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34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Hinduism, Italy: Sicily

Hinduism, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Hinduism Japan 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 143. "Aum's theology was a syncretistic mishmash of Hinduism, Tibetan Buddhism, and its own special variety of Christian millennialism, in which Aum and Asahara would reign supreme after the Day of Judgment. "
Hinduism Kansas 1989 Denton, Bradley. Buddy Holly Is Alive and Well on Ganymede. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1991); pg. 96. "Tornadoes occur in any number of sizes... Most people who have never seen one assume that they all look like the one in The Wizard of Oz... The tornado in The Wizard of Oz is a mewling infant. "
Hinduism Kondra 2050 Charnas, Suzy McKee. "Listening to Brahms " in Vanishing Acts (Ellen Datlow, ed.) New York: Tor (2000); pg. 31. Pg. 31: "Some snake who calls himself Swami Nanda has worked out how the demographic growth is only a sign of the underlying situation. According to him Kondra makes an 'astral agreement' to take in not only us living human survivors but the souls of all the dead of Earth... I have sent this 'Swami' four furious letters... ";

Pg. 32: "'Your entire population died out; many of them burnt up in an instant. This created much karma, and those who are responsible must be allowed to pay.'

'You're a Nandist, then,' I said. 'Swami Nanda and his reincarnation crap.' " [Other refs. to the Swami and his quasi-Indian concepts, not in DB.]

Hinduism Louisiana: New Orleans 1990 Rice, Anne. The Witching Hour. New York: Ballantine (1993; c. 1990); pg. 697. "'...I went to the shrine of Our Lady of Perpetual Help and I knelt and prayed, and the strangest truth came through to me. Didn't matter if God in his heaven was a Catholic or Protestant God, or the God of the Hindus. What mattered was something deeper and older and more powerful than any such image--it was a concept of goodness based upon the affirmation of life...' "
Hinduism Luna 2020 Dick, Philip K. Clans of the Alphane Moon. Boston, MA: G.K. Hall (1979; c. 1964); pg. 73. "'According to my theory the several sub-types of mental illness should be functioning on this world as classes somewhat like those of ancient India. These people here, the hebephrenics, would be equivalent to the untouchables. The manics would be the warrior class, without fear; one of the highest.' " [More.]
Hinduism Luna 2075 Heinlein, Robert A. The Moon is a Harsh Mistress. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons (1966); pg. 45. "'...I was clerking in a Hindu shop, eating money, no more, when I saw this ad in the Hong Kong Gong...' "
Hinduism Luna 2075 Heinlein, Robert A. The Moon is a Harsh Mistress. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons (1966); pg. 85. "Could dump two Chinee down in one of our maria and they would get rich selling rocks to each other while raising twelve kids. Then a Hindu woul sell retail stuff he got from them wholesale--below cast at fat profit. We got along. "
Hinduism Luna 2076 Heinlein, Robert A. The Moon is a Harsh Mistress. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons (1966); pg. 243. "A Hindu journalist looked thoughtful, started to write. "
Hinduism Malaysia 2025 Cool, Tom. Infectress. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 159. "He saw bare-faced Hindu women in dresses more iridescent than parakeet plumage. "
Hinduism Mars 2048 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Red Mars. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 357. "But Frank would deal with them when the time came, they were a bunch of Chamber of Commerce kids these days, arrogant but stupid. Tell them it was this or a Third World Mars, a Chinese Mars, a Hindu-Chinese Mars, with little brown people and cows unmolested in the walktubes. They would come around. In fact they would hide behind his knees yelling for protection, Grandpa Chalmers pleas save me from the yellow horde.

He watched the Indian and Chinese look at each other... "

Hinduism Mars 2109 Barnes, John. Kaleidoscope Century. New York: Tor (1995); pg. 30. "I remember Woody Allen had a movie, a real old one I saw once. A health nut woke up in the future and it turned out all the things like hot fudge, steak, and cigars were what was really good for you.

