for the Greats and the Reforms, crescents for the Moslems, and five-pointed stars for the Peeps. "
Islam Newmanhome 2200 Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 283. "Then there were the natural moons human being had colonized: Mary, Joseph, Mohammed, and Gautama were the important ones. (Sudden thrill almost of nostalgia: so some of the religious differences of frozen Newmanhome had persisted even here!) "
Islam Newmanhome 2200 Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 192-193. "'I'm Mooni-bet,' she said, glancing fearfully at the doorway. Then she whispered, 'Is it true? Were you really on old Earth? Did you actually see Mecca?'

Viktor stared at her, startled. 'Mecca? No, of course not. I remember California pretty well, and maybe even a little of Poland--but I was as young as you when I left. And, until we left Earth, I didn't get to do much traveling.'

She stared at him, wide-eyed. 'You saw California? Where the movie stars and the oil sheikhs lived?'

'I don't remember any sheikhs or movie stars,' Viktor said, amused, almost touched by the girl's naivete. 'I mean, except on television--but I suppose you have the old tapes of that kind of thing, anyway.'

'We do not look at graven images,' the girl said sadly. 'Not counting sometimes when we're working in the bean fields, anyway--the Greats have screens there, but we're supposed to turn away from them.' "

Islam Niger 2010 Bell, M. Shayne. "Dry Niger " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1990); pg. 272. "I turned back and watched the riverbed ahead of us. 'How often do you get flash floods?' I asked.

'That Allah should send us rain,' Ahmid said with almost a laugh. But after maybe ten minutes, he looked hard at me. 'If you see any cloud, however small, tell me,' he said. " [Other refs. to the Muslim character Ahmid, without mentioning Islam, in story.]

Islam Niger 2010 Bell, M. Shayne. "Dry Niger " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1990); pg. 277. "'Were you dreaming?' Ahmid asked.

I nodded. 'Of a beautiful woman.'

He looked concerned. 'A woman, you say?'

'Yes, Ahmid.' I regretted mentioning women to him, a castrato. He could never know the things I knew. I did not want to hurt him.

'You do not understand what such a dream could mean,' he said. 'The Djenoun blow about on winds across these empty lands till they find a man's mind to inhabit. If one troubles you, tell me and I will pray to Allah for your protection. Allah can protect you, even in your dreams.'

I could not believe that he believed what he was telling me about the Djenoun. Yet for one moment I wondered if Tuareg superstitions could be true, and if a Djenoun were haunting my mind. If she were I would not ask Ahmid to pray to have her taken from me. "

Islam Nigeria 1999 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 312. "Eda... the great physicist, the discoverer of what was called superunification... He had been born a Muslim in Nigeria, not unusual in itself, but he was an adherent of an unorthodox Islamic faction called the Ahmadiyah, which encompassed the Sufis. The Sufis, he explained after the evening with Abbot Utsumi, were to Islam what Zen was to Buddhism. Ahmadiyah proclaimed 'a jihad of the pen, not the sword.' "
Islam Nigeria 1999 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 312. "Despite his quiet, indeed humble demeanor, Eda [an Ahmadiyyan] was a fierce opponent of the more conventional Muslim concept of jihad, holy war, and argued instead for the vigorous free exchange of ideas. In this he was an embarrassment for much of convervative Islam, & opposition to his participation in the Machine crew had been made by some Islamic nations. "
Islam Nigeria 1999 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 367. "Eda was accompanying a stunning young woman in a brightly colored blouse and skirt, her hair neatly covered with the lacy gele favored by Moslem women in Yorubaland; he was clearly overjoyed to see her. From photographs he had shown, Ellie recognized her as Eda's wife... "
Islam Nigeria 1999 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 312-313. "Many Nigerian men and women--Muslims, Christians, & Animists...--took his [Eda's] vision seriously. "
Islam North America 2027 Atack, Chris. Project Maldon. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 69. "...the degenerate liberals who created them and finally the Islamic Coalition, which had coiled like a snake around the Christian world during the long sleep of the righteous. "
Islam North America 2125 Anderson, Poul. Harvest of Stars. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 32-33. "'...This culture has a martial tradition.'

'Where did it come from?'

