Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to homosexual, New Jersey

homosexual, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
homosexual New Jersey 2012 Morrow, James. Only Begotten Daughter. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1990); pg. 268. "Computerized racks elongated the homosexuals' bodies. fusion reactors heated the tongs that seared the Uncertaintists until they renounced their ignorance... "
homosexual New Mexico 2008 England, Terry. Rewind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 31. "'Perhaps they don't consider race,' Tom said. 'I can imagine them not even dividing us into separate racial groups. To them, we're all alike, the way the six on the ship looked alike to us. The makeup of the group is balanced in the only aspect they saw as important: gender. Although'-- he rubbed his forehead--'the might not have realized another division, that of homosexuality. I speak from personal experience. I am gay.' He looked around. 'Anyone else?'

No one spoke.

'Another minority represented,' Pete said.

'If you remove the gay from the mix, you have an even balance in gender,' Eddie said. [Six men, six women.]

'I hadn't thought of that,' Tom said. 'I wonder if it's possible.'

'How could they know?' Cheryl said. "

homosexual New Mexico 2008 England, Terry. Rewind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 60. [News report.] "'Our source tells us that the one who calls himself Eddie Thompson also calls himself the 'token black,'... We have also learned that one of the so-called children is gay, but we haven't been able to identify him...' "
homosexual New World 2276 Gloss, Molly. The Dazzle of Day. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 112. "And though he and Luza had never had a sexual union--Luza was sapphic, her lovers all had been women--people knew that Humberto had loved her for a while, and tried to interest her in loving him... "
homosexual New York 2001 Moffett, Judith. Time, Like an Ever-Rolling Stream. New York: St. Martin's Press (1992); pg. xxx. "I brooded quite a while over the 'Twenty-Five Years Ago in America' photo, an appalling shot of Central Park right after an 'AIDS Ain't Licked Yet' rally. The Lowenfels vaccine had been discovered earlier that year, 2001, and the gay community--a lot of whose members were already HIV positive--was scared it was just going to be abandoned, so they held a lot of big demonstrations like this one: speeches, posters, slogans. An trash--unbelievable heaps and pools of trash. Abandoned placards all over the ground, newspaper blowing, the grass covered with small 'throw-away' items, many of them obviously made of plastic--cups, spoons, big bags, little bags, clear bags, colored bags, wrappers, all sorts of nameless plastic. stuff. How could they do that? Gather to support a cause so worthy and then behave like pigs and wastrels, like criminals, right there on the holiest ground in all of Manhattan? "
homosexual New York 2020 Vonnegut Jr., Kurt. Player Piano. New York: Delacorte Press (1952); pg. 74. "He used words to describe his feelings that Paul could never bring himself to use when speaking of a friend: love, affection, and other words generally consigned to young and inexperienced lovers. It wasn't homosexual; it was an archaic expression of friendship by an undisciplined man in an age when most men seemed in mortal fear of being mistaken for pansies for even a split second. "
homosexual New York: New York City 1975 Russ, Joanna. The Female Man. New York: G. K. Hall (1977; 1975); pg. 141. Pg. 141: "feminine lack of objectivity . . . this pretense at a novel . . . trying to shock . . . the tired tricks of the anti-novelists . . . how often must a poor critic have to . . . the usual boring obligatory references to Lesbianism . . . denial of the profound sexual polarity which . . . an all too womanly refusal to face facts . . . pseudo-masculine brusqueness... "; Pg. 187: "Maddened Lesbians did not put cigarette butts out on her breasts, propaganda to the contrary ";

Pg. 209: "Now they'll tell me it's because I'm a Lesbian, I mean that's why I'm dissatisfied with things. That's not true. It's not because I'm a Lesbian. It's because I'm a tall, blonde, blue-eyed Lesbian.

Does it count if it's your best friend? Does it count if it's your mind you love through her body? Does it count if you love men's bodies but hate men's minds? Does it count if you still love yourself? "

homosexual New York: New York City 1976 Silverberg, Robert. Dying Inside. New York: Ballantine (1976; c. 1972); pg. 44. "But Martha tearfully fights back, quoting Hittner's letter, reading key passages out of her extensive library on child psychology, offering damning statistics on the incidence of neurosis, maladjustment, bed-wetting, and homosexuality among only children. "
homosexual New York: New York City 1976 Silverberg, Robert. Dying Inside. New York: Ballantine (1976; c. 1972); pg. 132. "I phoned. It rang and rang. At last Bob Larkin picked up. Gay, all right, a sweet tenor voice complete with lisp, not very different from the voice of Teddy-at-work. Who teaches them to speak with the homo accent? "
homosexual New York: New York City 1976 Silverberg, Robert. Dying Inside. New York: Ballantine (1976; c. 1972); pg. 228. "Cushing finds him physical as well as morally repugnant, seeing him as unwashed and unclean, possibly syphilitic. Cushing suspects him of being homosexual. Cushing has for him the scorn of the Rotarian for the junkie. "
homosexual New York: New York City 1984 Delany, Samuel R. "The Tale of Plagues and Carnivals " in Flight from Neveryon. Hanover, NH: Wesleyan University Press (1994; c. 1984); pg. 185. "A handsome boy, the Master mused... Someone had told someone who'd mentioned it to someone else who'd whispered it to the Master. Toplin had been selling himself to men in the city! The Master was not an unworldly man. He was aware of the sexual play that went with adolescence... But this was not a rumor the school could tolerate.