No hot fudge or steak among the stacked meals in the fridge. No beef at all, in fact. Are cows extinct or am I Hindu? "

Hinduism Mars 2130 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Blue Mars. New York: Bantam Books (1996); pg. 284. "...emigrants all day every day, a stream of Sikhs and Kashmiris and Muslims and also Hindus, ascending into space and moving to Mars. "
Hinduism Mars 2180 Bear, Greg. Moving Mars. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 254. "Religion raised its head, as Christians and Moslems and Hindu factions--long a polite undercurrent in Martian life... saw historic opportunity, and made a rush to the political high ground... The syndic of Cailetet Mars died in 2180... "
Hinduism Mars 2181 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Blue Mars. New York: Bantam Books (1996); pg. 405. "Jackie's contact was a translator programmer, a woman who understood Mandarin, Urdu, Dravidian and Vietnamese, as well as her Hindu and English... '...And after having one child, people expect to be sterilized for good. Even the Hindu fundamentalists have changed on this, the social pressure on them was so great...' "
Hinduism Monaco 2036 Besher, Alexander. Mir: A Novel of Virtual Reality. New York: Simon & Schuster (1998); pg. 63. "On this trip, he had been dosing himself with liquid drops of Futureplex adrenal pep (antitox biotherapy) and Chinese Energetics Planetary Formulas Yang capsules to boost his male energy (two tablets two or three times daily, taken with warm water). His friend Mishra in Bombay had sent him a bottle of pure and unrefined Ganges water for its spiritual benefits, but it was confiscated by customs in San Francisco. "
Hinduism Montana 1972 McCullough, Ken. "Chuck Berry, Won't You Please Come Home " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 463. [Author's self-written biography, in the introduction to his story.] "Am presently sojourning in Bozeman, Montana with Lady K. and son Galway Django Ari Kamal Krishna--where I am poet-in-residence at Montana State University, hating (nearly) every minute of it... "
Hinduism Nepal 2021 Goonan, Kathleen Ann. Crescent City Rhapsody. New York: Tor (2001; c. 2000); pg. 157. "...though Tamchu would not have known if it was a recent fantasy construction like many of the Western cities he'd heard about. They were starting some of that in Kathmandu. Disney had torn down an ancient Hindu temple, first removing all of the sacred monkeys who littered the place with their feces. Now strange monkeylike creatures roamed the temple, and no one knew if they were robots or artificially created organic creatures with only a few rote responses programmed into them. "
Hinduism New Jersey 3417 Farmer, Philip Jose. Dayworld Rebel. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons (1987); pg. 30. "...a large crucifix dangled from the string of beads attached to it. He wore necklases from which were suspended a seal of Solomon, a crescent, a tiny African idol, a fou-leaved clover, a four-armed, fierce-faced figurine, and a symbolic eye on top of a pyramid. Jewish, Muslim, Voodoo, Irish, Hindu and Freemasonic. "
Hinduism New York 1966 Keyes, Daniel. Flowers for Algernon. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1966); pg. 88, 132. Pg. 88: "My most absorbing interests at the present time are etymologies of ancient languages, the newer works on the calculus of variations, and Hindu history. It's amazing the way things, apparently disconnected, hang together. "; Pg. 132: "'It hasn't ben translated yet. I read it in the Hindu Journal of Psychopathology just a few days ago. "
Hinduism New York 1999 Bear, Greg. Darwin's Radio. New York: Del Rey (1999); pg. 58. "'...The CDC just broke the news this morning. They have confirmed the existence of the first viable human endogenous retrovirus. They're shown that it can be transmitted laterally between individuals. They call it Scattered Human Endogenous RetroVirus Activation, SHERVA. They dropped the R in retro for dramatic effect. That makes it SHEVA. Good name for a virus, don't you think?' " [This acronym is derived from the name of the Hindu god. Many refs. to SHEVA throughout novel, not in DB.]
Hinduism New York 2075 Kress, Nancy. Beggars in Spain. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1993); pg. 297. "Religious holidays in Sanctuary varied from family to family; some kept Christmas, Ramadan, Easter, Yom Kippur, or Divali; many kept nothing at all. "
Hinduism New York: Brooklyn 2100 Arnason, Eleanor. "The Warlord of Saturn's Moon " (published 1974) in The Norton Book of Science Fiction (Ursula K. Le Guin & Brian Atterbery, editors). New York: W. W. Norton & Co. (1993); pg. 307. [Year is estimated.] "As for herself, she had been an ordinary sharpshooter and student of Hindu mysticism, a follower of Swami Bluestone of the Brooklyn Vedic Temple and Rifle Range. "
Hinduism New York: New York City 1966 Shiner, Lewis. "The Long, Dark Night of Fortunato " in Wild Cards (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1986); pg. 236. "'I am Shakti,' she said. 'I am the goddess. I am the power.' She smiled when she said it, and instead of sounding crazy it just made him want her even more. " [More, pg. 238.]
Hinduism New York: New York City 1976 Silverberg, Robert. Dying Inside. New York: Ballantine (1976; c. 1972); pg. 142. "The mystical era: Augustine, Aquinas, the Tao Te Ching, the Upanishads, the Bhagavad-Gita. "
Hinduism New York: New York City 1986 Martin, George R. R.; Melinda Snodgrass, et al. Wild Cards III: Jokers Wild. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 25. "The Astronomer called it TIAMAT, and he'd used a machine he'd called the Shakti device to bring it to Earth. " [Also mentioned pg. 45, 334.]
Hinduism New York: New York City 1986 Martin, George R. R.; Melinda Snodgrass, et al. Wild Cards III: Jokers Wild. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 323. "Sometime after everything he read, from particle physics to Masonic ritual to the Bhagavad Gita, told him the same thing, over and over: all is one. Nothing mattered. Everything mattered. "
Hinduism New York: New York City 2000 Silverberg, Robert. The Stochastic Man. New York: Harper & Row (1975); pg. 22. "'That's not so,' I told her. 'Old grudges don't mean crap here. Hindus sleep with Paks in New York, Turks and Armenians go into partnership and open restaurants. In this city we invent new ethnic hostilities...' "
Hinduism New York: New York City 2000 Silverberg, Robert. The Stochastic Man. New York: Harper & Row (1975); pg. 23. Pg. 23: "Her parents were from Bombay but she had been born in Los Angeles, yet her supple fingers played radha to my Krishna as though she were a padmini of the Hindu dawn, a lotus woman fully versed in the erotic shastras and the sutras of the flesh, which in truth she was, though self-taught and no graduate of the secret academies of Benares. ";