'Part old American. There was a wave of converstions to Islam in, uh, the twentieth century. Especially among afros, I believe. But the ancestors of these folkds were mainly Near Easterners, refugees from the Holy League, after the Befehl broke down and the Europeans pulled out. Muslims were already unpopular in the West, often discriminated against. This immigration made matters worse. THings got really horrible during the Grand Jihad--segregation, restriction, outright persecution. THey were driven in on themselves, their own resources. Naturally, they reacted by emphasizing their cultural identity; you may think they've exaggerated it. By the time they could mingle freely, many didn't want to. Also, by then the tech development curve was rising too fast fora lot of them to catch up. The end result was communities like this.' "

Islam Ontario 1995 Ryman, Geoff. 253. New York: St. Martin's Press (1998); pg. 162. "About a mile from my old church, now an evangelical centre, there is a Coptic Orthodox Church. There is a mosque. "
Islam Ontario: Toronto 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 172. "Hollus wavered into existence a short time later. 'I have been thinking about the people who blew up the abortion clinic,' he said. 'You said they were religious fundamentalists.'

'Well, one presumes so, yes. They haven't been caught yet.'

'No smoking gun,' said Hollus.

I smiled. 'Exactly.'

'But if they are, as you suspect, religious people, why is that relevant?'

'Blowing up an abortion clinic is an attempt to protest a perceived moral outrage.'

'And . . .?' said Hollus.

'Well, on Earth, the concept of God is inextricably linked to issues of morality.'

Hollus listened.

'In fact, three of our principal religions share the same Ten Commandments, supposedly handed down by God.' "

Islam Ontario: Toronto 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 173. "But, basically, what Susan said was true. I didn't know the Bible well, and I didn't know the Qur'an or any other holy book at all. "
Islam Ontario: Toronto 2011 Sawyer, Robert J. The Terminal Experiment. New York: HarperCollins (1995); pg. 82. "'When you do announce it,' said Sarkar, 'there will be a ton of publicity. This is as big as it gets. You've proven the existence of life after death.'

Peter shook his head. 'You're going beyond the data. A small, weak electrical field leaves the body at the moment of death. That's all; there's nothing to prove that the field is conscious or living.'

'The Koran says--'

'I can't rely on the Koran, or the Bible, or anything else...'

'You're being deliberately obtuse. It's a soul, Peter. You know that.' "

Islam Ontario: Toronto 2011 Sawyer, Robert J. The Terminal Experiment. New York: HarperCollins (1995); pg. 116. "'...Do you seriously think that if you were to bankrupt yourself buying nanotechnology immortality that Allah couldn't take you anyway if He wanted to? You have a destiny, as do I. We have no choice. When it's time for you to go to the stable, the horse nearest the door will be the one that is meant for you. Call it Hobson's choice or qadar Allah or kismet--whatever term you use, it's the foredestiny of God.' "
Islam Ontario: Toronto 2011 Sawyer, Robert J. The Terminal Experiment. New York: HarperCollins (1995); pg. 166. "Peter looked up. 'You surprise me. I mean, well, you're a Muslim--I assumed that meant you were a creationist.'

'Please,' said Sarkar. 'I am not fool enough to ignore the fossil record... What 'created in His image' means to me is simply that He provided the selection criteria--the target vision--and the form we evolved to take was one that was pleasing to Him.' "

Islam Ontario: Toronto 2011 Sawyer, Robert J. The Terminal Experiment. New York: HarperCollins (1995); pg. 248. [Upon learning that his computer simulations might be responsible for the murder of his wife's coworker Hans, Peter Hobson, the protagonist, tells his wife he must see his friend Sarkar, his Muslim friend and colleague. She mistakenly thinks that Peter is suggesting Sarkar might be the murderer, and Peter responds with a joke which refers to the Ayatollah Khomeini's death edict against Salmon Rushdie.]

"'No, something's wrong. Tell me.'

Peter was already on his feet. 'Later. I've got to go talk to Sarkar.'

'Sarkar? You don't think he's responsible?'

'Christ, no. It's not like Hans wrote The Satanic Verses.' "