He'd called Toplin in.

On presentation of the accusation -- delicately enough, the Master felt -- the youngster had been embarrassed, seemed confused, and denied such a thing had occurred; yet his distress spoke not only of embarrassment but of guilt. Thus it had gone till the Master said: 'If you need money, you must talk to your mother... But we cannot have our students running about the Bridge of Lost Desire like a bunch of barbarian ragamuffins, doing things even a barbarian would hesitate over!' "

homosexual New York: New York City 1984 Delany, Samuel R. "The Tale of Plagues and Carnivals " in Flight from Neveryon. Hanover, NH: Wesleyan University Press (1994; c. 1984); pg. 186. "Without a virus, in a sense AIDS is not a disease. It's a mysterious and so far (23 February 1984) microbically unagented failure to fight disease. It is connected with sex -- 'perverted' sex. "
homosexual New York: New York City 1984 Delany, Samuel R. "The Tale of Plagues and Carnivals " in Flight from Neveryon. Hanover, NH: Wesleyan University Press (1994; c. 1984); pg. 187. "AIDS is like unto a Scourge of Satan, the Wrath of Khan, and the most awfullest thing that can happen not only to the sniveling faggot... who, doubtless, deserves it, but to the whole lax, doomed, and immoral nation, which, evil as it is, doesn't deserve a fatal disease just yet! " [Other refs., not in DB. Homosexuality and AIDS are the primary themes of this story.]
homosexual New York: New York City 1984 Delany, Samuel R. "The Tale of Plagues and Carnivals " in Flight from Neveryon. Hanover, NH: Wesleyan University Press (1994; c. 1984); pg. 214. "'It's interesting about its social patterns,' Peter mused. 'There I am, working at the Gay Men's Heath Crisis three days a week, interviewing people with AIDS every day, and yet I don't know anyone in my personal circle who's come down with it. On the other hand, I know of people who have eight, nine, ten friends who have it... The thing you have to remember with AIDS is that all these statistics about the average number of sexual contacts a year for the average person with AIDS -- sixty a year, three hundred a year -- are very skewed. And the range those averages are drawn from is immense. There're guys with it who claim only one or two contacts for a lifetime... And there're some who claim truly astronomical numbers of contacts, three or four thousand per year. And with a subject as touchy as this, both could be exaggerating in either direction for any number of reasons' " [More.]
homosexual New York: New York City 1984 Delany, Samuel R. "The Tale of Plagues and Carnivals " in Flight from Neveryon. Hanover, NH: Wesleyan University Press (1994; c. 1984); pg. 215. "'Peter... you know what three hundred contacts a year can mean.' I said: 'You go out to the right movie theater with some action in the back balcony for an hour and a half on Tuesday night, and on your way home from work Friday you stop into the right public john for twenty minutes. You can easily have three contacts involving semen in each. With only two hours a week devoted to it, that's six contacts a week; and that's three hundred and twelve for the year. You know as well as I do, you can keep up an eight-hour-a-day job, an active social life, have your three hundred contacts, and not even be late for dinner. Thousands of men in this city live that way.' (I pondered the dozen-plus years I did it myself, with a wife who was agreeable to it, which is how I managed to combine married life and a child with an active gay life that continues more than a half dozen years after our divorce.) "
homosexual New York: New York City 1984 Delany, Samuel R. "The Tale of Plagues and Carnivals " in Flight from Neveryon. Hanover, NH: Wesleyan University Press (1994; c. 1984); pg. 215. "'And that's without ever going to the baths or a bar with a back room -- where you can up that by a factor of two, three, or more without really trying. The fact is, the straight people who're dealing with AIDS --say the ones in the media -- simply have no notion of the amount of sexual activity that's available to a gay male in this city!' I said: 'Most straights, Peter, don't realize, when they're putting together these statistics, that a moderately good looking gay man in his twenties or thirties can have too [sic] or three contacts while he's in the subway on his way to the doctor's to see if he has AIDS . . .' "
homosexual New York: New York City 1984 Delany, Samuel R. "The Tale of Plagues and Carnivals " in Flight from Neveryon. Hanover, NH: Wesleyan University Press (1994; c. 1984); pg. 215. "Peter said: 'We also know that there're many, many gay people -- probably many more thousands -- who can count the number of sexual contacts they have a year on one or two hands... Still, the people with AIDS I've been working with... have really been living life in the fast lane. But we still don't have any reliable statistical prototype for sexual behavior. In my own experience, I see a leaning toward IV-needles and passive anal. But that's what they're calling anecdotal evidence, these days. And everyone's got some, and it's all different.' "
homosexual New York: New York City 1984 Delany, Samuel R. "The Tale of Plagues and Carnivals " in Flight from Neveryon. Hanover, NH: Wesleyan University Press (1994; c. 1984); pg. 237. "I reassured her I'd put some sharp curtailments on sex outside my main relationship. (When sex is as available as it is in New York, monogamous gay relationships tend to be the exception.) "
homosexual New York: New York City 1984 Delany, Samuel R. "The Tale of Plagues and Carnivals " in Flight from Neveryon. Hanover, NH: Wesleyan University Press (1994; c. 1984); pg. 239. "...with invasions of Hell's Angels and admiring cross-dresses from several states -- Divine's and Holly Woodlawn's visits were the talk of the month -- and student leaders of Gay Liberation university groups from Jersey trooping through all day. "
homosexual New York: New York City 1984 Delany, Samuel R. "The Tale of Plagues and Carnivals " in Flight from Neveryon. Hanover, NH: Wesleyan University Press (1994; c. 1984); pg. 241. "Two years ago, the death from AIDS of the man whose hand I shook once on a San Francisco street -- George Harris, Jr/Hibiscus -- was reported in the Village Voice. Indeed, till that particular article, all I'd read of was KS, the 'gay cancer,' and it was only with the report of Harris's death that I saw for the first time mention of the more general problem of opportunistic infections... "
homosexual New York: New York City 1986 Harper, Leanne C. "Breakdown " in Wild Cards V: Down and Dirty (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 58. "'I don't know what to say. . .' Cordelia blushed. 'I mean, it's like I don' know him anymore. You don' understand. I was raised in the [Catholic] Church. I was taught that bein' a homo--what Jack is, is one of the worst sins.'