Pg. 25: "A taped reading from the Kama Sutra. 'Chapter Seven. The various ways to hit a woman and the accompanying sounds. Sexual intercourse can be compared to a lover's quarrel, because of the little annoyances so easily caused by love and the tendency on the part of two passionate individuals to change swiftly from love to anger. In the intensity of passion one often hits the lover on the body, and the parts of the body where these blows of love should be dealt are the shoulders--the head... " [More, pg. 25, 55.]

Hinduism New York: New York City 2000 Silverberg, Robert. The Stochastic Man. New York: Harper & Row (1975); pg. 69. "Old friends had warned me long ago: marry a Hindu and you'll be twirling prayer wheels with her from dusk to dawn, you'll turn into a vegetarian, she'll have you singing hymns to Krishna. I laughed at them. Sundara was American, Western, earthy. But now I saw her Sanskrit genes taking their revenge.

Transit, of course, wasn't Hindu--more a mixture of Buddhism and fascism, actually, a stew of Zen and Tantra and Platonism and Gestalt therapy and Poundian economics and what-all else, and neither Krishna nor Allah nor Jehovah nor any other divinity figure in its beliefs. It had come out of California, naturally, six or seven years ago, a characteristic product of the Wild '90s that had succeeded the Goofy '80s... " [More, not in DB.]

Hinduism Ontario: Toronto 2011 Sawyer, Robert J. The Terminal Experiment. New York: HarperCollins (1995); pg. 202. "'Reincarnation . . .' said Sarkar... 'My Hindu friends will be pleased to hear this...' "
Hinduism Parvati 3099 Simmons, Dan. Endymion. New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 129-130. "'What kind of world is Parvati?' asks Gregorius...