Islam Ontario: Toronto 2011 Sawyer, Robert J. The Terminal Experiment. New York: HarperCollins (1995); pg. 266. "'I face Mecca five times a day and pray. Perhaps we would have better luck if both of you really did pray, too.' "
Islam Ontario: Toronto 2011 Sawyer, Robert J. The Terminal Experiment. New York: HarperCollins (1995); pg. 42-43. "Peter had known Sarkar Muhammed since they'd both been teenagers... Sarkar was devoutly Muslim. Peter wasn't devoutly anything. But they'd hit it off shortly after Sarkar's family moved into the neighborhood... Also, of course, Peter didn't drink, and that made Sarkar happy. Although Sarkar would eat in licensed restaurants, he avoided whenever possible sitting at a table with someone who was imbibing alcohol... dinner was always at Sonny Gotlieb's a deli... Peter couldn't stand Pakistani cuisine... and Sarkar had to eat where he could get food that adhered to Islamic dietary laws--something which most kosher fare managed to do admirably... What would Sarkar think of if he knew? What would he think of Cathy? He thought at first that he wasn't telling Sarkar because of his religion; Sarkar's family was prominent in the Toronto Muslim community and Peter new that they still practiced arranged marriages. But that wasn't it. "
Islam Ontario: Toronto 2011 Sawyer, Robert J. The Terminal Experiment. New York: HarperCollins (1995); pg. 68-69. "Sarkar... 'My religion teaches that we do continue on after this existence, but the near-death experience has nothing to do with real life after death. If you want to know what that's like, I'll give you a copy of the Koran.' " [Sarkar is one of the main characters in the book, the best friend of the protagonist. Not all references to this character are in DB, although all references to Islam by name are thought to be.]
Islam Ontario: Toronto 2125 Anderson, Poul. Harvest of Stars. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 16. "She noticed exceptions... Several bearded men in headcloths accompanied women in veils and muffling ankle-length gowns. "
Islam Pakistan 1994 Ing, Dean. Systemic Shock. New York: Tor (original 1981; 1st Tor edition 1992); pg. 34-35. "Moslem Pakistan had several times struggle to produce a democracy... Thanks to her draconian rule she lost he eastern half to India in 1971, and when India annexed Bangladesh she welcomed more Moslems into parliament. Still devoutly Moslem, stil incapable of sustaining a democracy, still wrangling with India and fumbling with nuclear energy, Pakistan existed largely with western aid until 1994, when she lost the River War. "
Islam Pakistan 1996 Ing, Dean. Systemic Shock. New York: Tor (original 1981; 1st Tor edition 1992); pg. 35. "India overflew Sukkur and Karachi in two waves... Pakistan surrendered, obtained recognition as the State of Sulaiman, and was instantly absorbed by Inda as Moslems everywhere gave thanks. It was thought possible that India had deliberately provoked the River War. Perhaps 'possible' was too weak a word.

Now, in 1996, the fifty million Moslems of Sulaiman formed a gentle buffer as India's border with the AIR [Associated Islamic Republics] crescent... "

Islam Pakistan 2000 Knight, Damon. Rule Golden in Three Novels. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (c. 1954); pg. 59. "Late the same day, a clash between Sikh and Moslem guards on the India-Pakistan border near Sialkot resulted in the annihilation of both parties. "
Islam Pakistan 2000 Knight, Damon. The Observers. New York: Tor (1988); pg. 31. "Or take the next headline, which was about the war between India and Pakistan. In Pakistan they were Moslems, and in India they were mostly Hindus, and the Hindus and the Moslems had loathed each other for centuries. So every now and then the Hindus would try to blow the Moslems away, and to the extent that they succeeded, it would make the Moslems mad, and the next time they would try to blow the Hindus away. That had been going on for generation, and it was no secret; the Hindus knew what would happen if they killed Moslems and the Moslems knew what would happen if they killed Hindus. So they knew it was dumb, but they did it anyway. Nobody said, 'If we kill them they are just going to kill us, and we wind up worse off than before.' What they said was, probably, 'Are we dogs or men? Let us go and avenge the deaths or our relatives...' "
Islam Pakistan 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 169. "'Where will India make its move?' asked Peter. 'The obvious thing would be war with Pakistan.'

'Again?' said Bean. 'Pakistan would be in indigestible lump. It would block India from further expansion, just trying to get the Muslims under control. A terrorist war that would make the old struggle with the Sikhs look like a child's birthday party.'

...'What if India offers Pakistan a free hand against Iran? It can go for the oil. India is free to move east. To scoop up the countries that have long been under her cultural influence. Burma. Thailand. Not Muslim countries, so Pakistan's conscience is clear.' "

Islam Pakistan 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 202. "During the flight Achilles showed her [Petra] the letter he had sent to Ghaffar Wahabi, the 'prime minister' of Pakistan--actually, of course, the military dictator, if you preferred it that way... " [Chapter 12 takes place in Islamabad, the capital of Pakistan, and features a meeting between Achilles and the leader of Pakistan in which he negotiates a nonaggression pact between the two countries. Achilles draws heavily on Pakistan's Muslim interests, and there are many refs. here to Islam, most not in DB.]
Islam Pakistan 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 205. "'The spirit of God is more at home in India and Pakistan than any other place. It is no accident that great religions have been born here, or have found their purest form...' "


Islam, continued

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