'It's not catching and he's your uncle...' " [Other refs., not in DB, including references to AIDS.]

homosexual New York: New York City 1986 Hubbard, L. Ron. Mission Earth Vol. 2: Black Genesis. Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (1986); pg. 316. "It looked very like one Humphrey Bogart used to wear. But the rest of it . . . Then I realized the true source of my antipathy. It wasn't the styles, it was the tailor. He was a homo. If there is anything I can't stand, it's a gay! "
homosexual New York: New York City 1986 Hubbard, L. Ron. Mission Earth Vol. 6: Death Quest. Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (1986); pg. 30. Pg. 30: "'My dear fellow,' said a lesbian husband, leaning close to me and forgetting all about a bass voice... 'Oh, pish, pish,' said a lesbian wife. 'Anyone can simulate, Pinchy, and you know it. The only innovation here is that this Inkswitch is wearing a falsie.' And she yanked at the sheet.

'Movie blood,' said a lesbian husband. 'But a delightful fake all the same.'

...She was working on the lesbian husband with the bluish hair. ";

Pg. 31: "A lesbian husband who was still wearing a top hat and leaning on a cane drawled, 'Oh, I do say, Pinchy, that it was a great show. But obviously Spike and Lover-girl were just part of the act as well. We all know that natural sex is no good.'

...'Evidence,' said the lesbian husband in the top hat...

'Good show, Pinchy. Stirred one up. So if you don't mind, we'll go home and do it in the good old recommended way and keep up the great lesbian tradition.' " [Other refs., not in DB, e.g. pg. 31-36, 58-58, 110, 239-240, etc.]