'It was settled by Reformed Hindus not long after the Hegira,' says de Soya, who has accessed all this on the ship's computer. 'Desert world. Not enough oxygen to support humans--mostly C-O-two atmosphere--and it was never enough of a success to terraform, so either the environments are tailored or the people are. Population was never large--a few dozen million before the Fall. Fewer than half a million now, and most of then live in the one big city of Gandhiji.' " [More about this planet, but not about Hinduism.]

Hinduism Riverworld 1890 Farmer, Philip Jose. To Your Scattered Bodies Go. New York: Berkeley Medallion Books (1971); pg. 13-14. [The main character wonders where he is after dying.] "It was then that Burton was sure that this Resurrection Day was not the one which any religion had stated would occur. Burton had not believed in the God portrayed by the Christians, Moslems, Hindus, or any faith... "
Hinduism Riverworld 2008 Farmer, Philip Jose. To Your Scattered Bodies Go. New York: Berkeley Medallion Books (1971); pg. 63. "Ruach described the despair and disgust of a Croat Muslim and an Austrian Jew because their grails contained pork. A Hindu screamed obscenities because his grial offered him meat. "
Hinduism Roman Empire 620 C.E. Douglas, L. Warren. The Veil of Years. New York: Baen (2001); pg. 108. "The Greek Pythagoras, centuries before, had learned of the soul from druids of the Keltoi, whose lands bordered his peoples', and wrote his doctrine of metempsychosis, the transmigration of immortal souls, and reincarnation. The Hindus east of the Indus (the same root stock as the Gauls) espoused a similar doctrine. "
Hinduism Senegal 2015 Julian, Astrid. "Bringing Sissy Home " in L. Ron Hubbard Presents The Best of Writers of the Future (Algis Budrys, ed.) Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (2000; c. 1992); pg. 232. "I... pretend to be interested in the vendor's statuettes, miniature Catholic saints ringed by eight-armed Indian gods. "
Hinduism Singapore 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 224. "They loved it. A tall foreign blonde on a pedestal, wrapped in gold and green, some kind of demented Kali juggernaut thing . . . "
Hinduism Singapore 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 225. "'Now they were marching through the thick of Singapore's Chinatown. Temple Street, Pagoda Street. The psychedelic, statue-covered stupa of a Hindu temple rose to her left. 'Sri Mariamman,' it read. Polychrome goddesses leered at each other as if they'd planned all this, just for grins. "
Hinduism Solar System 2235 Asimov, Isaac. Nemesis. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 96. "'Come, Fisher. You don't have to study them. Judge by their appearances. In all your stay on Rotor, did you encounter one face that was Afro, or Mongo, or Hindo? Did you encounter a dark complexion? An epicanthic fold?' "
Hinduism Solar System 3001 Clarke, Arthur C. 3001: The Final Odyssey. New York: Ballantine (1997); pg. 57. "'...we still needed a word for the Prime Cause, or the creator of the Universe--if there is one... There were lots of suggestions--Deo--Theo--Jove--Brahma--they were all tried, and some of them are still around...' "
Hinduism Sri Lanka 150 C.E. Clarke, Arthur C. The Fountains of Paradise. New York: Ballantine (1980; 1st ed. 1978); pg. 3. "The Hindus believed that it was a kind of water, magically transformed, but Kalidasa laughed at such superstitions. "
Hinduism Sri Lanka 150 C.E. Clarke, Arthur C. The Fountains of Paradise. New York: Ballantine (1980; 1st ed. 1978); pg. 21. "'Now this was an extraordinary thing to do, for it aroused the instant hostility of the monks. Dagobas were reserved for relics of the Buddha, and this act appeared to be one of deliberate sacrilge.

'Indeed, that may well have been its intention, because King Paravana had come under the sway of a Hindu swami and was turning against the Budddhist faith...' "

Hinduism Sri Lanka 150 C.E. Clarke, Arthur C. The Fountains of Paradise. New York: Ballantine (1980; 1st ed. 1978); pg. 45. "'He destroyed our temples and scattered the priests. If he worshipped any god, it was Siva.' " [Many other refs. to Hinduism in book, most not in DB.]
Hinduism Sri Lanka 1987 Simons, Walton. "The Teardrop of India " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 253. "'Each religion had its own belief about the footprint,' he said. 'We believe it was made by Buddha. The Hindus say it was made by Shiva...'

'Whoever it was, they had a big foot,' Paula said. 'That print was three feet long.' "

Hinduism Sri Lanka 2160 Clarke, Arthur C. The Fountains of Paradise. New York: Ballantine (1980; 1st ed. 1978); pg. 87. "'The footprint,' he said. 'The Muslims believed it was Adam's; he stood here after he was expelled from Paradise. The Hindus attributed it to Siva or Saman. But to the Buddhists, of course, it was the imprint of the Enlightened One.' "
Hinduism T'ien Shan 3131 Simmons, Dan. The Rise of Endymion. New York: Bantam (1998 mass market edition; first ed. 1997); pg. 291. "...in the evening shadow of Shivling--the 'Phallus of Shiva.' I smile beneath my therm mask as I imagine the Christian missionaries brooding about this heathen indignity... Far south along the great ridge spine called the Lob-sang Gyatso lies the land of the Yellow Hat Sect, ending at the terminal peak of Nanda Devi, where the Hindu goddess of bliss is said to dwell. "
Hinduism T'ien Shan 3131 Simmons, Dan. The Rise of Endymion. New York: Bantam (1998 mass market edition; first ed. 1997); pg. 292. "East of Mt. Koya, out of sight over the curve of the world, are Mt. Kalais, home to Kubera, the Hindu god of wealth, as well as to Shiva, who evidently does not mind being separated from his phallus by more than a thousand kilometers of cloud space. Parvati, Shiva's wife, is also reputed to live on Mt. Kalais, although no one has heard her opinion of the separation. " [Some other refs., not in DB.]
Hinduism T'ien Shan 3131 Simmons, Dan. The Rise of Endymion. New York: Bantam (1998 mass market edition; first ed. 1997); pg. 401. "'The Bible lies. The Koran lies. The Talmud and Torah lie. The New Testament lies. The Sutta-pitaka, the nikayas, the Itivuttaka, and the Dhammapada lies. The Tiptaka lies. All Scripture lies . . . just as I lie as I speak to you now.

'All these books lie not from intention or failure of expression but by their very nature of being reduced to words; all the images, precepts, laws, canons, quotations, parables, commandments, koans, zazen, and sermons in these beautiful books ultimately fail by adding only more words between the human being who is seeking and the perception of the Void Which Binds.' "

Hinduism Tarot 2077 Anthony, Piers. God of Tarot. New York: Berkley (1982; c. 1977); pg. 126. "The Swami... 'Do you comprehend the prana?'

Brother Paul chuckled. 'No. I have tried hatha yoga and zen meditation and read the Vedas, but never achieved any proper awareness of either prana or jiva. I can repeat only the vulgar description: prana is the individual life principle, and jiva is the personal soul.'

'That is a beginning,' the Swami said. 'You are better versed than I anticipated, and this is fortunate. In the Hindu, Vedic, and Tantric texts there is a symbol of a sleeping serpent coiled around the base of the human spine. This is Kundalini, the coiled latent energy of prana, known by many names. Christians call it the 'Holy Spirit,' the Greeks termed it 'ether,' martial artists described it as 'ki.'' " [Other refs., not in DB.]

Hinduism Tarot 2077 Anthony, Piers. God of Tarot. New York: Berkley (1982; c. 1977); pg. 140. "'A heathen demon!' the Swami muttered.

'Observe the intemperate yogi,' she said. 'Other Indian-derived religions are supremely tolerant, but he--' "

Hinduism Texas: Galveston 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 4. "He shrugged. 'No. Seeing your O.P. [Optimal Persona]--it's a fad. Like folks used to see UFO's, you know?...'

'It's mystic bullsh--,' Laura told him. 'If it was really your Optimal Self, you should have been building something, right? Not beachcombing for Nirvana.' "

Hinduism Tidewater 2300 Swanwick, Michael. Stations of the Tide. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1991); pg. 110. [Year is estimated.] "Orphelin's head whipped up, face transormed. His eyes were wide open, startlingly white. They quivered slightly. He parted his lips, and a third eye glared out from his mouth.