homosexual New York: New York City 1986 Pollack, Rachel. "Angel Baby " in Future on Fire (Orson Scott Card, ed.) New York: Tor (1991; story copyright 1982); pg. 151. "I don't know who grabbed who first, but somehow we were holding each other and kissing, and couldn't stop... Her name was Jo, short for Josephine I thought... and we sort of moved in together, even though we both kept our own places. You'd think I would have worried about us being, you know, both girls, but that never bothered either of us... " [Other refs., not in DB. See also pg. 151-153.]
homosexual New York: New York City 1986 Pollack, Rachel. "Angel Baby " in Future on Fire (Orson Scott Card, ed.) New York: Tor (1991; story copyright 1982); pg. 154. "I didn't really live with anybody, though I sort of went steady a few times, once with another girl, a typist from work named Karen. Karen worried a lot about people at work or her family finding out about us. Once we went away to a hotel for the weekend and she brought along her cousin who lived with a guy, so we could make it look like two normal couples, even registering that way, then sneaking into the right rooms when no one was looking. I didn't really mind, though it bothered me that I had to watch the way I looked at her in restaurants or places like that... One guy even wanted to marry me. His name was Allen and I met him... "
homosexual New York: New York City 1986 Vonnegut, Kurt. Galapagos. New York: Delacorte Press (1985); pg. 163. "This was Prince Richard of Croatia-Slavonia, a direct descendant of James the First of England and Emperor Frederick the Third of Germany and Emperor Franze Joseph of Austria and King Louis the Fifteenth of France. He ran an antique shop on upper Madison Avenue, and he wasn't homosexual. "
homosexual New York: New York City 1987 Bryant, Edward. "The Second Coming of Buddy Holly " in Wild Cards V: Down and Dirty (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 196. "...when the black cat had saved him from having to tangle with the psychopathic gay-basher. " [Other refs., not in DB.]
homosexual New York: New York City 1987 Cadigan, Pat. "Addicted to Love " in Wild Cards V: Down and Dirty (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 323. Pg. 323: "No one was supposed to know they were lovers, but she wasn't sure why they were so fanatical about keeping it secret. Something to do with AIDS perhaps, she thought. The perception of all gays as AIDS carries had brought renewed persecution to homosexuals. She could almost be glad that Sal hadn't lived to see that. "; Pg. 365: "She'd loved him, too, and it had been so unfair that he'd had to die of AIDS. . . . " [May be other refs., not in DB.]
homosexual New York: New York City 1987 Hubbard, L. Ron. Mission Earth Vol. 8: Disaster. Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (1987); pg. 9. "Pinch, Miss--Lesbian-sadist ex-Rockecenter employee who blackmailed Bris with a bigamous marriage and with trick photos of Gris with Teenie. "
homosexual New York: New York City 1991 Shiner, Lewis. "Riders " in Wild Cards IX: Jokertown Shuffle (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1991); pg. 258. "'...I was jealous. Of you and Hannah. We used to be . . .' She didn't seem able to finish.

'You were lovers.'

'Years ago. But she got tired of me.'

Veronica kissed the top of her head. Nancy looked up at her, helpless and vulnerable. Veronica unhooked Nancy's glasses and put them on the table, then kissed her on the mouth.

They made love awkwardly, with vague passion and no conviction. Veronica was ashamed of her body. With nothing to do all day, her addict's metabolism had developed a craving for sugar that she couldn't control. It took all her strength to stay on methadone and off heroin. There was no strength left to diet. In a month and a half she'd already gained fifteen pounds and was still gaining.

Nancy's body was covered with fine dark hairs, and her skin seemed unhealthily pale... Veronica would find herself remembering Hannah, then have to force herself to go on. " [More.]

homosexual New York: New York City 1991 Simons, Walton. "Nobody Does It Alone " in Wild Cards IX: Jokertown Shuffle (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1991); pg. 290. "You could have gone to bed with her, he thought, remembering Veronica's current sexual preference and the way she'd looked at Beth. "
homosexual New York: New York City 1995 Aldiss, Brian. "Becoming the Full Butterfly " in Supertoys Last All Summer Long. New York: St. Martin's Griffin (2001; c. 1995); pg. 201. "'You want to promote an event where two crazy people sleep together?' The question was asked incredulously in a publicity office in New York...

'Are we talking hetero, gay, lesbian or what here?'

'Have they figgered out a new way of doing it? A short cut or something?'

'Forget it, you can see people screwing back home every night, in the safety of your own apartment.'

'They don't only screw, these two. They plan to have a very basic dream.'

'Dream, did you say? You want us to rent Monument Valley for some [expletive] queers to have a dream? Get the [expletive] out of here!' "

homosexual New York: New York City 1995 Hand, Elizabeth. Waking the Moon. New York: HarperPrism (1995); pg. 332. Pg. 322: "Because if Angelica di Rienzi didn't have something to do with Baby Joe's death, then she, Anne Marie Jeanne Harmon was a Carmelite nun. And Carmelites don't hang out on the Manhattan riverfront, waiting to meet transsexual prostitutes early on a torrid July evening. "; Pg. 344: "'I'm underwhelmed,' she said, and grabbed me in a hug. 'Remember me? The girl least likely to succeed in a long-term heterosexual relationship?' "
homosexual New York: New York City 1999 Hand, Elizabeth. Glimmering. New York: HarperCollins (1997); pg. 13. "...Thomas Cole--the year his dear friend and former lover Eric died. Nineteen ninety-seven was the year his grandmother fell and broke her lip. It was the year Jack developed full-blown AIDS; the year the glimmering began. " [Other refs. to AIDS and gay characters throughout novel.]
homosexual New York: New York City 2000 Renado, Trevor. "Get a Lifestyle " in Circa 2000: Gay Fiction at the Millennium (Robert Drake & Terry Wolverton, eds). Los Angeles, CA: Alyson Pub. (2000); pg. 321. [Main characters are homosexual. Refs. throughout story, pg. 321-331.]
homosexual New York: New York City 2000 Silverberg, Robert. The Stochastic Man. New York: Harper & Row (1975); pg. 13. "--gently deflected the playful advances of City Councilman Ronald Holbrecht, the self-styled Voice of the gay Community and the first man outside California to win an election with Homophile Party endorsement... "
homosexual New York: New York City 2000 Silverberg, Robert. The Stochastic Man. New York: Harper & Row (1975); pg. 57. "...told his or her favorite scabrous Republican / gay / black / Puerto / Jew / Irish / Italian / doctor / lawyer / rabbi / priest / female politician / Mafioso... "
homosexual New York: New York City 2002 Millar, Mark. Ultimates Vol. 1: Super-Human. New York: Marvel Comics Group (2002) [Graphic novel reprint of The Ultimates #1-6]; pg. Chap. 6, pg. 10. Jarvis: "Just a shame you couldn't bear to part with your late mother's old evening wear when you were taking part in this execrable, new-age nonsense, eh, Master Tony? "; Tony Stark/Iron Man: "Oh, God. Here we go again. I thought this was your night off, anyway, Jarvis. Aren't you supposed to be going to the club tonight with Alfred and all those other old degenerates? "; Jarvis: "Oh, but I cancelled the moment I heard who were entertaining, Master Tony. Even the club can't compete with a Super-Soldier and an Asgardian God. "; Tony Stark: "You're wasting your time, you know, Jarvis. Do you seriously think Captain America and Thor have even noticed that preposterous new waistcoast of yours? "; Jarvis: "Give it time, young sir. Give it time. I'm feeling jolly lucky this evening, you know. " [Tony Stark's openly gay butler Jarvis appears here, and with fewer lines on pages on other pages in this graphic novel.]
homosexual New York: New York City 2015 Pohl, Frederik. The Years of the City. New York: Timescape (1984); pg. 13. " White Way is Gayer than ever, with its parade of militants in lavender shirts. "
homosexual New York: New York City 2015 Pohl, Frederik. The Years of the City. New York: Timescape (1984); pg. 47. "...Terrorist Hijacks LaGuardia Shuttle, Mystery Sniper Shocks Midtown, Gay Love Nest Murderer Confesses... "
homosexual New York: New York City 2015 Pohl, Frederik. The Years of the City. New York: Timescape (1984); pg. 68. "He was ushered to a seat by a woman wearing a right-to-life button, given a cup of instant coffee by a man from Gay Lib and a newspaper to look at by a woman from the Haitian-American Friendship Society. "
homosexual New York: New York City 2015 Westerfeld, Scott. Polymorph. New York: Penguin (1997); pg. 58. Pg. 14: "The neck was thin and elegant. It was modeled on a young Polynesian transvestite who worked an after-hours club downtown. The boy was a hustler who had come home with her (or rather, him) in an ecstasy daze one night, no charge. "; Pg. 58: "It was their first time in New York, and they were eager to compare it to their native city. They talked about the gay scene in New Orleans, the secrecy of their clubs and the danger of being bashed. The tall woman made a comment about the political maturity of the New York lesbian scene, and Bonita laughed out loud. Lee leaned against her and signaled for two beers. Kathy talked about a trip she'd taken to New Orleans in the nineties, and though Kathy rarely exaggerated her tales of sexual conquest, the New Orleanois' eyes widened. " [More about this, pg. 59-64.]
homosexual New York: New York City 2076 Morehouse, Lyda. Archangel Protocol. New York: Penguin Putnam (2001); pg. 94. "'He has more dotted lines to antigovernment groups than . . . I don't know what. Angelucci has his fingers in all the radical groups: Hasidim, Muslims . . . possibly other heathens as well. Not to mention the liberal fringe like ACLU, human rights campaigners--which we know is a front for queers--and God knows what else. He and his pals, like Jibril Freshta, have been stirring the pot of dissension for the last year...' "
homosexual New York: New York City 2076 Morehouse, Lyda. Archangel Protocol. New York: Penguin Putnam (2001); pg. 163. "'What about the Gay Liberation Ecumenical folks?'