'Krishna!' Mintouchian gasped. All three eyes glanced toward him, then dismissively away. "

Hinduism United Kingdom 2030 McAuley, Paul J. Fairyland. New York: Avon Books (1997; c 1995); pg. 37. "The driver is a Bengali Alex knows slightly. His minicab is done out in red plush and gold braiding. Little trinkets hang from bead-chains on the dashboard. There's a hologram of Shiva the Destroyer right next to the driver's laminated photo ID, and the slogan God gives me speed is littered across the top of the windscreen. "
Hinduism United Kingdom: England 1810 Powers, Tim. The Anubis Gates. New York: Ace (1983); pg. 110. Pg. 110: "She'd been dressed in her Ahmed the Hindoo Beggar outfit, with a turban sandals, and a robe made from a chintz bedspread... "; Pg. 124: "'...Four dozen of my tiniest homunculi were drowned out here tonight by that bloody Hindoo...' "; Pg. 139: "...as Ahmed the Hindoo Beggar stepped out of Paddy Corvan's... " [Other refs. to this character, not in DB.]
Hinduism United Kingdom: England 1985 Dickinson, Peter. The Green Gene. New York: Random House (1973); pg. 57. "This alarmed him still more. he turned his book over, closed his eyes and whispered those verses of the Kama Sutra that had never before failed to bring him to bursting manhood, if he chose. The charm had no effect.

This was Glenda's doing. He remembered her look as she ha come from the cupboard and a broken phrase in the launderette... What kind of curse might an English witch have put on such a token? Wait! She had said he could take it off in the bath!

In the tiny shower-space, with the warm water slashing its whips against his shoulders, the Kama Sutra worked its boyhood magic. " [The main character, an Asian Indian living in London, has a Hindu background. But Hinduism isn't mentioned by name in novel.]

Hinduism United Kingdom: England 1985 Dickinson, Peter. The Green Gene. New York: Random House (1973); pg. 115. "'He did not feel like mathematics--his processes were not sufficiently coherent. Instead he became Pravandragasharatipili Humayan, a speck of being, who summoned into that speck the vast peacefulness of the universe. occasionally on the fringe of his consciousness he was aware of the ghost of a man called Pete who would remark in a superficial touristy way that there were undeniable advantages in being an Indian with hereditary resources and techniques available that were unknown to Western races. At first the appearances of the Pete-ghost were few and ethereal, a wisp of mist in the slow whirlpool of non-matter. But after many ages the mist began to draw itself into solidity, until at last it strutted into the sphere of peace and remarked loudly that Indians could be jolly interesting chaps... " [More.]
Hinduism United Kingdom: England 2054 Willis, Connie. Doomsday Book. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 261. "'No. I think it's much more likely that Badri caught it from someone at that dance in Headington. There may have been New Hindus there, or Earthers, or someone else who doesn't believe in antivirals or mdern medicine...' "
Hinduism United Kingdom: England 2054 Willis, Connie. Doomsday Book. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 52-53. "'We'll be able to tel a good deal more about the sort of visus we're dealing with when we know what antivirals Badris had and how recently. He may have a history of anomalous reactions, and there's alsoa chance he's missed a seasonal. Do you happen to know his religion... Is he New Hindu?'

Dunworthy shook his head. 'He's Church of England,' he said, knowing what Mary was getting at. The New Hindus beleived that all life was sacred, including killed viruses, if killed was the right word. They refused to have any inoculations or vaccines. The University gave them waivers on religious grounds but didn't allow them to live in college. "

Hinduism United Kingdom: London 1500 C.E. Moorcock, Michael. Gloriana. New York: Warner Books (1986; c 1978); pg. 98. "...the Queen [Gloriana] received the rest of her guests:... Prince Hira of Hindoostan [Hindu India], a protectorage of Albion's; Lord Li Pao, ambassador from the Court of Cathay, another vassal state... "
Hinduism United Kingdom: London 1875 Blaylock, James P. Homunculus. New York: Ace Books (1986); pg. 7. "In Kraken's left hand was an oval pot with a swing handle, the pot swaddled in a length of cloth, as if Kraken carried the head of a Hindu. Around his neck was a small closed basket, which, St. Ives guessed, held salt, pepper, and vinegar. "
Hinduism United Kingdom: London 1890 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "The Sign of Four " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1890); pg. 153. On our knocking, however, the door was instantly thrown open by a Hindoo servant, clad in a yellow turban, white loose-fitting clothes, and a yellow sash. There was something strangely incongruous in this Oriental figure framed in the commonplace doorway of a third-rate suburban dwelling-house.