'Most of their energy is concentrated on repelling the gender-bending fashion restrictions. Even the extremists in Vulva Riot and Act Up's LINK protest have been confined to newsgroups--very much within the letter of the law. The most they do is run under handles to protect their identities. The ones with resources to pull off a siphon are under too much scrutiny.' Ahead of me, I saw Rebeckah's proud shoulders droop just a fraction. 'I wouldn't rule them out, but it's unlikely.' "

homosexual New York: New York City 2076 Morehouse, Lyda. Archangel Protocol. New York: Penguin Putnam (2001); pg. 174. "'There's more than the secular analogy going on--it's the queer thing,' an anonymous representative from the illegal organization ACT UP told this reporter. 'First of all, no one likes to be reminded of the 'gay plague.' And then, for Grey to say that queers weren't deserving of their fate is like admitting he likes the sin and not the sinners, if you get my meaning.'

The ACT UP spokesperson's comment may have some merit, as a large percentage of people polled since the flame war agree that it was the reference to AIDS that made them the most angry. "

homosexual New York: New York City 2076 Morehouse, Lyda. Archangel Protocol. New York: Penguin Putnam (2001); pg. 253. [1] "'Mahaffry?' I smiled, 'Irish and Jewish?'

He returned my smile with a dimpled one of his own. 'It happens, but I'm not. I've got a different kind of 'family' connection to the [Jewish] Malachim, if you get my meaning.'

I shook my head.

'Girlfriend.' He smiled. 'I'm gay.'

'Oh.' It was rumored that Rebeckah sheltered gays, lesbians, and other sexual deviants unwilling to renounce their lifestyles, but I'd always thought the rumors false, a smear campaign to destroy the Malachim [Hasidic Jewish group] reputation further. "

homosexual New York: New York City 2076 Morehouse, Lyda. Archangel Protocol. New York: Penguin Putnam (2001); pg. 253. [2] "I found myself staring, searching for clues. I'd never met an admittedly gay man before. If Matthew hadn't told me, I doubted I could have guessed. There was nothing about him that seemed feminine in the least. He held himself arrow-straight, none of the 'warning signs' of unmanly posture. His body was slender, but not unmuscular. Matthew wore his uniform well, and I wondered if he did any actual soldiering. Most likely he did, as I doubted Rebeckah would allow anyone to tarnish the Israeli insignia by not doing their part for the Malachim cause. Rebeckah had an interesting sense of irony. "
homosexual New York: New York City 2076 Morehouse, Lyda. Archangel Protocol. New York: Penguin Putnam (2001); pg. 253. [3] Pg. 253-254: "A ban of gays in the military was the first battle cry of the New Right's campaign against the Queer Nation. The New Right claimed that the mass destruction of the war came down to a secular president's leniency toward gays during the 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' years. If we hadn't left the protection of the country in the hands of a bunch of fruitcakes, they claimed, none of this would have happened--'this' meaning the Medusa bomb. And here stood Matthew in the center of the glass city wearing a uniform.

...Michael shrugged. 'Matthew appeals to me. He's very funny and sharp. He was one of the most interesting people I used to hang out with when I was here before.'

'Were you lovers?'

'No,' he said quietly, almost regretfully.

'Are you bisexual?'

Michael grimaced. 'You say that like it's a dirty word.'

'Are you?'

'Gender is a human notion. Flesh is a costume I wear. My insides are male and female--in God's image.' "

homosexual New York: New York City 2076 Morehouse, Lyda. Archangel Protocol. New York: Penguin Putnam (2001); pg. . "'So . . . God is okay with [homosexuality] . . . It's not a sin?... What about, what is it, Deuteronomy? 'Two men shall not lie down together.' '

'There are hundreds of laws in that book. Do you follow them all?'

'No, but Rebeckah's people do.' [Rebeckah's people, the Malachim, are Hasidic Jews.]

'Yes, and Rebeckah has no trouble reconciling it.'

'What are you saying?' I asked, even though I knew Rebeckah was a lesbian. I'd suspected for a long time. She was discreet; I never saw a lover. Since she had never confirmed or denied it, I'd figured it was none of my business. Mostly, I tried not to think about her sexual preference, because politically it was a liability, and a doozie at that.

'You're the detective, Deidre. Have you missed all the clues, or just ignored them?'

'Rebeckah is smarter than to be obvious.'

'So you knew,' Michael said. 'Why do you do it? What's the point of denying the truth about people?'

'To protect myself from entanglements . . . and pain.' "

homosexual New York: New York City 2150 McHugh, Maureen F. China Mountain Zhang. New York: Tor (1992); pg. 15. Pg. 15: "She finally appears in tights and a long red jacket. She has nice taste in clothes but the night already has the same out-of-synch quality as all those times in middle school when I took a girl out. At least now I am not hoping that something will arouse some sort of latent heterosexuality. "; Pg. 52: "Then I find myself going down the stairs and out onto the street with this gay ABC [American-born Chinese] in his mirrors and his sharkskin jacket... We walk west. I'm not sure of his name, sounded like the blond kept calling him Rafe or something... " [The main character and narrator is homosexual. Apparently few references to this, however.]
homosexual New York: Westchester County 1986 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 45: "We Were Only Foolin' ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Nov. 1986); pg. 24. Kitty: "Who was he, then, that we gather to mourn him? Who am I? A four-eyed, flat-chested, brat, chick, brain, hebe, stuck-up Xavier's snob freak! Don't like the words? I could use nicer. I've heard worse. Who here hasn't So often, so casually, that maybe we've forgotten the power they have to hurt. Nigger, spic, wop, slope, faggot, mutie--the list is so long. And so cruel. They're labels. Put-downs. And they hurt. "
homosexual Newmanhome 2200 Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 197. "Of course, their ways of keeping the population down differed from community to community. When Viktor found out about them he was startled, not to say repelled. The Reformers and the Moslems practiced nonprocreative sex--frequently homosex. "
homosexual North America 2874 Forbes, Edith. Exit to Reality. Seattle, WA: Seal Press (1997); pg. 114. "At my level of society, homosexual behavior had effectively been eliminated. The subject was never mentioned, not even in the most private of conversations. It fell in the same category as childbearing. It was simply not part of modern life. To talk about something impossible could only be painful to a person who wanted it and awkward for a person who did not share the want. I had never considered whether I wanted sex with a woman any more than I had considered whether I wanted to bear a child, or wanted to die... possibilities were artifacts from another era, an era before the present civilization had been achieved. "
homosexual North Carolina 1998 Bradley, Marion Zimmer & Holly Lisle. In the Rift. New York: Baen (1998); pg. 151. "'The various cultures of my world have their taboos, too... men don't marry men nor women marry women--'

Rhiana's mind reeled. She interrupted. 'Skin color? Religion? What sort of nonsense is that? And as for the rosalle, if they cannot love each other, who are they permitted to love?'

'Rosalle?'

'The men who love men. The women who love women.'

'Our term is homosexual. I wonder why it didn't translate.'

Rhiana heard the word as tondara, which meant something entirely different than rosalle. She said, 'A tondara is someone with a problem. Someone not normal. Someone with a form of sickness. At least that is what I hear when you said the word. But rosalle is just men who love men, and women who love women, without the taint of sickness. What is your word for that?'

Kate smiled sadly. 'We don't even have a word for that. Every word we have carries some stigma...' " [More.]

homosexual North Carolina 2000 McDowell, Ian. "Sunflowers " in Vanishing Acts (Ellen Datlow, ed.) New York: Tor (2000); pg. 119. Pg. 118: "'Here's the deal. You can't imagine how bad it will get for Michelle at home once Daddy finds out about you and her, and you know how this town is, and that he will find out. Never mind how I feel about it, never mind what other people say. If you, uh, care about her, you don't want her to go through that. You really don't. Do the right thing and break up with her.'

'Jesse rested her chin on her fist and looked him straight in the eye. 'No. I'm not going to do that. And if your daddy touches her, I'll kill him.' ";

Pg. 119: "'...He won't do anything. You don't sic the Klan on family, no matter how pissed off you are at some dyke for seducing your sister. He's bluffing.' " [Some other refs. not in DB.]

homosexual Ohio 1999 Willis, Connie. "Epiphany " in Miracle and Other Christmas Stories. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 266. "'...Look around you. Who do you see prospering? Abortion doctors and homosexuals and godless atheists. But when Christ comes, they will be punished...' "
homosexual Ontario 1992 de Lint, Charles Memory & Dream. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 194. "But it gets harder and harder for me to be in her company and not just blurt out that I love her. That I want to be her lover. I don't think she's exactly homophobic, but I do know that the thought of same-sex sex makes here feel very uncomfortable.

I can remember walking past a cafe on Lee Street with her once and we saw two women necking in a darkened corner on the outside patio.

'God,' Izzy said. 'Why do they have to do that in public?'

'Heterosexuals do it in public.'

'Yeah, but that's normal. I couldn't ever imagine kissing another woman like that.'