"The sahib awaits you, " said he, and even as he spoke, there came a high, piping voice from some inner room.

"Show them in to me, khitmutgar, " it said. "Show them straight in to me. " [Other refs., not in DB, to 'Indians', a term which seems to be used at times interchangeably with 'Hindoo.']

Hinduism United Kingdom: London 1890 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "The Sign of Four " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1890); pg. 201. "A savage! " I exclaimed. "Perhaps one of those Indians who were the associates of Jonathan Small. "

"Hardly that, " said he. "When first I saw signs of strange weapons I was inclined to think so, but the remarkable character of the footmarks caused me to reconsider my views. Some of the inhabitants of the Indian Peninsula are small men, but none could have left such marks as that. The Hindoo proper has long and thin feet. The sandal-wearing Mohammedan has the great toe well separated from the others because the thong is commonly passed between. These little darts, too, could only be shot in one way. They are from a blow-pipe. Now, then, where are we to find our savage? "

Hinduism United Kingdom: London 1995 Ryman, Geoff. 253. New York: St. Martin's Press (1998); pg. 231. "Mr Gurdev Dhollin... Grew up in Punjab, where his family are now... Dismayed by the invention of Hindu fundamentalism. Where does this come from? The term Hindu refers to geography not belief. No one in India calls it Hinduism. It is the dharma. People can worship Rama or Durga. All religions are individual and personal.

Gurdev blames the failure of politics in India, and he blames that on corruption... "

Hinduism United Kingdom: London 1997 Watson, Ian. God's World. New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers (this ed. 1990; copyright 1979); pg. 17. "'One of my grandads was a Bengali, a Hindu who'd emigrated to London. He married an Irish girl who'd lapsed rom her faith. My other two grandparents were Finnish and Brazilian; he was an engineer and she was a Kardecist spiritualist... The grandparents used to make up hybrid stories to amuse us kinds: Krishna and the leprechauns, you know!...' "
Hinduism USA 1956 Jones, Raymond F. "The Non-Statistical Man " in The Non-Statistical Man. New York: Belmont Books (1964; copyright 1956); pg. 21. "Charles Bascomb glanced about as he sat down, assessing the crowd who had turned out to hear Magruder. They were easily typed: Ninety percent of them were heavily loaded with psychosomatic ills that had already blossomed into heart trouble, cancer, arthritis, and diabetes in two thirds of them. This year they were here to listen to Magruder. Last year it had been Hongi, or something like that, from India; the year before, the sour cream and road tar molasses man; next year somebody else. Always the same crowd, minus the ones who died in between, augmented by the gullible newcomers.

Bascomb felt sorry for them; he wished he could have taken them to his office and shown them his statistics. There was the record of what would happen to this group--and all the Magruders, Hongis, and sour cream men in creation couldn't change it. "

Hinduism USA 1963 Grimwood, Ken. Replay. New York: Arbor House (1986); pg. 137. "She nodded thoughtfully, concentrating on one of her intricate mandalas. 'Have you read the Hindus?' she asked. 'The Rig-Veda, the Upanishads?'

'Only the Bhagavad-Gita. A long, long time ago.'

' 'You and I, Arujna,' ' she quoted easily, ' 'have lived many lives. I remember them all: You do not remember.' ' Her eyes lit with intensity. 'Sometimes I think our experience is what they were really talking about: not reincarnation over a linear time scale, but little chunks of the entire world's history occasionally repeated over and over again . . . until we realize what's happening and are able to restore the normal flow.' " [More, pg. 299. Hinduism isn't mentioned by name many times in novel, but the whole novel deals with a novel form of reincarnation.]



Hinduism, continued

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