I didn't say anything. Truth is, I'm not sure I'm actually a lesbian myself. I'm not attracted to men, but I'm not attracted to women either. It's just Izzy I want. " [May be other refs., not in DB.]

homosexual Ontario 2002 Sawyer, Robert J. Hominids. New York: Tor (2002); pg. 130. "Reuben thought Mary looked inordinately pleased to see the attractive young woman who was accompanying him; maybe the professor was a lesbian. "
homosexual Ontario 2002 Sawyer, Robert J. Hominids. New York: Tor (2002); pg. 318. [1] Pg. 317-318: "'But he is also my partner... We share a home... and meals and a bed and . . .'

Mary was angry with herself for the way her heart fluttered. She knew lots of gay men; she was just used to them coming out of the closet, not popping through a transdimensional portal.

'You're gay!' said Louise. "'How cool is that!'

'Actually, I was happier at home,' said Ponter.

'No, no, no,' said Louise. Not happy. Gay. Homosexual... Having sexual relations with one's own gender: men who have sex with other men, or women who have sex with other women.'

Ponter looked more confused than ever. 'It is impossible to have sex with a member of the same gender. Sex is the act of potential procreation and it requires a male and a female.'

'Well, all right, not sex as in sexual intercourse,' said Louise. 'Sex as in intimate contact, as in--you know--um, affectionate touching of . . . of the genitals.' "

homosexual Ontario 2002 Sawyer, Robert J. Hominids. New York: Tor (2002); pg. 318. [2] "'Oh,' said Ponter. 'Yes, Adikor and I did that.'

'That's what we call being homosexual,' supplied Reuben. 'Having such contact only with members of your own gender.'

'Only?' said Ponter, startled. 'You mean exclusively? No, no, no. Adikor and I keep each other company when Two were separate, but when Two become One, we, of course, had--what did you call it, Lou?--'affectionate touching of the genitals' with our respective females . . . or at least I did until Klast, my woman-mate, died.'

'Ah, said Mary. 'You're bisexual... You have genital contact with men and women.'

'Yes.'

'Is everyone like that in your world?' asked Louise, stabbing some lettuce with he fork. 'Bisexual?'

'Just about.' Ponter blinked, getting it at last. "

homosexual Ontario 2002 Sawyer, Robert J. Hominids. New York: Tor (2002); pg. 318. [3] "'You mean it is different here?'

'Oh, yes,' said Reuben. 'Well, for most people anyway. I mean, sure there are some bisexual people, and lots and lots of gay--homosexual--people. But the vast majority are heterosexual. That means they have affectionate contact only with members of the opposite gender.'

'How boring,' said Ponter.

Louise actually giggled. Then, composing herself, she said, 'So, do you have any children?' "

homosexual Ontario: Ottawa 1987 de Lint, Charles Jack the Giant Killer. New York: Ace Books (1987); pg. 47. "'Do you believe in . . . faeries?' she asked.

'Faeries as in gay, or faeries as in Tinkerbell?'

'As in Tinkerbell...' "

homosexual Ontario: Toronto 1993 Huff, Tanya. Blood Lines. New York: DAW Books (1993); pg. 28. "'Black leather trench coat billowing out behind him, Henry made his way quickly down Church Street... At Church and College, he paused.

'Hey, faggot!'

Henry smiled, turned his head slightly, and tested the breeze. Three of them. Young. Healthy. Perfect.

'What's the matter, faggot, you deaf?'

'Maybe he's got someone's pecker stuffed in his ear.'

Hands in his pockets, he pivoted slowly on one heel... the smile he sent them was deliberately provocative, impossible to ignore.

'F---in' faggot!'

They followed him east, yelling insults, getting braver and coming closer when he didn't respond...

'Faggot's walking like he's still got a prick shoved up his ass.'

...They moved to surround him.

He allowed it.

'So, why aren't you f---ing dead like the rest of the f---ing queers?' Their leader, for all packs have a leader of sorts, reached out to shove a slender shoulder, the first move in the night's entertainment. "

homosexual Oregon 1995 Ryman, Geoff. 253. New York: St. Martin's Press (1998); pg. 243. "...ex-devotee of the Bhagwan Sri Rajneesh... in Oregon... For a woman as highly sexed a Annabelle, it was paradise, for there were handsome men, beautiful women, and they all made love rather as cats must, in complete security. "
homosexual Oregon 2001 Callenbach, Ernest. Ecotopia. New York: Tor (1977; c. 1975); pg. 83. "Americans are familiar with rumors of sexual depravity in Ecotopia, but I must report that the sexual practices of these families seem about as stable as ours. Generally there are more or less permanent heterosexual couples involved--though both male and female homosexual couples also exist, and I gather that same-sex relationships pose less of a problem psychologically than they do with us. Monogamy is not an officially proclaimed value, but the couples are generally monogamous (except for four holidays each year, at the solstices and equinoxes, when sexual promiscuity is widespread. "


homosexual, continued

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